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  • 151.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Elmstahl, Solve
    Lund Univ, Malmo Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Div Geriatr Med, Malmo, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Stanford Cardiovasc Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Cardiometabolic Proteins Associated with Metabolic Syndrome2019In: Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, ISSN 1540-4196, E-ISSN 1557-8518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although metabolic syndrome (MetS) was described in the late 80s, the molecular mechanisms underlying clustering of risk factors in certain individuals are not fully understood. The present study used targeted proteomics to establish cardiometabolic proteins related to all MetS components, thereby providing new hypotheses regarding pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MetS.

    Methods: In the EpiHealth study, 249 cardiometabolic proteins were measured by proximity extension assay (PEA) and related to the five MetS components [consensus-modified National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria] in 2,444 participants aged 45-75 years (50% women).

    Results: Thirty-one proteins were associated with systolic blood pressure following adjustment for age and sex (P < 0.000040, taking multiple testing into account). The corresponding number of proteins significantly associated with fasting glucose, waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and serum triglycerides were 58, 132, 127, and 148. Twenty-two proteins were significantly related to all 5 MetS components, and of those, 20 were with MetS as a binary outcome (n = 600, 24% of the sample) following adjustment for age, sex, fat mass, and lifestyle factors (alcohol intake, smoking, education, and exercise habits).

    Conclusion: Using targeted proteomics, we identified 20 proteins reflecting a range of pathways, such as immunomodulation at different levels; regulation of adipocyte differentiation; lipid, carbohydrate, and amino acid metabolism; or insulin-like growth factor signaling, to be strongly associated with MetS independently of fat mass and lifestyle factors. Whether some of these proteins are causally involved in the pathogenesis of clustering of multiple risk factors in the same individual remains to be investigated.

  • 152.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ng, Esther
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, USA.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    van Bavel, Bert
    MTM Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Mahajan, Anubha
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Morris, Andrew P
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Department of Biostatistics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Lind, P. Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Genetic and methylation variation in the CYP2B6 gene is related to circulating p,p'-dde levels in a population-based sample2017In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 98, p. 212-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Since the metabolism of the organochlorine pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is not fully known in humans, we evaluated if circulating levels of a major breakdown product of DDT, p,p'-DDE, were related to genome-wide genetic and methylation variation in a population-based sample.

    METHODS: In the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (1016 subjects all aged 70), circulating levels of p,p'-DDE were analyzed by high-resolution chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). Genetic variants were genotyped and imputed (1000 Genomes reference, March 2012 release). Methylation sites were assayed using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 array in whole blood. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach was applied.

    RESULTS: Evidence for genome-wide significant association with p,p'-DDE levels was observed only for a locus at chromosome 19 corresponding to the CYP2B6 gene (lead SNP rs7260538). Subjects being homozygote for the G allele showed a median level of 472ng/g lipid, while the corresponding level for those being homozygote for the T allele was 192ng/g lipid (p=1.5×10(-31)). An analysis conditioned on the lead SNP disclosed a distinct signal in the same gene (rs7255374, position chr19:41520351; p=2.2×10(-8)). A whole-genome methylation analysis showed one significant relationship vs. p,p'-DDE levels (p=6.2×10(-9)) located 7kb downstream the CYP2B6 gene (cg27089200, position chr19:41531976). This CpG-site was also related to the lead SNP (p=3.8×10(-35)), but mediated only 4% of the effect of the lead SNP on p,p'-DDE levels.

    CONCLUSION: Circulating levels of p,p'-DDE were related to genetic variation in the CYP2B6 gene in the general elderly population. DNA methylation in this gene is not closely linked to the p,p'-DDE levels.

  • 153.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Penell, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Luttropp, Karin
    Nordfors, Louise
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Salihovic, Samira
    van Bavel, Bert
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lind, P Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Global DNA hypermethylation is associated with high serum levels of persistent organic pollutants in an elderly population2013In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 59, p. 456-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dioxin exposure has experimentally been associated with changes in DNA methylation, an epigenetic change that is associated with disease. The present study aims to investigate if serum levels of dioxin and other persistent environmental pollutants are related to global DNA methylation in a human sample. In the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (all aged 70), global DNA methylation was measured by the Luminometric Methylation Assay in 524 subjects. Twenty-three different POPs, including 16 PCBs, five pesticides, one dioxin (OCDD) and one brominated flame retardant (BDE47) were analysed by HRGC/HRMS. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Aryl hydrocarbon (Ah)-receptor were analysed by mini-sequencing. High levels of toxic equivalency (TEQ) for PCBs and dioxin were associated with DNA hypermethylation (p=0.030). This was mainly attributed to coplanar non-ortho PCBs. While no significant associations were found between DNA methylation and SNPs in the Ah-receptor, an interaction was found between the SNP rs2237297 and TEQ so that TEQ was associated with hypermethylation (p=0.009) only in subjects with one G-allele (n=103). Also high levels of the PCB126 congener, the OCDD, and the pesticide metabolite p,p'-DDE were related to DNA hypermethylation (p=0.01, 0.03 and 0.003, respectively). In conclusion, in a sample of elderly subjects, high TEQ including PCBs and the dioxin OCDD and high serum levels of PCB126, OCDD, and p,p'-DDE were related to global DNA hypermethylation in a cross-sectional analysis.

