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  • 101.
    Andersson, Daniel P.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Cardio Metabolic Unit, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden;Medical Unit Endocrinology, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge , 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden.
    Littmann, Karin
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Cardio Metabolic Unit, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden;Medical Unit Endocrinology, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge , 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden.
    Kindborg, Gustav
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Cardio Metabolic Unit, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden;Medical Unit Endocrinology, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge , 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Medical Unit Clinical Chemistry, C1-62, Karolinska University Laboratory, 141 86   Stockholm , Sweden.
    Sejersen, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry. Uppsala University Hospital; Unilabs AB, Unilabs Laboratory Medicine Stockholm, Section of Clinical Chemistry, 171 54 Solna, Sweden.
    Yan, Jane
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels väg 13, 17 177   Stockholm , Sweden.
    Eriksson Hogling, Daniel
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Cardio Metabolic Unit, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden;Medical Unit Endocrinology, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge , 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden.
    Parini, Paolo
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Cardio Metabolic Unit, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden;Medical Unit Endocrinology, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge , 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden;Department of Laboratory Medicine, Cardio Metabolic Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels Allé 8, 141 52 Huddinge , Sweden.
    Brinck, Jonas
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Cardio Metabolic Unit, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden;Medical Unit Endocrinology, C2:94, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge , 141 86 Stockholm , Sweden.
    Relation among hypertriglyceridaemia, cardiometabolic disease, and hereditary factors: design and rationale of the Stockholm hyperTRIglyceridaemia REGister study2024In: European Heart Journal Open, E-ISSN 2752-4191, Vol. 4, no 2, article id oeae010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Hypertriglyceridaemia (hTG) is associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, pancreatitis, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in large population-based studies. The understanding of the impact of hereditary hTG and cardiometabolic disease status on the development of hTG and its associated cardiometabolic outcomes is more limited. We aimed to establish a multigenerational cohort to enable studies of the relationship between hTG, cardiometabolic disease and hereditary factors.

    Methods and results

    The population-based observational Stockholm hyperTRIglyceridaemia REGister (STRIREG) study includes 1 460 184 index individuals who have measured plasma triglycerides in the clinical routine in Region Stockholm, Sweden, between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2021. The laboratory measurements also included basic haematology, blood lipid panel, liver function tests, and HbA1c. Using the Swedish Multi-Generation register, 2 147 635 parents and siblings to the indexes were identified to form the complete study cohort. Laboratory data from participants were combined with data from several national registers that provided information on the cause of death, medical diagnoses, dispensed medicines, and socioeconomic factors including country of birth, education level, and marital status.

    Conclusion

    The multi-generational longitudinal STRIREG cohort provides a unique opportunity to investigate different aspects of hTG as well as heredity for other metabolic diseases. Important outcome measures include mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, development of incident diabetes, and NAFLD. The STRIREG study will provide a deeper understanding of the impact of hereditary factors and associated cardiometabolic complications.

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  • 102.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Skelleftea Res Unit, Umea, Sweden..
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Delicano, Rachel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Family Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Jansson, Jan-Hakan
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Skelleftea Res Unit, Umea, Sweden..
    GDF-15 is associated with sudden cardiac death due to incident myocardial infarction2020In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 152, p. 165-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Preventing sudden cardiac death (SCD) due to acute myocardial infarction (MI) in previously healthy patients is challenging. Proteomic analysis may lead to an understanding of biological mechanisms and provide predictive biomarkers. Methods: In this prospective, nested case -control study from northern Sweden, 87 candidate cardiovascular protein biomarkers were studied in 244 individuals who later died within 24 h from an incident MI and 244 referents without MI and individually matched for age, sex and date of health examination and alive at the date of event in the index person. Association analysis was conducted using conditional logistic regression. Bonferroni correction was applied to avoid false positive findings. Results: Ten proteins were associated with future SCD due to acute MI in the non -adjusted analysis. The strongest association were found for growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.79 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41, 2.25) per standard deviation increase in protein, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor with an OR of 1.66 (95% CI 1.34, 2.06). In models adjusted for lipid levels, body mass index, education, smoking, hypertension and C -reactive protein, only association with GDF-15 remained (OR 1.47 (95% 1.11, 1.95)). Conclusion: Elevated levels of GDF-15 are associated with increased risk of SCD within 24 h of incident MI. Further research may enable the use of GDF-15 together with other clinical and biological markers to guide primary preventive interventions for individuals at high risk for SCD.

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  • 103.
    Andersson, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Vårdcentralen Centrum Flen, Sweden; Research and Development Centre, Sörmland County Council.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Research and Development Centre, Sörmland County Council.
    Heart Failure Patients' Perceptions of Received and Wanted Information: A Cross-Sectional Study2019In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 340-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate heart failure patients’ perceptions of received and wanted information and to identify differences regarding received and wanted information in relation to sociodemographic variables. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Patients with heart failure (n = 192) were recruited from six primary health care centers in Sweden. Data were collected by a postal questionnaire. A majority of the respondents had received information about the condition and the medication. Within primary health care, most respondents had been informed about medication. The respondents wanted more information about continued care and treatment, medication, and the condition. There were significant differences between sociodemographic groups concerning what information they wanted. Clinical nurses can support patients with heart failure by using evidence-based methods that strengthen the patients’ self-efficacy and by individualized information that increases patients’ knowledge and improves their self-care behaviors. Future studies are needed to identify informational needs of particular fragile groups of patients.

  • 104.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Ronmark, Eva
    Lindberg, Anne
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Physical activity and fatigue in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - A population based study2015In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 109, no 8, p. 1048-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), symptoms of fatigue, concomitant heart disease and low physical activity levels are more frequently described than in subjects without COPD. However, there are no population-based studies addressing the relationship between physical activity, fatigue and heart disease in COPD. The aim was to compare physical activity levels among subjects with and without COPD in a population based study, and to evaluate if concomitant heart disease and fatigue was associated to physical activity. Methods: In this, 470 subjects with COPD and 659 subjects without COPD (non-COPD) participated in examinations including structured interview and spirometry. A ratio of the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/best of forced vital capacity (FVC) and vital capacity (VC) <0.7 was used to define COPD. Physical activity was assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and fatigue with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue scale (FACIT-F). Results: The prevalence of low physical activity was higher among subjects with FEV1 <80% predicted compared to non-COPD subjects (22.4% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.041). The factors most strongly associated with low physical activity in subjects with COPD were older age, OR 1.52, (95% CI 1.12-2.06), a history of heart disease, OR 2.11 (1.10-4.08), and clinically significant fatigue, OR 2.33 (1.31-4.13); while obesity was the only significant factor among non-COPD subjects, OR 2.26 (1.17-4.35). Conclusion: Physical activity levels are reduced when lung function is decreased below 80% of predicted, and the factors associated with low physical activity are different among subject with and without COPD. We propose that the presence of fatigue and heart disease are useful to evaluate when identifying subjects for pulmonary rehabilitation.

  • 105.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coyne, James
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA USA..
    Caution Warranted Regarding the Efficacy of iCBT in Patients With Symptomatic Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation2023In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 82, no 19, article id e181Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 106. Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Frobert, Ole
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Poci, Dritan
    Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: A nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies of patients with "lone" and "idiopathic" atrial fibrillation (AF) have provided conflicting evidence concerning the development, management and prognosis of this condition. Methods: In this nation-wide, retrospective, cohort study, we studied patients diagnosed with incidental AF recorded in national Swedish registries between 1995 and 2008. Controls were matched for age, sex and calendar year of the diagnosis of AF in patients. All subjects were free of any in-hospital diagnosis from 1987 and until patients were diagnosed with AF and also free of any diagnosis within one year from the time of inclusion. Follow-up continued until 2009. We identified 9519 patients (31% women) and 12,468 matched controls. Results: Relative risks (RR) versus controls for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in women were 19.6, 4.4, 3.4 and 2.5 in the age categories <55, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-85, years respectively. Corresponding figures for men were 3.4, 2.5, 1.7 and 1.9. RR for heart failure were 6.6, 6.6, 6.3 and 3.8 in women and 7.8, 4.6, 4.9 and 2.9 in men. All RR were statistically significant with p < 0.01. RR for myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality were statistically significantly increased only in the two oldest age categories in women and 65-74 years in men. Conclusions: Patients with AF and no co-morbidities at inclusion had at least a doubled risk of stroke or TIA and a tripled risk of heart failure, through all age categories, as compared to controls. Women were at higher RR of stroke or TIA than men. 

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  • 107.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Magnuson, Anders
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Orebro, Sweden..
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Orebro, Sweden..
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. AstraZeneca R&D, Molndal, Sweden..
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Poci, Dritan
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls2017In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 1076-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundLittle is known about the long-term, cause-specific mortality risk in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF). MethodsFrom a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized with incident AF between 1995 and 2008 we identified 9 519 patients with a first diagnosed AF and no comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis. They were matched with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes. ResultsDuring follow-up, 11.1% of patients with AF and 8.3% of controls died. Cardiovascular diseases were the most common causes of death and the only diagnoses which showed significantly higher relative risk in patients with AF than controls (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.3), and the relative risk was significantly higher in women than in men. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.03.1years. ConclusionsIn patients with incident AF and no known comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis, only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death as compared to controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men.

  • 108. Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Nagy, Peter
    Niazi, Mohammad
    Nylander, Sven
    Galbraith, Hal
    Ranjan, Santosh
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Effect of Esomeprazole With/Without Acetylsalicylic Acid, Omeprazole and Lansoprazole on Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Clopidogrel in Healthy Volunteers2014In: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs, ISSN 1175-3277, E-ISSN 1179-187X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 217-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel was assessed in two healthy volunteer crossover studies. Study 1: subjects received clopidogrel alone (300-mg loading dose, then 75 mg/day for 28 days) and two of three PPIs (omeprazole 80 mg, esomeprazole 40 mg or lansoprazole 60 mg) plus clopidogrel for 29 days in three treatment periods (randomized treatment sequence assignment). Study 2: subjects received clopidogrel alone (75 mg/day for 9 days) and clopidogrel alone for 4 days followed by clopidogrel plus fixed-combination esomeprazole 20 mg/low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 81 mg for 5 days in two treatment periods (randomized treatment sequence assignment). Pharmacokinetic effects were estimated by measuring active metabolite of clopidogrel, and pharmacodynamic effects by inhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation. There was a relative decrease of up to 50 % in exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel with the different PPIs (study 1), and close to 40 % with esomeprazole/low-dose ASA (study 2), compared with clopidogrel alone. There was an absolute decrease of up to 17 % in inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation with co-administration of different PPIs, compared with clopidogrel alone; however, no differences in platelet inhibition were observed during co-administration with the esomeprazole/low-dose ASA fixed-dose combination. Omeprazole, esomeprazole and lansoprazole decreased systemic exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel in healthy volunteers, leading to modest decreases in its antiplatelet effect. However, no apparent differences in platelet inhibition were observed when esomeprazole was co-administered with low-dose ASA as a fixed-dose combination.

