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  • 101.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Peace or War? The Prospects of the Conflicts in the Caucasus1997In: The Iranian Journal of International Affairs, ISSN 1016-6130, Vol. 9, no 2, 208-224 p.Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 102.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Democracy and Pluralism in Muslim Areas of the Former Soviet Union2001Chapter in book (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Title of Chapter: Ethnic Relations and Democratization in the Northwestern Caucasus

  • 103.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Small Nations and Great Powers: A Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict in the Caucasus2000Book (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the end of the 1980s, the world's interest in the Caucasus region has kept growing. Especially since 1996, interest in the oil resources of the Caspian Sea has created yet more need for information about the region. For the Caucasus remains a very l

  • 104.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    The Devaluation of the Concept of Autonomy: National Minorities in the Former Soviet Union1999In: Central Asian Survey, ISSN 0263-4937, Vol. 18, no 2, 185-196 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Geopolitics and Strategic Alignments in the Caucasus and Central Asia1999In: Perceptions: Journal of International Affairs, ISSN 1300-8641, Vol. 4, no 2, 100-125 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Undeclared War: The Nagorno Karabakh Conflict Reconsidered1997In: Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, ISSN 0149-1784, Vol. 20, no 4, 1-20 p.Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 107.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    US Policy in the "Caspian-Asian": Imperatives of Strategic Vision2000In: Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, no 18Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 108.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Cloaking the Chechen War as jihad: The Risk of Militant Contagion2000In: Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, no 15Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 109.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Putin's Past and Russia's Future in the 'Near Abroad'2000In: Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, no 4Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 110.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Chechnia, Russia and the Islamic Factor: a Source of Instability in The Northern Caucasus2000In: Central Asia and the Caucasus, no 4Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 111.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Armenia's Political Insecurity and Caucasian Stability2000In: Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, no 10Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 112.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The Weary Path to Mutual Compromise: Elusive Peace in Nagorno-Karabakh1999In: Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, no 2Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 113.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Konflikt v Nagornom Karabkhe: Dinamika i Perspektivy Reshenia2001In: Azerbaydzhan i Rossiya: Obshestvo i Gosudarstvo, Sakharov Foundation, Moscow , 2001, 435-477 p.Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 114.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    The Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict1999Book (Other scientific)
  • 115.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    The Unruly Caucasus1997In: Current History, ISSN 0011-3530, Vol. 96, no 612, 341-347 p.Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    "Russia's policy in the Caucasus is confused, sometimes contradictory and often destabilizing. It has failed to dampen ethnic tensions [and] has contributed to anti-Russian feelings."

  • 116.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    International reactions to massive human rights violations: The case of Chechnya1999In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, Vol. 51, no 1, 85-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Autonomy and Conflict: Ethnoterritoriality and Separatism in the South Caucasus - Cases in Georgia2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing minority populations with autonomy is gaining appreciation as a method of solving,managing, and even pre-empting ethnic conflict. However, in spite of the enthusiasm for autonomy solutions among academics and practitioners alike, there is reason to argue that the provision of autonomy for a minority may under certain circumstances increase rather than decrease the likelihood of conflict. In certain political conditions, autonomy strengthens the separate identity of a minority; it thereby increases its incentives to collective action against the state; and most of all its capacity to seek separation from the central state, through the state-like institutions that autonomy entails. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate whether territorial autonomy was a contributing factor to the violent ethnic conflicts that have erupted in the South Caucasus since the late 1980s. It presents a theoretical argument to explain which qualities of autonomy solutions increase the likelihood of conflict; and then seeks to outline possible rival explanations derived from the theoretical literature. The dissertation then examines the explanatory value of autonomy as compared to nine other possible causal factors in a study of nine minorities in the South Caucasus. Finding that autonomy has the highest explanatory value of any of the factors under study, it then moves on to study in depth the five minorities existing on the territory of the republic of Georgia. Three of them, Abkhazia, Ajaria, and South Ossetia, were autonomous, whereas two (the Armenians and Azeris in Southern Georgia) had no autonomous status. The dissertation shows how the institution of autonomy, by promoting an ethnic elite in control of state-like institutions, and by enhancing factors such as leadership, economic viability, and external support, played a crucial together with these factors in the escalation to conflict in Abkhazia and South Ossetia, whereas the absence of autonomy mitigated conflict in Javaheti’s Armenian and Kvemo Kartli’s Azeri populations.

