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  • 101.
    Molavi Arabshahi, Amir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Elderly users & Mobile Phones: An explorative Study on Designing for Emotion & Aesthetic Experience: 2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to examine the role that non-instrumental aspects such as aesthetic and emotion play in elderly user interaction with mobile phones. It presents an analysis of the results from in-depth interviews with a selected group of Swedish elderly users, and discusses how the aesthetic experience which they yield in interacting with mobile phones could impact their preference, and their perceived usability of the devices.  A set of mobile phones, different in usability and aesthetic levels were presented to the group of elderly user in order to investigate how they perceive phones attributes, including appearance and general features, and different facets of their user experience, including their motivations of use, the involved emotions, desires, and concerns. The analyses revealed a possible existing correlation between non-instrumental aspects of elderly users’ interaction with mobile phones, and their preference to use those devices. While negative aesthetic experience as a result of social concerns had a strong negative influence on elderly’s perceived usability, and could consequently alter their preference, certain symbolic meanings in interaction such as the tendency to be modern, contributed to perceived ease-of-use & perceived usefulness of the mobile phones. Elderly user’s familiarity or earlier experience with a device or with the technology was found to be a confounding variable. However, in the presence of usability concerns, traditional factors of aesthetic went into the shadow, and therefore had no direct impact on users’ perceived usability of the device. A set of design solutions that would address elderly user’ both instrumental and non-instrumental concern, were proposed. 

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    AmirMolavi - MaserThesis
  • 102.
    Moll, Jonas
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Cancerpatienter positiva till journal på webben2021In: Onkologi i Sverige, no 4, p. 78-84Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 103.
    Mustaquim, Moyen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Study of Universal Design Principles Assessment2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goal in this pilot study is to explore the effect of universal design principles on the user’s behavior as they use a system. It is found that the universal design principles are not really able to symbolize the system’s attitude towards user’s action on the system. This research result is a part of a larger and ongoing research effort to discover if a system is designed universally or not based on the design principles and thereby come up with new innovative universal design principles.

  • 104.
    Mustaquim, Moyen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Assessment of Universal Design Principles for Analyzing Computer Games’ Accessibility2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universal design is a significant topic of interest in the research of accessibility. However, to date there are no certain verification of these principles on the accessibility issues for computer games. In this paper the existing universal design principles were verified to assess accessibility in computer games. Quantitative analysis of collected data showed that some design principles are not really optimal for assessing computer games’ accessibility while other design principles were overlooked. The findings from this study take the argument of alternation of existing universal design principles further ahead and initializes the possibilities of developing accessible games design principles.

  • 105.
    Mustaquim, Moyen Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Automatic speech recognition: an approach for designing inclusive games2013In: Multimedia tools and applications, ISSN 1380-7501, E-ISSN 1573-7721, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer games are now a part of our modern culture. However, certain categories of people are excluded from this form of entertainment and social interaction because they are unable to use the interface of the games. The reason for this can be deficits in motor control, vision or hearing. By using automatic speech recognition systems (ASR), voice driven commands can be used to control the game, which can thus open up the possibility for people with motor system difficulty to be included in game communities. This paper aims at find a standard way of using voice commands in games which uses a speech recognition system in the backend, and that can be universally applied for designing inclusive games. Present speech recognition systems however, do not support emotions, attitudes, tones etc. This is a drawback because such expressions can be vital for gaming. Taking multiple types of existing genres of games into account and analyzing their voice command requirements, a general ASRS module is proposed which can work as a common platform for designing inclusive games. A fuzzy logic controller proposed then is to enhance the system. The standard voice driven module can be based on algorithm or fuzzy controller which can be used to design software plug-ins or can be included in microchip. It then can be integrated with the game engines; creating the possibility of voice driven universal access for controlling games.

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  • 106.
    Mustaquim, Moyen Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Fuzzy-Logic Controller for Speaker-Independent Speech Recognition System in Computer Games2011In: Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction: Applications and Services 6th International Conference, UAHCI 2011, Held as Part of HCI International 2011, Orlando, FL, USA, July 9-14, 2011, Proceedings, Part IV / [ed] Constantine Stephanidis, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 91-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer Games are now a part of modern culture. By using automatic speech recognition systems (ASRS), voice driven commands can be used to control the game, which can open up the possibility for people with disabilities and age related problems to be included in game communities and use the service offerered. Conventional speech recognition systems however, do not support emotions, attitudes, tones etc. This is a problem because such expressions can be vital for gaming, especially as the majority of the users to be considered for this operation are elderly adult. For instance, if a command is uttered in a low pitch the character in the game can act differently than when it is voiced in an elevated pitch. The traditional voice controller for such operation is usually based on logic or a probability supported algorithm that can serve the purpose but has certain limitations like long process time, cost and complexity in implementation. This paper proposes a fuzzy logic based controller to detect a user’s emotion from their voice command for controlling the game in a different ways. This fuzzy logic controller can be programmed even on a microchip to drive certain voice driven actions as a built-in form of hardware. To use a fuzzy logic controller, instead of an approach based on traditional algorithms, gives more accuracy, control and efficiency when handling the user’s voice input commands for manipulation.

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  • 107.
    Mustaquim, Moyen Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Gaze Interaction: A Challenge for Inclusive Design2011In: Innovative Computing Technology / [ed] Pit Pichappan, Hojat Ahmadi and Ezendu Ariwa, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 244-250Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaze interaction for many people is the only means of communication because of extremely limited conditions like traumatic brain injuries, cerebral palsy to multiple sclerosis. No doubt it holds great undertake of the disable people while the ‘design for all slogans’ is highly supported by this feature. However, on the other hand people those who do not need such special need are intentionally excluded from using gaze technology even though a lot of promising research is being done in this field. There are several limitations and at present there is no model which can guide towards the design of sustainable, stable, eye tracking system for majority people. This paper examines such limitations of gaze interactions and proposes an accessibility passport model to overcome the challenges, thereby opening opportunity better design of gaze interaction for achieving universal and inclusive design.

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    fulltext
  • 108.
    Mustaquim, Moyen Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Use of Hands-Free Mouse for Game Control2011In: HCI International 2011: Posters' extended abstracts / [ed] C. Stephanidis, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, , p. 4p. 184-187Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction using gaze is not a new concept. It has been ready to deliver the promises to many people who suffer from severe disability and the only means of communication for them is eye or some muscle movement. The ideas proposed here construct a system that can collect gaze data, studies the oculomotor functions and capture natural human behavior. The hands-free mouse concept here is based on this idea which will provide the user to move the cursor and select object using eye, or any other muscular movement for the operation of game control. The concept of game in this study is, a tool that can help users with special needs doing exercise in an informal way. This can be helpful for patients who are under physiotherapy. A game interface can be used to show progresses of user’s muscle movement using scanning technique challenging the users for advancing certain level while exercising parallel.