  • 109.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Kalmar, Sweden;Res Sect, Kalmar, Region Kalmar C, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Sch Nursing, Irvine, CA USA.
    Stromberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden;Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Sch Nursing, Irvine, CA USA;Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

  • 110.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden; Linköping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linköping, Sweden; Univ Calif Irvine, Program Nursing Sci, Irvine, CA USA.
    Chung, Misook L.
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping Univ, Div Nursing Sci, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Res, Kalmar, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    Results: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    Conclusions: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 111.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Trinity Western Univ, Sch Nursing, Langley, BC, Canada.;Providence Hlth Care Res Inst, Ctr Hlth Evaluat & Outcome Sci, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Nursing Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Psychometric Evaluation of Two Appetite Questionnaires in Patients With Heart Failure2015In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 954-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased appetite in heart failure (HF) may lead to undemutrition which could negatively influence prognosis. Appetite is a complex clinical issue that is often best measured with the use of self-report instruments. However, there is a lack of self-rated appetite instruments. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (CNAQ) and the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) are validated instruments developed primarily for elderly people. Yet, the psychometric properties have not been evaluated in HF populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of CNAQ and SNAQ in patients with HE Methods and Results: A total of 186 outpatients with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classifications II-IV were included (median age 72 y; 70% men). Data were collected with the use of a questionnaire that included the CNAQ and SNAQ. The psychometric evaluation included data quality, factor structure, construct validity, known-group validity, and internal consistency. Unidimensionality was supported by means of parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). The CFA results indicated sufficient model fit. Both construct validity and known-group validity were supported. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, with ordinal coefficient alpha estimates of 0.82 for CNAQ and 0.77 for SNAQ. Conclusions: CNAQ and SNAQ demonstrated sound psychometric properties and can be used to measure appetite in patients with HF.

  • 112.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    van der Wal, Martje H L
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    Yang, Bei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Changes in Appetite During the Heart Failure Trajectory and Association With Fatigue, Depressive Symptoms, and Quality of Life2021In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 539-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite can contribute to malnutrition in patients with heart failure (HF). Little is known about the trajectory of appetite over time in patients with HF and the factors associated with decreased appetite after discharge from the hospital.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate changes in appetite over time and explore how fatigue, depressive symptoms, and quality of life are associated with decreased appetite.

    METHODS: Data from the multicenter randomized Coordinating study evaluating Outcomes of Advising and Counseling in Heart Failure were used. Logistic regression and mixed-effects logistic regression were used to investigate changes in appetite over time and to explore the relationship between appetite and fatigue, depressive symptoms, and quality of life.

    RESULTS: A total of 734 patients with HF (mean age, 69 years) were included. Decreased appetite was present at all follow-up measurements; however, decreased appetite was significantly lower at the 1-month (odds ratio [OR], 0.43; confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.63), 6-month (OR, 0.31; CI, 0.20-0.47), 12-month (OR, 0.22; CI, 0.14-0.34), and 18-month (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.15-0.37) follow-ups compared with baseline. Decreased appetite was associated with fatigue (OR, 3.09; CI, 1.98-4.84), depressive symptoms (OR, 1.76; CI, 1.35-2.29), and low quality of life (OR, 1.01; CI, 1.01-1.02) across all measurement points adjusted for covariates.

    CONCLUSIONS: Appetite improved after discharge; however, at all time points, at least 22% of patients reported decreased appetite. Fatigue, depressive symptoms, and low quality of life are factors associated with decreased appetite. Decreased appetite is a long-standing problem in that it does not disappear spontaneously after an acute HF deterioration.

  • 113. Andreotti, Felicita
    et al.
    Rocca, Bianca
    Husted, Steen
    Ajjan, Ramzi A
    Ten Berg, Jurrien
    Cattaneo, Marco
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    De Caterina, Raffaele
    Fox, Keith A A
    Halvorsen, Sigrun
    Huber, Kurt
    Hylek, Elaine M
    Lip, Gregory Y H
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Morais, Joao
    Patrono, Carlo
    Verheugt, Freek W A
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Weiss, Thomas W
    Storey, Robert F
    Antithrombotic therapy in the elderly: expert position paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 46, p. 3238-+Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 114. Andreou, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Saetre, Peter
    Milesson Fors, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Nilsson, Björn Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jönsson, Erik Gunnar
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Cardiac left ventricular ejection fraction in men and women with schizophrenia on long-term antipsychotic treatment2020In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 218, p. 226-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit a higher cardiovascular mortality compared to the general population which has been attributed to life-style factors, genetic susceptibility and antipsychotic medication. Recent echocardiographic studies have pointed to an association between clozapine treatment and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), a measure that has been inversely associated with adverse outcomes including all-cause mortality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the reference method for LVEF measurement. The aim of the present study was to investigate the LVEF in patients with schizophrenia on long-term treatment with antipsychotics and healthy controls. Twenty-nine adult patients with schizophrenia on long-term medication with antipsychotics and 27 age-, sex- and body mass index-matched healthy controls (mean ages 44 and 45 years, respectively) were recruited from outpatient psychiatric clinics in Uppsala, Sweden. The participants were interviewed and underwent physical examination, biochemical analyses, electrocardiogram and CMR. Men with schizophrenia on long-term antipsychotic treatment showed significantly lower LVEF than controls (p = 0.0076), whereas no such difference was evident among women (p = 0.44). Specifically, clozapine-treated male patients had 10.6% lower LVEF than male controls (p = 0.0064), whereas the LVEF was 5.5% below that of controls among male patients treated with non-clozapine antipsychotics (p = 0.047). Among medicated men with schizophrenia, we found significantly lower LVEF compared to healthy individuals, suggesting the need of routine cardiac monitoring in this patient group. This is the first study showing a significant negative association between treatment with non-clozapine antipsychotics and LVEF.

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  • 115. Angeras, O.
    et al.
    Albertsson, P.
    Ramunddal, T.
    Petursson, P.
    Sarno, Giovanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Persson, J.
    Jensen, U.
    Sjogren, I.
    Olsson, H.
    Omerovic, E.
    Impact of left main stenosis on one-year mortality in patients undergoing coronary angiography2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 150-150Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Angeras, Oskar
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Haraldsson, Inger
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Redfors, Bjorn
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Petursson, Petur
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Albertsson, Per
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ioanes, Dan
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Odenstedt, Jacob
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Olsson, Hans
    Karlstad Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Witt, Nils
    South Hosp Stockholm, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ruck, Andreas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Millgard, Jonas
    Sunderby Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Sunderbyn, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Heart Ctr, Umea, Sweden..
    Persson, Jonas
    Danderyd Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Soderbom, Mans
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Econ, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wedel, Hans
    Univ Gothenburg, Hlth Metr, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ramunddal, Truls
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Impact of Thrombus Aspiration on Mortality, Stent Thrombosis, and Stroke in Patients With ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report From the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e007680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Thrombus aspiration is still being used in a substantial number of patients despite 2 large randomized clinical trials showing no favorable effect of routine thrombus aspiration during primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with STsegment- elevation myocardial infarction. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke using all available data from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR). Methods and Results-We identified 42 829 consecutive patients registered in SCAAR between January 2005 and September 2014 who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Thrombus aspiration was used in 25% of the procedures. We used instrumental variable analysis with administrative healthcare region as the treatmentpreference instrumental variable to evaluate the effect of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke. Thrombus aspiration was not associated with mortality at 30 days (risk reduction: -1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], -5.4 to 3.0; P=0.57) and 1 year (risk reduction: -2.4; 95% CI, -7.6 to 3.0; P=0.37). Thrombus aspiration was associated with a lower risk of stent thrombosis both at 30 days (risk reduction: -2.7; 95% CI, -4.1 to -1.4; P<0.001) and 1 year (risk reduction: -3.5; 95% CI, -5.3 to -1.7; P<0.001). In-hospital stroke and neurologic complications did not differ between groups (risk reduction: 0.1; 95% CI, -0.8 to 1.1; P=0.76). Conclusions-Mortality was not different between the groups. Thrombus aspiration was associated with decreased risk of stent thrombosis. Our study provides important evidence for the external validity of previous randomized studies regarding mortality.

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  • 117.
    Angiolillo, Dominick J.
    et al.
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiol, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Rollini, Fabiana
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiol, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Infect Immun & Cardiovasc Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Harvard Med Sch, Heart & Vasc Ctr, Boston, MA USA..
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Schneider, David J.
    Univ Vermont, Cardiovasc Res Inst, Cardiol Unit, Dept Med, Burlington, VT 05405 USA..
    Sibbing, Dirk
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Cardiol, Munich, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Berlin, Germany..
    So, Derek Y. F.
    Univ Ottawa, Heart Inst, Div Cardiol, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Trenk, Dietmar
    Univ Heart Ctr Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Dept Cardiol & Angiol 2, Freiberg, Germany..
    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios
    Natl & Capodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Cardiol 2, Attikon Univ Hosp, Athens, Greece..
    Gurbel, Paul A.
    Inova Heart & Vasc Inst, Inova Ctr Thrombosis Res & Drug Dev, Falls Church, VA USA..
    Hochholzer, Willibald
    Univ Heart Ctr Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Dept Cardiol & Angiol 2, Freiberg, Germany..
    De Luca, Leonardo
    San Giovanni Evangelista Hosp, Lab Intervent Cardiol, Div Cardiol, Tivoli Rome, Italy.;Mediterranean Acad Assoc Res & Studies Cardiol, Marseille, France.;Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, UMRS 1076, Marseille, France..
    Bonello, Laurent
    Hop Nord Marseille, AP HP, Dept Cardiol, Marseille, France..
    Aradi, Daniel
    Heart Ctr Balatonfured, Budapest, Hungary.;Semmelweis Univ Budapest, Budapest, Hungary..
    Cuisset, Thomas
    CHU Timone, Dept Cardiol, Marseille, France.;Aix Marseille Univ, Fac Med, Marseille, France..
    Tantry, Udaya S.
    Inova Heart & Vasc Inst, Inova Ctr Thrombosis Res & Drug Dev, Falls Church, VA USA..
    Wang, Tracy Y.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Valgimigli, Marco
    Bern Univ Hosp, Swiss Cardiovasc Ctr Bern, Bern, Switzerland..
    Waksman, Ron
    MedStar Washington Hosp Ctr, Sect Intervent Cardiol, Washington, DC USA..
    Mehran, Roxana
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, New York, NY USA..
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Univ Paris 6, Hop Pitie Salpetriere, ACTION Study Grp, Paris, France..
    Franchi, Francesco
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiol, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Price, Matthew J.
    Scripps Clin, Div Cardiovasc Dis, La Jolla, CA USA..
    International Expert Consensus on Switching Platelet P2Y(12) Receptor-Inhibiting Therapies2017In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 136, no 20, p. 1955-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y(12) inhibitor is the treatment of choice for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. The availability of different oral P2Y(12) inhibitors (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) has enabled physicians to contemplate switching among therapies because of specific clinical scenarios. The recent introduction of an intravenous P2Y(12) inhibitor (cangrelor) further adds to the multitude of modalities and settings in which switching therapies may occur. In clinical practice, it is not uncommon to switch P2Y(12) inhibitor, and switching may be attributed to a variety of factors. However, concerns about the safety of switching between these agents have emerged. Practice guidelines have not fully elaborated on how to switch therapies, leaving clinicians with limited guidance on when and how to switch therapies when needed. This prompted the development of this expert consensus document by key leaders from North America and Europe with expertise in basic, translational, and clinical sciences in the field of antiplatelet therapy. This expert consensus provides an overview of the pharmacology of P2Y(12) inhibitors, different modalities and definitions of switching, and available literature and recommendations for switching between P2Y(12) inhibitors.

