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  • 101. Melinder, A.
    et al.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, A.
    Nelson, C.
    Brain activity dring upright and inverted coding of own- and other-age faces2010In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, no 13, p. 588-598Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 102. Melinder, Annika M. D.
    et al.
    Konijnenberg, Carolien
    Hermansen, Tone
    Daum, Moritz M.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The developmental trajectory of pointing perception in the first year of life2015In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 233, no 2, p. 641-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the development of the neural basis of pointing perception in 6-month- and 13-month-old infants. In a spatial-cueing paradigm, infants were presented with a peripheral target followed by a hand pointing toward (congruent condition) or away (incongruent condition) from the previously cued location. EEG responses to the presentation of the hand were measured. Thirteen-month-olds demonstrated larger amplitudes of ERP component P400 to incongruent compared to congruent pointing gestures over posterior temporal areas; 6-month-olds did not show any differential activation. This result suggests that the neural correlates of pointing perception undergo substantial development between 6 and 13 months of age.

  • 103. Melinder, Annika Maria D.
    et al.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Alissa
    Nelson, Charles A.
    Brain Activation during Upright and Inverted Encoding of Own- and Other-Age Faces: ERP Evidence for an Own-Age Bias2009In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Nyström, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The TimeStudio Project: An open source scientific workflow system for the behavioral and brain sciences2016In: Behavior Research Methods, ISSN 1554-351X, E-ISSN 1554-3528, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 542-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a new open source scientific workflow system, the TimeStudio Project, dedicated to the behavioral and brain sciences. The program is written in MATLAB and features a graphical user interface for the dynamic pipelining of computer algorithms developed as TimeStudio plugins. TimeStudio includes both a set of general plugins (for reading data files, modifying data structures, visualizing data structures, etc.) and a set of plugins specifically developed for the analysis of event-related eyetracking data as a proof of concept. It is possible to create custom plugins to integrate new or existing MATLAB code anywhere in a workflow, making TimeStudio a flexible workbench for organizing and performing a wide range of analyses. The system also features an integrated sharing and archiving tool for TimeStudio workflows, which can be used to share workflows both during the data analysis phase and after scientific publication. TimeStudio thus facilitates the reproduction and replication of scientific studies, increases the transparency of analyses, and reduces individual researchers' analysis workload. The project website ( http://timestudioproject.com ) contains the latest releases of TimeStudio, together with documentation and user forums.

  • 105.
    Nyström, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gliga, Teodora
    Birkbeck Univ London, Ctr Brain & Cognit Dev, London, England.
    Nilsson Jobs, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Charman, Tony
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, Dept Psychol, London, England.
    Johnson, Mark H.
    Birkbeck Univ London, Ctr Brain & Cognit Dev, London, England and Univ Cambridge, Dept Psychol, Cambridge, England.
    Bölte, Sven
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Neurodev Disorders Karolinska Inst KIND, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Pediat Neuropsychiat Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Enhanced pupillary light reflex in infancy is associated with autism diagnosis in toddlerhood2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 1678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition affecting around 1% of the population. We previously discovered that infant siblings of children with ASD had stronger pupillary light reflexes compared to low-risk infants, a result which contrasts sharply with the weak pupillary light reflex typically seen in both children and adults with ASD. Here, we show that on average the relative constriction of the pupillary light reflex is larger in 9–10-month-old high risk infant siblings who receive an ASD diagnosis at 36 months, compared both to those who do not and to low-risk controls. We also found that the magnitude of the pupillary light reflex in infancy is associated with symptom severity at follow-up. This study indicates an important role of sensory atypicalities in the etiology of ASD, and suggests that pupillometry, if further developed and refined, could facilitate risk assessment in infants.

  • 106.
    Nyström, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bolte, Sven
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hypersensitive pupillary light reflex in infants at risk for autism2015In: Molecular Autism, ISSN 2040-2392, Vol. 6, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Post mortem brain tissue data and animal modeling work indicate cholinergic disruptions in autism. Moreover, the cholinergic system plays a key role in the early neurodevelopmental processes believed to be derailed early in life in individuals with the disorder. Yet, there is no data from human infants supporting a developmentally important role of this neurotransmitter system. Because the pupillary light reflex depends largely on cholinergic synaptic transmission, we assessed this reflex in a sample of infants at risk for autism as well as infants at low (average) risk. Methods: Ten-month-old infants with an older sibling with autism (n = 29, 16 females), and thus a genetic predisposition to developing the disorder themselves, were presented with white flashes on a computer monitor, and pupillary responses were captured using eye tracking. A control group matched on age and developmental level (n = 15, seven females) was also tested. Results: The siblings of children with autism had a faster and stronger pupillary light reflex compared to control infants. Baseline pupil diameter was equal in the two groups, ruling out tonic autonomic imbalance as an explanation for these differences. Conclusions: This study establishes that infant siblings of children with autism have hypersensitive pupillary light reflexes, a result which supports the view that altered sensory processing in infancy is associated with elevated autism risk. Moreover, the study indicates that individual differences in autism susceptibility are linked to differences in the cholinergic system during an early developmental period.