  • 109.
    Mustaquim, Moyen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Nyström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    An Inclusive Framework for Developing Video Games for Learning2012In: Proceedings of the 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning (ECGBL 2012) / [ed] Felicia, P., Reading, UK: Academic Publishing International Limited , 2012, , p. 656p. 348-355Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Games are a type of vehicle with which society is changing at present-day. But how the games themselves will be changed by society, is an interesting question to ask for enhancing and initiating better design of games. As participation in gaming upsurges around the world and across a larger part of the population, it is obvious that games are not only an entertainment medium for children or young people anymore. Games can be used to accomplish different purposes for different groups of people in the society. Design and use of games for learning and/or educational purpose has been an important research field for several years. However, this research field is yet to deliver expected achievement and result, despite many efforts and resources put into it. Factors that are important to consider for designing a game that will motivate users to active involvement in playing a game for active learning, are crucial for the successfulness of the design of such a game. The design goal for educational games would be to produce games that motivate users and thereby achieve effective learning. This paper proposes a framework in which the parameters of what users want from a game are considered for the development of games for learning. The framework is based on the previous research and theory of Richard Rouse (2001), who defined different dimensions of game design in terms of learning. The proposed framework is important in order to investigate and assess the success of existing games used for learning. Also the framework can provide better understanding as a requirement engineering tool for game designers, who are to design games for learning and educational purposes in the future. The proposed framework was verified using a small quantitative analysis. It was found that, while some parameters of the framework indeed have significance for designing games for learning, there are additional factors that need to be discovered by further analysis and research to enhance the usability of the framework.

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    An_Inclusive_Framework_for_Developing_Video_Games_for_Learning
  • 110.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Parilla Bel, Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Circus, Play and Technology Probes: Training Body Awareness and Control with Children2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 on Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 1223-1236Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical training can be frustrating and hard, especially for those who experience additional challenges to access and control their proprioceptive senses. In the context of designing for children with Sensory-based Motor Disorder, we designed and deployed a series of Training Technology Probes to be used in circus training. Here we focus on how these were used, tested, and appropriated by children and instructors during a six-week circus training course. Through these explorations, we identified a range of potential benefits from using their functions in training. We present the Physical Training Technology Probes and the benefits they brought to training. We show how the technology functions helped children focus and provided feedback related to posture and balance. Furthermore, their open-ended designs and versatile options for use were crucial in exploring their contributions to training, and in how they helped foster creative engagement with technology and training. Our work contributes towards understanding the specific requirements when designing for the target group, and more generally contributes with design strategies for technology support for skill training.

  • 111.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm University.
    Bodystorming for movement-based interaction design2016In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 193-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a decade of movement-based interaction in human–computer interaction, designing for the moving body still remains a challenge. Research in this field requires methods to help access, articulate, and harness embodied experiences in ways that can inform the design process. To address this challenge, this article appropriates bodystorming, an embodied ideation method for movement-based interaction design. The proposed method allows for early consideration of the physical, collocated, and social aspects of a designed activity as illustrated with two explorative workshops in different application domains: interactive body games and interactive performances. Using a qualitative methods approach, we used video material from the workshops, feedback from participants, and our own experience as participants and facilitators to outline important characteristics of the bodystorming method in the domain of movement-based interaction. The proposed method is compared with previous ones and application implications are discussed.

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  • 112.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Duval, Jared Scott
    Computational Media University of California Santa Cruz, United States.
    Parrilla Bel, Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Altarriba Bertran, Ferran
    Social Emotional Technology Lab UC Santa Cruz, United States.
    Physical Warm-up Games: Exploring the Potential of Play and Technology Design2021In: CHI '21: Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, article id 440Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Warm-up games are widespread practices in multiple activities across domains, yet little scholarly work can be found about their role in physical training. Here, we study potential goals and benefits of warm-up games, and explore opportunities for technology inclusion through investigating a collection of warm-up games gathered: online, from a survey of online warm-up games curated, described, and used by Physical Education teachers; and in person, from an ongoing design research work as part of a technology-supported circus training course. Further, in the context of the latter, we conducted explorative design interventions, augmenting a range of the warm-up games with wearable technology. Our work surfaces major goals and benefits of warm-up games, which can be broadly classified as preparing participants physically, socially, and mentally. We also show how the inclusion of open-ended technology can support these goals and discuss broader opportunities for technology inclusion in warm-up games.

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  • 113.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Parilla Bel, Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Super Trouper: The Playful Potential of Interactive Circus Training2019In: CHI PLAY '19 Extended Abstracts: Extended Abstracts of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts, ACM Digital Library, 2019, p. 511-518Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Training can be challenging at times, and even more so to users with movement mastery and body awareness issues, like children with sensory-based motor disorder (SBMD). They often experience less enjoyment when engaging with physical activities. In this project, our goal is to support physical training of children with SBMD through the design of playful training activities and technology. Drawing from our observations during a technology-supported circus training course with circus instructors, we identify play potentials that can inspire future technology and activity design. We surface key elements that supported the emergence of play and playfulness, including strategies used by the instructors, and technology features. We discuss how these can be built on in future design iterations.

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    fulltext
  • 114.
    Naess, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Be active or stay unattractive: Be active or stay unattractive2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprises utilize information and communication technology, including websites, to market themselves and expand their businesses. However, employing this technology is not always a guarantee of success, especially for small enterprises. This is often due to limited resources and to the extent of having web skills present within the enterprise. Deciding who will design the website for a small enterprise is therefore of importance since a well designed website is a requirement to attract interest in visitors. The design of a website is also a main factor for the first impression to a visitor, a website that is visually appealing tends to give a greater confidence at first glance. This thesis is based on the interest of small enterprises considerations about what website design development characteristics and objective characteristics is generating more positive first impressions. To find this out, interviews together with subjective and objective measures of visual aesthetics were conducted to immerse in the aesthetics of small enterprise websites. The methods implemented gave variables to test in a correlation analysis. This correlation analysis showed that two web development characteristics had strong correlations with users' perception of visual aesthetics. None of the objective aesthetic attributes based on previous theories gave any strong correlations. These characteristics were therefore supplemented with other objective characteristics, which gave two strong correlations.