  • 118.
    Anselmino, Matteo
    et al.
    Univ Turin, Citta Salute & Sci TorinoHosp, Dept Med Sci, Div Cardiol, Turin, Italy..
    Ballatore, Andrea
    Univ Turin, Citta Salute & Sci TorinoHosp, Dept Med Sci, Div Cardiol, Turin, Italy..
    Saglietto, Andrea
    Univ Turin, Citta Salute & Sci TorinoHosp, Dept Med Sci, Div Cardiol, Turin, Italy..
    Stabile, Giuseppe
    Clin Montevergine, Mercogliano, Italy..
    De Ponti, Roberto
    Casa Cura San Michele, Maddaloni, Italy.;Univ Insubria, Dept Heart & Vessels, Osped Circolo, Varese, Italy..
    Grimaldi, Massimo
    Osped Gen Reg F Muilli, Dept Cardiol, Acquaviva Delle Fonti, Italy..
    Agricola, Pietro M. G.
    Casa Cura Privata Piacenza, Unita Operat Cardiol, Piacenza, Italy..
    Della Bella, Paolo
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Electrophysiol Lab, Milan, Italy.;Ist Sci San Raffaele, Arrhythmia Unit, Milan, Italy..
    Tritto, Massimo
    Ist Clin Humanitas Mater Domini, Castellanza, Italy..
    Pappone, Carlo
    IRCCS Policlin San Donato, Arrhythmol Dept, Milan, Italy..
    Calo, Leonardo
    Policlin Casilino, Div Cardiol, Rome, Italy..
    Bongiorni, Maria G.
    Univ Hosp Pisa, CardioThorac & Vasc Dept, Div Cardiol & Arrhythmol, Pisa, Italy..
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Gaita, Fiorenzo
    Clin Pinna Pintor, Cardiol Dept, I-10129 Turin, Italy..
    De Ferrari, Gaetano M.
    Univ Turin, Citta Salute & Sci TorinoHosp, Dept Med Sci, Div Cardiol, Turin, Italy..
    Atrial fibrillation ablation long-term ESC-EHRA EORP AFA LT registry: in-hospital and 1-year follow-up findings in Italy2020In: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine, ISSN 1558-2027, E-ISSN 1558-2035, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 740-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To report the Italian data deriving from the European Society of Cardiology-EURObservational Research Program atrial fibrillation ablation long-term registry.

    Methods and results: Ten Italian centers enrolled up to 50 consecutive patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation. Of the 318 patients included, 5 (1.6%) did not undergo catheter ablation, 1 had ablation partially done and 62 were lost at 1-year follow-up. Women were less represented (23.6%) and the median age was 60.0 years. A total of 195 patients (62.3%) suffered paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, whereas only 9 (2.9%) had long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation. Most Italian patients (92.3%) were symptomatic but suffering fewer symptomatic events than patients enrolled in other countries (median of two events in the month preceding the ablation vs. three, respectively; P<0.0001). The main finding of the study is that the success rate at 1 year, with and without antiarrhythmic drugs, was 76.4%, consistently with other participating countries (73.4%). This result was obtained however, with a significantly lower prevalence of 1-year adverse events (7.3 vs. 16.6%, P<0.0001). Procedure duration and fluoroscopy total time resulted as being shorter in Italy (145 vs. 160, P=0.0005 and 16.9 vs. 20.0 min, P=0.0018, respectively); however, the radiation dose per BSA was greater (37.5 vs. 26.0mGy/cm(2), P=0.0022).

    Conclusion: The demographic characteristics of patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation are similar to those reported in other countries. The success rate in Italy is consistent with those in other countries, whereas the complications rate is lower.

  • 119.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro Univ Hosp.
    Farahmand, Bahman
    Alzheimer Dis Res Ctr, Epiconsultant Formerly Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    To Treat or Not to Treat: Anticoagulants as Secondary Preventives to the Oldest Old With Atrial Fibrillation2017In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1617-1622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose-Anticoagulant treatment is effective for preventing recurrent ischemic strokes in patients who have atrial fibrillation. This benefit is paid by a small increase of hemorrhages. Anticoagulant-related hemorrhages seem to increase with age, but there are few studies showing whether the benefits of treatment persist in old age.

    Methods-For this observational study, 4 different registers were used, among them Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register. Patients who have had a recent ischemic stroke, were 80 to 100 years of age, and had atrial fibrillation, were included from 2006 through 2013. The patients were stratified into 3 age groups: 80 to 84, 85 to 89, and ?90 years of age. Information on stroke severity, risk factors, drugs, and comorbidities was gathered from the registers. The patients were followed with respect to ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, other hemorrhages, or death.

    Results-Of all 23 356 patients with atrial fibrillation, 6361 (27%) used anticoagulants after an ischemic stroke. Anticoagulant treatment was associated with less recurrent ischemic stroke in all age groups. Hemorrhages increased most in the >= 90-year age group, but this did not offset the overall beneficial effect of the anticoagulant. Apart from age, no other cardiovascular risk factor or comorbidity was identified that influenced the risk of anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage. Drugs other than anticoagulants did not influence the incidence of major hemorrhage.

    Conclusions-Given the patient characteristics in this study, there is room for more patients to be treated with anticoagulants, without hemorrhages to prevail. In nonagenarians, hemorrhages increased somewhat more, but this did not affect the overall outcome in this age stratum.

  • 120. Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Thrombolysis in acute stroke2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 385, no 9976, p. 1394-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121. Apple, FS
    et al.
    Jaffe, AS
    Collinson, P
    Mockel, M
    Ordonez-Llanos, J
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hollander, J
    Plebani, M
    Than, M
    Chan, MH
    IFCC educational materials on selected analytical and clinical applications of high sensitivity cardiac troponin assays2015In: Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0009-9120, E-ISSN 1873-2933, Vol. 48, no 4-5, p. 201-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, the IFCC Task Force on Clinical Applications of Cardiac Bio-Markers (TF-CB) was formed, with the purpose of providing evidence based educational materials to assist all biomarker users, i.e. laboratorians, clinicians, researchers, in-vitro diagnostics and regulatory agencies, in better understanding important analytical and clinical aspects of established and novel cardiac biomarkers for use in clinical practice and research. The goal of the task force was to promulgate the same information conjointly through the in vitro diagnostic industry to the laboratory, emergency department and cardiologists. The initial undertaking of the TF-CB, which is comprised of laboratory medicine scientists, emergency medicine physicians and cardiologists, was to address two key issues pertaining to implementing high-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays in clinical practice: the 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL) and calculating serial change values in accord with the Universal Definition of AMI. The highlights of both concepts from IFCC statements are described.

  • 122. Aradi, Daniel
    et al.
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Mair, Johannes
    Plebani, Mario
    Merkely, Bela
    Jaffe, Allan S.
    Moeckel, Martin
    Giannitsis, Evangelos
    Thygesen, Kristian
    ten Berg, Jurrien M.
    Mueller, Christian
    Storey, Robert F.
    Lindah, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Huber, Kurt
    Platelet function testing in acute cardiac care - is there a role for prediction or prevention of stent thrombosis and bleeding?2015In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, E-ISSN 2567-689X, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 221-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of platelet function testing in acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial despite the fact that high platelet reactivity is an independent predictor of stent thrombosis and emerging evidence suggests also a link between low platelet reactivity and bleeding. In this expert opinion paper, the Study Group on Biomarkers in Cardiology of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association and the Working Group on Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology aim to provide an overview of current evidence in this area and recommendations for practicing clinicians.

  • 123.
    Arbelo, Elena
    et al.
    Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin Barcelona, Cardiovasc Inst, Dept Cardiol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Brugada, Josep
    Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin Barcelona, Cardiovasc Inst, Dept Cardiol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Laroche, Cecile
    European Soc Cardiol, EURObservat Res Programme, Sophia Antipolis, France..
    Kautzner, Josef
    Inst Clin & Expt Med, Dept Cardiol, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Pokushalov, Evgeny
    State Res Inst Circulat Pathol, Arrhythmia Dept, Novosibirsk, Russia.;State Res Inst Circulat Pathol, EP Lab, Novosibirsk, Russia..
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Heart Ctr Co, Tampere, Finland..
    Efremidis, Michael
    Evangelismos Gen Hosp Athens, Lab Cardiac Electrophysiol, Dept Cardiol 2, Athens, Greece..
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Univ Leipzig, Ctr Heart, Dept Electrophysiol, Leipzig, Germany..
    Barrera, Alberto
    Univ Hosp Virgen de la Victoria, Dept Cardiol, Arrhythmia Unit, Malaga, Spain..
    Maggioni, Aldo
    European Soc Cardiol, EURObservat Res Programme, Sophia Antipolis, France.;Assoc Nazl Med Cardiol Osped Res Ctr AMCO Res Ctr, Florence, Italy..
    Tavazzi, Luigi
    Maria Cecilia Hosp, ES Hlth Sci Fdn, GVM Care & Res, Cotignola, Italy..
    Dagres, Nikolaos
    Univ Leipzig, Ctr Heart, Dept Electrophysiol, Leipzig, Germany..
    Contemporary management of patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation: in-hospital and 1-year follow-up findings from the ESC-EHRA atrial fibrillation ablation long-term registry2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 38, no 17, p. 1303-1316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The ESC-EHRA Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Long-Term registry is a prospective, multinational study that aims at providing an accurate picture of contemporary real-world ablation for atrial fibrillation (AFib) and its outcome. Methods and results A total of 104 centres in 27 European countries participated and were asked to enrol 20-50 consecutive patients scheduled for first and re-do AFib ablation. Pre-procedural, procedural and 1-year follow-up data were captured on a web-based electronic case record form. Overall, 3630 patients were included, of which 3593 underwent an AFib ablation (98.9%). Median age was 59 years and 32.4% patients had lone atrial fibrillation. Pulmonary vein isolation was attempted in 98.8% of patients and achieved in 95-97%. AFib-related symptoms were present in 97%. Inhospital complications occurred in 7.8% and one patient died due to an atrioesophageal fistula. One-year follow-up was performed in 3180 (88.6%) at a median of 12.4 months (11.9-13.4) after ablation: 52.8% by clinical visit, 44.2% by telephone contact and 3.0% by contact with the general practitioner. At 12-months, the success rate with or without antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) was 73.6%. A significant portion (46%) was still on AADs. Late complications included 14 additional deaths (4 cardiac, 4 vascular, 6 other causes) and 333 (10.7%) other complications. Conclusion AFib ablation in clinical practice is mostly performed in symptomatic, relatively young and otherwise healthy patients. Overall success rate is satisfactory, but complication rate remains considerable and a significant portion of patients remain on AADs. Monitoring after ablation shows wide variations. Antithrombotic treatment after ablation shows insufficient guideline-adherence.

  • 124.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Cardiovascular Disease: Associations with Heart Failure and Prognosis after Myocardial Infarction2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous investigations of snus use (oral moist snuff, a Swedish form of smokeless tobacco) and cardiovascular disease have generally focused on atherosclerotic events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, likely because smoking is such a well-established risk factor for atherosclerotic disease. Smokeless administration of tobacco circumvents most of the atherogenic effects of the combusted products from smoked tobacco, but it is possible that the potent autonomic and hemodynamic effects of snus and nicotine per se are detrimental for cardiovascular tissues.

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate if snus is associated with development of heart failure and the prognosis after myocardial infarction. We used data from Swedish cohort studies and the national quality register for myocardial infarctions (SWEDEHEART), with linkages to national registers.

