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  • 101.
    Shijaku, Egi
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media.
    Adding interaction to decision making support tools: What can be learned from the Capitalization Table2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    The capitalization table is the system that aids companies in keeping ownership data. The current norm is a simple spreadsheet that does not provide for all the needed functionalities. This thesis investigates how designing a new interactive capitalization table can add knowledge to the broader area of interactive decision making support tools.

    The iterative design process carried out in this thesis is user based, with qualitative interviews, prototyping and user testing as main methods.

    Rather than merely the final design, the crucial point in this thesis is the knowledge that can be obtained from the case in hand, the ways it can be used to motivate design choices and how these can be transferred to similar systems that aid decision making. It can be concluded that enabling safe simulation and adding visual support are two crucial paradigms that add value to a decision support system.

  • 102.
    Shrestha, Suman
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Människa-datorinteraktion.
    Evaluation of Shape's Influence on User's Performance in Shape Replication Task2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents experimental results of shape’s influence on user’s performance in terms of time and accuracy in shape replication task. The shapes are drawn with mouse, pen and touch input devices. For this purpose, two non-meaningful, semi- randomly generated shapes have been used. The first shape has a combination of straight lines and curves whereas the second shape has curves only. Each of these shapes is presented in four versions namely contour, polygon, narrow tunnel and wide tunnel. A method to compare versions of these shapes with the corresponding versions of user drawn shapes is presented. In general, the results showed that the replication of second shape takes less time and the replicated shape is more accurate when compared to the first shape. In addition, performance of the input devices was found to be dependent upon the shapes and their versions they were used to draw.

  • 103.
    Sirkel, Annes
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media.
    Livet i den digitaliserade världen: Generation frihet2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 104.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Informationssystem.
    Ågerfalk, Pär Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Informationssystem.
    Lochan, Ruth
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Informationssystem.
    Mutability Matters: Baselining the Consequences of Design2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Artefact mutability has been proposed as an important component of design theory in information systems. Although initial work on establishing a solid foundation for discussing mutability has been reported, conceptual as well as practical uncertainty still prevails. This paper draws on empirical work in a design science research project in the health sector to explore the notion of mutability and provides a novel conceptualization based on four different types of mutability. The study shows that in order to embrace mutability, IS researchers need to establish a sound philosophy of mutability and be open to incorporate theory and best practices from neighbouring fields, perhaps primarily from software engineering.

  • 105.
    Spil, Erwin
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media.
    The Social Shaping of the Swedish Photography Market: The Influence of Prosumers by Their Use of New Information and Communication Technologies2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
  • 106.
    Stensson, Patrik
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media.
    The Quest for Edge Awareness, Lessons not yet learned: PhD Thesis on practical and situated usefulness of advanced technological systems among inescapable uncertainties and competing interests in a world of dynamic changes2014Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis problematizes the concept of usefulness, in part by taking questions to the extreme. The starting point is the contemporary view of usefulness, a view that remains within a traditional paradigm of technical rationality in which important aspects are disregarded or not perceived because they are not part of the equation. For scrutiny of technological usefulness that is a socially situated phenomenon regarding physical systems, neither interpretivist nor positivist research approaches are sufficient. Both views are required. Critical Realism supports such duality, facilitating the combination of elements from different paradigms, and provides methodological guidelines for doing this. The critical realist approach makes it possible to transcend the boundaries of technical rationality and contribute an alternative definition of usefulness that takes into account also the situated, the contextual, and the unpredictable. The aim is that this definition will contribute to a transformation of society.

    Concepts related to usefulness, such as predictability, controllability, effectiveness, and safety, are revisited, redefined, or complemented. Underlying aspects and mechanisms are explored and tensions identified, resulting in a theoretical contribution with models and frameworks explaining what is argued to be the true nature of usefulness. Potentiality is suggested as a complementary concept to effectiveness, similar to how resilience complements safety. Situated usefulness is then defined using these four concepts. The phenomenon known as situation awareness is scrutinized as well, and complemented by system awareness and the thesis title concept, edge awareness.

    Four cases, two airline crashes and two nuclear power plant events, and three future scenarios, constitute the empirical contribution. The analysis shows that the contributed frameworks and redefinition of usefulness facilitate different or extended explanations of all four events, and that future cases lack considerations of situated usefulness. Research implications center on the human role and our responsibilities in relation to the technology that we use, and on the meaning of concepts defining this role. We are situated human beings. Our role is to be involved and responsible, a role requiring awareness and controllability. The escalating ubiquity and the character of computerized technological systems make therefore the quest for edge awareness more important than ever.

  • 107.
    Stensson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Människa-datorinteraktion. Försvarshögskolan.
    Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Matematisk-datavetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för informationsteknologi, Avdelningen för visuell information och interaktion. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Matematisk-datavetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för informationsteknologi, Bildanalys och människa-datorinteraktion.
    Edge awareness: A dynamic safety perspective on four accidents/incidents2014Inngår i: Advances in Human Factors, Software and Systems Engineering: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, 2014, s. -179Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 108.
    Strand, Cecilia
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Are mobile phones a viable anti-corruption tool?: -a literature review of ten years of mobiles as an anti-corruption tool in East Africa2016Inngår i: Proceedings of  the 5th International Conference on M4D Mobile Communication Technology for Development  M4D 2016, (General Tracks) / [ed] Orlando P. Zacarias and Caroline W. Larsson (eds.), Humanit, Karlstad Universitet, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 109.
    Strand, Cecilia
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Digital news flow on Twitter in connection with the Kenyan election 2017- supplement or replacement?2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 110.
    Strand, Cecilia
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Twitter4HRs promotion: a study of a sexual minority rights network’s twitter communication during the 2016 Ugandan general election.2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Uganda has since the introduction of the anti-homosexuality bill of 2009, experienced an increasingly polarized media discourse on sexual minority rights. Rights that are indisputable for other Ugandan citizens most notably rights to privacy, health and indeed life, are questioned in relation to sexual minorities in mainstream media. The following study analyses a Ugandan NGO’s utilization of Twitter to supply the domestic public with counter-narratives and attempts to assert sexual minority rights in connection with the general election which will take place February 18 2016. The tentative analysis indicates that while Twitter is actively used as a space for highlighting organizational activity and events, information sharing, emotional support for group members, it is also used as a tool for political commentary on both news media coverage of sexual minority issues, and perhaps more importantly a platform for discussing the political candidates’ positioning of themselves in relation to rights issues. The official Twitter account is thus an important tool for political commentary and dissemination of counter narratives on sexual minority rights. The study concludes that Twitter, although restricting through its format, provides minority groups important access to public space otherwise denied on traditional media platforms.