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  • 115. Neumayer, Christina
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Activism and radical politics in the digital age: Towards a typology2016In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Nilsson, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Exploring how internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy platforms can be designed to suit older adults with method triangulation and triangulation of sources2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 117.
    Nowotny, Helga
    Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS).
    Life in the digital time machine2020 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a truism, albeit an urgent one, that humanity faces unprecedented global challenges. At last, wehave discovered the spatial finiteness and vulnerability of the planet, our only habitat so far. Our temporal bearings are also shifting. We cannot escape the present which increases in density, accelerationand openness towards past and future, filled with ever more information from the past and expectations from a future that is already here, but unequally distributed. With access to a huge amount ofdata, unprecedented computational power and clever algorithms we are constructing a digital niche.The predictive power of algorithms enables us to see further ahead, opening new opportunities forprevention and shaping the future. Does it also risk a return to a more deterministic worldview oncewe start to align with the predictive power of the digital time machine?

  • 118.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Humlab.
    Digitala material och verktyg: möjligheter och problem utifrån exemplet spatial history2013In: Historisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, E-ISSN 2002-4827, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 474-482Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 119.
    Olsenmyr, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Sannehag, André
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    1:1 – teknik före funktion?: En studie av kommunala 1:1-satsningars motivering och implementering2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna uppsats granskar fem kommunala 1:1-satsningar, det vill säga projekt att ge en egen dator till varje elev. Syftet med uppsatsen är att jämföra beslutfattarnas visioner med elevernas upplevelser av det faktiska användandet. Utifrån detta är målet att identifiera hur stor vikt bilden av det medialiserade samhället hade vid beslutet av dessa satsningar och eventuellt fortsätter ha i det nuvarande användandet av tekniken. Frågeställningen fokuserar på hur stor roll bilden av det medialiserade samhället spelade i beslutsprocessen. Dessutom har ett par underfrågor formulerats för att tydliggöra arbetet.

    Uppsatsens teoretiska ramverk grundar sig främst i medialiseringsteorin och media literacy. Dessutom presenteras kommunikativa strategier, top-down och bottom-up samt Maslows behovstrappa för att ytterligare kunna problematisera de empiriska resultaten. Den metod som använts är kvalitativa samtalsintervjuer med både elever och beslutsfattare. Dessa har sedan transkriberats och analyserats utifrån de tidigare nämnda teorierna i tre analysteman; beslut, implementering och användning.

    Uppsatsen påvisar att det medialiserade samhället skapade ett upplevt måste för skolorna att följa med i teknikutvecklingen vilket underbyggde besluten för de flesta 1:1-satsningar. I och med ett beslut som med tydlighet anspelar på ett top-down-perspektiv skapas en ytlig instruktionsgrund till användarna. Tillgången till bara ett fåtal instruktioner skapade ett behov av att lärare och elever själva bildade sig en uppfattning om hur datorerna skulle användas på bästa sätt. Den nivå av mediekompetens som studien uppvisar indikerar även på att den i vissa fall är överskattad från beslutsfattarhåll. Detta har i sin tur lett till att det förändrade arbetssätt, som var beslutsfattarnas mål, främst syns genom ett utbyte av skrivdon från papper och penna till datorer hos eleverna.

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    1:1-teknik före funktion?
  • 120.
    Ovalle, Anaelia
    et al.
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA..
    Subramonian, Arjun
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA..
    Singh, Ashwin
    Queer AI, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Voelcker, Claas
    Queer AI, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Vector Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Sutherland, Danica J.
    Queer AI, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Amii, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Locatelli, Davide
    Queer AI, Barcelona, Spain..
    Breznik, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3. Queer AI, Sweden.
    Klubicka, Filip
    Queer AI, Dublin, Ireland.;Technol Univ Dublin, ADAPT Ctr, Dublin, Ireland..
    Yuan, Hang
    Queer AI, Oxford, England..
    Hetvi, J.
    Queer AI, Oxford, England..
    Zhang, Huan
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Shriram, Jaidev
    Queer AI, San Diego, CA USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, San Diego, CA USA..
    Lehman, Kruno
    Queer AI, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Soldaini, Luca
    Queer AI, San Diego, CA USA.;Allen Inst AI, Seattle, WA USA..
    Sap, Maarten
    Queer AI, Zurich, Switzerland.;Allen Inst AI, Seattle, WA USA.;Carnegie Mellon Univ, Language Technol Inst, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Deisenroth, Marc Peter
    Queer AI, London, England.;UCL, London, England..
    Pacheco, Maria Leonor
    Queer AI, Boulder, CO USA.;Univ Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO USA..
    Ryskina, Maria
    Queer AI, Cambridge, MA USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Mundt, Martin
    Queer AI, Darmstadt, Germany.;Tech Univ Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany.;Hessian AI, Darmstadt, Germany..
    Agarwal, Milind
    Queer AI, Fairfax, VA USA.;George Mason Univ, Fairfax, VA USA..
    McLean, Nyx
    Queer AI, Makhanda, South Africa.;Rhodes Univ, Makhanda, South Africa..
    Xu, Pan
    Queer AI, Durham, NC USA.;Duke Univ, Durham, NC USA..
    Pranav, A.
    Queer AI, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Korpan, Raj
    Queer AI, New Rochelle, NY USA.;Iona Univ, New Rochelle, NY USA..
    Ray, Ruchira
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Mathew, Sarah
    Queer AI, Atlanta, GA USA.;Georgia Inst Technol, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Arora, Sarthak
    Queer AI, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    John, S. T.
    Queer AI, Espoo, Finland.;Aalto Univ, Espoo, Finland..
    Anand, Tanvi
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Agrawal, Vishakha
    Queer AI, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India..
    Agnew, William
    Queer AI, Seattle, WA USA.;Univ Washington, Seattle, WA USA..
    Long, Yanan
    Queer AI, Chicago, IL USA.;Univ Chicago, Chicago, IL USA..
    Wang, Zijie J.
    Queer AI, Atlanta, GA USA.;Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA USA..
    Talat, Zeerak
    Queer AI, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Ghosh, Avijit
    Queer AI, Boston, MA USA.;Northeastern Univ, Boston, MA USA..
    Dennler, Nathaniel
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Noseworthy, Michael
    Queer AI, Cambridge, MA USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Jha, Sharvani
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Baylor, Emi
    Queer AI, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Joshi, Aditya
    Queer AI, North Sydney, NSW, Australia.;SEEK, North Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Bilenko, Natalia Y.
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    McNamara, Andrew
    Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Microsoft, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Gontijo-Lopes, Raphael
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Markham, Alex
    Queer AI, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dong, Evyn
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Kay, Jackie
    Queer AI, Oxford, England..
    Saraswat, Manu
    Queer AI, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Vytla, Nikhil
    Queer AI, Los Angeles, CA 90001 USA..
    Stark, Luke
    Queer AI, London, ON, Canada.;Western Univ Canada, London, ON, Canada..
    Queer In AI: A Case Study in Community-Led Participatory AI2023In: FAccT '23: Proceedings of the 2023 ACM Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 1882-1895Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Queerness and queer people face an uncertain future in the face of ever more widely deployed and invasive artificial intelligence (AI). These technologies have caused numerous harms to queer people, including privacy violations, censoring and downranking queer content, exposing queer people and spaces to harassment by making them hypervisible, deadnaming and outing queer people. More broadly, they have violated core tenets of queerness by classifying and controlling queer identities. In response to this, the queer community in AI has organized Queer in AI, a global, decentralized, volunteer-run grassroots organization that employs intersectional and community-led participatory design to build an inclusive and equitable AI future. In this paper, we present Queer in AI as a case study for community-led participatory design in AI. We examine how participatory design and intersectional tenets started and shaped this community's programs over the years. We discuss different challenges that emerged in the process, look at ways this organization has fallen short of operationalizing participatory and intersectional principles, and then assess the organization's impact. Queer in AI provides important lessons and insights for practitioners and theorists of participatory methods broadly through its rejection of hierarchy in favor of decentralization, success at building aid and programs by and for the queer community, and effort to change actors and institutions outside of the queer community. Finally, we theorize how communities like Queer in AI contribute to the participatory design in AI more broadly by fostering cultures of participation in AI, welcoming and empowering marginalized participants, critiquing poor or exploitative participatory practices, and bringing participation to institutions outside of individual research projects. Queer in AI's work serves as a case study of grassroots activism and participatory methods within AI, demonstrating the potential of community-led participatory methods and intersectional praxis, while also providing challenges, case studies, and nuanced insights to researchers developing and using participatory methods.

