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  • 101.
    Saxena, Anju
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The sound system of Nàvakat2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe the basic sound system of Nàvakat, a Tibeto-Burman language spoken in the Nako village in Kinnaur (Himachal Pradesh, India). This is the first attempt to describe the sound system of any Upper Kinnaur language. The analysis presented here shows that Nàvakat exhibits many features which are typically associated with Tibetan. It shows especially close affinity with the sound systems of Tibetan varieties such as Tabo and Ladakhi. In all these respects, it differs from the sound system of Sangla Kinnauri – a West Himalayish Kanauri variety spoken in Lower Kinnaur.

  • 102.
    Shokri, Guiti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Impersonal constructions in Mazandarani2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 182-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate impersonal constructions in the Sari and Ziyarat dialects ofMazandarani, a language spoken in the north of Iran. The language data used in this study are oral narratives,stories, and ethnographic texts.Kitagawa (1990), Blevins (2003), and Siewierska (2008) are among those general linguists who havepaid attention to this type of construction in recent years. Siewierska (2008: 3) defines impersonal constructionsas “subjectless constructions, constructions featuring only a pleonastic subject, and constructionswhich lack a specified agent.” This study concentrates on the latter type, specifically on the use of3PL and 2SG constructions to denote a non-specified agent.Sometimes 3PL impersonal constructions are in the past tense, where there is a separation in time fromthe moment of speech, but some examples are in the present tense, which means that there is no time separation.In most examples, the addressee is excluded, but this is mainly due to the situation in which thecorpus was gathered. In some of the examples it is obvious that the speaker wants to create a mental distancebetween him/her and the verb action. The construction is also used when talking about a taboo, perhapsto avoid the embarrassment of having to identify with the verbal action. In other examples, the 3PLconstruction lends more generality, and therefore more importance, to the verbal action. It can also excludeboth the speaker and the addressee from the group of possible agents. The 2SG construction is used bothin a similar way to the 3PL construction to talk about customs in a specific context in the past or present,thus excluding the addressee from the referential framework in this specific context, but probably not inall contexts. But this construction is also used to include both the speaker and the addressee as potentialagents.The general conclusion that can be drawn from this study is that the 3PL construction is less inclusivethan the 2SG. If the speaker wants to mark an exclusive interpretation (-speaker, -addressee) the onlypossible construction is the 3PL, and if the speaker wants to focus on the inclusive interpretation (+speaker,+addressee) the only possible construction is 2SG, but there is also a grey zone where both constructionsare possible.

  • 103.
    Shokri, Guiti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Past and Non-past Structures in the Mazandarani Dialect Spoken by the Galesh of Ziarat2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 199-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article1 deals with the Mazandarani dialect spoken in Ziarat, a village near Gorgan in Golestan Province,Iran. This dialect is spoken by the Galesh cow herders in this area and is to be regarded as a variant of Mazandarani, which is spoken in Mazandaran Province and neighbouring regions south of the Caspian Sea in Iran. I give a brief description of the past and non-past2 verb forms in the Ziarat dialect and show the formation of the present/future, past, and past imperfect indicative verbs in this dialect. I conclude that the formation of the non-past indicative is influenced by Persian, whereas the past indicative and past imperfect indicative follow the Mazandarani structure. However, when the past imperfect has a derivational preverb, it uses a Persian structure with a Mazandarani stem. All personal endings, except the 3SG past ending, are copied from Persian. On the whole, this hybrid dialect can basically be described as a dialect of Mazandarani, but it is affected by Standard Persian, Gorgani Persian3 and Khorasani Persian depending on the geographic situation.

  • 104.
    Simonsen, Jørgen Bæk
    Københavns Universitet.
    Johannes Pedersens ophold i Cairo 1920-19212012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 107-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recipient of this Festschrift was in her capacity as the Professor of Semitic Philology also the Warden of "Johannes Pedersen Grant." I know that Kerstin Eksell respects her predecessor and therefore I have used the opportunity to re-read a number of letters which Johannes Pedersen wrote to his colleagues in Denmark when he was studying in Cairo 1920-21. I have also re-read his applications to Carlsberg Foundation and looked into the goals that he intended to reach during his stay in Cairo. I have chosen to give extensive quotations from his applications and letters in order to let Johannes Pedersen himself speak in the Festschrift addressed to one of his successors.