  • 111.
    Strand, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Svensson, Jakob
    ICTs and Opportunities of Empowerment in a Context of State-Sanctioned Homophobia: The case of the LGBTQI community in Kampala2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    After decades of growing acceptance of LGBTQI human rights in the West, Uganda began an African backlash in 2009, when it introduced an Anti-Homosexuality Bill. Even if the Bill was eventually defeated, it signaled the beginning of a new era of state-sponsored homophobia and wide-spread societal discrimination. State-sponsored persecution has however not silenced the Ugandan LGBTQI community. In the following reflections we explore the Ugandan LGBTQI community’s remarkable resilience and quest for change and in particular their use of ICTs for empowerment. Based on a pilot study conducted in November 2016, and ongoing online observations, tentative results are that the community organizes their communication practices around a division between intra-group organization (so-called deep information), and broadcasting and human-rights advocacy (surface information), due to perceived risks as well as opportunities of different communication modes and platforms.

  • 112.
    Strand, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Malmö Universitet.
    ICTs and Opportunities of Empowerment in a Context of State-Sanctioned Homophobia.: The case of the LGBTQI community in Kampala2018Inngår i: EGOV-CeDEM-ePart 2018 Proceedings / [ed] virkar, S & Parycek, P & Edelmann, N & Glassey, O & Janssen, M & Scholl H-J & Tambouris E, Krems: Donau-Universität, 2018, s. 229-236Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 113.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Activist Networking Capital: A Study of Positioning and Power within an Activist Community2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 114.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Algorithms, Big Data  & the Role of Network Media Logic2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 115.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Amplification and Virtual Back-Patting: The Rationalities of Social Media Uses in the Nina Larsson Web-Campaign2014Inngår i: Political Campaigning in the Information Age / [ed] Ashu M. G. Solo, IGI Global, 2014, s. 51-65Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter intends to explore the rationalities of politicians' social media uses in web-campaigning in a party-based democracy. I will do this from an in-depth case study of a Swedish Liberal Party politician, Nina Larsson, who with the help of a PR- agency utilized several social media platforms in her campaign to become re-elected to the Swedish Parliament in 2010. By analysing how and for what purposes Larsson used social media in her web-campaign, this chapter concludes that even though discourses of instrumental rationality, to strategically target specific voter groups, and of communicative rationality, to establish loci for electorate-politician deliberations, were common to make her practices relevant, Nina primarily used social media to amplify certain offline news media texts by recirculating them in her social media networks as well as to commend and support other liberal party members. Hence from this case the chapter concludes that web-campaigning on social media are also used for expressive purposes, to negotiate and maintaing an attractive political image within the party hierarchy. 

  • 116.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Deliberation, Dialogue or just Updating? : Activist social media practices in southern Stockholm2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses social media platforms and their promise of deliberation. Based on a (n)ethnograpic inspired case study of middle class activists in southern Stockholm, the question this paper seeks to discuss is whether the activists in my study used social media platforms for deliberation, dialogue or for something else. The aim is to understand and discuss contemporary practices of activist political participation online. In this paper it will be argued that rather than deliberation, or dialogue for that matter, activists were engaging in practices of online updating. Such practices will be understood in light of late modern theories of reflexivity, identity negotiation and maintenance.

    Social media platforms are defined as different from other sites because they allow users to articulate their social networks while making them visible to other users (for one definition see Ellison and boyd, 2007, p. 2). The social media platforms used in southern Stockholm (Facebook, Twitter and Ning) provided activists with a new set of opportunities and different modes of processing information, networking and interacting with each other as well as the outside world. Social media platforms are no doubt altering the way we live and socialize, shaping the way things get done, providing access to information and giving us new tools that allow us to arrange and take part in all sorts of activities and encounters (Dahlgren, 2009; Leaning, 2009; Rheingold, 2002). In this paper I will argue that one practice emerging as dominant among contemporary activists is updating, often misleadingly labelled as sharing or interacting which in turn sometimes is confused with dialogue (which in turn is confused for deliberation).

    The paper starts with a brief look at the role of deliberation in Western and connected societies. This section will be followed by a description of the setting in southern Stockholm and the methods used to study the activists there. The analysis begins with an evaluation of the empirical findings in southern Stockholm against theories of deliberation. This will be followed by an argument making the case for updating being the appropriate concept to describe the activists' practices on the social media platforms they used. The paper continues with an analysis about how to understand such practices. Finally, I will end with a discussion on the implications of updating on political participation. Even though they cannot be considered dialogue or deliberation, practices of updating have certain consequences for participation and representative systems that could be considered positive and encouraging for democracy. 

  • 117.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Deliberation or Updating?: The Case of Southern Stockholm Activists Online2012Inngår i: Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on eGovernment: ESADE Ramon Llull University Barcelona, Spain 14-15 June 2012. Volume Two / [ed] Gascó, Mila, Reading: ACI Academic Conferences International, 2012, s. 691-697Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a (n)ethnographic inspired study of middle class activists in southern Stockholm, the aim is to understand contemporary political action and to discuss changing practices of participation in digital and late modernity. More specifically this paper addresses the Internet and its promise of deliberation. However instead of echoing techno-deterministic and optimist accounts of the Internet and online social networking affording a digital public sphere where deliberation can flourish, this paper argues that it is more accurate to understand the practices among the activists in southern Stockholm as updating. Updating is described here as a two-way practice,to be updated what is happening in your social networks as well as updating your social networks what is happening.These practices of updating are understood in light of late modern theories of reflexivity, identity negotiation and maintenance, practices that arguably are heightened in digital and networked societies. Hence to avoid determinism without resorting to the idea of technology as neutral, the paper is based in atechno-social dialectical understanding of our time as digital late modernity.The paper will end with a brief discussion of the implications of updating on political participation in digital late modernity. Even though not deliberation, practices of updating has consequences for participation and political action that perhaps could be considered positive and encouraging for democratic tradition in general.

