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  • 151.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda 20062008In: 29. Kazi Sonuclari Toplantisi, 28 mayis-1 haziran 2007, Ankara, 2008, p. 263-272Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda 20072009In: Kazi Sonuclari Toplantisi, ISSN 10177655, Vol. 30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda 20072007In: 30. Kazi Sonuclari Toplantisi, 26-30 mayis, 2008, Ankara, 2007, p. 107-118Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda 20082010In: Kazi Sonuclari Toplantisi, ISSN 10177655, Vol. 31, p. 355-371Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda 20092009In: Aktüel Arkeoloji, ISSN 1307-5756, Vol. 11, p. 24-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 156.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda 20092010In: Aktüel Arkeoloji, ISSN 1307-5756, Vol. 15, p. 20-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 157.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda:  The Sanctuary of the Weather God of Heaven2010In: Mylasa Labraunda: Archaeology and Rural Architecture in Southern Aegean Region / [ed] Amélie Edgü, Istanbul: Milli Reasürans T.A.S. , 2010, p. 10-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Scavi svedesi di San Giovenale2017In: Forma Urbis, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 8-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The city walls of Morgantina2015In: Morgantina Duemilaequindici: La ricerca archeologica a sessant'anni dall'avvio degli scavi / [ed] Laura Maniscalco, Palermo: Regione Siciliana-Assessorato dei beni culturali e dell'identita siciliana , 2015, p. 123-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Hekatomnid Pottery from the Recent Excavations and the Date of the Forts at Labraunda2013In: Euploia. La Lycie e la Carie antiques.: Dynamiques des territoires, échanges et identités. Actes du colloque de Bordeaux, 5, 6 et 7 novembre 2009 / [ed] P. Brun, L. Cavalier, K. Konuk et F. Prost, Bordeaux: Ausonius , 2013, p. 213-224Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Walls of Syracuse. The Castle of Euryalos and the Fortification of the Epipolai2016In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 9, p. 286-288Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Karlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Blid, Jesper
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Henry, Olivier
    Institute Francaise d' Études Anatoliennes .
    Hedlund, Ragnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labraunda 2011: A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations with an appendix by R. Hedlund2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, p. 49-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main goals of the 2011 campaign were the excavation of the Kepez tower, the West Church and the necropoleis. The tower of Kepez was excavated and black-gloss pottery indicates a date in the 3rd century BC. The 2011 excavations in the West Church uncovered three Late Roman and Byzantine building phases. Among the finds from Late Antiquity was a well-preserved glass lamp with a Greek inscription and a marble figurine, possibly representing an apostle or a saint. The excavations in the necropolis uncovered eleven tombs in the Area 5B, located along the Sacred Way, completing the excavation initiated in 2010. New tombs were discovered in the territory east and south of the sanctuary. Finally, the three stone sarcophagi inside the Built Tomb were moved in order to facilitate complete excavation and the cleaning of all the interior space of this monumental tomb. The conservation of architectural marble was continued and included the conservation of an Ionic column capital and an anta capital from Andron B. Thomas Thieme and Pontus Hellstrom prepared the publication of the andrones.