  • 121.
    Pacaci, Görkem
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Hamfelt, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Colour Beads Visual Representation of Compositional Relational Programs2013In: Proceedings of 2013 IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing (VL/HCC), IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 131-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on a compositional relational programming language Combilog, code visualization with a motivation of flexible practical applications is explored. Following from earlier work based on Higraph diagram formalizations, a new coloured and human perception-centric iteration of visual representation is introduced, and its effects on understanding compositional relational programs are analysed by means of a user study. Results showed that visuals helped participants to solve coderelated questions 46% faster with 69% less errors.

  • 122.
    Papadimitriou, Georgios
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Acoust Technol Grp, DTU Electro, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Brunskog, Jonas
    Tech Univ Denmark, Acoust Technol Grp, DTU Electro, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Heuchel, Franz M.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Acoust Technol Grp, DTU Electro, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Lyberg Åhlander, Viveka
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Logoped Phoniatr & Audiol, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Abo Akad Univ, Fac Arts Psychol & Theol, Turku 20500, Finland..
    Öhlund Wistbacka, Greta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Speech-Language Pathology. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Logoped Phoniatr & Audiol, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Sex differences in vocal behavior in virtual rooms compared to real rooms2024In: JASA Express Letters, E-ISSN 2691-1191, Vol. 4, no 4, article id 045201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates speech production under various room acoustic conditions in virtual environments, by comparing vocal behavior and the subjective experience of speaking in four real rooms and their audio-visual virtual replicas. Sex differences were explored. Males and females (N = 13) adjusted their voice levels similarly to room acoustic changes in the real rooms, but only males did so in the virtual rooms. Females, however, rated the visual virtual environment as more realistic compared to males. This suggests a discrepancy between sexes regarding the experience of realism in a virtual environment and changes in objective behavioral measures such as voice level.

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  • 123.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Beyond cloud computing: why should society be allowed to say a word about it2012In: Creating and applying socially, ethically and professionally acceptable ICT systems: Current challenges and what is next? / [ed] Whitehouse, Diane, 2012, p. 4-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Is the IT infrastructure future proof?2011In: The social impact of social computing / [ed] A. Bisset et al., Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Hallam University , 2011, p. 356-361Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICT infrastructure and its technological core are now becoming the critical infrastructures of our society. Our activities and processes are now relying on these platforms, they are now our social and business platforms. But are they sustainable? What are the (physical) limits to take into account when looking into the ICT future? Do the planet have enough resources to sustain the making, powering and wasting of all the electronic devices needed to support our social and business platforms in the future? This paper addresses the issue of evaluating the environmental impact of ICT. Starting from the analysis of the sustainability of one of its most celebrated "laws", the Moore's law, we analyse its entire life-cycle, from "silicon-factories", to their use in data centres, to the final destination of ICT products: recycling and reuse (trash ware) in the best case or, uncontrolled waste traffic towards poor countries with health hazards and environmental pollution, in the worst case. We introduce a new dimension in the social and ethical analysis related to ICT: the future. What are the implications of this future ethics in ICT?

  • 125.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Is the post-Turing ICT sustainable?2012In: ICT critical infrastructure and society: 10th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC10 2012, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 27-28, 2012. Proceedings / [ed] M. D. Hercheui, D. Whitehouse, W. McIver & J. Phahlamohlaka, Amsterdam: Springer, 2012, p. 183-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we introduce a definition of post-Turing ICT with an initial analysis of its sustainability. At the beginning of the history of computing the attention was concentrated on the single machine: a device able to read and write a memory and able to execute different actions depending on the internal state. It was only in the 1960’s that the fifth function (after input, memory, processing and output) was introduced: the network, the capability of this single computational node to be connected and exchange data with similar machines. In the last fifty years the network has grown at an incredible speed, introducing us into the post-Turing ICT era: billions of electronic devices interconnected. ICT has now a significant environmental impact along all its lifetime phases: manufacturing (based on scarce minerals), application (based on growing power consumption) and e-waste management (with open cycles difficult to close). In this paper, we introduce relevant topics to understand whether the current ICT production and consumption paradigms are sustainable, and the social consequences and implications of such a problem for stakeholders.

  • 126.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The brave new world of socio-technical systems: Cloud computing2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, p. 377-383Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose an analysis of Cloud Computing as a new kind of socio-technical system. For many organizations, moving ICT from the capital expenditure line to the operational expenditure line, by using "ICT services on-demand" and paying them by consumption, is an opportunity. From another perspective Cloud Computing represents a big shift back towards centralized architectures where end-users and organizations will use on.demand resources provided by very large datacentres. Are we moving from the "autonomy" of the 1980's introduced by Personal Computing to the "heteronomy" of Cloud Computing of the XXI century? For analysing the main social and ethical issues related to Cloud Computing we propose a simple model based on the Socio-Technical Systems concept. The co-shaping between society and technology is clean-cut and can be a useful tool for users and organisations that are considering to enter into the world of ICT as-a-service. We finally investigate possible connections between our reflections about Cloud Computing and more deep ethical, philosophical, and psychological ways of addressing these issues.