  • 118.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Autonomy: A Catalyst of conflict in the Caucasus?2000In: Paper for the 5th annual convention of the Association for the Study of Nationalities, 2000, 51- p.Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 119.
    Cornell, Svante E
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Ismailzade, Fariz
    Makarenko, Tamara
    Salukvadze, Khatuna
    Tcheishvili, Georgi
    The South Caucasus: Regional Overview and Conflict Assessment2002Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 120.
    Cornell, Svante E
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Spector, Regine A.
    Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Central Asia: More than Islamic Extremists2002In: The Washington Quarterly, ISSN 0163-660X, Vol. 25, no 1, 193-206 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Cornell, Svante E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of East European Studies.
    Spector, Regine A.
    Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Islamic Militancy in Central Asia: Defining the Threat2001In: Marco Polo Magazine, no 6, 13-16 p.Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 122.
    Cornell, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Swanström, Niklas
    Kinas Dubbla Intressen2001In: Uppsala Nya Tidning, no Oktober 26Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 123.
    Crumley, Carole
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Integrated Hist & Future People Earth IHOPE, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Laparidou, Sofia
    Univ Texas Austin, Dept Anthropol, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Ramsey, Monica
    Univ Texas Austin, Dept Anthropol, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Rosen, Arlene M.
    Univ Texas Austin, Dept Anthropol, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    A view from the past to the future: Concluding remarks on the "The Anthropocene in the Longue Duree'2015In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 25, no 10, 1721-1723 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Special Issue provides a deep-time interdisciplinary perspective on the Anthropocene and signals the importance of the Anthropocene concept in past, present, and future human-environmental relationships. This concluding article recognizes that various approaches - scientific, postmodern, catastrophist, and ecomarxist - can contribute to understanding the Anthropocene as a process and that contributions have been made by several disciplines, including Anthropology, Archaeology, Geography, History, and Politics. The critical importance of weaving together social science perspectives with those of the natural sciences is emphasized.

  • 124.
    Dafoe, Allan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Statistical Critiques of the Democratic Peace: Caveat Emptor2011In: American Journal of Political Science, ISSN 0092-5853, E-ISSN 1540-5907, Vol. 55, no 2, 247-262 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The “democratic peace”—the inference that democracies rarely fight each other—is one of the most important and empirically robust findings in international relations (IR). This article surveys the statistical challenges to the democratic peace and critically analyzes a prominent recent critique (Gartzke 2007). Gartzke's claim that capitalist dynamics explain away the democratic peace relies on results problematically driven by (1) the censoring from the sample of observations containing certain communist countries or occurring before 1966, (2) the inclusion of regional controls, and (3) a misspecification of temporal controls. Analysis of these issues contributes to broader methodological debates and reveals novel characteristics of the democratic peace. Gartzke and other critics have contributed valuably to the study of IR; however, the democratic peace remains one of the most robust empirical associations in IR.

  • 125.
    Daivadanam, Meena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Why reality matters when developing interventions2015In: Klagandets diskurs: matforskare refleckterar / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015, 173-182 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Dangoor, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    "No need to exaggerate": - the 1914 Ottoman Jihad declaration in genocide historiography 2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 127. de la Chapelle, Eva
    Förbättring och utveckling av kompetensförsörjning: En kvalitativ studie utförd vid Swedavia AB2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    An organizations quality management, including process improvement and -development requires continuous work. Quality- and process improvement does not only concern the individual employee but the entire organization. This bachelor thesis is about studying and improving a competence provision process at the organization Swedavia. The purpose is to suggest improvements that increase the efficiency and clarifies the competence prevision process.