  • 163.
    Karlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Carlsson, SusanneUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.Blid Kullberg, Jesper
    Labrys: Studies presented to Pontus Hellström2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Katrantsiotis, Christos
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden; NEO, Messenia, Greece; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norstrom, Elin
    NEO, Messenia, Greece; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Smittenberg, Rienk H.
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Hattestrand, Martina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden; NEO, Messenia, Greece; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Avramidis, Pavlos
    Univ Patras, Dept Geol, Rion, Greece.
    Wastegard, Stefan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Climate changes in the Eastern Mediterranean over the last 5000 years and their links to the high-latitude atmospheric patterns and Asian monsoons2019In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 175, p. 36-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to improve the knowledge of the mid to late Holocene climate changes and the underlying drivers in the eastern Mediterranean. We focus on the Peloponnese peninsula, SW Greece, characterized by a W-E rainfall/temperature gradient and a strong climate-sensitivity to shifts in the large-scale atmospheric patterns. A radiocarbon-dated sediment core, taken from the ancient Lake Lerna, a former lake in NE Peloponnese, was analyzed for distribution and hydrogen isotope (δD) composition of n-alkanes and bulk organic geochemistry (δ13C, TOC). The predominantly macrophyte (submerged/floating)-derived δD23 profile exhibits the largest long-term fluctuation in the record and co-varies with δD of long-chain n-alkanes providing evidence for precipitation and temperature changes over the last 5000 years. The Lerna δD23 signal is sometimes in agreement with other n-alkane δD records from SW Peloponnese indicating wetter conditions in the peninsula at ca 5000–4600, ca 4500–4100, ca 3000–2600 (more unstable in SW) and after ca 700 cal BP with drier periods at ca 4100–3900 and ca 1000–700 cal BP. Conversely, a NE-SW climate see-saw is revealed at ca 4600–4500, ca 3200, ca 2600–1800, and ca 1200–1000 cal BP when the δD23 Lerna exhibits more positive trends (drier in NE) with a reversal at ca 3900–3300, ca 3200–3000 and ca 1800–1300 cal BP. These opposing and sometimes similar signals between NE and SW Peloponnese can be explained by the relative dominance of high-latitude atmospheric patterns over the peninsula. A similar signal would be expected when the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) exerts the main control with NAO (+) creating conditions of reduced moisture. The dipole pattern is likely driven by shifts in North Sea–Caspian Atmospheric pattern (NCP), which account for the present-day regional climate variability with NCP (+) leading to wetter and colder conditions in NE Peloponnese. The Asian monsoonal system likely has an additional impact on the δD variabilities through influencing the summer temperatures. There is a consistency between the Peloponnesian δD signals and monsoonal records after ca 4000 cal BP confirming the actualistic models. Strong monsoonal periods coincide with cooler summers (lower δD values) in Lerna, due to the northerly winds, the Etesians. On the contrary, SW Peloponnese is dominated by warmer conditions during the same periods as the area is located on the lee side of the mountain and highly influenced by the adiabatic warming associated with the subsidence over the Eastern Mediterranean.

  • 165.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Appendix 1: Two possible water channels in The New Swedish Cyprus Expedition 2010 Excavations at Dromolaxia Vizatzia/Hala Sultan Tekke2010In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 4, p. 85-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Cisternarsle! Torr humor och grekiska cisterner2013In: Institutionens historier: En vänbok till Gullög Nordquist, Uppsala universitet, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Ett cisternsystem på Kalaureia och några tankar kring en antik helgedoms vattenförsörjning2011In: Hellenika, Vol. 136, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 168.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Greek Cisterns: Water and risk in ancient Greece, 600–50 BC2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores cisterns in the Greek world 600–50 BC based on a representative body of archaeological material of 410 cisterns from 49 sites presented in a catalogue, and the literary and epigraphic evidence. The aim is to investigate when and how cisterns were constructed, how they were used and functioned in ancient Greek society and why they were used only at certain times.

    The first part of the study creates a framework for the investigation of cisterns, examining the installations, the chronology and ancient terminology. The variation in shape and construction and various features used to improve functionality are treated. Chronologically, the study discusses methodological questions related to the dating of cisterns as well as when cisterns were constructed. It is shown that cisterns existed in the Archaic period but were rare, while during the 4th c. BC they become more popular, and remained so until the last century BC.

    Based on the framework established in the first part, the study investigates how cisterns were used, from construction to abandonment, and how the use was both formed by, and formed, interaction between cisterns and humans. Cisterns are then studied on a micro-, meso- and macro-level, as these three perspectives reveal different aspects of how cisterns were used and functioned in the Greek world. Finally, the study explores the way in which cisterns were viewed in comparison to other water sources and how this affected their relation to the humans using them. It is argued that cisterns were connected to passivity and control, and that this enabled them to be used as a risk-management strategy.