  • 127.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Whitehouse, Diane
    Slow Tech: The bridge between computer ethics and business ethics2014In: Proceedings 11th International Conference on human Choice and computers, HC11, 2014: ICT and society / [ed] K. Kimppa, D. Whitehouse, T. Kuusela and J. Phahlamohlaka, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 92-106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the difficult task of implementing the concept of Slow Tech, that is,information and communication technology (ICT) that is good, clean and fair, in a businessenvironment. It investigates the democratic, environmental, and social challenges currently facingICT vendors. More specifically, it examines the opportunities available for these companies to useSlow Tech as a bridging mechanism between their Computer Ethics and their Business Ethicsstrategies, based on Corporate Social Responsibility. Last but not least, it highlights what some"next step" questions for further investigation and implementation might be and the challenges ofimplementing these.

  • 128.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Whitehouse, Diane
    Slow tech: Towards good, clean and fair ICT2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT / [ed] T. W. Bynum, W. Fleishman, A. Gerdes, G. Moeldrup Nielsen and S. Rogerson, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, p. 384-390Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Slow tech is a new way of looking at technology. It means designing and developingtechnologies that are ‘slow’, with the aim of being good, clean, and fair. It has, as anaspiration, the design and use of a new kind of information and communicationtechnologies (ICT): ICT that is human-centred, and that takes into account both thelimits of the planet and those of human beings. The focus of this reflection paper is onICT that speaks to the needs of the environment and society, and is thus implicitlyethical. It contributes towards promoting slow tech to an audience of computerprofessionals and computer end-users.

  • 129.
    Paulino, Isabel
    et al.
    Faculty of Tourism, Universitat de Girona, Girona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Domènech, Antoni
    Department of Geography, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Bassols, Narcís
    Independent scholar, Vilabertran, Catalonia.
    Do Visitors Visit What the Tours Industry Supplies?: Sightseeing Tours Versus First-timers' Photos2022In: Tourism Planning & Development, ISSN 2156-8316, E-ISSN 2156-8324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourist behaviour within destinations is a research topic of increasing interest. The most relevant approaches focus on demand and are aimed at detecting factors affecting travel patterns, or revealing the mobility flows shaping tourism destinations. This paper adds another layer to this stream of research by including the supply-side, contrasting it with the demand-side. It aims to detect potential market opportunities by overlapping the geographical distribution of geolocated user-generated photos from social media taken by first time visitors to Cartagena, Colombia, versus the attractions offered in city tours. Mixed-method approaches are used to analyse the association between both datasets, including spatial analysis, correlation and cluster analysis. The results show a partial overlap in the correlation between attractions included in city tours and geotagged tourist photos. This opens up a debate on the need for tours to adapt their products to how visitors consume the city's attractions and spaces of interest.

  • 130.
    Persson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Future Technology Support of Command and Control: Assessing the impact of assumed future technologies on cooperative command and control2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to technological advances, especially in the field of information and communication technology (ICT), the so called revolution in military affairs (RMA) and later the concept of network-centric warfare (NCW) emerged as a theory to further utilize technology for military command and control (C2). Advocates of the Swedish ROLF 2010-vision and the concept of NCW have made claims and assumptions that future technology will improve mission effectiveness by, for example, increasing the understanding of a current situation and its development, the speed of command, and providing means to utilize more efficient forms of organizations. The scope of this thesis is to critically dissect and assess some of these claims and assumptions.

    Four papers are included: (1) An observational study involving military officers participating in a training session at the Swedish National Defence College’s command and control laboratory. (2) A study performed with a microworld is presented with a discussion considering using microworlds as a tool for investigating the effects of introducing characteristics of novel tech- nology. (3) An experimental study introducing a method to measure individual’s apprehension and assessed development of a situation. (4) Finally, an experiment is presented addressing assumptions of the efficiency of different C2 architectures and effects of graphical support for communication of intentions.

    The overall conclusion is that the strong benefits from implementing new technologies can be questioned. Results from the qualitative observations indicate that traditional working practices are used regardless introduction of technology with future characteristics. The results show that the strong positive effect that networked and technology enhanced C2 architecture was expected to have generally could not be demonstrated experimentally. However, it appeared that such a C2 architecture can provide some advantages of C2 performance over traditional counterparts under conditions of moderate complexity. Under situations of high complexity, neither the networked nor the traditional C2 architecture performed better than the control condition who lacked C2 capabilities.

    List of papers
    1.
    The record could not be found. The reason may be that the record is no longer available or you may have typed in a wrong id in the address field.
    2. C3Fire in command and control research
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>C3Fire in command and control research
    2003 (English)In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 191-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    New and envisioned technological means and abilities for exerting command and control have increased the interest of man-machine research in a military context. Although there are many current proposals for how new command and control systems should be designed, many of the proposed properties that are considered advantageous have never been tested or could even be impossible to test in real-world situations. In spite of that, proposed design solutions are generally held valid in many Western countries where developments of major command and control system projects are in progress. An important question is how microworlds can be used for research on team decision-making. The use of microworlds gives us the possibility to create controlled settings and the opportunity to use advanced monitoring tools to study the subjects. Our studies indicate that the microworld concept, even though the simulation is fairly simple, reflects some of the crucial aspects of team-work in dynamic settings. The article presents results from a study in command and control using the C3Fire microworld (http:// www.c3fire.org). Results and methodological issues are discussed.