  • 118.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Deliberation or What?: A Study of Activist Participation on Social Networking Sites2012Inngår i: International Journal of Electronic Governance, ISSN 1742-7509, E-ISSN 1742-7517, Vol. 5, nr 2, s. 103-115Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses social networking sites (SNSs hereafter) and their promise of deliberation. Based on a (n)ethnograpic inspired case study of middle class activists in southern Stockholm, the question this paper seeks to discuss is whether the activists in my study used SNSs for deliberative purposes or for something else. The aim is to understand and discuss contemporary practices of activist political participation online. In this paper it will be argued that rather than deliberation activists were engaging in practices of online updating. Such practices will be understood in light of late modern theories of reflexivity, identity negotiation and maintenance.

  • 119.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Discussing Politics in an Online Gay Community2013Konferansepaper (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 120.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Gay the Correct Way: Mundane queer flaming practices when discussing politics online2016Inngår i: LGBTQs, Media and Culture in Europe: Situated Case Studies / [ed] Alexander Dhoest, Lukasz Szulc & Bart Eeckhout, London: Routledge, 2016Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 121.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Gay the Right Way: Mundane queer flaming practices when discussing politics online2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 122.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    ICT 4 Learning2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 123.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Internet-Based Activism, Privacy and Surveillance2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 124.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    M4D – Challenges of local languages2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 125.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Mobile Communication for Development 2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 126.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Mobile Communication for Development in Emerging Economies.2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 127.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Mobile phones and the transformation of the Informal Economy2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 128.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Mobile Phones and the Transformation of the Informal Economy: Stories from market women in Kampala2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 129.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Negotiating the Political Self : A Study of a Politician Campaigning on Social Networking Sites 2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 130.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Negotiating the Political Self on Social Media Platforms: An In-Depth Study of Image-Management in an Election-Campaign in a Multi-Party Democracy2012Inngår i: eJournal of eDemocracy & Open Government, ISSN 2075-9517, E-ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 4, nr 2, s. 183-197Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The elections 2010 were the first in Sweden where social media platforms were used to a large extent by politicians and parties in their campaigns. In this paper we follow the liberal parliamentarian Nina Larsson, who in tandem with traditional election campaigning used social media platforms with the guidance of a local communication agency, Hello Clarice. The paper is theoretically grounded in an understanding of our time as late modern, of social media use as expressive and web campaigning as to large extent revolving around image-management. The research question that will be attended to in this paper is how Nina Larsson used social media platforms in her campaign negotiate the image of herself. The methods used for empirical data-gathering are inspired by (n)ethnography, with both participant observation online and offline, interviews as well as content analyses of Nina's social media postings. Results indicate that she used social media platforms to control her political image, to amplify selected text - texts that often originated in offline/broadcast media – and to negotiate a position within the Liberal Party rather than to deliberate with potential voters

  • 131.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    New Media for Development2013Inngår i: , 2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 132.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Participation as a Pastime: Political Discussion in a Queer Community Online2015Inngår i: Javnost - The Public, ISSN 1318-3222, Vol. 22, nr 3, s. 283-297Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a research project studying political discussions in the Swedish queer online community Qruiser. The research is netnographic through online participant observations in ­political forum discussions on Qruiser as well as participant interviews during November 2012. Acknowledging sites of popular culture as pivotal for political participation, together with the importance of affinity communities for engaging subjectively in larger political issues, this explorative study discusses what type of participation took place on Qruiser. Using as its point of departure deliberative and radical pluralist approaches to participation, the paper concludes that the participation in Qruiser can neither be described as deliberation nor agonism. Rather, a picture emerges of rude and antagonistic participation as a pastime, a way to have fun. 

  • 133.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Participation as a Pin. 2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: This article is based on a research project studying political discussions in the Swedish LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bi- Transsexual) community Qruiser. Political discussions on Qruiser is defined as cultural participation and it is argued that not only may non institutionalized online arenas become spaces for political participation, we should broaden our focus to arenas of popular culture if aiming at understanding political participation in digital and late modern societies. The aim of this particular paper is to understand what motivated participation and how did participants understand their participating in Qruiser political clubs. This aim is operationalised by attending to a cultural method focusing on processes of meaning making. However, during the studied period very little participation took place in these clubs. The interview material suggests that club membership rather had the function of wearing a pin, in the digital age translated to displaying an icon on your profile page. It is further found that this declaration of content was important in a community primarily set up for dating. The paper then concludes that the participation in the clubs did not center on discussions, but rather around finding a potential date. The frame that thus motivated much of participation - here understood as displays of club memberships - was to find a date. Hence, political participation and dating are not mutually exclusive and may intersect in a network society.

  • 134.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Participation as a Pin.: Political Discussions in an Online Swedish LGBT Community2014Inngår i: Proceedings of the 14th European Conference on eGovernment ECEG 2014 / [ed] A. Ionas, Academic Conferences Publishing, 2014, s. 235-241Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a research project studying political discussions in the Swedish LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bi- Transsexual) community Qruiser. Political discussions on Qruiser is defined as cultural participation and it is argued that not only may non institutionalized online arenas become spaces for political participation, we should broaden our focus to arenas of popular culture if aiming at understanding political participation in digital and late modern societies. The aim of this particular paper is to understand what motivated participation and how did participants understand their participating in Qruiser political clubs. This aim is operationalised by attending to a cultural method focusing on processes of meaning making. However, during the studied period very little participation took place in these clubs. The interview material suggests that club membership rather had the function of wearing a pin, in the digital age translated to displaying an icon on your profile page. It is further found that this declaration of content was important in a community primarily set up for dating. The paper then concludes that the participation in the clubs did not center on discussions, but rather around finding a potential date. The frame that thus motivated much of participation - here understood as displays of club memberships - was to find a date. Hence, political participation and dating are not mutually exclusive and may intersect in a network society.