  • 107.
    Rennels, Jennifer L
    et al.
    Univ Nevada, Las Vegas, USA.
    Kayl, Andrea J
    Univ Nevada, Las Vegas, USA.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Juvrud, Joshua
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Asperholm, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Caregiving experience and its relation to perceptual narrowing of face gender2017In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1437-1446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examined whether infants tested longitudinally at 10, 14, and 16 months of age (N = 58) showed evidence of perceptual narrowing based on face gender (better discrimination of female than male faces) and whether changes in caregiving experience longitudinally predicted changes in infants' discrimination of male faces. To test face discrimination, infants participated in familiarization/novelty preference tasks and visual search tasks including female and male faces. At each age of participation, they were coded as having a female primary caregiver only or distributed caregiving experience (alternating experience with a female and male primary caregiver). Perceptual narrowing was evident for infants with a female primary caregiver, but only within the visual search task, which required location of a familiarized face among 3 novel distractor faces (exemplar-based discrimination); it was not evident within the familiarity/novelty preference task, which required discrimination between a familiarized and novel face (individual-based discrimination). Caregiving experience significantly explained individual changes in infants' ability to locate male faces during the visual search task after 10 months. These data are the first to demonstrate flexibility of the face processing system in relation to gender discrimination when there is a change in caregiver within the infants' natural environment after perceptual narrowing normally manifests.

  • 108.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cortical processing of visual motion in young infants2007In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 1614-1623Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Sciutti, Alessandra
    et al.
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Robot Brain & Cognit Sci Dept, Cognit Interact Lab, Genoa, Italy..
    Lohan, Katrin Solveig
    Heriot Watt Univ, Math & Comp Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Bielefeld, Appl Informat Grp, Bielefeld, Germany..
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Koch, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rohlfing, Katherina J.
    Univ Paderborn, Fac Arts & Humanities, Psycholinguist, Paderborn, Germany..
    Language Meddles with Infants' Processing of Observed Actions2016In: Frontiers in Robotics and AI, ISSN 2296-9144, Vol. 3, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When learning from actions, language can be a crucial source to specify the learning content. Understanding its interactions with action processing is therefore fundamental when attempting to model the development of human learning to replicate it in artificial agents. From early childhood, two different processes participate in shaping infants' understanding of the events occurring around them: Infants' motor system influences their action perception, driving their attention to the action goal; additionally, parental language influences the way children parse what they observe into relevant units. To date, however, it has barely been investigated whether these two cognitive processes- action understanding and language- are separate and independent or whether language might interfere with the former. To address this question, we evaluated whether a verbal narrative concurrent with action observation could avert 14-month-old infants' attention from an agent's action goal, which is otherwise naturally selected when the action is performed by an agent. The infants observed movies of an actor reaching and transporting balls into a box. In three between-subject conditions, the reaching movement was accompanied either with no audio (Base condition), a sine-wave sound (Sound condition), or a speech sample (Speech condition). The results show that the presence of a speech sample underlining the movement phase reduced significantly the number of predictive gaze shifts to the goal compared to the other conditions. Our findings thus indicate that any modeling of the interaction between language and action processing will have to consider a potential top-down effect of the former, as language can be a meddler in the predictive behavior typical of the observation of goal-oriented actions.

  • 110. Szufnarowska, Joanna
    et al.
    Rohlfing, Katharina J.
    Fawcett, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Is ostension any more than attention?2014In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 4, p. 5304-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to natural pedagogy theory, infants are sensitive to particular ostensive cues that communicate to them that they are being addressed and that they can expect to learn referential information. We demonstrate that 6-month-old infants follow others' gaze direction in situations that are highly attention-grabbing. This occurs irrespective of whether these situations include communicative intent and ostensive cues (a model looks directly into the child's eyes prior to shifting gaze to an object) or not (a model shivers while looking down prior to shifting gaze to an object). In contrast, in less attention-grabbing contexts in which the model simply looks down prior to shifting gaze to an object, no effect is found. These findings demonstrate that one of the central pillars of natural pedagogy is false. Sensitivity to gaze following in infancy is not restricted to contexts in which ostensive cues are conveyed.