    Keywords
    Microworld; Dynamic decision making; Command and control; Simulation; Team decision making
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects
    Research subject
    Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction; Computer Science with specialization in Real Time Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221782 (URN)10.1007/s10111-003-0127-x (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-04-03 Created: 2014-04-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. A measure of situation apprehension, outcome prediction and performance in one microworld
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A measure of situation apprehension, outcome prediction and performance in one microworld
    2007 (English)In: Proc. of the 10th IFAC/IFIP/IFORS/IEA Symposium on Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of Human-Machine Systems (IFAC-HMS 2007), Korea: Elsevier, 2007, Vol. 58Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article a measurement method of situation apprehension and outcome prediction is examined psychometrically. This method has its inspiration in Spearman’s theory of intelligence and constitutes an alternative to the concepts of situation awareness and sense making. The measurement approach of certain aspects of understanding that is examined here is specific to the decision making environment (microworld) used, but its general properties, however, should be rather widely applicable. Using one microworld – C3Fire – and an assessment technique of situation apprehension and prediction ability, we studied the rela- tionships between apprehension, prediction, and performance in the microworld. These results indicate that the measurement method used may be psychometrically sound and thus a viable alternative to current approaches to understanding, such as situation awareness and sense making.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Korea: Elsevier, 2007
    Keywords
    Assessment, Awareness, Command and control, Communication, Decision making, Measurement, Methodology, Prediction, Signal detection
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects
    Research subject
    Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221784 (URN)
    Conference
    The 10th IFAC/IFIP/IFORS/IEA Symposium on Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of Human-Machine Systems (IFAC-HMS 2007), 4-6 September 2007, Seoul, South Korea.
    Available from: 2014-04-03 Created: 2014-04-03 Last updated: 2014-06-30Bibliographically approved
    4. Complexity: the dark side of network-centric warfare
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complexity: the dark side of network-centric warfare
    2014 (English)In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 103-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Military theoretical considerations suggest that a networked command and control architecture will provide a more effective form of command and control under complex operations that demand a high tempo of action. This article presents an experimental study with the purpose to examine team performance under different conditions of command and control architectures and their resilience to complexity. The experiment was performed with the task to extinguish simulated fires in a microworld. Three factors were varied in the experiment: command and control architecture, the number of simulated units, and tempo. The dependent variable was the number of lost cells in the microworld. Three command and control architectures were investigated; command by negation, directive command, and a control condition. The general conclusion from this experiment was that all command and control architectures performed equally poorly under the condition of many subordinate units and fast tempo. This was in contradiction to suggestions made in the military theoretical literature. Command by negation was presumably the more effective command and control architecture under the other conditions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Springer, 2014
    Keywords
    Architecture, Command, Complexity, Control, C3Fire, Experimental study, Graphical decision support, Microworld, Network centric, Team performance
    National Category
    Human Aspects of ICT
    Research subject
    Computer Systems Sciences; Information Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221717 (URN)10.1007/s10111-012-0248-1 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-04-03 Created: 2014-04-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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  • 131.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Militärvetenskapliga institutionen, Försvarshögskolan, Department of military studies, Swedish National Defence College.
    Rigas, Georgios
    Militärvetenskapliga institutionen, Försvarshögskolan, Department of military studies, Swedish National Defence College.
    Complexity: the dark side of network-centric warfare2014In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 103-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military theoretical considerations suggest that a networked command and control architecture will provide a more effective form of command and control under complex operations that demand a high tempo of action. This article presents an experimental study with the purpose to examine team performance under different conditions of command and control architectures and their resilience to complexity. The experiment was performed with the task to extinguish simulated fires in a microworld. Three factors were varied in the experiment: command and control architecture, the number of simulated units, and tempo. The dependent variable was the number of lost cells in the microworld. Three command and control architectures were investigated; command by negation, directive command, and a control condition. The general conclusion from this experiment was that all command and control architectures performed equally poorly under the condition of many subordinate units and fast tempo. This was in contradiction to suggestions made in the military theoretical literature. Command by negation was presumably the more effective command and control architecture under the other conditions.

  • 132.
    Plaudina, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Non-violent resistance movements in the light of digital repression2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, the success rate of non-violent resistance movements has decreased. With the development of information and communication technology (ICT), governments have taken repression into the digital realm to tamper with protest movements. The effects of repression on protest mobilization have been rather inconclusive; even less is known about the effects of digital repression. By using the political jiu-jitsu, backfire and moral jiu-jitsu theory as well as the theory on emotion and protest participation in hard autocracy, this thesis showcases how the moral shock and indignation helps to overcome fear caused by both traditional and digital repression, thus helping to explain the relationship between repression and mobilization. This theoretical framework is applied to the case of Belarusian post-election protests in 2010 and 2020. Although traditional repression was present in both time frames, there is a significant variation in the government’s digital repression resolve. The analysis shows that mobilization was primarily driven by traditional repression – police brutality and violence. However, in 2020 people were also outraged by censorship and Internet shutdowns that left them in an information vacuum which was deemed completely undeserved. The outrage about digital repression was facilitated by the opposition activities that acted against digital repression.

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    Non-violent resistance movements in the light of digital repression
  • 133.
    Rabe, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Improving the Usability of Complex Life Science Software: Designing for a significant difference in skill among users in a scientific work domain2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The usability of complex scientific software is often lacking as it tends to not receive a high priority in development, in addition to the fact that developers are usually engineers with a low level of knowledge in usability areas. The study examines such a software in an environment with a significant difference in terms of user skill, which creates some issues in terms of improving usability. Novice users need to have a higher degree of learnability to better understand how to operate the system, but this cannot reduce the overall level of complexity since it is required by experienced users to perform more advanced tasks. To find out how usability could be increased under these conditions, qualitative interviews were conducted with users of the software. The gathered data was applied to a thematic analysis that was used as a foundation in the development of a functional prototype for a new design, which was iteratively tested and evaluated with users. The design integrates a somewhat novel feature through a zoom-in function as an adaptable view, where the user can visualize a more complex layer of the software. The study also highlights the importance of correctly identifying central user activities in an environment with a high difference in complexity among tasks, to make more informed design decisions around visual priority.

  • 134.
    Rahman, Md. Shadman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Navigating Anonymity in Online Communities: A Multilevel Perspective: Examining user experiences and perceptions of online anonymity in the Fishbrain enthusiast community2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the intricate dynamics of online anonymity in the context of Fishbrain, a platform for fishing enthusiasts. By conducting semi-structured interviews with ten Fishbrain users, I scrutinized the experiences and understanding of online anonymity through a deductive thematic analysis approach. This research was further underpinned by a comprehensive platform analysis. Using Eklund et al.'s framework [15], I studied six themes that encompass both macro and micro-regulating structures that govern online anonymity. The research findings highlight the pivotal role of these structures, revealing that users frequently balance the advantages of disclosing personal information against potential risks. This study accentuates the need to consider a spectrum of factors—commercial, legal, and technological structures, alongside the factual, social group, and physical facets of anonymity—when investigating online anonymity. This research expands the existing body of knowledge on online anonymity and provides valuable insights for platforms like Fishbrain to better address their users' concerns and customize their features and policies effectively.

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    Navigating Anonymity in Online Communities: A Multilevel Perspective
  • 135.
    Rode, Sonia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Inclusive and Accessible Workplaces: AI- and Robotics-Based Assistive Technologies for Professionals with High-Functioning Autism2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Although every society member should be offered an equal chance to participate in working life, individuals with high-functioning autism encounter many barriers. Here, assistive technologies using AI and robotics can provide new possibilities to create accessibility and inclusion. This thesis followed the methodology of user-centred design by performing an online survey with 48 autistic professionals to understand their current work experiences and attitudes towards AI- and robotics-based assistive technologies. Based on the survey findings, neurotypical participants from different educational backgrounds ideated in workshops novel technological solutions. The survey results indicate that autistic professionals are open to AI and robotics to overcome, among others, barriers of sensory overload resulting from sounds and many simultaneous social interactions. Thus, the ideas of headphones using personalisation to cancel specific noises and a device summarising conversation content from team meetings for the remotely located professional can be supportive. Finally, the research results can be a starting point for future design ambitions addressing autistic individuals in their work environments.