    Snus use was associated with a higher risk of heart failure in a dose-response manner. This association was specific to non-ischemic heart failure, implying a direct myocardial effect, rather than an atherogenic effect (papers I and II).

    Acute, short-term or long-term outcomes following a myocardial infarction were not consistently worse among snus users relative to snus non-users, although snus use was associated with an increased risk of death after myocardial infarction among never-smokers (paper III).

    Discontinuation of snus use after a myocardial infarction was associated with an almost halved mortality risk, similar to the benefit associated with smoking cessation (paper IV).

    Although smoking was consistently stronger related to all adverse outcomes, and with reservations due to the observational design, the findings from this thesis indicate that snus should not be regarded as harmless. Snus use was associated with a higher risk of heart failure and post-myocardial infarction mortality, which may have public health implications for the risk assessment of snus, and potentially other modes of smokeless nicotine.

    List of papers
    1. Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Risk of Heart Failure: Results from Two Swedish Cohorts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Risk of Heart Failure: Results from Two Swedish Cohorts
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-8267, E-ISSN 1741-8275, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1120-1127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Oral moist snuff (snus) is discussed as a safer alternative to smoking, and its use is increasing. Based on its documented effect on blood pressure, we hypothesized that use of snus increases the risk of heart failure.

    Design:

    Two independent Swedish prospective cohorts; the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a community-based sample of 1076 elderly men, and the Construction Workers Cohort (CWC), a sample of 118,425 never-smoking male construction workers.

    Methods:

    Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate possible associations of snus use with risk of a first hospitalization for heart failure.

    Results:

    In ULSAM, 95 men were hospitalized for heart failure, during a median follow up of 8.9 years. In a model adjusted for established risk factors including past and present smoking exposure, current snus use was associated with a higher risk of heart failure [hazard ratio (HR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-4.22] relative to non-use. Snus use was particularly associated with risk of non-ischaemic heart failure (HR 2.55, 95% CI 1.12-5.82). In CWC, 545 men were hospitalized for heart failure, during a median follow up of 18 years. In multivariable-adjusted models, current snus use was moderately associated with a higher risk of heart failure (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.00-1.64) and non-ischaemic heart failure (HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.97-1.68) relative to never tobacco use.

    Conclusion:

    Data from two independent cohorts suggest that use of snus may be associated with a higher risk of heart failure.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-164695 (URN)10.1177/1741826711420003 (DOI)000309527700022 ()21828223 (PubMedID)
    Note

    De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2011-12-22 Created: 2011-12-22 Last updated: 2021-11-30
    2. Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Risk of Heart Failure of Ischemic and Non-Ischemic Origin: a Pooled Analysis of Eight Prospective Cohort Studies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Risk of Heart Failure of Ischemic and Non-Ischemic Origin: a Pooled Analysis of Eight Prospective Cohort Studies
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Snus, a Swedish type of smokeless tobacco, has potent acute hemodynamic effects, which could provoke stress on the cardiovascular system, including the myocardium. Snus has, however, not been linked to risk of ischemic heart disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that snus use increases the risk for heart failure of non-ischemic origin.

    Methods

    We conducted a pooled analysis of eight Swedish prospective cohort studies involving individual participant data from 350,711 men. Shared frailty models with random effects at the cohort level, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of heart failure in relation to snus use. We investigated dose-response associations, and association with ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure in separate. For positive control purposes, we also investigated associations between smoking and risk of heart failure.

    Results

    During a median follow-up time of 16 years, 5,404 men were hospitalized for heart failure. In models adjusting for age, smoking, previous myocardial infarction and educational level, current snus use was associated with a higher risk of heart failure (HR 1.27, 95 % CI 1.07-1.50), relative to non-current snus use. A dose-response pattern was observed, with higher risk with more snus cans used per week. We observed an association of snus use with non-ischemic heart failure, HR 1.34 (95 % CI 1.11-1.63), but not with ischemic heart failure, HR 1.01 (95 % CI 0.72-1.42). Smoking was more strongly associated with heart failure, particularly of ischemic origin, than snus use.

    Conclusions

    Snus use was associated with a modestly increased risk for heart failure of non-ischemic origin in a dose-response manner. This finding has public health implications for the risk assessment of snus use, and potentially other modes of smokeless use of nicotine.

    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Research subject
    Cardiology; Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345868 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-03-18 Created: 2018-03-18 Last updated: 2018-03-22
    3. Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Outcome of Myocardial Infarction: a SWEDEHEART Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Outcome of Myocardial Infarction: a SWEDEHEART Study
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Based on effects of nicotine and snus (a smokeless tobacco) on hemodynamics, pro-arrhythmia and remodelling, in combination with indications of increased risk for fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in snus users; we hypothesised that the outcome of an MI may be worse in snus users.

    Methods

    Data was extracted from the SWEDEHEART registry for all patients who underwent coronary angiography in Sweden due to MI between December 2009 and December 2014. In snus users (n=4,950) relative to snus non-users (n=55,412), we compared risks of a large MI (defined as hs-cTnT of  > 10,000 ng/L, cTnT > 10 μg/L or cTnI > 10 μg/L) and death in the acute (in-hospital) setting, and death+HF (a combined endpoint of all-cause death or hospitalization for heart failure) and all-cause death at short- (<28 days) and long-term follow-up. Relations of snus use to outcomes were also analysed in pre-specified subgroups of never, previous and current smokers.

    Results

    A large MI was diagnosed in 10,975 patients. During long-term follow-up (median 1.9 years), 7,758 either died (n=6,044) or were hospitalized due to heart failure (n=1,714). In models adjusting for age, gender, smoking, previous MI and occupational classification (employed, unemployed/sick leave and retired), snus use was not associated with risk of large MI (odds ratio 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.09) or death+HF (long-term Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) 0.99; 95% CI 0.90-1.10). Nonetheless, among never-smokers snus use was associated with an increased risk for death+HF (long-term HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.55), driven by a higher mortality risk (long-term HR for death of any cause 1.29, 95% CI 1.02-1.64).

    Conclusions

    In this study, snus use was unrelated to acute, short-term or long-term adverse outcomes after an MI. Among never-smokers, snus use was associated with an increased risk of post-MI death.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology; Epidemiology; Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342247 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-03-18 Created: 2018-03-18 Last updated: 2018-06-26
    4. Discontinuation of Smokeless Tobacco and Mortality Risk After Myocardial Infarction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discontinuation of Smokeless Tobacco and Mortality Risk After Myocardial Infarction
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 130, no 4, p. 325-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Given the indications of increased risk for fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in people who use snus, a moist smokeless tobacco product, we hypothesized that discontinuation of snus use after an MI would reduce mortality risk. Methods and Results-All patients who were admitted to coronary care units for an MI in Sweden between 2005 and 2009 and were <75 years of age underwent a structured examination 2 months after discharge (the baseline of the present study). We investigated the risk of mortality in post-MI snus quitters (n=675) relative to post-MI continuing snus users (n=1799) using Cox proportional hazards analyses. During follow-up (mean 2.1 years), 83 participants died. The mortality rate was 9.7 (95% confidence interval, 5.7-16.3) per 1000 person-years at risk in post-MI snus quitters and 18.7 (14.8-23.6) per 1000 person-years at risk in post-MI continuing snus users. After adjustment for age and sex, post-MI snus quitters had half the mortality risk of post-MI continuing snus users (hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.91). In a multivariable-adjusted model, the hazard ratio was 0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-1.02). The corresponding estimate for people who quit smoking after MI versus post-MI continuing smokers was 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.69). Conclusions-In this study, discontinuation of snus use after an MI was associated with a nearly halved mortality risk, similar to the benefit associated with smoking cessation. These observations suggest that the use of snus after MI should be discouraged.

    Keywords
    mortality, myocardial infarction, prognosis, risk factors, smokeless tobacco
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-230084 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.007252 (DOI)000339392300009 ()24958793 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-09-03 Created: 2014-08-19 Last updated: 2018-03-18
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  • 125.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Galanti, Rosaria
    Lundberg, Michael
    Ye, Weimin
    Norberg, Margareta
    Lindmark, Krister
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Trolle Lagerros, Ylva
    Bellocco, Rino
    Lager, Anton
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Eriksson, Marie
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Risk of Heart Failure of Ischemic and Non-Ischemic Origin: a Pooled Analysis of Eight Prospective Cohort StudiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Snus, a Swedish type of smokeless tobacco, has potent acute hemodynamic effects, which could provoke stress on the cardiovascular system, including the myocardium. Snus has, however, not been linked to risk of ischemic heart disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that snus use increases the risk for heart failure of non-ischemic origin.

    Methods

    We conducted a pooled analysis of eight Swedish prospective cohort studies involving individual participant data from 350,711 men. Shared frailty models with random effects at the cohort level, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of heart failure in relation to snus use. We investigated dose-response associations, and association with ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure in separate. For positive control purposes, we also investigated associations between smoking and risk of heart failure.

    Results

    During a median follow-up time of 16 years, 5,404 men were hospitalized for heart failure. In models adjusting for age, smoking, previous myocardial infarction and educational level, current snus use was associated with a higher risk of heart failure (HR 1.27, 95 % CI 1.07-1.50), relative to non-current snus use. A dose-response pattern was observed, with higher risk with more snus cans used per week. We observed an association of snus use with non-ischemic heart failure, HR 1.34 (95 % CI 1.11-1.63), but not with ischemic heart failure, HR 1.01 (95 % CI 0.72-1.42). Smoking was more strongly associated with heart failure, particularly of ischemic origin, than snus use.

    Conclusions

    Snus use was associated with a modestly increased risk for heart failure of non-ischemic origin in a dose-response manner. This finding has public health implications for the risk assessment of snus use, and potentially other modes of smokeless use of nicotine.

  • 126.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Discontinuation of Smokeless Tobacco and Mortality Risk After Myocardial Infarction2014In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 130, no 4, p. 325-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Given the indications of increased risk for fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in people who use snus, a moist smokeless tobacco product, we hypothesized that discontinuation of snus use after an MI would reduce mortality risk. Methods and Results-All patients who were admitted to coronary care units for an MI in Sweden between 2005 and 2009 and were <75 years of age underwent a structured examination 2 months after discharge (the baseline of the present study). We investigated the risk of mortality in post-MI snus quitters (n=675) relative to post-MI continuing snus users (n=1799) using Cox proportional hazards analyses. During follow-up (mean 2.1 years), 83 participants died. The mortality rate was 9.7 (95% confidence interval, 5.7-16.3) per 1000 person-years at risk in post-MI snus quitters and 18.7 (14.8-23.6) per 1000 person-years at risk in post-MI continuing snus users. After adjustment for age and sex, post-MI snus quitters had half the mortality risk of post-MI continuing snus users (hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.91). In a multivariable-adjusted model, the hazard ratio was 0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-1.02). The corresponding estimate for people who quit smoking after MI versus post-MI continuing smokers was 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.69). Conclusions-In this study, discontinuation of snus use after an MI was associated with a nearly halved mortality risk, similar to the benefit associated with smoking cessation. These observations suggest that the use of snus after MI should be discouraged.

  • 127.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Response to Letter Regarding Article, "Discontinuation of Smokeless Tobacco and Mortality Risk After Myocardial Infarction"2015In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 131, no 17, p. E423-E423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Andersen, Kasper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Varenhorst, Christoph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Outcome of Myocardial Infarction: a SWEDEHEART StudyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Based on effects of nicotine and snus (a smokeless tobacco) on hemodynamics, pro-arrhythmia and remodelling, in combination with indications of increased risk for fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in snus users; we hypothesised that the outcome of an MI may be worse in snus users.