    The thesis is based on the questions (1) How can the competence prevision be improved at Swedavia? And (2) How can the competence prevision be developed into a more adaptable process that fits into all business areas? In order to identify the cause of quality deficiency, three quality management tools have been used. To provide manageable improvement proposals, data collection has been focused on individual perspective such as interviews and surveys, as well as an operational perspective where quality audits have been reviewed. By analyzing the result with aid in information and material concerning competence prevision and process improvement, improvement proposals for the process have been developed and presented in an implementation plan.

    The study shows that (1) Swedavia’s competence provision can be improved by further developing the process method descriptions, responsibilities and the tools used. An improvement that benefits both the employees and the organization is to apply a clearer description of the overall competence provision process. The description should be based on guidelines for competence management by the Swedish Standard Institute. The result shows that depending on the area of business, the unconsciousness seems to vary. Improvement proposals for a more adaptable process (2) therefore include clearer guidelines, process tools and methods that is specific to the studied business area. In addition to suggested improvements, Swedavia should review what is considered to be of most importance and challenging in the process management, good communication and accessibility.

    The full text will be freely available from 2017-11-11 13:24
  • 128.
    de Vries Lindestam, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, The Collegium for Development and Assistance Studies.
    Making it Work: Experiences in Canada, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom with Recommendations for Sweden's Implementation of Security Council Resolution 13252005Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 129. de Bekker-Grob, Esther
    et al.
    Berlin, Conny
    Levitan, Bennet
    Raza, Karim
    Christoforidi, Kalliopi
    Cleemput, Irina
    Pelouchova, Jana
    Enzmann, Harald
    Cook, Nigel
    Hansson, Mats G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Giving Patients’ Preferences a Voice in Medical Treatment Life Cycle: The PREFER Public–Private Project2017In: Patient, ISSN 1178-1653, E-ISSN 1178-1661, Vol. 10, no 3, 263-266 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    The full text will be freely available from 2018-06-14 09:00
  • 130.
    Dekker, Jolien
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    An analysis of factors for success of community-based disaster risk reduction in Java, Indonesia2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Indonesia has a very high exposure and high vulnerability to natural disasters. Community-based disaster risk reduction can be life-saving, cost effective and reduce the gap between development and humanitarian aid. Community-based activities enable people to express their real needs and priorities, allowing problems and measures to be defined and implemented effectively. In Indonesia, CBDRR initiatives often come from NGOs, university-based researchers, or (local) governments. This study aims to identify how community-based disaster risk reduction programs implemented by institutions can be successful. The hypothesis is that the key for successful community-based disaster risk reduction is to include and empower the communities at stake. Key concepts in this research for community-based disaster risk reduction are culture and vulnerability. The Pressure and Release model of Wisner et al (2004) addresses the structural vulnerability which underlies disasters and shows that they are a product of social, political and economic environments.  The process framework integrating indigenous and scientific knowledge of Mercer et al (2010) enables the integration of scientific and local knowledge. Together, these models are used as the framework of analysis. Two case studies have been selected: volcanic eruptions of Mount Merapi and landslides in Banjarnegara. Findings have shown that there are programs focused on early warning systems and evacuations, relocation, and education in both areas. Application of the framework reveals that the models are effective tools to assess the success of community-based disaster risk reduction initiatives, as well as reasons for failure. Deriving from these findings, the factors that determine successful community-based disaster risk reduction are: community engagement through collaborating with community and stakeholders, identification of community goals and establishing trust; the identification of intrinsic and extrinsic vulnerability by addressing root causes, dynamic pressures, and unsafe conditions; identifying local knowledge and disaster mitigation strategies; and integrating these with scientific knowledge. The findings have also demonstrated that the hypothesis of this research - that the key for successful community-based disaster risk reduction programs implemented by institutions is to include and empower the communities at stake - is confirmed.