  • 135.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Polarizing Political Participation Frames in a Nordic Gay Community2014Inngår i: eJournal of eDemocracy & Open Government, ISSN 2075-9517, E-ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 166-181Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: This article is based on a research project studying political discussions in the Nordic LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bi-, Transsexual) community Qruiser. These discussions were very antagonistic and rude. The aim is therefore to understand what motivated participation in these heated discussions. The focus is on threads in the political forum on Qruiser. The research is nethnographic through online interviews, participant observations in, and content analyses of, political discussions threads during the month of November 2012. By using framing theory as an analytical tool, the article seeks to answer which frames attracted and mobilized participation and how this was done. In the article I find that polarizing frames of the left vs the right, the xenophobic vs the political correct, together with a truth and a game frame was used to motivated participation in the Qruiser forum threads. 

     

  • 136.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Political Participation on Social Media Platforms in Sweden today: Connective Individualism, Expressive Issue-Engagement and Disciplined Updating2015Inngår i: International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, ISSN 1740-8296, E-ISSN 2040-0918, Vol. 10, nr 3, s. 347-354Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 137.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Power and Identity among Citizens in Networked Societies: Towards a Critical Study of Cultural E-Governance2012Inngår i: E-Governance and Civic Engagement: Factors and Determinants of E-Democracy / [ed] Aroon Manoharan, Hershey: IGI Global , 2012, s. 109-127Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A classic question within studies of governance, and a key element for understanding the concept of citizenship, concerns what appears to be a paradox of being free and governed at the same time. In this chapter, I will return to this question, but departing from contemporary Western (Scandinavian) society, a society to which I attach labels such as digital, late modern and networked.This is a theoretical chapter addressing political participation, citizenship practices and power.Howdo people enter into citizenship through political participation online and what governs these processes? The contribution to the academic discussion on governance and citizenship is to highlight the expressive as an increasingly important rationale for political participation in networked and digital late modernity. I arrive at this conclusion departing from the intersections between technology, society and culture. In these intersections, expressive processes of identification are key. Therefore citizenship and political participation also need to be approached from an axis of individualism, creating even more intersections when combined with technology, society and culture. 

  • 138.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Power, Identity and Feelings in Digital Late Modernity: The Rationality of Reflexive Emption Displays Online2013Inngår i: Internet & Emotions / [ed] T. Benski & E. Fischer, Routledge, 2013, s. 17-32Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter highlights practices of emotion display online. The aim is to understand feelings in emerging forms of power relations on social network sites. The starting point is an understanding of society and technology as mutually interdependent in digital late modernity, and that relations of power have taken new forms when overtly hierarchical structures in mass societies morph into what has been described as more horizontal relations in network societies. The chapter concludes that a kind of network logic is disciplining users to identity negotiation, hence the increasing display of emotions and (semi)publicly management of feelings. Since rationalized practices for feeling management previously have been confined to the middle- and upper classes, this might explain why these users are more successful in displaying emotions for resource-enhancing purposes. The kind of emotional reflexivity emerging online will also be discussed in light of what Elias described as the civilization process.

  • 139.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Promoting social change through Infirmation Technology 2015Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PREFACE

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become an integral part of our daily life and correspondingly information technology finds a variety of applications in the planning, implementation and monitoring of several social development programs and projects. It is becoming among the most prevalent tools for international development and social change, including opening up new arenas for civic participation and protest in countries as diverse as Egypt (see chapter five), Spain (see chapter six), China (see chapter seven) and Russia (see chapter eight). It is to this development that the present volume speaks. In particular, we ask whether and what contextual circumstances are important for ICTs in promoting democracy and social change.

    The background to this subject matter can be found in the phenomenal increase of ICTs worldwide, not only in the West. Nowadays, when citizens around the Globe want to voice their opinions, define their political identities and change their life situations, they increasingly do so by using online platforms, mobile telephones and other information technologies. To start, the rise and spread of the Internet has been remarkable. The number of users has increased from 40 million in 1995 to 2,7 billion in 2013 according to ITU (International Telecommunication Union). This represents approximately 40 per cent of the world population. However, the Internet is surpassed another ICT here, the mobile telephone. Mobile cellular subscriptions reached more than 95 per cent of the world population (as per ITU data from 2014). Important to notice here, the rate of increase in penetration of the mobile phones has been higher in so-called developing countries rather than in so-called developed counties (as highlighted in chapter two). While the Internet is yet to achieve the same reach as mobile telephony, it is worth to mention the very fast increase in the use of so-called smart handheld devises in countries like India during the last couple of years is making it increasingly difficult to separate the two (Internet and Mobile Phone Devices). Indeed, mobile phone adoption probably will pave the way for digital connectivity, both through smart phones as well as through broadband connection via the mobile phone. For example, even though Internet connectivity is rather low among the citizens in East Africa, the ones who do get connected to the World Wide Web mostly use mobile and wireless broadband. This suggests that developing regions probably will leapfrog the fixed (cable/ fiber) broadband phase countries in the West have been through. This increase and social integration of ICTs around the Globe serves as a point of departure for chapters in this volume.

    It has been argued that the rise of ICTs is among the most important developments of the century, changing the ways societies function as well as its relations of power. The spread and diversity of ICTs together with their equally diverse applications in different domains of human life are posing a range of questions at every moment. Researchers around the Globe are working to take-up these questions and challenges. It is especially the raised expectations of democracy and social change that has accompanied this increase of ICTs worldwide that we want to address in this volume. The question on the potentials of ICTs to promote democracy and social change has sparked a debate between what is often labelled as techno-optimists and techno-pessimists. This debate is partly addressed in chapter three of the volume. But since this is perhaps the major dividing line of studies in ICTs, democracy and social change – it deserves a further mention here, as a background to the subject matter as well as to discern how the present volume relates to this debate.