  • 105. Singh, Sunny
    A Cup Full of Jasmine Oil2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 97-100Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 106. Singh, Udaya Narayana
    Review of Rajendra Singh, ed. (2009) Annual Review of South Asian Languages and Linguistics (in Trends in Linguistics: Studies & Monographs 222). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Demy 8vo; viii+249 pp.2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 223-225Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Spooner, Brian
    Dept. of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Review of Jahani, Carina, Agnes Korn and Paul Titus (eds.), The Baloch and Others. Linguistic, Historical and Socio-Political Perspectives on Pluralism in Balochistan. Wiesbaden: Reichert Verlag, 2008, 399 pp.2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 189-191Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Squarcini, Federico
    University of Venice.
    Pāṣaṇḍin, vaitaṇḍika, vedanindaka and nāstika. On criticism, dissenters and polemics and the South Asian struggle for the semiotic primacy of veridiction2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 101-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By reconsidering the epistemic implications underlying the marginal status to which the materials produced by South Asian exponents of various forms of ‘dissenting’ or ‘anti-traditional’ intellectual activity have been consigned, in this essay I propose revisiting our understanding of why many South Asian traditions that do not adhere to a dominant doxa have been omitted or given a permanent status of subordination. From this perspective I here argue the paucity of textual materials produced by the ‘dissenters’ – which now survive only in fragments – is the most striking proof that over the centuries these elements have not been considered as what they really are.

  • 109.
    Stadel, Christian
    Department of Hebrew Language, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.
    Burtea, Bogdan: Die Geheimnisse der Vorväter. Edition, Übersetzung und Kommentierung einer esoterischen mandäischen Handschrift aus der Bodleian Library Oxford. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag 2015. VII, 158 S., Mandäistische Forschungen. Band 5. Hartb. € 49,00. ISBN 978-3-447-06466-82019In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 62-68, p. 18-19Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Strelkova, Guzel
    University of Moskow, Russia.
    Unknowable or Comprehensible: Two Attitudes to Life and Death inModern Hindi Prose2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with the approach of Hindi literature to understanding the nature of God through the realization of the nature of Life and Death. The focus is on two novels by two prominent novelists: Apne–apne ajnabī (To Each His Stranger, 1961) by Sachchidananda Hirananda Vatsyayana “Ajneya” (or “Agyeya”, 1911–1987) and Ai, laṛkī (Hey, Girl!, 1991) by Kṛṣṇā Sobtī(b. 1925).

    The main characters in Ajneya’s prose are often people who oppose conservative society and experience a feeling of exclusion and detachment from the common world. In his early stories the characters are based on events from the Russian revolution, and in his later creations are lonely heroes. Some of Kṛṣṇā Sobtī’s heroines could also be understood as marginal characters, but they try to overcome this marginality and sometimes work actively to reach their goal. As a rule, they finally succeed. The reader is left with a feeling that Kṛṣṇā Sobtī’s heroines’ attitudes to life on the whole are very positive.

    In my paper I proceed from the assumption that the creations of both writers combine a western and an Indian approach to understanding and representing the world. The novels look very similar in composition, in the construction of the main characters, and in the way they highlight key elements. But Ajneya and Kṛṣṇā Sobtī in these novels reached practically opposite results depicting their protagonists in the margin between Life and Death, in search of God, attempting to understand the meaning of their existence. For Yoke, one of Ajneya’s heroines, rebellion against the world and against God is practically the only way to realize Truth. Rebellion is her existential choice. At the same time the writer presents Selma as an alternative heroine.

    The novel by Kṛṣṇā Sobtī, written about 30 years later than Ajneya’s, might be viewed as a woman writer’s attempt to subvert Ajneya’s existentialist pattern. The interplay between the two texts seems to me very important for understanding the attitude of both writers to the challenges that life and death pose to human beings.

  • 111.
    Sultán Sjöqvist, Madeleine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    [recension av] Kreyenbroek, Philip G. (2009). Yezidism in Europe. Different Generations Speakabout their Religion. In collaboration with Z. Kartal, Kh. Omarkhali, and Kh. JindyRashow. Göttinger Orientforschungen Iranica Neue Folge 5. Wiesbaden: Harras-sowitz. Pp. 2462012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. LXI, p. 217-219Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Viberg, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Swedish Impersonal Constructions from a Crosslinguistic Perspective: An Explanatory Corpus-Based Study2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 122-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a corpus-based contrastive study of impersonals in Swedish based on extracts from five Swedish novels and their translations into German, English, French, and Finnish. As a first step in the analysis, impersonals were identified with simple formal criteria. All occurrences of non-referential det ‘it’ in the subject slot and all occurrences of the Swedish generalized pronoun man were extracted for further analysis. As a second step, this material was analysed from a functional point of view. It turned out that det appears as a formal subject (or placeholder) in agentless sentences or sentences with low agentivity, whereas man appears as an impersonal subject with general (‘all of mankind’) or vague reference. From a contrastive perspective, it turns out that Finnish in many respects represents a different type than the other languages included in the study, but even if German, English, and French in many cases have rather direct structural equivalents to the Swedish impersonal constructions, the usage patterns differ in a striking way even between these languages.