  • 169.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Review of: K. Wellbrock, Die innerstädtische Wasserbewirtschaftung im hellenistisch-römischen Pergamon 2018In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 11, p. 205-206Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Sulla undviker att bli huggen i ryggen2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 21-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 171.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Utgrävningar i en antik stoa: 2012 års säsong på Poros2012In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 23-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 172.
    Klingborg, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Vatten, cisterner och risk i det antika Grekland2015In: Hellenika, Vol. 154, p. 13-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 173.
    Klynne, Allan
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Prima Porta Garden Archaeological Project. Terra sigillata from the Villa of Livia, Rome. Consumption and discard in the early Principate.2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines a corpus of Italian sigillata from the Villa of Livia outside Rome, and presents the excavations during which it was found. Most of the material stems from archaeologically secure contexts, a refuse tip and dump dating to the late Augustan and Neronian periods respectively. These prove to be valuable sources of information concerning the influx of terra sigillata from different places of manufacture to Rome during the early Principate. Unlike other sites around the Roman Empire, where the central Italian stamps and/or fabrics amount to less than five percent of the finds, about 60 percent of the stamps in the Augustan contexts were found to be central Italian. In the light of this, it is argued that the central Italian production of terra sigillata has been considerably underestimated. Special focus is directed on this production as a manifestation of the non-agrarian economy in the hinterland of Rome. It is suggested that these workshops operated by means of locatio conductio contracts and were mainly supplying the capital. An analysis of forms and fabrics reveals that products from the Arezzo workshops were more or less barred from the market of Rome during the same period. In context of this evidence, it is suggested that these local manufacturers were an important factor in a competitive environment of terra sigillata production in Italy. It is argued that Arezzo's establishment of regional and provincial branch workshops should be seen in relation to this, and not solely as a means of seeking export markets.

    Ocular inspection has identified six central Italian fabrics, a division that can only partially be confirmed chemically, but techniques of MGR-analysis make it possible to locate the production centres for several potters of unknown provenance. Several methodological issues are raised here and it is argued that attempts to match fabrics between sites risk a high margin of error, due to their dependence upon a blend of subjective observations, inference and an unwarranted faith in 'scientism'.

    I argue that the excavated material can also be interpreted in behavioural terms, linked to patterns of consumption and refuse-management. A distinction between cenae and/or convivia during the late Augustan period, and servant-related activities during the reign of Nero, is postulated. During the former period it seems that terra sigillata was much appreciated even at the very heart of the Roman Empire, whereas by the time of Nero it had taken on a devalued, functional and more utilitarian aspect.

    I argue that the vessel forms Consp. 23.1, 26.3, 28.1-2, 33.4 and 33.5 should be tied with a higher degree of certainty to the late Augustan period. The evidence also implies that the traditional dating of Consp. 23.2 is too late, and I propose that its introduction should be pushed back to the late Augustan period. It is further suggested that the idea of terra sigillata services with one plate and two cups can be explained by the higher discard rate of the latter in relation to the former, and that the mending of vessels was done irrespective of replacement costs.

  • 174.
    Knitter, Daniel
    et al.
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Phys Geog, Ludewig Meyn Str 14, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Guenther, Gerrit
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Phys Geog, Ludewig Meyn Str 14, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Hamer, Wolfgang Berengar
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Phys Geog, Ludewig Meyn Str 14, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Kessler, Torben
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Class Archaeol, Johanna Mestorf Str 5, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Seguin, Joana
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Inst Ecosyst Res, Phys Geog, Olshausenstr 75, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Unkel, Ingmar
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Inst Ecosyst Res, Phys Geog, Olshausenstr 75, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Duttmann, Rainer
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Phys Geog, Ludewig Meyn Str 14, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Nakoinz, Oliver
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Pre & Protohist Archaeol, Johanna Mestorf Str 3, D-24118 Kiel, Germany.
    Land use patterns and climate change?a modeled scenario of the Late Bronze Age in Southern Greece2019In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 14, no 12, article id 125003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we present a modeling approach that investigates how much cultivable land was required to supply a society and whether societies were in need when environmental conditions deteriorated. The approach is implemented for the North-Eastern Peloponnese and is based upon the location of Late Helladic IIIB (1300?1200 BCE) archaeological sites, an assessment of their sizes, and a proposed diet of the people. Based on these information, the areal requirement of each site is calculated and mapped. The results show that large sites do not have sufficient space in their surroundings in order to supply themselves with the required food resources and thus they depended on supplies from the hinterland. Dry climatic conditions aggravate the situation. This indicates that potential societal crisis are less a factor of changing environmental conditions or a shortage of arable land but primarily caused by socio-economic factors.