    As always, whenever a new media technology is introduced, hopes and expectations (as well as outrage) are raised and invested into practices of this new media technology. Surely the emerging communication landscapes exhibit exciting possibilities for political discussion, protest mobilization and organization, offering citizens new channels for voicing concerns, speaking and acting together (participation in other words). The popular uprisings in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region have provided us with examples of how information circulation using online platforms can induce processes of democratization and political developments (see chapter five in this volume). Hence, the more techno-optimist stand of researchers and practitioners has argued that the long-raging debate over the potential of the digital technology, so- called  “new” or “social” media and mobile telephony to invigorate citizens’ participation in a democracy and promote social change, is not a matter of speculation anymore. In particular, they argue that these ICTs lower the threshold for political participation and social change all over the world.

    Still there are many questions around the claim of ICTs as tools for democratic participation and social change. Most of the uprisings in the MENA region failed (in terms of that democracy has not yet been achieved, apart from Tunisia). Furthermore, it has been argued that labelling these uprisings as Twitter or Facebook revolutions is both uncritical and ignorant of the real dynamics behind theses uprisings. Indeed, even though we have access today to numerous examples of the use of the digital technology and mobile phones for democratic participation and social change, very few democratic movements and social change projects have succeed through ICTs alone.

    Alongside with high-profile protests and so-called “social media revolutions”, research in the field has also revolved around less conspicuously, and perhaps more mundane, E-Government/ E-Services projects, offering access to asserted citizen centric services and improved processing of government-to-citizen transactions. Addressing the subject matter of ICTs democracy and social change these more mundane government uses of ICTs are also of interest to us in this book. Here, optimists argue that ICTs have emerged as powerful tools for reaching to the ever-increasing information demands of our contemporary societies. Indeed, governments across the Globe – from countries like India (see chapter nine) to countries like Australia (see chapter ten) ­–are increasingly focusing on such projects and many success stories have been accounted for in the academic literature of remarkable developments of E-Government services in the last five years. On the other hand, more pessimistic voices have been raised in regards to E-Government and E-Services in relation to issues of surveillance and data privacy in light of Edward Snowden’s revelation of United States NSA (National Security Agency) massive data collection of private citizens. In this volume, the issue of surveillance (video surveillance in particular) is addressed in chapter four. Here we also need to mention that consumerism and corporate ownership of information technologies and so-called social media platforms have also raised concerns of whether users communication practices are capitalized on by non-accountable commercial enterprises (to some extent addressed in chapter three).

    Hence, on the one hand we are witnessing that increased  access to ICTs has resulted in an array of new uses, innovative designs, practices and strategies often accompanied by success stories of democratic development and social change both in small and large scale. On the other hand, we are still groping in the dark when it comes to understanding the place of the ICTs in the shifting landscapes of democracy, government practices and social welfare around the Globe. We therefore invited scholarly research to shed light on these issues. In particular, we wanted to include two issues in relation to this long-raging debate between pessimists and optimist: 1) a focus on contextual matters and 2) research and researchers with a background in the global south. This is also how we situate this volume in the debate between techno-optimists and techno-pessimists. We contribute to the debate on how democracy and social change may be promoted through ICTs by 1) providing case studies in which contextual factors are highlighted and 2), by including studies and authors from four different continents (Africa, Asia, Australia and Europe). We are thus able to provide a broader perspective on the subject matter.

    Hence, the chapters in this volume provide examples of more optimist as well as more pessimist discourses on the roles of ICTs for promoting democracy and social change. We as editors have not wanted to put our foot down in this debate; we leave it to the reader to evaluate the benefits and constraints of ICTs in the contexts within which these chapters are written. As such this volume will serve very well as material for discussion in class as well as in study-circles. Indeed, the picture is often more complicated than fervent techno-optimists or techno-pessimists claim. The very different contexts within which ICTs are used and appropriated today make it difficult to generalize on an overall positive or negative “effect” of a communication platform and a technological practice. Therefore, we have asked the authors to rather focus on the contexts within which their cases are set. We strongly believe it is out of the contexts and cultures that ICTs are used and appropriated that they are best evaluated.

    We have also put explicit emphasis to include non-Western contexts and voices. As such, this volume taps into research in the field of ICT4D (Information and Communication Technology for Development). Development agencies and governments have started to take interest in the use of ICTs to further democracy also in so-called developing regions. Indeed, the field of ICT4D has also been informed by the increase of ICTs around the Globe. Examples that stand out are successful developments of crowd-mapping platforms such as Ushahidi (meaning testimony in Swahili) and uses of banking services through the mobile phone (M-Pesa, Pesa being Swahili for money and M signifying the mobile phone), arguably bringing banking services in rural areas and to the poor (see chapter two). These platforms have caught the attention of an audience far beyond the global south, where they were initiated, highlighting how innovative design and applications occur in less wealthy parts of the world and spread from there. In this volume, chapter eleven presents an interesting case of Infomediaries in the Philippines.

    While far from exhaustive and complete, the volume offers a smorgasbord of theories as well as examples of ICT uses around the Globe. This volume is divided the two sections. Section one is focused around theoretical chapters while section two is focused around empirical chapters. The first section covers theoretical approaches to social movements, mobile phones and development, techno-optimism vs. techno-pessimism as well as issues of privacy and surveillance. In the second section, we tour the Globe and visit well-known instances of ICTs uses in the so-called Arab Spring in Egypt, the 15M movement in Spain, Weibo in China, and the recent case of opposition politician Navalny in Russia. The section also offers more practitioner related studies of ICT uses in India, Australia and the Philippines. We are particularly happy to be able to present this range of cases and to include non-Western voices in these debates that arguably have an impact far beyond the globalized North.