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  • 136.
    Runeson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Performing on a digital stage: A Twitch.tv case study on streamer behavior2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Twitch.tv is a growing platform for game related live streaming. Streamers present themselves live in front of a live audience, where innovative interactions take place. In this study, I looked at two Twitch.tv live streamers with varying audience sizes. The study was conducted to better understand the differences in behavior based on their interaction with their audiences. The research question was as follows: How do two live streamers, one big and one small, interact with their audiences through the use of different features of Twitch.tv? To do this I conducted video analyses of over 60 hours worth of streaming data as well as one interview with one of the live streaming participants. The gathered data was analyzed using Erving Goffman’s (1990) Dramaturgical theory for studying the behaviors during the streamers performances. The results show differences in both performance behavior (Dramatization and Idealization) as well as differences in their streaming interface (Stage and Set pieces). Both streamers where affected by expectations from the audience while creating fronts to maintain these expectations for the benefit of the performance. 

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  • 137. Russmann, Uta
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    How to study Instagram?: Reflections on coding visual communication online2016In: CeDem2016 : Conference on E-Democracy and Open Government. / [ed] Parycek, P & Edelmann, N, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Ryu, Hansol
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Exploring design practices for explaining music recommendations2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 139.
    Sadowski, Helga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Children's Rights to ‘Good’ and ‘Bad’ Screen Time: Parental Narratives of How Children Do Family Online2021In: Young Children's Rights in a Digital World: Play, Design and Practice / [ed] Holloway, D., Willson, M., Murcia, K., Archer, C., & Stocco, F., Cham: Springer, 2021, p. 57-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many families, ICTs have become an indispensable part of family life. Smartphones and other digital communication technologies help them to keep up with each other during school/work hours; organizing family gatherings can be coordinated in chat-groups created specifically for that purpose; and keeping up with grandparents overseas has become much more vivid thanks to video-telephony. However, integrating ICTs into families’ everyday lives means new (micro) tasks, new opportunities, but also new troubles.

    Drawing on interview data with six extended Swedish families spread over 18 households, we investigate how (grand-)parents manage, relate to, and assist in children’s digital family work. In our qualitative analysis, we show how particular roles and tasks are assigned to and expected of the children. We find that the children are often put into a paradoxical position. On the one hand, they are understood as digital natives “by default”, who embrace digital technologies and for whom communicating online is automatically fun and easy. On the other hand, they are placed as victims of omnipresent digitalisation, who need to be protected in favor of a more ‘natural childhood’. In accordance to these opposing positions, we analyze how technologies are called ‘good’ in the framework of family communication, and ‘bad’ in other contexts, such as entertainment.

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  • 140.
    Sadowski, Helga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Creative Forms of Family Intimacy: Managing Family Bonds Across Distances2021In: Creative Families: Gender and Technologies of Everyday Life / [ed] Jana Mikats, Susanne Kink-Hampersberger & Libora Oates-Indruchová, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, p. 145-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICTs are an indispensable part of many families’ everyday life, not only for family management but also for maintaining family intimacy. Yet, we know little about the everyday practices of using ICTs for family work. How do contemporary Swedish families use ICTs to support family intimacy? We investigate how particular social needs for family intimacy lead to creative forms of technology adaptation and use. We conducted interviews with six, Swedish families, living in different households, cities, and even countries. Our results detail three main distances—spatiotemporal, generational, and embodied—that people experience in their family life. We conclude that bridging distances requires doing digital intimate family work; i.e. families find ways of translating or recreating intimate family settings, situations, and interactions into digital contexts.

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  • 141.
    Sagala, Ramadhan Kurniawan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Visualization of Vehicle Usage Based on Position Data for Root-Cause Analysis: A Case Study in Scania CV AB2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Root cause analysis (RCA) is a process in Scania carried out to understand the root cause of vehicle breakdowns. It is commonly done by studying vehicle warranty claims and failure reports, identifying patterns that are correlated to the breakdowns, and then analyzing the root cause based on those findings. Vehicle usage is believed to be one of the factors that may contribute towards the breakdowns, but the data on vehicle usage is not commonly utilized in RCA.

    This thesis investigates a way to help RCA process by introducing a dataset of vehicle usage based on position data gathered in project FUMA (Fleet telematics big data analytics for vehicle Usage Modeling and Analysis). A user-centered design process of a visualization tool which presents FUMA data for people working in RCA process was carried out. Interviews were conducted to gain insights about the RCA process and generate design ideas. PACT framework was used to organize the ideas, and Use Cases were developed to project a conceptual scenario. A low fidelity prototype was developed as design artifact for the visualization, and a formative test was done to validate the design and gather feedback for future prototyping iterations.

    In each design phase, more insights about how visualization of vehicle usage should be used in RCA were obtained. Based on this study, the prototype design showed a promising start in visualizing vehicle usage for RCA purpose. Improvement on data presentation, however, still needs to be addressed to reach the level of practicality required in RCA.

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  • 142.
    Saller, Nathalie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Uppkopplad eller nedkopplad? -Konflikt mellan förnuft och känsla: En etnografiskt inspirerad studie av fyra studenters vardag online och offline2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this thesis has been to study and obtain greater understanding of the consequences of active social media use. Specifically, in terms of social identity, social life and the sense of belonging. Secondly, the thesis studies the consequences of disconnecting and for a limited amount of time opt out of the social media context.

    Method/material:  The study is based on an explorative, cultural ethnographically-inspired method, in which four respondents were studied: two men and two women, all frequent users of social media. This was done in three steps: initial interviews, followed by social media diaries and finally a focus group. By allowing these methods to complement each other, the goal was to create an overall picture of the importance of social media in their everyday lives.

    The study's focus lies on the week in which the respondents kept social media diaries. This was done with an application designed to continuously provide me updates during the week. The first three days of the week, the respondents used the social media as usual. Every time they were active on social media, the task was to update the diary with the activity, as well as motivation, emotion, simultaneous offline activity and possible reflections. The last four days of the weak, the respondents were prohibited from using social media, and instead they updated the diaries every time they had an impulse to use social media.

    Main results: The study shows that social media plays a big role in shaping the self as well as the social identity. The respondents feel a social requirement to be constantly available, which stresses them and affects offline-activities and how they socialize in real life. The days without social media meant great relief in many ways; they began to read books, socialized more concentrated with friends and family and were able to relax more. Despite these surprising insights, they want to continue using social media since being disconnected was also very stressful since they often had the feeling of being excluded and left out. The conflict between reason and emotion arises. Sense dictates that they should cut down on their social media activity but the feeling tells them the opposite.