    Methods

    Data was extracted from the SWEDEHEART registry for all patients who underwent coronary angiography in Sweden due to MI between December 2009 and December 2014. In snus users (n=4,950) relative to snus non-users (n=55,412), we compared risks of a large MI (defined as hs-cTnT of  > 10,000 ng/L, cTnT > 10 μg/L or cTnI > 10 μg/L) and death in the acute (in-hospital) setting, and death+HF (a combined endpoint of all-cause death or hospitalization for heart failure) and all-cause death at short- (<28 days) and long-term follow-up. Relations of snus use to outcomes were also analysed in pre-specified subgroups of never, previous and current smokers.

    Results

    A large MI was diagnosed in 10,975 patients. During long-term follow-up (median 1.9 years), 7,758 either died (n=6,044) or were hospitalized due to heart failure (n=1,714). In models adjusting for age, gender, smoking, previous MI and occupational classification (employed, unemployed/sick leave and retired), snus use was not associated with risk of large MI (odds ratio 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.09) or death+HF (long-term Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) 0.99; 95% CI 0.90-1.10). Nonetheless, among never-smokers snus use was associated with an increased risk for death+HF (long-term HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.55), driven by a higher mortality risk (long-term HR for death of any cause 1.29, 95% CI 1.02-1.64).

    Conclusions

    In this study, snus use was unrelated to acute, short-term or long-term adverse outcomes after an MI. Among never-smokers, snus use was associated with an increased risk of post-MI death.

  • 129.
    Ariens, Robert
    et al.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Med, Discovery & Translat Sci Dept, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Becattini, Cecilia
    Univ Perugia, Internal & Cardiovasc Med Stroke Unit, Perugia, Italy..
    Bender, Markus
    Univ Hosp, Inst Expt Biomed Chair 1, Wurzburg, Germany.;Rudolf Virchow Ctr, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Bergmeier, Wolfgang
    Univ N Carolina, UNC Blood Res Ctr, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA..
    Castoldi, Elisabetta
    Maastricht Univ, Cardiovasc Res Inst Maastricht Carim, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Devreese, Katrien
    Univ Ghent, Ghent Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Coagulat Lab, Ghent, Belgium.;Univ Ghent, Ghent Univ Hosp, Dept Diagnost Sci, Coagulat Lab, Ghent, Belgium..
    Ellis, Martin
    Tel Aviv Univ, Meir Med Ctr, Hematol Inst, Tel Aviv, Israel.;Tel Aviv Univ, Meir Med Ctr, Blood Bank, Tel Aviv, Israel.;Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Sch Med, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Gailani, David
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Pathol Microbiol & Immunol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Ignjatovic, Vera
    Univ Melbourne, Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Dept Paediat, Haematol Res Team, Parkville, Vic, Australia..
    James, Paula D.
    Queens Univ, Kingston, ON, Canada..
    Kerrigan, Steven
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Irish Ctr Vasc Biol, Sch Pharm & Biomol Sci, Dublin, Ireland..
    Lambert, Michele
    Univ Penn, Dept Pediat, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Lee, Lai Heng
    Singapore Gen Hosp, Dept Haematol, SingHlth, Singapore, Singapore..
    Levi, Marcel
    Univ Coll London Hosp, London, England..
    Maugeri, Norma
    Ist Sci San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Meijers, Joost
    Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Expt Vasc Med, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Sanquin Res, Dept Mol & Cellular Hemostasis, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Melero-Martin, Juan
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Michelson, Alan D.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Mingozzi, Federico
    Spark Therapeut, Philadelphia, PA USA..
    Neeves, Keith
    Colorado Sch Mines, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Golden, CO 80401 USA..
    Ni, Heyu
    Univ Toronto, St Michaels Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, St Michaels Hosp, Keenan Res Ctr Biomed Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Prohaszka, Zoltan
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Dept Internal Med 3, Res Lab, MTA SE Res Grp Immunol & Hematol, Budapest, Hungary.;Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary..
    Ranson, Marie
    Univ Wollongong, Sch Chem & Mol Biosci, Wollongong, NSW, Australia..
    Riva, Nicoletta
    Univ Malta, Fac Med & Surg, Dept Pathol, Msida, Malta..
    Senis, Yotis
    Univ Strasbourg, Etab Francais Sang Grand Est Inserm UMR S1255, Strasbourg, France..
    van Ommen, Cornelia H.
    Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vaughan, Douglas E.
    Northwestern Univ, Feinberg Sch Med, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Weisel, John
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Dept Cell & Dev Biol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Illustrated State-of-the-Art Capsules of the ISTH 2020 Congress2020In: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE IN THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS, ISSN 2475-0379, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 680-713Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2020 Congress of the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) was held virtually July 12-15, 2019, due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The congress convenes annually to discuss clinical and basic topics in hemostasis and thrombosis. Each year, the program includes State of Art (SOA) lectures given by prominent scientists. Presenters are asked to create Illustrated Capsules of their talks, which are concise illustrations with minimal explanatory text. Capsules cover major themes of the presentation, and these undergo formal peer review for inclusion in this article. Owing to the shift to a virtual congress this year, organizers reduced the program size. There were 39 SOA lectures virtually presented, and 29 capsules (9 from talks omitted from the virtual congress) were both submitted and successful in peer review, and are included in this article. Topics include the roles of the hemostatic system in inflammation, infection, immunity, and cancer, platelet function and signaling, platelet function disorders, megakaryocyte biology, hemophilia including gene therapy, phenotype tests in hemostasis, von Willebrand factor, anticoagulant factor V, computational driven discovery, endothelium, clinical and basic aspects of thrombotic microangiopathies, fibrinolysis and thrombolysis, antithrombotics in pediatrics, direct oral anticoagulant management, and thrombosis and hemostasis in pregnancy. Capsule authors invite virtual congress attendees to refer to these capsules during the live presentations and participate on Twitter in discussion. Research and Practice in Haemostasis and Thrombosis will release 2 tweets from @RPTHJournal during each presentation, using #IllustratedReview, #CoagCapsule and #ISTH2020. Readers are also welcome to utilize capsules for teaching and ongoing education.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 130.
    Arinell, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Blanc, Stephane
    Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien–De´partement d’Ecologie, Physiologie,.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Frobert, Ole
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Effect of prolonged standardized bed rest on cystatin C and other markers of cardiovascular risk2011In: BMC Physiology, E-ISSN 1472-6793, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 17-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Sedentary lifestyle is associated with coronary artery disease but even shorter periods of physical inactivity may increase cardiovascular risk. Cystatin C is independently associated with cardiovascular disease and our objective was to investigate the relation between this novel biomarker and standardized bed rest. Research of immobilization physiology in humans is challenging because good biological models are in short supply. From the Women International Space simulation for Exploration study (WISE) we studied markers of atherosclerosis and kidney function, including cystatin C, in a standardized bed rest study on healthy volunteers. Fifteen healthy female volunteers participated in a 20-day ambulatory control period followed by 60 days of bed rest in head-down tilt position (-6degrees) 24 h a day, finalized by 20 days of recovery. The subjects were randomized into two groups during bed rest: a control group (n=8) that remained physically inactive and an exercise group (n=7) that participated in both supine resistance and aerobic exercise training.

    RESULTS:

    Compared to baseline values there was a statistically significant increase in cystatin C in both groups after bed rest (P<0.001). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), calculated by both cystatin C and Cockcroft-Gault equation, decreased after bed rest while there were no differences in creatinine or creatine kinase levels. CRP did not change during bed rest in the exercise group, but there was an increase of CRP in the control group during recovery compared to both the baseline and the bed rest periods. The apo-B/apo-Ai ratio increased during bed rest and decreased again in the recovery period. Subjects experienced a small but statistically significant reduction in weight during bed rest and compared to baseline weights remained lower at day 8 of recovery.

    CONCLUSION:

    During and following prolonged standardized bed rest the concentrations of several clinically relevant cardiovascular risk markers change.

  • 131. Arking, Dan E
    et al.
    Pulit, Sara L
    Crotti, Lia
    van der Harst, Pim
    Munroe, Patricia B
    Koopmann, Tamara T
    Sotoodehnia, Nona
    Rossin, Elizabeth J
    Morley, Michael
    Wang, Xinchen
    Johnson, Andrew D
    Lundby, Alicia
    Gudbjartsson, Daníel F
    Noseworthy, Peter A
    Eijgelsheim, Mark
    Bradford, Yuki
    Tarasov, Kirill V
    Dörr, Marcus
    Müller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Lahtinen, Annukka M
    Nolte, Ilja M
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Bis, Joshua C
    Isaacs, Aaron
    Newhouse, Stephen J
    Evans, Daniel S
    Post, Wendy S
    Waggott, Daryl
    Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka
    Hicks, Andrew A
    Eisele, Lewin
    Ellinghaus, David
    Hayward, Caroline
    Navarro, Pau
    Ulivi, Sheila
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Tester, David J
    Chatel, Stéphanie
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kumari, Meena
    Morris, Richard W
    Naluai, Asa T
    Padmanabhan, Sandosh
    Kluttig, Alexander
    Strohmer, Bernhard
    Panayiotou, Andrie G
    Torres, Maria
    Knoflach, Michael
    Hubacek, Jaroslav A
    Slowikowski, Kamil
    Raychaudhuri, Soumya
    Kumar, Runjun D
    Harris, Tamara B
    Launer, Lenore J
    Shuldiner, Alan R
    Alonso, Alvaro
    Bader, Joel S
    Ehret, Georg
    Huang, Hailiang
    Kao, W H Linda
    Strait, James B
    Macfarlane, Peter W
    Brown, Morris
    Caulfield, Mark J
    Samani, Nilesh J
    Kronenberg, Florian
    Willeit, Johann
    Smith, J Gustav
    Greiser, Karin H
    Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette
    Werdan, Karl
    Carella, Massimo
    Zelante, Leopoldo
    Heckbert, Susan R
    Psaty, Bruce M
    Rotter, Jerome I
    Kolcic, Ivana
    Polašek, Ozren
    Wright, Alan F
    Griffin, Maura
    Daly, Mark J
    Arnar, David O
    Hólm, Hilma
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Denny, Joshua C
    Roden, Dan M
    Zuvich, Rebecca L
    Emilsson, Valur
    Plump, Andrew S
    Larson, Martin G
    O'Donnell, Christopher J
    Yin, Xiaoyan
    Bobbo, Marco
    D'Adamo, Adamo P
    Iorio, Annamaria
    Sinagra, Gianfranco
    Carracedo, Angel
    Cummings, Steven R
    Nalls, Michael A
    Jula, Antti
    Kontula, Kimmo K
    Marjamaa, Annukka
    Oikarinen, Lasse
    Perola, Markus
    Porthan, Kimmo
    Erbel, Raimund
    Hoffmann, Per
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Kälsch, Hagen
    Nöthen, Markus M
    den Hoed, Marcel
    Loos, Ruth J F
    Thelle, Dag S
    Gieger, Christian
    Meitinger, Thomas
    Perz, Siegfried
    Peters, Annette
    Prucha, Hanna
    Sinner, Moritz F
    Waldenberger, Melanie
    de Boer, Rudolf A
    Franke, Lude
    van der Vleuten, Pieter A
    Beckmann, Britt Maria
    Martens, Eimo
    Bardai, Abdennasser
    Hofman, Nynke
    Wilde, Arthur A M
    Behr, Elijah R
    Dalageorgou, Chrysoula
    Giudicessi, John R
    Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia
    Barc, Julien
    Kyndt, Florence
    Probst, Vincent
    Ghidoni, Alice
    Insolia, Roberto
    Hamilton, Robert M
    Scherer, Stephen W
    Brandimarto, Jeffrey
    Margulies, Kenneth
    Moravec, Christine E
    Greco M, Fabiola Del
    Fuchsberger, Christian
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R
    Lee, Wai K
    Watt, Graham C M
    Campbell, Harry
    Wild, Sarah H
    El Mokhtari, Nour E
    Frey, Norbert
    Asselbergs, Folkert W
    Mateo Leach, Irene
    Navis, Gerjan
    van den Berg, Maarten P
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    Kellis, Manolis
    Krijthe, Bouwe P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Franco, Oscar H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hofman, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kors, Jan A
    Uitterlinden, André G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Witteman, Jacqueline C M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kedenko, Lyudmyla
    Lamina, Claudia
    Oostra, Ben A
    Abecasis, Gonçalo R
    Lakatta, Edward G
    Mulas, Antonella
    Orrú, Marco
    Schlessinger, David
    Uda, Manuela
    Markus, Marcello R P
    Völker, Uwe
    Snieder, Harold
    Spector, Timothy D
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Kähönen, Mika
    Mononen, Nina
    Raitakari, Olli T
    Viikari, Jorma S
    Adamkova, Vera
    Kiechl, Stefan
    Brion, Maria
    Nicolaides, Andrew N
    Paulweber, Bernhard
    Haerting, Johannes
    Dominiczak, Anna F
    Nyberg, Fredrik
    Whincup, Peter H
    Hingorani, Aroon D
    Schott, Jean-Jacques
    Bezzina, Connie R
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Gasparini, Paolo
    Wilson, James F
    Rudan, Igor
    Franke, Andre
    Mühleisen, Thomas W
    Pramstaller, Peter P
    Lehtimäki, Terho J
    Paterson, Andrew D
    Parsa, Afshin
    Liu, Yongmei
    van Duijn, Cornelia M
    Siscovick, David S
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Jamshidi, Yalda
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Felix, Stephan B
    Sanna, Serena
    Ritchie, Marylyn D
    Stricker, Bruno H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Boyer, Laurie A
    Cappola, Thomas P
    Olsen, Jesper V
    Lage, Kasper
    Schwartz, Peter J
    Kääb, Stefan
    Chakravarti, Aravinda
    Ackerman, Michael J
    Pfeufer, Arne
    de Bakker, Paul I W
    Newton-Cheh, Christopher
    Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization.2014In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 826-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD.