    This volume thus targets everyone who is interested in ICTs and their role in promoting democracy and social change, researcher, practitioners, policy makers, civil society organizations, students as well a general public. Given that we have not taken a firm stance in the debate between techno-optimists and techno-pessimists and given the rich contextual data these chapters provide, they are very well suited for further discussions about the roles of ICTs promoting democracy and social change (or not), discussions for example in class or in study-circles. Together with the first section, that provides a theoretical background, the volume is especially apt for courses in communication for social change, public administration, ICT4D, ICTs and participation as well as a complement to the more Western-oriented literature on the subject matter. We also believe that practitioners, policy-makers and ICT professionals, in the public as well private sector, in governmental as well as non-governmental organizations have a great interest in the focus on contextual circumstances these studies provide. We are not saying that practices and solutions discussed in these chapters can be copied uncritically. But given the rich contextual data, practitioners, policy-makers and ICT professionals will be in a position to better translate how practices and solutions can be implemented in the particular settings they work in.

     

    The first chapter “The Pamphlet Meets API: An Overview of Social Movements in the Age of Digital Media” by Emily Stacey presents an overview of the various traditional theories involved in the social movements and then how these theories are mapped to the present day digital tools. A comprehensive approach has been taken to explain the contemporary movements with integration of the digital tools being utilized by citizens on the ground. The chapter focuses upon Social Movement Theory and Networked Mobilization, particularly with respect to the political protest from the perspective of tactics, mobilization and participation. Stacey explores the scholarly work in social media in relation to claims that political and social dynamics have shifted with the introduction of new modes of communication. She uses the specific instances from the Arab Spring movements in Egypt and Tunisia to exemplify her theoretical account. The chapter asserts the effectiveness of social networking technologies in grassroots political movements and discusses the advocacy for normative and institutional change in society. This infusion has led to a detachment of movement networks from hierarchical forms of power toward increasingly bottom-up, people-oriented and coordinated protest organizations.

    The second chapter of the volume “Approaches to Development in M4D Studies: An overview of major approaches” focuses upon the development approaches in studies of mobile communication. The chapter is of the utmost importance as mobile communication technology has the highest penetration in the societies across the Globe. Jakob Svensson and Caroline Wamala-Larsson have reviewed the most prominent journals and conference series to discuss how development has been approached by different researchers across the Globe. The main areas in which mobile communication have discussed as vital tools of the development the authors argue are livelihood, health and participation. These are also the important pillars for any democracy and therefore have direct and significant impact also on democratic development. The authors nicely depict the integration of cultural and social aspects, while studying the approaches to development, considering that individuals, communities and societies have different understandings of development. The authors end the chapter by suggesting a dialectical approach to the study of mobile communication in development.

    While, moving ahead of the basic mobile phone device, Marco Briziarelli tries to explore the role of social media in the promotion of social change in the third chapter “Utopia, Labor and Informational Capitalism: Lights and Shadows of Social Media”. The chapter provides a strong theoretical base towards the capability of social media to “mediate” multiple messages, to concurrently generate social transformation and social reproduction. The author takes into account both the aspects of participation and commercial exploitation of social media in order to discuss the roles of social media for social change. Furthermore, the author uses a case study of Facebook to illustrate his framework and concludes that Facebook indeed is capable of producing social change but such a change is limited by the social (and market) relations in which it works.

     

    Considering the large-scale penetration of ICTs, the privacy and surveillance aspects become important for a volume discussing the promotion of social change and democracy through ICTs. Surveillance becomes very important and common for security measures in our age of fast moving technologies. This however may lead to breaches of privacy that in turns limits claims of ICTs in the service of democracy. Chapter four “Video Surveillance: Privacy Issues and Legal Compliance” by Qasim Mahmood Rajpoot and Christian Damsgaard Jensen discusses privacy issues in video surveillance and provides a model to help identify privacy requirements in a video surveillance system. Advancements within ICTs with capacities to collect and analyze information about individuals increase the importance to protect the right users’ privacy. Presently, most of the countries in the world recognize the rights of privacy in their legislation, still a number of counties have very little in their legislations to ensure privacy. The authors critically examine present day legal infrastructure available in a number of different countries to support their claim to protect citizens’ right to privacy. The authors nicely depict the need for the deployment of video surveillance systems that strikes a balance between security and privacy.

     

    The second section of the volume presents more practical perspective to the theme of the book. This contains the interesting cases from different parts of the world. These cases present a range of different examples of ICTs and its application for democracy and social change. The case studies also give ample of insight into a variety of societies around the Globe. Every society has its own style of working and responds to the ICTs in different ways. Correspondingly ICTs work at a different pace and levels in different societies and come-up with different results concerning democracy and social change. The case studies presented in the volume provide us very specific examples to consider this.

     

    In chapter five “ICT, Media and the Egyptian Revolution: Building Networks of Democracy” Ahmed El Gody explores the role of ICT based media in the Egyptian revolution. The chapter is highly relevant to the volume not the least since the Egyptian Revolution was among the most media-exposed event in the Arab world. Citizens used Facebook, Twitter, and mobile telephones to make their voices heard, whereas the Government tried to stop media coverage by all possible means. The author argues that a multiplicity of ICT based social networks led to what he labels “a network journalism” and in this way individuals contributed to the so-called revolution. Furthermore the author argues the ICT-based social networks matured after the revolution and transformed into something the author labels political, social change and religious networks. The convergence and fusion of ICTs not only performed as a mediator in information transactions within the Egyptian society, but also served as a catalyst to the democracy according to the author.

    In chapter six “Internetworked Social Movements and the Promise of Politics: A case study of the 15M movement” Julen Figueras presents a specific example of ICT led civic engagement.  In a matter of hour, Twitter triggered anonymous citizens to gather in demand of real democracy. This is a significant example of blurring the classical divides between the public and the private, as well as the one between the individual and the collective, all with the help of ICT based platforms according to the author. Figueras makes use of the notion “Internet-worked Social Movements” to refer to new hybrid movements that are created and developed both online and offline. The author uses this notion to address the tension between liberal and republican citizenship, and between limited or expanded ways of citizen participation.