  • 175.
    Kordatzaki, G.
    et al.
    British Sch Athens, Fitch Lab, Souedias 52, Athens 10676, Greece.
    Kiriatzi, E.
    British Sch Athens, Fitch Lab, Souedias 52, Athens 10676, Greece.
    Mueller, N. S.
    British Sch Athens, Fitch Lab, Souedias 52, Athens 10676, Greece.
    Voyatzis, M.
    Univ Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Dr,POB 210030, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA.
    Romano, D.
    Univ Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Dr,POB 210030, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA.
    Petrakis, S.
    Forsen, J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Box 200, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordquist, Gullög Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Rodriguez-Alvarez, E.
    Univ Arizona, 1009 E South Campus Dr,POB 210030, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA.
    Linn, S.
    Univ Penn, 3405 Woodland Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    A diachronic investigation of 'local' pottery production and supply at the sanctuary of Zeus, Mount Lykaion, Arcadia, Peloponnese2016In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 7, p. 526-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper reports results of an integrated study of a selection of pottery recovered from the altar of Zeus, Mount Lykaion, Arcadia, in the Peloponnese, Greece, dating from the Neolithic to the Early Iron Age. A multianalytical approach based on petrographic and chemical analysis, supported by refiring tests and geological sampling, has been employed to tackle issues of technology and provenance. Results shed light on patterns of raw material sources exploitation and pottery production and supply at the site over time. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 176.
    Krönström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Rom föll inte på en dag: En undersökning om jordskattens eventuella påverkan på Västroms fall2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay plans to research the fall of the Roman Empire and especially look at the land-tax angle, my hypothesis is that the land-tax had a bigger effect of the Roman Empire fall than previously thought. This essay also investigates why the Western Roman Empire declined. To accomplish this a lot of research will be made about the decline and analysis of the content.  The main source of information about the land-tax will come from The Theodosian Code which is a book from the 5th-century about taxes in the Roman Empire. To reach this goal I will interpret the sources to clarify what actually happened. I use this information to either to confirm or discard other scientists’ theories. The result is that land-tax had a bigger influence on the Roman Empires fall the previously believed.  

  • 177. Labuhn, Inga
    et al.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Izdebski, Adam
    Roberts, Neil
    Woodbridge, Jessie
    Climatic Changes and Their Impacts in the Mediterranean during the First Millennium AD2018In: Late Antique Archaeology, ISSN 1570-6893, E-ISSN 2213-4522, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many events and developments in human history have been suspected to be, at least partly, influenced by climate and environmental changes. In order to investigate climate impacts on societies, reliable palaeoclimatic data of adequate dating precision, resolution, spatial representativeness, and so on, are needed. This paper presents a survey and analysis of published palaeoclimatic data of the Mediterranean for the 1st millennium AD, and identifies regional patterns of hydro-climate variability, useful for comparison with archaeological/historical studies. It also provides general guidelines to palaeoclimatic data for archaeologists/historians interested in climatic change. We conclude with a discussion of how the emerging patterns of regional climate histories may have had an impact on Mediterranean societies in Late Antiquity.

  • 178.
    Laeben-Rosén, Viktoria
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Age of rust.: Court and power in the Severan age (188-238 AD)2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Severan age has become known as a time when Syrian empresses brought eastern influences to Rome and transformed the stable principate into an absolutist state ready for the dominate. Every tie to the old principate was broken in a conscious attempt to change the fundamental structure of society. After a thorough examination of the structures of the Severan court, those opinions have here been refuted. The Severan age did see increased importance of both the empresses and the emperor’s other dependants. That, however, was a result of the necessities of rule.