  • 131. Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    et al.
    Kemerink, JS
    Kooy, Michelle
    Brandimarte, Luigia
    Floods and societies: the spatial distribution of water‐related disaster risk and its dynamics2014In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, ISSN 2049-1948, Vol. 1, no 2, 133-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Dulic, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, The Uppsala Programme for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.
    Tito's Slaughterhouse: A Critical Analysis of Rummel's Work on Democide2004In: Journal of Peace Research, ISSN 0022-3433, Vol. 41, no 6, 85-102 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article provides a critical analysis of the method used by Rudolph J. Rummel in order to calculate the death toll of various regimes in the 20th century.

  • 133.
    Dulic, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Peace Research and Source Criticism: Using historical methodology to improve information gathering and analysis2011In: Understanding Peace Research: Methods and challenges / [ed] Kristine Höglund and Magnus Öberg, London and New York: Routledge , 2011, 35-47 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Dulic, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Geocoding Bosnian violence: A note on methodological possibilities and constraints in the production and analysis of geocoded event data2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Dulić, Tomislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Perpetuating Fear: Insecurity, Costly Signalling and the War in Central Bosnia, 19932016In: Journal of Genocide Research, ISSN 1462-3528, E-ISSN 1469-9494, Vol. 18, no 4, 463-484 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the relationship between the ethnic and societal security dilemmas on the one hand, and the way in which elites seek to prevent local-level cooperation through ‘costly signalling’, on the other. By analysing transcripts of tape-recorded conversations from the Security Council of the Republic of Croatia during the period 1992–95, the author shows that the Croatian elite based its initial strategy on the widespread fear that Croats would become dominated in an independent Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was during this phase that Franjo Tuđman and parts of the Bosnian Croat elite voiced the idea that parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina should—at least as a contingency—be joined with Croatia. However, the elite in Zagreb began backtracking in early 1992, when it became clear that the international community would not allow such a turn of events. It is also shown that fears of political domination began transforming into security concerns in the second half on 1992 due to the increasing tensions between the Bosniak and Croat armed forces. The final part of the analysis shows how local elites used nationalist symbols and the presence of foreign Mujahedin fighters in the vicinity of Zenica for the purpose of ethnic mobilization in the spring of 1993.

  • 136.
    Dussauge, Isabelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    The Experimental Neuro-Framing of Sexuality2013In: Graduate Journal of Social Science, ISSN 1572-3763, Vol. 10, no 1, 124-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain scans of homosexuality, sexual desire and images of male and female brain function are becoming a common element of popular scientific news. How is sexuality re-described and re-produced when studied in brain scanners? This article explores the cultural production of sexuality in the growing field of neuroimaging research. In focus is the neural framing of sexuality, i.e. the process by which sexuality is understood as a matter of brain activity and visualizable with medical imaging technologies. The neuroframing of sexuality enables a reproduction of socio-cultural notions of difference, but also of neuroscience’s own notions of agency. The neural framing of sexuality re-mediates an idealized sexuality: ageless, neatly oriented, bodiless although haunted by the de-animated body, unfolding neatly as a sequential response of a psychological inside to an inanimate outside, and essentialized as independent from its feelers and objects.

  • 137.
    Dussauge, Isabelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Sex, Cash and Neuromodels of Desire2015In: BioSocieties, ISSN 1745-8552, E-ISSN 1745-8560, Vol. 10, no 4, 444-464 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the twenty-first century’s biological culture, pleasure and desire seem to be widely reconceptualized as processes of the brain. The neurosciences of sex and money are two fields of crucial interest in this cerebralization of desire. On the basis of a cross-reading of neuroimaging studies of sexuality and of neuroeconomics, I analyze the specific notions of desire/pleasure at work in the neuroimaging experiments. What is lost, and what is claimed to be found, in the neu- rosciences of desire for sex and cash? With particular attention to notions of rewards, I argue that transfers of metaphors from neuroeconomics naturalize economized notions of sexual desire. Moreover, I argue that neuroeconomics and the neuroscience of sex essentialize desire as the drive of our behavior, and that this, in turn, relates to the neurosciences’ re-invention of the social in the terms of a late capitalist society.