    Chapter seven “Microblogs, Jasmine Revolution, and Civil Unrests:  Reassessing the Emergence of Public Sphere and Civil Society in People’s Republic of China” by Kenneth Yang and Yowei Kang is a nice presentation on the use of microblogs (Weibo) in the so-called Jasmine revolution in China. The authors provide a detailed description of the dynamic interactions between institutional constraints and technological empowerment. The authors use the concept of public sphere to examine the behavior of Chinese micro bloggers to contest the omnipresent Chinese state. According to the authors, microblogs helped citizens to enjoy freedom of expression and to get by Government censorship. This further led to the use of the microblogs for democratic mobilizing and empowerment. On the other hand, microblogs also served as a buffer to allow government officials to channel the opinions of angry Internet users, to avoid widespread protests around the country and hence they could be conceived of as a controlling device. 

     

    The case study from Russia “Grassroots Political Campaign in Russia: Alexey Navalny and Transmedia Strategies for Democratic Development” in chapter eight discusses the role of ICTs in the grass root political campaign of Alexey Navalny in the 2013 mayoral elections. Renira Rampazzo Gambarato andSergei Medvedev provide a good insight into the Russian electoral system and the role of transmedia applications in the 2013 Moscow mayor elections. The authors mainly focus upon the campaign of Alexey Navalny, who harnessed the potential of ICTs in these elections. These applications led to a participatory culture and democratic influence according to the authors even though Navalny, as we know, was later put into jail by the regime. Authors have used the concept of transmedia storytelling in their analysis to refer to the integrated media experiences that occur in a variety of media platforms to attract audience engagement.

     

    Shefali Virkar in chapter nine “Designing and Implementing e-Government Projects for Democracy and Social Change in India: Actors, Behaviours, Influences, and Fields of Play“ connects the ICT to the social dynamics of the biggest democracy of the world, India. The chapter not only discusses the design and implementation issues of the e-governance projects, but also connects to various actors and their behavior.  The author strategically analyses ICT-based applications and their potential to “revolutionize” the patterns of communication between the Government and the citizens, and also to render governance effective by making systems more integrated, transparent, and efficient. The author also highlights the limitations of budgetary constraints to the success of e-Governance projects.  The conceptual framework contributed by the chapter is relevant to the policy discussions of e-government software platform design and maintenance from a global context.

     

    The case study from Australia in chapter ten “Developer Challenges as a Platform for Citizen Engagement with Open Government Data: The Australian Case ” talks about the relevance of Open Data in the development paradigm. The approach is significant as a large number of Open Data initiatives have been started around the Globe. Raul Alberto Caceres and Kelly Royds argue that open government data is based on the idea that national governments have a moral and political obligation to release this to the public. Therefore a number of governments have come up with specific legislations to support this. According to the authors, the proliferation of ICTs leads new opportunities and ideas for citizens to manipulate, use and disseminate data in innovative ways. The authors also take a critical perspective to investigate into development potential of open data, more specifically the ways to create effective platforms for civic engagement and transform public data into socially and politically relevant applications.

     

    Jaime Albarillo Manalo, Katherine Balmeo, Jayson Berto and Fredierick Saludez present an interesting case of engaging young people in informing agriculture in the Philippines through the use of ICTs in chapter eleven “The Infomediary Campaign in the Philippines as a strategy to address information poverty. In particular, the authors argue that timely information can play a significant role in improving rice farming. There are many examples, where so-called Infomediaries have played a vital role in improving information access to farmers by creating alternate means of information access. In the present case, school students are used as mediators of information for their parents as well as other farmers. The schools themselves provide the necessary guidance and infrastructure for this information mediation. This information mediation has not only helped in getting timely information to the farmers, but at the same time also has improved the interests of youngsters in farming activities. This infomediary practice may, according to the authors, help in reducing information poverty and hence also lead to reduction of economic poverty and thus create social change.

     

    We sincerely hope that this edited book shall provide insight to different aspects and perspectives of ICT, democracy and social change to researchers, students, practitioners, policy makers and other interested in this field. We hope that the chapters will serve as material for discussing, criticizing and thus developing our understandings of the relationships between ICTs, democracy and social change.

     

     

    Vikas Kumar                                                                                                 Jakob Svensson

     

  • 140.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Relations of Power Within a Field of Contemporary Activism: Activist Capitals in Network Societies2013Inngår i: CeDEM2013 International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2013: Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government / [ed] Peter Parycek & Noella Edelmann, Krems: Donau Universität Krems , 2013, s. 213--228Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to understand relations of power within a middle-class activist community in southern Stockholm using online communication platforms in tandem with more traditional offline activist participation to organize and mobilize participation in order to save their local bathhouse. The method for studying this group is (n)ethnographic, conducting participant observations and interviews online as well as offline. Adherence to, and socialization into, community values are of utmost importance for understanding relations of power within a community. At the same time community values are structured by the acts of identifications of the individual participants and vice versa. Understanding this dialectic between community values and participants identifications as enacted in processes of positioning, this paper seeks to discuss relations of power within the activist community. By reference to Bourdieu, the activists are approached as forming a social field in which core/periphery positions are negotiated through interactions between field specific values, the activists habitus and capitals. In this paper, the activists relative positions to each other and the community are understood by outlining the contours of participation, mobilization, legitimacy and networking capital. Through these capitals core/periphery positions within the community were negotiated. 