  • 132.
    Armaganijan, Luciana V.
    et al.
    Brazilian Clin Res Inst, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Alexander, Karen P.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Huang, Zhen
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Tricoci, Pierluigi
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Van de Werf, Frans
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Cardiol, Leuven, Belgium..
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    Univ Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Aylward, Philip E.
    Flinders Univ & Med Ctr, South Australian Hlth & Med Res Inst, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    White, Harvey D.
    Green Lane Cardiovasc Serv, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Moliterno, David J.
    Gill Heart Inst, Lexington, KY USA.;Univ Kentucky, Lexington, KY USA..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Chen, Edmond
    Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceut Inc, Whippany, NJ USA..
    Harrington, Robert A.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Strony, John
    Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ USA..
    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Lopes, Renato D.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Effect of age on efficacy and safety of vorapaxar in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome: Insights from the Thrombin Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction in Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRACER) trial2016In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 178, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Antithrombotic therapy plays an important role in the treatment of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) but is associated with bleeding risk. Advanced age may modify the relationship between efficacy and safety. Methods Efficacy and safety of vorapaxar (a protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist) was analyzed across ages as a continuous and a categorical variable in the 12,944 patients with NSTE ACS enrolled in the TRACER trial. To evaluate the effect of age, Cox regression models were developed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with the adjustment of other baseline characteristics and randomized treatment for the primary efficacy composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, recurrent ischemia with rehospitalization, or urgent coronary revascularization, and the primary safety composite of moderate or severe Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) bleeding. Results The median age of the population was 64 years (25th, 75th percentiles = 58, 71). Also, 1,791 patients (13.8%) were <= 54 years of age, 4,968 (38.4%) were between 55 and 64 years, 3,979 (30.7%) were between 65 and 74 years, and 2,206 (17.1%) were 75 years or older. Older patients had higher rates of hypertension, renal insufficiency, and previous stroke and worse Killip class. The oldest age group (>= 75 years) had substantially higher 2-year rates of the composite ischemic end point and moderate or severe GUSTO bleeding compared with the youngest age group (<= 54 years). The relationships between treatment assignment (vorapaxar vs placebo) and efficacy outcomes did not vary by age. For the primary efficacy end point, the HRs (95% CIs) comparing vorapaxar and placebo in the 4 age groups were as follows: 1.12 (0.88-1.43), 0.88 (0.76-1.02), 0.89 (0.76-1.04), and 0.88 (0.74-1.06), respectively (P value for interaction = .435). Similar to what was observed for efficacy outcomes, we did not observe any interaction between vorapaxar and age on bleeding outcomes. For the composite of moderate or severe bleeding according to the GUSTO classification, the HRs (95% CIs) comparing vorapaxar and placebo in the 4 age groups were 1.73 (0.89-3.34), 1.39 (1.04-1.86), 1.10 (0.85-1.42), and 1.73 (1.29-2.33), respectively (P value for interaction = .574). Conclusion Older patients had a greater risk for ischemic and bleeding events; however, the efficacy and safety of vorapaxar in NSTE ACS were not significantly influenced by age.

  • 133. Armstrong, Paul W
    et al.
    Pieske, Burkert
    Anstrom, Kevin J
    Ezekowitz, Justin
    Hernandez, Adrian F
    Butler, Javed
    Lam, Carolyn S P
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Voors, Adriaan A
    Jia, Gang
    McNulty, Steven E
    Patel, Mahesh J
    Roessig, Lothar
    Koglin, Joerg
    O'Connor, Christopher M
    Pol, Tymon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Vericiguat in Patients with Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction.2020In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 382, no 20, p. 1883-1893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The effect of vericiguat, a novel oral soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction who had recently been hospitalized or had received intravenous diuretic therapy is unclear.

    METHODS: In this phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we assigned 5050 patients with chronic heart failure (New York Heart Association class II, III, or IV) and an ejection fraction of less than 45% to receive vericiguat (target dose, 10 mg once daily) or placebo, in addition to guideline-based medical therapy. The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes or first hospitalization for heart failure.

    RESULTS: Over a median of 10.8 months, a primary-outcome event occurred in 897 of 2526 patients (35.5%) in the vericiguat group and in 972 of 2524 patients (38.5%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 0.98; P = 0.02). A total of 691 patients (27.4%) in the vericiguat group and 747 patients (29.6%) in the placebo group were hospitalized for heart failure (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.00). Death from cardiovascular causes occurred in 414 patients (16.4%) in the vericiguat group and in 441 patients (17.5%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.06). The composite of death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure occurred in 957 patients (37.9%) in the vericiguat group and in 1032 patients (40.9%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.98; P = 0.02). Symptomatic hypotension occurred in 9.1% of the patients in the vericiguat group and in 7.9% of the patients in the placebo group (P = 0.12), and syncope occurred in 4.0% of the patients in the vericiguat group and in 3.5% of the patients in the placebo group (P = 0.30).

    CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with high-risk heart failure, the incidence of death from cardiovascular causes or hospitalization for heart failure was lower among those who received vericiguat than among those who received placebo. (Funded by Merck Sharp & Dohme [a subsidiary of Merck] and Bayer; VICTORIA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02861534.).

  • 134.
    Arnadottir, Solrun Dogg
    et al.
    Univ Akureyri, Sch Hlth Sci, Akureyri, Iceland.;Landspitali Univ Hosp, Vasc Surg Unit, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Palsdottir, Gudbjorg
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Wound Care Unit, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Logason, Karl
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Vasc Surg Unit, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Arnardottir, Harpa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. Univ Akureyri, Sch Hlth Sci, Akureyri, Iceland.;Akureyri Hosp, Rehabil Unit, Akureyri, Iceland..
    Aflimanir ofan ökkla 2010-2019 vegna útæðasjúkdóms og/eða sykursýki: Aðdragandi og áhættuþættir2024In: Laeknabladid: The icelandic medical journal, ISSN 0023-7213, E-ISSN 1670-4959, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: No recent studies exist on lower extremity amputations (LLAs) in Iceland. The aim of this study was to investigate LLA incidence in Iceland 2010-2019 and preceding procedures in amputations induced by peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and diabetes mellitus (DM).

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective study on clinical records of all patients (>18 years) who underwent LLA in Iceland's two main hospitals during 2010-2019. Patients were excluded if LLA was performed for reasons other than DM and/or PAD. Symptoms, medication and circulation assessment were recorded from first hospital visit due to symptoms, and prior to the last LLA, respectively. Previous arterial surgeries and amputations were also recorded.

    RESULTS: A total of 167 patients underwent LLA. Thereof, 134 (77 ± 11 years, 93 men and 41 woman) due to DM and/or PAD. The LLA-rate due to those diseases increased from 4.1/100,000 inhabitants in 2010-2013 to 6.7/100,000 in 2016-2019 (p=0,04). Risk factors were mainly hypertension, 84%, and smoking, 69%. Chronic limb -threatening ischemia induced 71% of first hospital visits. Revascularisations were performed (66% endovascular) in 101 patients. Non -diabetic patients were 52% and had statins less frequently prescribed than DM patients (26:45, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: DM and/or PAD are the leading causes of LLA in Iceland. Amputation rate increased during the period but is low in an international context. Amputation is most often preceded by arterial surgery. DM is present in almost half of cases, similar or less than in most other countries. Opportunities for improved prevention should aim on earlier diagnosis and preventive treatment of non -diabetic individuals with PAD.

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  • 135.
    Arthursson, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Kjellberg, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Tovedal, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Lennmyr, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Cerebral oxygenation and autoregulation during rewarming on cardiopulmonary bypass2023In: Perfusion, ISSN 0267-6591, E-ISSN 1477-111X, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 523-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Rewarming on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is associated with increased metabolic demands; however, it remains unclear whether cerebral autoregulation is affected during this phase. This RCT aims to describe the effects of 20% supranormal, compared to normal CPB flow, on monitoring signs of inadequate perfusion, oxygenation, and disturbed cerebral autoregulation, during the rewarming phase of CPB. Method Thirty two patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting were allocated to a Control group (n = 16) receiving a CPB pump flow corresponding to preoperatively measured cardiac output, and an Intervention group (n = 16) receiving the corresponding CPB pump flow increased by 20% during rewarming. Cerebral Oximetry Index (COx) was calculated with the aid of Near Infrared Spectroscopy. Results Twenty five patients were included in the data. Results show a median COx value of 0.0 (IQR -0.33-0.5) (Control) and 0.0 (IQR -0.15-0.25) (Intervention), respectively; p = .85 with individual variations within groups. The median cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was 55 (52-58) (Control) and 61 (54-66) mmHg (Intervention); p = .08. No significant difference in rSO2 values was observed between the groups (58.5% (50-61) versus 64% (58-68); p = .06). Conclusion The present study showed no difference between increased and normal CPB pump flow with respect to cerebral autoregulation during rewarming. Large variations in cerebral autoregulation were seen at individual level.