  • 138.
    Dussauge, Isabelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    The experimental neuroframing of sexuality2013In: Knowledge and evidence: Investigating technologies in practice / [ed] Boel Berner, Corinna Kruse, Linköping: The Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change, Linköping University , 2013, 27-55 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Dussauge, Isabelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Brains, Sex, and Queers 2090: An Ideal Experiment2014In: Gendered Neurocultures: Feminist and Queer Perspectives on Current Brain Discourses / [ed] Sigrid Schmitz, Grit Höppner, Vienna: Zaglossus , 2014, 67-88 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Eight meeting on the Working Group on Ordovician Geology of Baltoscandia (WOGOGOB 2004)2004Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 141.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Participation in Rebellion: Rebel Troop Size, 1946-2007Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the question of participation in rebellion using new time-series data on over 400 rebel groups during the period 1946-2007. Drawing on a number of theoretical literatures, the study investigates factors commonly argued to lead to increased levels of participation. Surprisingly, the study finds that neither material incentives (contraband, oil in conflict zone) nor social incentives (ethnic mobilization) were associated with larger rebel groups. Instead, security concerns are important in determining participation; the study finds that individuals are more likely to join rebel groups when repression is at intermediate levels. The results also find that gdp per capita is robustly correlated with larger troop sizes. This is the first cross-national study to explicitly investigate participation, and its findings present a number of challenges to common arguments within the civil war literature.

  • 142.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    From Armed Conflict to War: Ethnic Mobilization and Conflict Intensification2009In: International Studies Quarterly, ISSN 0020-8833, E-ISSN 1468-2478, Vol. 53, no 2, 369-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a new line of inquiry into ethnicity and armed conflict, asking the question: are conflicts in which rebels mobilize along ethnic lines more likely to see intensified violence than non-ethnically mobilized conflicts? The paper argues that the ascriptive nature of ethnicity eases the identification of potential rebels and facilitates a rebel group’s growth, leading to an increased risk for war. This proposition is empirically tested using a Cox model on all intrastate armed conflicts 1946–2004; the results show that ethnically-mobilized armed conflicts have a 92% higher risk for intensification to war. In extending the analysis, the study finds that the vast majority of conflicts intensified in the first year, but for every year a low-scale conflict remained active thereafter, the risk of intensification increased, peaking around year twelve.

  • 143.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Coercion in Rebel Recruitment2014In: Security Studies, ISSN 0963-6412, E-ISSN 1556-1852, Vol. 23, no 2, 364-398 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on rebel recruitment has focused on the economic and social incentives groups use as enticements, but has overlooked the question of why many armed groups recruit using coercion. The puzzle is why coercion occurs despite alienating civilian populations and being costly in terms of organizational and military effectiveness. I argue that recruitment is a dynamic process and that groups are likely to shift recruitment strategies depending on the exigencies of the conflict. The study tests this argument by examining whether rebels are more likely to employ coercion after suffering losses on the battlefield. Using unique microlevel new data on the conflict in Nepal, the results show that the argument is supported: the more rebel fatalities on the battlefield, the more likely are rebels to employ coercion.