    At Rome the imperial court developed apart from the city-state, never quite replacing its functions. Empresses and favourites did not necessarily have offices with formal, executive power. Their power came through their influence over the emperor and their control over access to his person. Favourites who held offices still depended upon the emperor and were inextricably parts of his court. Severan emperors generally had a bad relationship with the senate because of their low birth. Nobles were excluded from the administration and the court because the emperors had to avoid dangerous competition and because the senators hesitated to come to his aid. The solution meant increased control over imperial access; favourites to shield them from conflicts and empresses who acted as mediators. It also meant an increased number of offices under the direct control of the court, allowing rule without danger. At the same time, Severan emperors were obsessed with continuity and the traditional structures because of their troubles to achieve legitimacy. Legitimacy could only be had through the old, traditional institutions of the city-state. The result was a time focused on the importance of senate, plebs and soldiers and the preservation of traditional structures. The Severan court was still a court of the principate.

  • 179.
    Leppänen Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Pedagogisk och metodologisk verktygslåda för intersektonalitetsstudier inom antikämnet2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the project was to construct an academic educational platform for students and teachers with the intention to focus on problems concerning intersectionality within the cultural context of the Classical civilization. The aim of the project was to create a database concentrating on problems related to gender, class, ethnicity, sexuality and age as markers of difference within the ancient world. This approach to highlight intersectionality within the ancient world will demonstrate the relevance of these problems for both the ancient and the modern society and also with an interdisciplinary approach. The presence of intersectionality within the Classical world such as exhibited in black - and red figure Classical vases is illustrated in the web-based Intersectionality Tool Box (ITB).

  • 180.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Natan Valmins utgrävningar av Malthi iMessenien, Grekland, 1927-19342002Report (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    På återbesök i Malthi2016In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 11-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 182.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Definition of Late Helladic I Revisited2010In:  :  , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an endnote of Dickinson’s (1974) paper on the definition of Late Helladic I, the author

    referred to the ongoing work at Ayios Stephanos as potentially important for our

    understanding of the origin of Lustrous Mycenaean Decorated (LDM) pottery. The final

    publication of the potterysequence at the settlement justifies a review of how this “transition

    to Mycenaean” is identified. The possibility to split LH I into at least two parts –an early

    “becoming” with limited means of recognition outside Laconia, and a later “being”

    identifiable over considerable areas of the Greek Mainland –leave us with the conclusion that

    the “becoming” and hence beginning of LH I cannot be monitored outside ist initial core area

    with the same set of diagnostic tools (as the later ‘being’ stage). In published deposits from

    the NE Peloponnese LDM pottery appears in analytically meaningful quantities only in the

    later phase. The pottery from the Lerna shaft grave fills is used to show that LH I Late on the

    NE Peloponnese is contemporary with the volcanic destruction level (VDL) at Akrotiri and

    the mature LM IA. Because of the large size of the Lerna shaft graves assemblages, their

    well-defined ceramic range, and intersecting position between southern and central Greece,

    they offers additional tools to sequence and evaluate LH I/LC I in other deposits.