  • 111.
    Thorup, Emilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bölte, Sven
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Altered gaze following during live interaction in infants at risk for autism: An eye tracking study2016In: Molecular Autism, ISSN 2040-2392, Vol. 7, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ability to follow gaze is an important prerequisite for joint attention, which is often compromised in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The direction of both the head and eyes provides cues to other people's attention direction, but previous studies have not separated these factors and their relation to ASD susceptibility. Development of gaze following typically occurs before ASD diagnosis is possible, and studies of high-risk populations are therefore important. Methods: Eye tracking was used to assess gaze following during interaction in a group of 10-month-old infants at high familial risk for ASD (high-risk group) as well as a group of infants with no family history of ASD (low-risk group). The infants watched an experimenter gaze at objects in the periphery. Performance was compared across two conditions: one in which the experimenter moved both the eyes and head toward the objects (Eyes and Head condition) and one that involved movement of the eyes only (Eyes Only condition). Results: A group by condition interaction effect was found. Specifically, whereas gaze following accuracy was comparable across the two conditions in the low-risk group, infants in the high-risk group were more likely to follow gaze in the Eyes and Head condition than in the Eyes Only condition. Conclusions: In an ecologically valid social situation, responses to basic non-verbal orienting cues were found to be altered in infants at risk for ASD. The results indicate that infants at risk for ASD may rely disproportionally on information from the head when following gaze and point to the importance of separating information from the eyes and the head when studying social perception in ASD.

  • 112.
    Thorup, Emilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bölte, Sven
    Karolinska institutet.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska institutet.
    EASE Team, The
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska institutet.
    Reduced alternating gaze during social interaction in infancy is associated with elevated symptoms of autism in toddlerhood2017In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In typical development, infants often alternate their gaze between their interaction partners and interesting stimuli, increasing the probability of joint attention toward surrounding objects and creating opportunities for communication and learning. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have been found to engage less in behaviors that can initiate joint attention compared to typically developing children, but the role of such atypicalities in the development of ASD during infancy is not fully understood. Here, using eye tracking technology in a live setting, we show that 10-month-olds at high familial risk for ASD engage less in alternating gaze during interaction with an adult compared to low risk infants. These differences could not be explained by low general social preference or slow visual disengagement, as the groups performed similarly in these respects. We also found that less alternating gaze at 10 months was associated with more ASD symptoms and less showing and pointing at 18 months. These relations were similar in both the high risk and the low risk groups, and remained when controlling for general social preference and disengagement latencies. This study shows that atypicalities in alternating gaze in infants at high risk for ASD emerge already during the first 10 months of life - a finding with theoretical as well as potential practical implications.

  • 113.
    Truedsson, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fawcett, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wåhlstedt, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Callous-Unemotional Traits Influence Pupil Dilation during Exposure to Negative Emotional Stimuli2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Truedsson, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fawcett, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wåhlstedt, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Using Eye-Tracking Callous-Unemotional Traits Influence Pupil Dilation During Exposure to Negative Emotional Stimuli2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 115.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The role of looking in social development: perspectives from development and autism2008In: Social Cognition: Development, Neuroscience and Autism / [ed] V. Reid and P. Striano, Oxford: Blackwell , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 116. Wilkinson, N.
    et al.
    Metta, G.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Inter-facial relations: Binocular geometry when eyes meet2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 117. Wilkinson, N.
    et al.
    Metta, G.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Modeling the face-to-face effect: Sensory population dynamics and active vision can contribute to perception of social context2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 118. Wilkinson, N.
    et al.
    Paikan, A.
    Rea, F.
    Metta, G.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Staring us in the face?: An embodied theory of innate face preference2014In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 809-825Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human expertise in face perception grows over development, but even within minutes of birth, infants exhibit an extraordinary sensitivity to face-like stimuli. The dominant theory accounts for innate face detection by proposing that the neonate brain contains an innate face detection device, dubbed Conspec'. Newborn face preference has been promoted as some of the strongest evidence for innate knowledge, and forms a canonical stage for the modern form of the nature-nurture debate in psychology. Interpretation of newborn face preference results has concentrated on monocular stimulus properties, with little mention or focused investigation of potential binocular involvement. However, the question of whether and how newborns integrate the binocular visual streams bears directly on the generation of observable visual preferences. In this theoretical paper, we employ a synthetic approach utilizing robotic and computational models to draw together the threads of binocular integration and face preference in newborns, and demonstrate cases where the former may explain the latter. We suggest that a system-level view considering the binocular embodiment of newborn vision may offer a mutually satisfying resolution to some long-running arguments in the polarizing debate surrounding the existence and causal structure of newborns' innate knowledge' of faces.

  • 119. Wilkinson, Nick
    et al.
    Paikan, Ali
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rea, Francesco
    Metta, Giorgio
    How good?: Better. How simple? Simpler. And testable to boot2014In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 831-832Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Winman, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Inferring causality assessments from predictive responses: Cue interaction without cue competition2006In: Q J Exp Psychol (Colchester), ISSN 1747-0218, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 28-45Article in journal (Refereed)
123 101 - 120 of 120
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