  • 113.
    Wardini, Elie
    Stockholm University.
    Some aspects of Aramaic as attested in Lebanese place names2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Place names are one of the few sources of information about the Aramaic used in the region of Lebanon for more than two millennia. Therefore a comparative and diachronic study of Lebanese place names is of the utmost importance. The present study is based on a sample of 1724 place names from the regions of Mount Lebanon and North Lebanon. Four features of Aramaic as attested in place names are discussed briefly: two from phonology and two from morphology. The preliminary conclusion one can arrive at is that the Aramaic used in Lebanon is clearly, and as expected, of the Western type. It has a complex development which in some cases is parallel to, yet often distinct from, the development of its Modern West Aramaic cousins.

  • 114.
    Wendtland, Antje
    Seminar für Iranistik, Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    The Position of the Pamir Languages within East Iranian2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 172-188Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    “Who am I?” : : On the narrativity of identity andviolence in Sheila Rohekar’s novel Tāvīz2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 49-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Communal violence” and “communalism” have long been central tropes of progressivist Hindi prose writing. Tāvīz (The Amulet), a contemporary Hindi novel by Sheila Rohekar, is a recent and outstanding example within this literary tradition. The plot revolves around a mixed Hindu-Muslim love marriage and the complications this socially disrespected alliance leads to, culminating in the consecutive murder of both husband and wife, and their son. The focal point of the novel is the reconstruction of the identity crisis of the son, who – having a Hindu mother and a Muslim father – becomes a militant Hindutva activist and is killed during an agitation for the construction of the Rama-birth temple in Ayodhya. Throughout the novel, the recovered diary of the boy’s great-grandfather plays an important role as a historical narrative linking up the present with the past. The diary is used to provide constant flashbacks to generations earlier, when identities were still more “fuzzy” and open to inter-communal relationships compared with the present. The present is perceived as a catastrophic decline. Nevertheless, even then the writer of the diary expresses his frustration about independent India’s inability to put an end to the evils in society, and particularly to communalism. Sheila Rohekar is probably the sole living Indian-Jewish author in the world of contemporary Hindi writing.

  • 116.
    Wessler, Heinz Werner
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Consolaro, Alessandra
    Università degu Studi di Torino, University of Turin, Italy.
    Dissent in South Asian literary cultures2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Wilhelmsen, Vera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Review of North East Indian Linguistics, Volume 2. B65. Edited by Stephen Morey and Mark Post. New Delhi: Cambridge University Press India, xii +256 pp., 2010.2011In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 202-205Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Zecchini, Laetitia
    Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris.
    Strangeness and historicity against nativism:: blurring thefrontiers of the nation in Arun Kolatkar’s poetry2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 60-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kolatkar’s poetry corresponds to Rancière‘s definition of the literary as realm of “dissensus”, undoing strict delineating frontiers. Kolatkar refuses to draw the line between what is included and excluded – both in the space of the Bombay he portrays (and specifically the Kala Ghoda neighborhood) or in the space of writing itself, since the space of writing is linked to the space of the nation and frontiers of perception correspond to geopolitical frontiers. His poetry does not excise strangeness but makes it visible. It thrives on the “refusal of the world”, on people and objects abandoned at the margins of the nation and of our ordinary perception. It also celebrates those who oppose the certainties of identity and the sacredness of the nation (A. Appadurai). It hence subverts the ideology of Hindu nationalism that has been trying to restore an Indian-Hindu essence by purging history, language, and identity from so-called foreign, minor, or inauthentic elements. Kolatkar constantly exposes the historicity of identity and of language against nativism, the hospitality of poetics against the politics of expurgation.

  • 119.
    Öpengin, Ergin
    Université Paris III, Otto-Friedrich-University, Bamberg.
    Adpositions and Argument Indexing in the Mukri Variety of Central Kurdish: Focus on Ditransitive Constructions2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 187-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of adpositions in Central Kurdish interact with the argument indexing system in a peculiar manner.Previous research (Edmonds 1955; MacKenzie 1961; Samvelian 2007; Haig 2008; Jügel 2009) has described argument indexing in Central Kurdish, but ditransitive constructions are largely omitted. Here I study the adpositions and argument indexing in Central Kurdish in relation to semantic roles, valency and modality. I argue that the adpositions in question have obtained the semantically specified syntactic function of introducing a participant, usually a third-participant, into the speech event. Then I describe and analyse two previously unattested constructions, namely a periphrastic causative construction, where an absolute adposition introduces a causee in an indirect causation construction, and a periphrastic potentiality construction with passive inflection, where the adpositional complement is a “weakened actor” of the given event.

123 101 - 119 of 119
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