  • 183.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Early Helladic Period2011In: Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological Survey / [ed] Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells, Stockholm: Eddy.se ab , 2011, p. 53-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Middle Helladic period2011In: Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological Survey / [ed] Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells, Stockholm: Eddy.se ab , 2011, p. 77-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 185.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Heroes, ancestors or just any old bones? Contextualizing the consecration of human remains from the Mycenaean shaft graves at Lerna in the Argolid2016In: METAPHYSIS. Ritual, myth and symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age (Aegaeum 39): Proceedings of the 15th International Aegean Coference, Vienna, Institute for Oriental and Europena Archaeology, Aegean and Anatolia Department, Austrial Academy of Sciences and Institute of Classical Archaeology, University of Vienna, 22-25 April 2014 / [ed] Eva Alram-Stern, Fritz Blakolmer, Sigrid Deger-Jalkotzy, Robert Laffineur and Jörg Weilhartner, Leuven - Liege: Peeters Publishers, 2016, p. 235-243Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 186.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Gauss, Walter
    Pre-Mycenaean pottery shapes of the central Aegean: a new resource in development2017In: Social chage in Aegean prehistory / [ed] Corien Wiersma and Sofia Voutsaki, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 187.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Gauss, Walter
    Kiriatzi, Evangelia
    Some Reflections on Ceramic Technology Transfer at Bronze Age Kastri on Kythera, Kolonna on Aegina, and Lerna in the Argolid2015In: The Transmission of Technical Knowledge in the Production of Ancient Mediterranean Pottery: Proceedings of the International Conferenceat the Austrian Archaeological Institute at Athens 23rd – 25th November 2012 / [ed] W. Gauss, G. Klebinder-Gauss & C. von Rüden, 2015, p. 225-237Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of novel ideas and skills in pottery manufacture at the settlements of Kastri, Kolonna, and Lernaare used to illustrate how different potting traditions in the Bronze Age Aegean intersected. The insertion of foreignceramic traits into previously established production environments are discussed as examples of acceptance (Kastri),rejection (Kolonna), and mediation (Lerna) in an attempt to nuance the complex process of ›Minoanization‹ in theAegean Bronze Age.

  • 188.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Gauss, Walter
    Kiriatzi, Evangelia
    Lis, Bartłomiej
    Morrison, Jerolyn
    Aeginetan Late Bronze and Early Iron Age cooking pottery2017In: From Cooking Vessels to Cultural Practices in the Late Bronze Age Aegean / [ed] Julie Hruby and Debra Trusty, Oxford and Philadelphia: Oxbow Books, 2017, p. 46-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Manning, Sturt
    Malcolm and Carolyn Wiener Laboratory for Aegean and Near Eastern Dendrochronology, Cornell Tree Ring Laboratory.
    The Chronology of the Lerna Shaft Graves2011In: Our Cups are full: Pottery and Society in the Aegean Bronze Age: Papers Presented to Jeremy B. Rutter on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday / [ed] W. Gauss, M. Lindblom, R.A.K. Smith, J.C. Wright, Oxford: Archaeoppress , 2011, p. 140-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chronology of the two Lerna shaft grave fills is explored. It is concluded that the assemblages derive from either a single, one-time event approximately contemporary with the Late Minoan IA Mature volcanic destruction level at Akrotiri, or two events so close in time that they can only tentatively be separated by ceramic or radiocarbon study. In the latter case, shaft grave 1 is slightly older than shaft grave 2. Because of their large size, well-defined ceramic range, and intersecting position between southern and Central Greece, the two assemblages offer additional tools to sequence and evaluate Late Helladic/Late Cycladic I deposits elsewhere

  • 190.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Mommsen, Hans
    Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn.
    Whitbread, Ian
    School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester.
    Bichrome Pottery in the MBA-LBA Central AegeanManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Nordquist, Gullög Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Mommsen, Hans
    Univ Bonn, Helmholtz Inst Strahlen & Kernphys, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from Asine and their glyptic context2018In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 11, p. 81-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from the Third Terrace at Asine are presented. The objects, used to impress relief decoration on pithoi and hearths, are unique in that no other examples are known from the Early Bronze Age Aegean. Their origin is discussed based on chemical characterization and their depositional contexts are reviewed from an archaeological perspective. Although there are no known impressions from these rollers on pithoi and hearths at Asine, it is shown that their owners surrounded themselves with different objects featuring similar glyptic impressions. Two such impressions find identical parallels at Tiryns and the combined evidence strongly suggest that Asine was the home for one or several potters who produced Early Helladic impressed hearths and pithoi.*