  • 141.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Social Media and Implications for Privacy and Future Career Choices2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 142.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Social media and networking power within a Swedish middle-class activist demand2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper departs from a (n)ethnographic study of a middle-class activist demand in southern Stockholm engaging on social media platforms in tandem with more traditional offline activist participation to organise and mobilise participation around saving their bathhouse. The aim of the paper is to analyse the role of social media for relations of networking power within the bathhouse demand. To conduct such an analysis I will make use of a typology (developed in Svensson 2014) based on Bourdieu’s conceptual framework of habitus and capitals. The typology revolves around participating, mobilising, connecting, and engaging capitals and how these intersects, overlaps and can be negotiated for broader recognition, something that is argued is of pivotal importance for social media practices as well as for negotiating core positions within the demand.  We know from previous studies that we are not equal when it comes to using social media platforms for capital enhancing purposes. This paper will reveal that previously acquired skills and knowledge from other social movements, together with reputation from other activist campaigns, and being recognised within the demand through location based activities, by having a sense of using social media platforms to engage and mobilise others, by acting as intermediaries between activist demands, as well as by being active, connected and responsive – some were better equipped to negotiate core positions than others. By closely following five activists, mapping their positions and by in depth accounting for their habitus and the accumulation and composition of the above-mentioned capitals, as well as how these were exchanged into recognition and positions, I will be able to give a thick(ish) description of the role(s) of social media in political engagement in this particular group of middle-class activists.

  • 143.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Social Media and Political Participation: Lessons from a 'Failed' Neighborhood Fight2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 144.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Social Media and Protest Participation in a Middle-Class Activist Demand: Connective Individualism, Expressive Issue-Engagement and Disciplined Updating2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper departs from a study of a middle-class activist demand engaging on social media in tandem with more traditional offline activist participation to organise and mobilise participation around saving a bathhouse. The aim of the paper is to analyse intersections of social media uses with traditional protest activities and to discuss the type of participation that this brought forth.

    The paper will discuss the importance of other users/ participants for how individuals reflexively explored themselves as activists. To negotiate yourself as a politically interested individual was intertwined with connecting yourself to larger political groups and collectives. Through the concept of connective individualism the paper highlights such reflexive aspects and also underlines the mutuality between connectivity, individualism and protest participation. The above is intertwined with a kind of expressive issue-engagement that was observed among the activists. Engagement around saving the bathhouse was expressive since this issue often was reflexively chosen. With the idea of expressive issue-engagement I want to underline that issues are not only motivated by activists’ political convictions, but also important for expressing and sustaining activists identities. This is also intertwined with practices of disciplined updating. Activists needed both to be updated on what was going in their social media networks and to update their social media networks on what was going on in their lives and hence also self-biographies. Activists having connected themselves to the bathhouse demand on social media platforms, started to get information/updates flowing towards them. Some of this information also pushed some of them to act in offline protests. Connecting yourself to an activist demand seemed, if not to control, so to at least push people to stay “true” to their displayed identity and act accordingly. 

  • 145.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Social Media and the Disciplining of Visibility: Activist Participation and Relations of Power in Network Societies2012Inngår i: European Journal of ePractice, ISSN 1988-625X, E-ISSN 1988-625X, nr 16, s. 16-28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the relations of power in connection with the use of social media among middle-class activists in southern Stockholm. The method for studying these activists is both ethno-  and nethnographic, through participant observations and interviews both online and offline. The theoretical framework is based on late modern theories of reflexive identity negotiation and Foucauldian theories of visibility and power.

    The paper locates relations of power in the constant monitoring, supervision and negotiation of both ones own and others’ identity on social media platforms. This increasing importance of being updated in network societies will be discussed as a form of network logic. 

    Hence, social media usage has not only been about enabling participation of activists in southern Stockholm, but also about disciplining them to be kept updated, which in turn pushes them towards participating in offline activities too.

  • 146.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Social media, power and positionings in a Swedish middle-class activist demand2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to understand relations of power within a middle-class activist setting in southern Stockholm using online communication platforms in tandem with more traditional offline activist participation to organise and mobilise participation. The method for studying this setting is (n)ethnographic, conducting participant observations and interviews online as well as offline.  Attending to the dialectic between shared values and participants identifications as activist enacted in processes of positioning, this paper seeks to discuss relations of power within the activist group. The activists are approached as a field in which core/periphery positions are negotiated through interactions between field specific values, habitus, participation -, mobilisation -, legitimacy - and networking capitals. 

  • 147.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Sustainability and Citizen Participation in the Digital Age : The Expressive Turn of Citizenship. 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 148.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för informatik och media, Medier och kommunikation.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    Universität Zürich.
    Network Media Logic2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we revisit our concept of network media logic and further develop it in relation with political logics. The perspective of network media logic is useful to explain how social media platforms change political communication without resorting to technological determinism or normalization. By relating network media logic to both mass media logics as well as political logics we are able outline how these are distinctly different, while still overlapping in terms of how political communication is produced, distributed and used. In this chapter we pay particular attention to how ideals, commercial imperatives, and technological affordances differ in news mass media and on social media platforms in terms of media production, media distribution and media usage.

  • 149.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    Universität Zürich.
    The Emergence of a New Media Logic: A Theoretical Approach2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we argue that online social media platforms operate with a decidedly different logic than traditional mass media. This has led to different ways of producing content, distributing information and the way recipients use media. The changes in the media and communication landscape are embedded in a larger societal transformation context of fragmentation, individualization and reflexivity, a late modern context that sustains the modus operandi of social media platforms. By discussing the differences between traditional mass media and social media platforms, we carve out the central elements of a new network media logic - that is, the inherent rules of the game on social media platforms - and this logic's consequences for political communication and political actors. 

  • 150.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Larsson, Anders
    Oslo Universitet.
    Researching Politicians Online. Identifying Research Directions2013Inngår i: CeDEM2013 Krems 22-24 May, 2013: Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government / [ed] Peter Parycek & Noella Edelmann, Krems, 2013, s. 387-394Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than a decade scholars have shown interest in politicians uses of the Internet. In this reflection paper we have gauged literature on this topic and have identified two research opportunities for interested scholars. First, research should move beyond dichotomization such as conceiving of the Internet as either revolutionary or normalizing. Secondly, scholars within the field should contribute to the arguably limited knowledge base on online practices of politicians at regional and local levels. With these two recommendations we argue that the research field would move forward and generate new and interesting results. 

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