  • 144.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Nepal2007In: International Security and the United States, Greenwood/Praeger, New York , 2007Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 145.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Survey Research in Conflict and Post-Conflict Societies2011In: Understanding peace research: Methods and challenges / [ed] Kristine Höglund and Magnus Öberg, London: Routledge, 2011, 165-182 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Raising Rebels: Participation and Recruitment in Civil War2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do some individuals choose to participate in rebellion, and what recruitment tactics can rebel groups use to affect this decision? These questions are central to the study of civil war because rebel groups must raise troops in order to challenge the government and to survive as an organization. Indeed, much of the civil war literature builds on participation as a key causal mechanism, yet it is rarely specified in theoretical or empirical models. The dissertation attempts to open this black box by tackling three sets of gaps in the existing literature; these relate to the assumptions made in most studies, the theoretical bases for understanding participation and recruitment, and the record of empirical testing. Essay I examines whether a particular type of recruitment practice, ethnic mobilization, is associated with higher levels of violence. The results show that when rebel groups mobilize along ethnic lines, there is a higher risk for intensified violence. Essay II employs new data on rebel troop size to study what factors affect participation in rebellion. The findings indicate that concerns over personal security rather than economic and social incentives best explain participation. Essay III addresses coerced recruitment, positing that conflict dynamics affect whether rebel groups shift from voluntary to coerced recruitment. Using micro-level data on the conflict in Nepal, the results show that the more losses rebels suffer on the battlefield, the greater the number of individuals they subsequently abduct. Finally, the Nepal case study presented in Essay IV suggests that indoctrination as a recruitment strategy was more important to rebel leaders than other facets of the insurgency. Taken together, this dissertation indicates that there is analytical leverage to be had by examining not only the individual’s decision to participate, but also the rebel group’s recruitment strategy, and that these rebel strategies are flexible and contingent on conflict dynamics.

    List of papers
    1. Recruiting Rebels: Indoctrination and Political Education in Nepal
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recruiting Rebels: Indoctrination and Political Education in Nepal
    2010 (English)In: The Maoist Insurgency in Nepal: Revolution in the 21st Century, London: Routledge , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Routledge, 2010
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17610 (URN)0-415-77717-8 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2008-07-20 Created: 2008-07-20 Last updated: 2010-03-18Bibliographically approved
    2. From Armed Conflict to War: Ethnic Mobilization and Conflict Intensification
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Armed Conflict to War: Ethnic Mobilization and Conflict Intensification
    2009 (English)In: International Studies Quarterly, ISSN 0020-8833, E-ISSN 1468-2478, Vol. 53, no 2, 369-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a new line of inquiry into ethnicity and armed conflict, asking the question: are conflicts in which rebels mobilize along ethnic lines more likely to see intensified violence than non-ethnically mobilized conflicts? The paper argues that the ascriptive nature of ethnicity eases the identification of potential rebels and facilitates a rebel group’s growth, leading to an increased risk for war. This proposition is empirically tested using a Cox model on all intrastate armed conflicts 1946–2004; the results show that ethnically-mobilized armed conflicts have a 92% higher risk for intensification to war. In extending the analysis, the study finds that the vast majority of conflicts intensified in the first year, but for every year a low-scale conflict remained active thereafter, the risk of intensification increased, peaking around year twelve.

    Keyword
    civil war, civil conflict, ethnic conflict
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Research subject
    Peace and Conflict Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-120217 (URN)10.1111/j.1468-2478.2009.00538.x (DOI)000266637600006 ()
    Available from: 2010-03-10 Created: 2010-03-10 Last updated: 2010-12-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Participation in Rebellion: Rebel Troop Size, 1946-2007
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation in Rebellion: Rebel Troop Size, 1946-2007
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the question of participation in rebellion using new time-series data on over 400 rebel groups during the period 1946-2007. Drawing on a number of theoretical literatures, the study investigates factors commonly argued to lead to increased levels of participation. Surprisingly, the study finds that neither material incentives (contraband, oil in conflict zone) nor social incentives (ethnic mobilization) were associated with larger rebel groups. Instead, security concerns are important in determining participation; the study finds that individuals are more likely to join rebel groups when repression is at intermediate levels. The results also find that gdp per capita is robustly correlated with larger troop sizes. This is the first cross-national study to explicitly investigate participation, and its findings present a number of challenges to common arguments within the civil war literature.