  • 192.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wells, Berit
    Conclusions2011In: Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological survey / [ed] Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells, Stockholm: Eddy.se ab , 2011, p. 177-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wells, Berit
    Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological Survey2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the results of a small but intensive surface survey conducted on the Mastos Hill in the Berbati Valley in 1999. While remains from the Early and Late Helladic period were known from previous excavations on its southern and eastern slopes, this is the first analysis of the entire hill. It includes a digital documentation of the local topography as well as an account of the archaeological remains retrieved in the field. The study fills a gap in different data sets and results gained through old excavations and the extensive 1988–1990 Berbati-Limnes survey. The introductory chapter summarizes previous work in the valley, discusses its ancient routes of communication and outlines the method employed in the archaeological survey. This is followed by an account of the topographical survey and the geographical information system used. In the six following chapters the archaeological remains are presented and analyzed in a diachronic fashion. It is concluded that the hill was predominantly settled in prehistory with the exception of a small stronghold in medieval times on its top terrace. A detailed petrographic study of ceramics found at different locales in the valley is also included.

  • 194.
    Lindgren Liljenstolpe, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Den förföriska lyran2010In: Romhorisont, ISSN 0349-5590, no 52, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 195.
    Lindgren Liljenstolpe, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Förföriska lyror: Musik och genus i antikens Rom2010In: Tidig musik, ISSN 1400-5123, no 4, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 196.
    Lindgren Liljenstolpe, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Mysticus och Chloe spelar upp. En glimt av musiken och skådespelen vid Pompejis teatrar.2013In: Institutionens historier: En vänbok till Gullög Nordquist / [ed] Erika Weiberg, Susanne Carlsson, Gunnel Ekroth, Uppsala: DanagårdLITHO AB , 2013, 1, p. 15-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 197.
    Lindgren Liljenstolpe, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Platon, musiken och demokratin2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 29-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 198.
    Lindgren Liljenstolpe, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Roms kvinnliga musiker i rampljuset2018In: Gender, History, Futures: Report from the XI Nordic Women’s and Gender History Conference,Stockholm, Sweden, August 19–1 2015, 85-90. / [ed] Daniel Nyström och Johanna Overud, Umeå, 2018, Vol. 2, p. 85-90Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 199.
    Lindgren Liljenstolpe, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Rätt instrument i rätt sammanhang: Kvinnor i den grekiska symposiekulturen2011In: Hellenika, ISSN 0348-0100, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 9-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 200.
    Lindgren Liljenstolpe, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Sempronia's Song: Attitudes to Women's Music-making in Ancient Rome2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores attitudes towards women’s music-making in ancient Rome (c. 120 BC–130 AD), as expressed in love poetry, satire, letters, historiography, biography, rhetoric and philosophy. The texts are studied from an intersectional perspective considering gender, social status, age and ethnicity to explain various attitudes. Gender-theoretical concepts of differentiation, implementation of hierarchy and master suppression techniques explain the need for controlling the Roman gender order and women’s music-making. The study demonstrates that the traditional picture of women musicians as either prostitutes or decent, musically-talented matrons needs to be nuanced, and that the attitudes were more complex than previously assumed.

    Some Roman authors show a positive attitude to women’s musical talents, especially love poets, but also writers of other genres, as long as it was performed on “appropriate” instruments in accordance with the social status of the woman in question. The musical skills of a woman should not override her modesty and virtue. A young woman was encouraged to display musical talents. This enhanced her beauty and attractiveness in the eyes of a husband-to-be. Older music-making women were, on the other hand, ridiculed as unrespectable. The labelling of women musicians in Rome as “non-Roman” could be another way of differentiating non-respectable from respectable women, but such identifying could also serve to evoke “exotic” attraction, or for an artist to require a certain status or a sense of belonging.

    The results obtained from the ancient Roman sources are further augmented by comparison with more recent periods in musical history, displaying a long tradition of rather similar attitudes as a result of patriarchal structures: in seventeenth century Italy Pope Innocent XI in an edict tried to prohibit women from playing music, since this would be injurious to proper modesty. In the twenty-first century world-leading women musicians such as Madonna and Mariah Carey are publicly scorned for their older age in relation to their music-making.

    In ancient Rome both women and music needed to be controlled: Music was unpredictable and could evoke unexpected feelings and temptations, whereas women held the key to pure marital breed and the Roman family line.

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