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  • 136.
    Arvanitis, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Clinical evaluation and implications of left atrial remodeling in atrial fibrillation: From silent cerebral lesions and atrial stunning to novel electrocardiographic tools for prediction of arrhythmia outcome2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Left atrial (LA) remodeling and reverse remodeling are associated with cerebral involvement and cognitive function (CF) changes. Risk stratification for AF related outcomes is essential in the management of patients with AF. 

    This thesis aimed to 1) explore the effects of AF in a prospective cohort of anticoagulant-naïve patients, who underwent cardioversion (CV) within 48 hours after debut (Studies I and II) on i) occurrence of new silent thromboembolic events using brain magnetic resonance imaging, CF, cerebral biomarker ii) atrial remodeling and thrombogenicity using echocardiography, and hypercoagulability biomarkers; 2) identify novel electrocardiographic (ECG) predictors of 12-months AF recurrence, (Study III), in patients with non-permanent AF after CV or pulmonary vein isolation and study its effect on reverse atrial electrical remodeling (RAER) and 3) to evaluate traditional and novel ECG- and clinical predictors of new-onset AF (new-o-AF) on hospitalized Covid-19 patients (Study IV)  and explore the impact of AF on clinical outcomes.

    In Papers I and II, acute silent cerebral lesions could not be identified. A higher incidence of white matter hyperintensities was associated with higher CHA2DS2-VASc-score. A transient increase in cerebral damage biomarker was observed. Persistent AF patients had inferior CF test results. LA stunning resolved within ten days. The reverse functional remodeling was incomplete in patients with AF history. Higher levels of hypercoagulability-related biomarkers were observed prior to CV. 

    In Paper III, the novel Peq-time>33ms, from P-wave onset to the peak positive deflection, independently predicted 12-months AF recurrence. The P-leftward-area, from peak positive deflection to the offset of P-wave, showed the largest change during follow-up, describing RAER. Machine-learning predictive model including variables from the novel P-wave partitioning showed the best predictive performance.

    In Paper IV, the novel Peq-time>33ms, PR-interval>190ms and P-wave-duration>115ms were independent predictors of n-o-AF. Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), need for respiratory support, advanced age, males and increased body mass index (BMI) independently predicted new-o-AF. Logistic regression predictive models including age, sex, BMI, ICU admission and Peq-time or PR-interval had the best balanced accuracy.

    In conclusion, our findings in Studies I and II might suggest an enhanced thrombogenicity, even in patients with low stroke risk, supporting the concept of anticoagulation pericardioversion. We introduced the novel Peq-time, independently predicting AF recurrence in Study III and, along with PR-interval, new-o-AF in Study IV. Predictive models of arrhythmia outcome could be implemented in individually-tailored AF management and surveillance.

    List of papers
    1. Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Electrical Cardioversion of Recent Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Anticoagulant-Naïve Patients –: A Prospective Study Exploring Clinically Silent Cerebral Lesions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Electrical Cardioversion of Recent Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Anticoagulant-Naïve Patients –: A Prospective Study Exploring Clinically Silent Cerebral Lesions
    Show others...
    2020 (English)In: Journal of Atrial Fibrillation, ISSN 1941-6911, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cardiofront, 2020
    Keywords
    Silent brain lesions, Atrial fibrillation, Cognitive function, Cardioversion.
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-429683 (URN)
    Available from: 2021-01-01 Created: 2021-01-01 Last updated: 2023-04-24Bibliographically approved
    2. Recent-onset atrial fibrillation: a study exploring the elements of Virchow's triad after cardioversion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recent-onset atrial fibrillation: a study exploring the elements of Virchow's triad after cardioversion
    Show others...
    2022 (English)In: Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology, ISSN 1383-875X, E-ISSN 1572-8595, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) imposes an inherent risk for stroke and silent cerebral emboli, partly related to left atrial (LA) remodeling and activation of inflammatory and coagulation systems. The aim was to explore the effects of cardioversion (CV) and short-lasting AF on left atrial hemodynamics, inflammatory, coagulative and cardiac biomarkers, and the association between LA functional recovery and the presence of a prior history of AF.

    Methods

    Patients referred for CV within 48 h after AF onset were prospectively included. Echocardiography and blood sampling were performed immediately prior, 1–3 h after, and at 7–10 days after CV. The presence of chronic white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance imaging was related to biomarker levels.

    Results

    Forty-three patients (84% males), aged 55±9.6 years, with median CHA2DS2-VASc score 1 (IQR 0–1) were included. The LA emptying fraction (LAEF), LA peak longitudinal strain during reservoir, conduit, and contractile phases improved significantly after CV. Only LAEF normalized within 10 days. Interleukin-6, high-sensitivity cardiac-troponin-T (hs-cTNT), N-terminal-pro-brain-natriuretic peptide, prothrombin-fragment 1+2 (PTf1+2), and fibrinogen decreased significantly after CV. There was a trend towards higher C-reactive protein, hs-cTNT, and PTf1+2 levels in patients with WMH (n=21) compared to those without (n=22). At 7–10 days, the LAEF was significantly lower in patients with a prior history of AF versus those without.

    Conclusion

    Although LA stunning resolved within 10 days, LAEF remained significantly lower in patients with a prior history of AF versus those without. Inflammatory and coagulative biomarkers were higher before CV, but subsided after 7–10 days, which altogether might suggest an enhanced thrombogenicity, even in these low-risk patients.

    Keywords
    Physiology: medical, Cardiology, Cardiovascular Medicine
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-456899 (URN)10.1007/s10840-021-01078-9 (DOI)000710619700001 ()34689250 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research CouncilErik, Karin och Gösta Selanders FoundationUppsala University
    Available from: 2021-10-24 Created: 2021-10-24 Last updated: 2023-04-24Bibliographically approved
    3. Novel P-wave indices and machine learning predict atrial fibrillation recurrence after rhythm control interventions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel P-wave indices and machine learning predict atrial fibrillation recurrence after rhythm control interventions
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    Atrial fibrillation, Atrial fibrillation recurrence, P-wave indices, Pulmonary vein isolation, Cardioversion, Machine learning
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-500678 (URN)
    Available from: 2023-04-21 Created: 2023-04-21 Last updated: 2023-05-03
    4. Risk factors and electrocardiographic predictors associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. Evaluation of a novel P-wave index.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors and electrocardiographic predictors associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. Evaluation of a novel P-wave index.
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    New-onset atrial fibrillation, Covid-19, Risk factors, Electrocardiographic predictors, P-wave indices, Logistic regression predictive model
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-500681 (URN)
    Available from: 2023-04-21 Created: 2023-04-21 Last updated: 2023-05-03
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  • 137.
    Arvanitis, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Biering-Sørensen, Tor
    Linde, Cecilia
    Malmborg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Poole, Jeanne E.
    Sridhar, Arun R.
    Boyle, Patrick M.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Risk factors and electrocardiographic predictors associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. Evaluation of a novel P-wave index.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Arvanitis, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University Hospital.
    Johannson, Anna-Karin
    Frick, Mats
    Malmborg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University Hospital.
    Gerovasileiou, Spyridon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University Hospital.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University Hospital.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Electrical Cardioversion of Recent Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Anticoagulant-Naïve Patients –: A Prospective Study Exploring Clinically Silent Cerebral Lesions2020In: Journal of Atrial Fibrillation, ISSN 1941-6911, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Arvanitis, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Johansson, A. K.
    Frick, Mats
    Malmborg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Gerovasileiou, Spyridon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Timing and degree of left atrial stunning and reverse functional remodeling following electrical cardioversion in patients with recent onset atrial fibrillation2020In: European Heart Journal, Supplement, ISSN 1520-765X, E-ISSN 1554-2815, Vol. 41, no Supplement_2, article id ehaa946.0465Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) results in left atrial electrical, structural and functional remodeling. Restoration of sinus rhythm hallmarks the beginning of reverse remodeling, the extent of which may depend on the type of AF.

    Purpose

    The aim of the study was to assess resumption of left atrial function after electric cardioversion in patients with recent onset AF and to explore the association between reverse remodeling and the type of atrial fibrillation.

    Methods

    Patients with AF duration <48 hours were prospectively included. Trans-thoracic echocardiography was performed prior, immediately after (2–4 hours) and 7–10 days following CV. Left atrial volume index (LAVI), left atrial global longitudinal strain during reservoir (LAGLS-res), conduit (LAGLS-cond) and contractile (LAGLS-contr) phases, left atrial ejection fraction (LAEF) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured.

    Results

    Forty-three patients (84% males) aged 55±9.6 years, (mean±SD), with median CHA2DS2-VASc score 1 (interquartile range 0–1) were included. Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant overall change for LAGLS-res F(2,78)=55.4, p<0,001, LAGLS-cond F(2,78)=23.3, p<0,001, LAGLS-contr F(2,78)=39.7, p<0,001, LAEF F(2,80)=28.5, p<0.001 and LVEF F(2,80)=8.4, p<0.001. At 7–10 days, LAGLS-contr 12±4%, LAEF 53±9% and LVEF 60±6 (mean±SD) return within normal reference intervals. Notably left atrial recovery seems to precede left ventricular recovery. No statistical significant interaction with the type of atrial fibrillation could be shown.

    Conclusion

    Left atrial functional reverse remodeling occurs within ten days after successful electric cardioversion of patients with recent onset atrial fibrillation.

  • 140.
    Arvanitis, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Johansson, Anna-Karin
    Frick, Mats
    Malmborg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Gerovasileiou, Spyridon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Recent-onset atrial fibrillation: a study exploring the elements of Virchow's triad after cardioversion2022In: Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology, ISSN 1383-875X, E-ISSN 1572-8595, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) imposes an inherent risk for stroke and silent cerebral emboli, partly related to left atrial (LA) remodeling and activation of inflammatory and coagulation systems. The aim was to explore the effects of cardioversion (CV) and short-lasting AF on left atrial hemodynamics, inflammatory, coagulative and cardiac biomarkers, and the association between LA functional recovery and the presence of a prior history of AF.

    Methods

    Patients referred for CV within 48 h after AF onset were prospectively included. Echocardiography and blood sampling were performed immediately prior, 1–3 h after, and at 7–10 days after CV. The presence of chronic white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance imaging was related to biomarker levels.

    Results

    Forty-three patients (84% males), aged 55±9.6 years, with median CHA2DS2-VASc score 1 (IQR 0–1) were included. The LA emptying fraction (LAEF), LA peak longitudinal strain during reservoir, conduit, and contractile phases improved significantly after CV. Only LAEF normalized within 10 days. Interleukin-6, high-sensitivity cardiac-troponin-T (hs-cTNT), N-terminal-pro-brain-natriuretic peptide, prothrombin-fragment 1+2 (PTf1+2), and fibrinogen decreased significantly after CV. There was a trend towards higher C-reactive protein, hs-cTNT, and PTf1+2 levels in patients with WMH (n=21) compared to those without (n=22). At 7–10 days, the LAEF was significantly lower in patients with a prior history of AF versus those without.