    Keyword
    civil conflict, civil war, participation, rebel groups, rebellion, rebels
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Research subject
    Peace and Conflict Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-120218 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-03-10 Created: 2010-03-10 Last updated: 2010-03-18
    4. Coercion in Rebel Recruitment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coercion in Rebel Recruitment
    2014 (English)In: Security Studies, ISSN 0963-6412, E-ISSN 1556-1852, Vol. 23, no 2, 364-398 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on rebel recruitment has focused on the economic and social incentives groups use as enticements, but has overlooked the question of why many armed groups recruit using coercion. The puzzle is why coercion occurs despite alienating civilian populations and being costly in terms of organizational and military effectiveness. I argue that recruitment is a dynamic process and that groups are likely to shift recruitment strategies depending on the exigencies of the conflict. The study tests this argument by examining whether rebels are more likely to employ coercion after suffering losses on the battlefield. Using unique microlevel new data on the conflict in Nepal, the results show that the argument is supported: the more rebel fatalities on the battlefield, the more likely are rebels to employ coercion.

    Keyword
    civil conflict, civil war, rebellion, rebel recruitment, rebel group, rebels, Nepal, coercion
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Research subject
    Peace and Conflict Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-120219 (URN)10.1080/09636412.2014.905368 (DOI)000335942000005 ()
    Available from: 2010-03-10 Created: 2010-03-10 Last updated: 2014-07-02Bibliographically approved
  • 147.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    A Beginner’s Guide to Conflict Data: Finding and Using the Right Dataset2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a guide to identifying and using the right conflict dataset. It is composed of two parts: 1) a brief overview of factors researchers might consider when choosing a conflict dataset, and 2) a listing of approximately 60 of the most prominent conflict datasets. The first part of the paper includes a brief description of the historical evolution of conflict data. It then turns to various factors researchers might consider when using conflict data, focusing specifically on needs of the researcher, whether they be policy-related, qualitative research or quantitative research. For each of these categories, there is a discussion on conflict data that are relevant for those users, and substantive recommendations are provided for which dataset to choose. The second part of the paper is divided into two sections: armed conflict dataset and events datasets, both of which contain an alphabetical listing of prominent datasets. For each dataset, a description is provided, as is information on the temporal and spatial domain; the type of event in focus (usually armed conflict or war); how this event is defined; the violence threshold employed for case inclusion; a brief list of data coded; the principal researcher; and how to access the information.

  • 148.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Microstudies under the microscope: poverty and conflict in Nepal2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Eck, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Maoist Strategy2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Egnell, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Lessons from Helmand, Afghanistan: What now for British counterinsurgency?2011In: International Affairs, ISSN 0020-5850, E-ISSN 1468-2346, Vol. 87, no 2, 297-315 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of lessons stand out from the analysis of British operations in Helmand between 2006 and 2010: First, contrary to the legacy, British competence in the field of counterinsurgency is neither natural nor innate through regimental tradition or historical experience. The slow adaptation in Helmand is an indication that the expertise British forces developed in past operations is but a distant folktale within the British Armed Forces. Substantially changed training, painful relearning of counterinsurgency principles, and changed mindsets are therefore necessary to avoid repeated early failures in the future. Moreover, despite eventually adapting tactically to the situation and task in Helmand, the British Armed Forces proved inadequate in dealing with the task assigned to them for two key reasons. First, the resources of the British military are simply too small for large scale complex engagements such as those in Helmand or southern Iraq. Second, the over-arching comprehensive approach, especially the civilian aspects of operations that underpinned Britain’s historical successes with counterinsurgency, is today missing. In the end, the article calls for greater realism about what British contributions to international intervention can achieve – a strategy in tune with actual resources.

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