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  • 143.
    Samuelsson, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    A shape of play to come: Exploring children's play and imaginaries with robots and AI2023In: Computers and Education: Artificial Intelligence, ISSN 2666-920X, Vol. 5, p. 100173-100173, article id 100173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are rapidly moving into an era where AI and robots are part of everyday interactions in society and education, and there are immense discussions today about current and future technologies. Still, children are often not included in this discussion, while there is much to learn from current uses and children's understandings of AI and robotics. The study is based on a seven-month ethnographical work that details the implementation of a robot in two preschool groups of children aged 1–2 and 3–5 (n = 38). The study descriptively combines a framework for children's play analysis with explorative qualitative child interviews (n = 6) with the 3-5-year-olds to examine how children play with the robot and their thinking about a future with robots and AI. The results show how children's play with robots spans all of Hughes's (2011) sixteen play types and integrates robots into play in ways specific to child-robot interaction. The interviews indicate that children have well-formed knowledge about the current uses of robots and AI and elaborate imaginaries about a future with them, including critical boundaries toward robots and AI agents. The evidence shows emerging ways children relate to these. The potential of including children's actions and voices in the ongoing societal and educational debates on AI is discussed.

  • 144.
    Samuelsson, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Cultural Heritage Through Educational Robots: Using a Ukrainian Folk Tale with a Programmable Robot in Early Childhood Education2022In: HCI International 2022 – Late Breaking Posters: 24th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCII 2022, Virtual Event, June 26 – July 1, 2022, Proceedings, Part I, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 336-343Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Programmable robots are increasingly used to introduce computational thinking and programming to young children. However, how to practically introduce this is still being developed, where storytelling and project-based methods have been promoted as possible ways to achieve this. This paper presents a study from a preschool featuring 4–5 year-olds working with a Ukrainian folk tale, The Mitten, while introducing programming through a programmable floor robot, The Blue-Bot. The paper presents the iterative cycles during a design-based study of merging the folk tale with the Blue-Bot during the project. The paper further examines the educational affordances of a programming board created during the project, showing how the folk tale provided a fitting structure for the board and pedagogical scaffold during the activities. The paper discusses how older forms of cultural heritage can be merged with new technologies and the added importance of the particular case of Ukrainian cultural heritage following the outbreak of the war in Ukraine.

  • 145.
    Sarker, Biswajit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Organized Chaos!: Untangling multigenerational group interactions in a gamified science center.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This inductive study investigates interactions within groups of visitors during a science center visit. Using simplified interaction analysis of recorded videos; I explore the group dynamics in terms of what determines who takes the lead while multigenerational groups interact with different types of experiments. From the observations, I suggest that the age of different group members and specific design aspects of the experiments play the most important roles in the emergence of leadership. Teenagers in a group tend to take the leadership and dominate during a group interaction, while young children like to explore freely leading the group from one experiment to the next without focusing on finishing them properly. As for the design aspects, if an experiment requires cognitive skills then adults and teenagers take the lead but if an experiment requires physical skills and provides immediate feedback then young children take the lead. I also suggest, instead of guiding the young children in the group, adults tend to become observers during engagements. This study will be useful for researchers and interaction designers who are focusing their work on the behavior of multigenerational groups in science center or museum settings.

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  • 146.
    Sarker, Biswajit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Show me the sign!: The role of audio-visual cues in user experience of mobile virtual reality narratives2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This explorative study investigates the role of audio-visual cues in user experience of virtual reality narratives. Using qualitative research methods, this study analyzes users’ experiences from their point of view and finds out what design factors contribute to their positive or negative experiences. Based on a thematic analysis of collected data, this study argues that when users are experiencing an immersive virtual reality narrative their curiosity drive them to look for clues in that virtual environment. If the virtual world provides well-designed audio-visual cues to guide their attention throughout the narrative then users feel immersion and spatial presence. On the contrary, lack of cues in a virtual environment keeps users looking straight ahead throughout the narrative, which results in boredom. Finally, excessive use of audio-visual cues makes users to keep switching their attention in multiple directions in fear of missing out something important, eventually resulting in their frustration and stress. This study will be useful for HCI researchers and narrative designers who are focusing their work in consumer oriented virtual reality applications.

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  • 147.
    Selg, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Digital Contact Tools in Professional Life: What Governs the Choice?2015In: Selected Papers of Internet Research 16, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A changing communicative environment represents both opportunities and risks to professional organisations. Both public and private bodies are experimenting with the new contact tools in order to adapt them to daily tasks. In a survey of the use of contact tools such as voice calls (landline, mobile, VoIP ), and texts (e-mail, SMS, IM) the respondents were asked to indicate on a Likert-scale their preferences for the respective contact tools depending on context and situations. Taken together, the findings indicate that the choice of contact tools is less contingent on contextual matters as was hypothesised. Instead the results suggest that people choose the tool that they believe is most suitable for the person to be contacted.

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  • 148.
    Selg, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Research programs as a tool to map Internet studies2020In: Second International Handbook of Internet Research, Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer, 2020, p. 505-528Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Shijaku, Egi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Adding interaction to decision making support tools: What can be learned from the Capitalization Table2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The capitalization table is the system that aids companies in keeping ownership data. The current norm is a simple spreadsheet that does not provide for all the needed functionalities. This thesis investigates how designing a new interactive capitalization table can add knowledge to the broader area of interactive decision making support tools.

    The iterative design process carried out in this thesis is user based, with qualitative interviews, prototyping and user testing as main methods.

    Rather than merely the final design, the crucial point in this thesis is the knowledge that can be obtained from the case in hand, the ways it can be used to motivate design choices and how these can be transferred to similar systems that aid decision making. It can be concluded that enabling safe simulation and adding visual support are two crucial paradigms that add value to a decision support system.

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  • 150.
    Shrestha, Suman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Evaluation of Shape's Influence on User's Performance in Shape Replication Task2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents experimental results of shape’s influence on user’s performance in terms of time and accuracy in shape replication task. The shapes are drawn with mouse, pen and touch input devices. For this purpose, two non-meaningful, semi- randomly generated shapes have been used. The first shape has a combination of straight lines and curves whereas the second shape has curves only. Each of these shapes is presented in four versions namely contour, polygon, narrow tunnel and wide tunnel. A method to compare versions of these shapes with the corresponding versions of user drawn shapes is presented. In general, the results showed that the replication of second shape takes less time and the replicated shape is more accurate when compared to the first shape. In addition, performance of the input devices was found to be dependent upon the shapes and their versions they were used to draw.

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    Master's Thesis: Evaluation of Shape's Influence on User's Performance in Shape Replication Task
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