    Conclusion

    Although LA stunning resolved within 10 days, LAEF remained significantly lower in patients with a prior history of AF versus those without. Inflammatory and coagulative biomarkers were higher before CV, but subsided after 7–10 days, which altogether might suggest an enhanced thrombogenicity, even in these low-risk patients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 141.
    Arvanitis, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Mörtsell, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Novel P-wave indices and machine learning predict atrial fibrillation recurrence after rhythm control interventionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Arvidsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Heart Ctr, Dept Clin Physiol, Umea, Sweden.
    Henein, Michael Y.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umea Univ, Heart Ctr, Dept Clin Physiol, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Right ventricular involvement in transthyretin amyloidosis2018In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 160-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The extent of right ventricular (RV) involvement in transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is unknown.Objectives: This study sought to establish the degree of RV involvement in ATTR amyloidosis, and compare findings with RV involvement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).Methods: Forty-two patients with ATTR amyloidosis and echocardiographic evidence of cardiac amyloidosis (cardiac ATTR), 19 ATTR patients with normal left ventricular (LV) wall thickness (non-cardiac ATTR), 25 patients with diagnosed HCM and 30 healthy controls were included in this study. Echocardiographic measurements for conventional parameters, as well as RV global and segmental strain, were recorded.Results: When comparing RV structure and function between cardiac ATTR amyloidosis and HCM patients, only segmental strain differed between the two groups. In cardiac ATTR amyloidosis, we found an RV apex-to-base strain gradient with highest deformation in the apex. This pattern was reversed in patients with HCM.Conclusions: RV involvement is common in cardiac ATTR patients. The present study also detected an RV apical sparing pattern in patients with ATTR cardiomyopathy, similar to what has previously been described for the left ventricle in these patients. This pattern was not seen in HCM patients. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical importance of these findings.

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    fulltext
  • 143. Asayama, Kei
    et al.
    Thijs, Lutgarde
    Li, Yan
    Gu, Yu-Mei
    Hara, Azusa
    Liu, Yan-Ping
    Zhang, Zhenyu
    Wei, Fang-Fei
    Lujambio, Ines
    Mena, Luis J.
    Boggia, Jose
    Hansen, Tine W.
    Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Nomura, Kyoko
    Ohkubo, Takayoshi
    Jeppesen, Jorgen
    Torp-Pedersen, Christian
    Dolan, Eamon
    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna
    Malyutina, Sofia
    Casiglia, Edoardo
    Nikitin, Yuri
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Luzardo, Leonella
    Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina
    Sandoya, Edgardo
    Filipovsky, Jan
    Maestre, Gladys E.
    Wang, Jiguang
    Imai, Yutaka
    Franklin, Stanley S.
    O'Brien, Eoin
    Staessen, Jan A.
    Setting Thresholds to Varying Blood Pressure Monitoring Intervals Differentially Affects Risk Estimates Associated With White-Coat and Masked Hypertension in the Population2014In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 935-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outcome-driven recommendations about time intervals during which ambulatory blood pressure should be measured to diagnose white-coat or masked hypertension are lacking. We cross-classified 8237 untreated participants (mean age, 50.7 years; 48.4% women) enrolled in 12 population studies, using >= 140/>= 90, >= 130/>= 80, >= 135/>= 85, and >= 120/>= 70 mm Hg as hypertension thresholds for conventional, 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. White-coat hypertension was hypertension on conventional measurement with ambulatory normotension, the opposite condition being masked hypertension. Intervals used for classification of participants were daytime, nighttime, and 24 hours, first considered separately, and next combined as 24 hours plus daytime or plus nighttime, or plus both. Depending on time intervals chosen, white-coat and masked hypertension frequencies ranged from 6.3% to 12.5% and from 9.7% to 19.6%, respectively. During 91 046 person-years, 729 participants experienced a cardiovascular event. In multivariable analyses with normotension during all intervals of the day as reference, hazard ratios associated with white-coat hypertension progressively weakened considering daytime only (1.38; P=0.033), nighttime only (1.43; P=0.0074), 24 hours only (1.21; P=0.20), 24 hours plus daytime (1.24; P=0.18), 24 hours plus nighttime (1.15; P=0.39), and 24 hours plus daytime and nighttime (1.16; P=0.41). The hazard ratios comparing masked hypertension with normotension were all significant (P<0.0001), ranging from 1.76 to 2.03. In conclusion, identification of truly low-risk white-coat hypertension requires setting thresholds simultaneously to 24 hours, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. Although any time interval suffices to diagnose masked hypertension, as proposed in current guidelines, full 24-hour recordings remain standard in clinical practice.

  • 144.
    Asberg, Signild
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Terént, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Farahmand, B.
    Statin therapy and the risk of death and recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage2015In: International Journal of Stroke, ISSN 1747-4930, E-ISSN 1747-4949, Vol. 10, p. 43-43Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Asciutto, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Lindström, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    E-nside, a New Kid on the Aortic Block2023In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 818-818Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Asciutto, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Munster Univ Hosp, Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Albert Schweitzer Campus 1, D-48149 Munster, Germany..
    Usai, Marco, V
    St Franziskus Hosp Munster, Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Munster, Germany..
    Ibrahim, Abdulhakim
    Munster Univ Hosp, Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Albert Schweitzer Campus 1, D-48149 Munster, Germany..
    Oberhuber, Alexander
    Munster Univ Hosp, Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Albert Schweitzer Campus 1, D-48149 Munster, Germany..
    Early experience with the Bolton Relay Pro/Plus for physician-modified fenestrated TEVAR2022In: International Journal of Angiology, ISSN 0392-9590, E-ISSN 1827-1839, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 105-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) can be challenging in cases involving the aortic arch and the visceral segment. We report our initial experience with fenestrated TEVAR (f-TEVAR) for thoracic aortic disease involving aortic branches using physician-modified stent grafts (PMSGs). Methods: Between February 2019 and November 2020 nine patients were treated with a PMSG. Indication to treatment were a symptomatic acute type B aortic dissection (TBAD) in three cases, a penetrating aortic ulcer in three cases (two in zone 3 and one in zone 6), one case of an endoleak type IA after TEVAR, a chronic TBAD after TEVAR in one case and one case of a contained rupture of a thoracoabdominal aneurysm in zone 3. Pre-, intra-and postoperative clinical data were recorded. Results: The median patient age was 65 (IQR 60.5-71) years, and eight (89%) patients were men. Nine stent grafts (six Bolton Relay Plus and three Bolton Relay Pro, Terumo Aortic, Vascutek Ltd., Inchinnan, UK) were deployed. Small fenestrations (8 mm) were created on table, median duration for on table stent graft modifications was 20 minutes (range 13-22). The technical success rate was 100%. Median operative time was 188 (range 116-252) minutes. No major adverse events of any sort occurred during the first 30-day postoperatively. There were no type I or type III endoleaks at the end of the procedure, and no cases of spinal cord ischemia. Two access related complications occurred (22%). After a median of 12 (range 5-12) months all patients survived and all target vessels remained patent with one case of fenestration-related type I endoleak, which required open conversion. Conclusions: The results of our initial experience with f-TEVAR using PMSGs with the Bolton Relay stentgraft for the treatment of aortic diseases are acceptable. These results should be confirmed on larger patient cohorts. (Cite this article as: Asciutto G, Usai MV, Ibrahim A, Oberhuber A. Early experience with the Bolton Relay Pro/Plus for physician-modified fenestrated TEVAR. Int Angiol 2022;41:105-9. DOI: 10.23736/S03929590.22.04745-9)

  • 147.
    Aspelund, Aleksanteri
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Wihuri Res Inst, Biomedicum Helsinki, POB 63,Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Translat Canc Biol Program, Biomedicum Helsinki, POB 63,Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Robciuc, Marius R.
    Univ Helsinki, Wihuri Res Inst, Biomedicum Helsinki, POB 63,Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Translat Canc Biol Program, Biomedicum Helsinki, POB 63,Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Karaman, Sinem
    Univ Helsinki, Wihuri Res Inst, Biomedicum Helsinki, POB 63,Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Mäkinen, Taija
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Alitalo, Kari
    Univ Helsinki, Wihuri Res Inst, Biomedicum Helsinki, POB 63,Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Translat Canc Biol Program, Biomedicum Helsinki, POB 63,Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Lymphatic System in Cardiovascular Medicine2016In: Circulation Research, ISSN 0009-7330, E-ISSN 1524-4571, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 515-530Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mammalian circulatory system comprises both the cardiovascular system and the lymphatic system. In contrast to the blood vascular circulation, the lymphatic system forms a unidirectional transit pathway from the extracellular space to the venous system. It actively regulates tissue fluid homeostasis, absorption of gastrointestinal lipids, and trafficking of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes to lymphoid organs and on to the systemic circulation. The cardinal manifestation of lymphatic malfunction is lymphedema. Recent research has implicated the lymphatic system in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including obesity and metabolic disease, dyslipidemia, inflammation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and myocardial infarction. Here, we review the most recent advances in the field of lymphatic vascular biology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease.

  • 148. Aspelund, Aleksanteri
    et al.
    Tammela, Tuomas
    Antila, Salli
    Nurmi, Harri
    Leppanen, Veli-Matti
    Zarkada, Georgia
    Stanczuk, Lukas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Francois, Mathias
    Mäkinen, Taija
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Saharinen, Pipsa
    Immonen, Ilkka
    Alitalo, Kari
    Therapeutic Insights to Lymphangiogenic Growth Factors2015In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 52, no S1, p. 19-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Asswad, Amjad Ghazal
    et al.
    Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Freeman Hosp, Cardiol Dept, Freeman Rd, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE7 7DN, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Holm, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery. Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Burn Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, Olof
    Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Burn Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery. Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Burn Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lipcsey, Miklós
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    Rudolph, Andre
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Pediat Heart Ctr Stockholm Uppsala, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Delayed, Unprovoked, Hemodynamic Collapse with Following Asystole in a Pediatric Patient Following a High-Voltage Injury: A Case Report and Literature Review2022In: Pediatric Cardiology, ISSN 0172-0643, E-ISSN 1432-1971, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1163-1168Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical incidents are common and mostly uneventful, though can be severe and sometimes lethal. Aside from skin, muscle and soft tissue damage, electrical injuries can cause cardiac arrhythmias, the most common cardiac complication. The case of a 14-year-old girl who sustained 48.5% TBSA burns following a high-voltage electrical injury is described. She suffered five episodes of asystole 78 h following the injury, requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The cause of the delayed asystole was investigated and a PubMed literature search was conducted to explore late presenting cardiac sequelae following electrical injuries. This yielded fifteen studies, identified as relevant, of high quality and in the English language. These studies included a total of 1411 patients of whom only 3 were found to have had late potentially lethal arrhythmias, all manifesting within the first 24 h after the injury. Of these patients, 32 suffered cardiac arrests shortly after the electrical injury, 11 of which were documented as asystolic arrests though these were all from a single study with the rural locale and prolonged delay in arrival to the hospital setting contributing to this finding. To our knowledge, this is the only pediatric cardiac arrest developing in a stable patient over 72 h following the initial electrical injury. No other patient has suffered any significant cardiac complications first presenting outside the initial 24-h period following the electrical injury. Guidelines and recommendations on post electrical injury observation of patient vary and further research into this field is required to allow for guidance unification.

  • 150.
    Atar, Dan
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp Ullevaal, Dept Cardiol, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Kirkeveien 166,Soesterhjemmet, N-0450 Oslo, Norway..
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Inst Cardioctr Ticino, Div Cardiol, Clin Electrophysiol Unit, Lugano, Switzerland..
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, Örebro, Sweden..
    Cardiac device infection: removing barriers to timely and adequate treatment2023In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 44, no 35, p. 3323-3326Article in journal (Other academic)
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