  • 154.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Penell, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Morris, Andrew P
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Salihovic, Samira
    van Bavel, Bert
    Lind, P Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 gene is related to circulating PCB118 levels in a population-based sample2014In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 133, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), i.e. the dioxin-like PCBs, are known to induce the P450 enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 by activating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah)-receptor. We evaluated if circulating levels of PCBs in a population sample were related to genetic variation in the genes encoding these CYPs. In the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (1016 subjects all aged 70), 21 SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genes were genotyped. Sixteen PCB congeners were analysed by high-resolution chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/ HRMS). Of the investigated relationships between SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 and six PCBs (congeners 118, 126, 156, 169, 170 and 206) that captures >80% of the variation of all PCBs measured, only the relationship between CYP1A1 rs2470893 was significantly related to PCB118 levels following strict adjustment for multiple testing (p=0.00011). However, there were several additional SNPs in the CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that showed nominally significant associations with PCB118 levels (p-values in the 0.003-0.05 range). Further, several SNPs in the CYP1B1 gene were related to both PCB156 and PCB206 with p-values in the 0.005-0.05 range. Very few associations with p<0.05 were seen for PCB126, PCB169 or PCB170. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 was related to circulating PCB118 levels in the general elderly population. Genetic variation in CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 might also be associated with other PCBs.

  • 155.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, P. Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Mixture effects of 30 environmental contaminants on incident metabolic syndrome: A prospective study2017In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 107, p. 8-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several cross-sectional studies have linked different environmental contaminants to the metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, mixture effects have not been investigated and no prospective studies exist regarding environmental contaminants and the MetS.

    Objectives: To study mixture effects of contaminants on the risk of incident MetS in a prospective fashion.

    Methods: Our sample consisted of 452 subjects from the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (50% women, all aged 70 years) free from the MetS at baseline, being followed for 10 years. At baseline, 30 different environmental contaminants were measured; 6 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 3 organochlorine (OC) pesticides, one dioxin, one polybrominated diphenyl ether (all in plasma), 8 perfluoroalkyl substances (in plasma) and 11 metals (in whole blood). The MetS was defined by the ATPIII/NCEP criteria. Gradient boosted Classification and Regression Trees (CARTs) was used to evaluate potential synergistic and additive mixture effects on incident MetS.

    Results: During 10-year follow-up, 92 incident cases of the MetS occurred. PCB126, PCB170, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and PCB118 levels were all associated with incident MetS in an additive fashion (OR 1.73 for a change from 10th to 90th percentile (95% CI 1.24-3.04) for PCB126, OR 0.63 (0.42-0.78) for PCB170, OR 1.44 (1.09-2.20) for HCB and OR 1.46 (1.13-2.43) for PCB118). No synergistic effects were found.

    Conclusion: A mixture of environmental contaminants, with PCB126, PCB170, HCB and PCB118 being the most important, showed associations with future development of the MetS in an additive fashion in this prospective study. Thus, mixture effects of environmental contaminants could contribute to the development of cardiometabolic derangements.

  • 156.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Univ Orebro, Orebro.
    Van Bavel, B.
    Univ Orebro, Orebro, Switzerland..
    Lind, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Circulating levels of perfluorinated compounds and left ventricular geometry2015In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 238, no 2, p. S93-S93Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Stenemo, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Discovery of New Risk Markers for Ischemic Stroke Using a Novel Targeted Proteomics Chip2015In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 3340-3347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose-Emerging technologies have made it possible to simultaneously evaluate a large number of circulating proteins as potential new stroke risk markers. Methods-We explored associations between 85 cardiovascular proteins, assessed by a proteomics chip, and incident ischemic stroke in 2 independent cohorts of elderly (Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors [PIVUS]: n=977; 50% women, mean age=70.1 years, 71 fatal/nonfatal ischemic stroke events during 10.0 years; and Uppsala Longitudinal Study in Adult Men [ULSAM]: n=720, mean age=77.5 years, 75 ischemic stroke events during 9.5 years). The proteomics chip uses 2 antibodies for each protein and a polymerase chain reaction step to achieve a high-specific binding and the possibility to measure multiple proteins in parallel, but gives no absolute concentrations. Results-In PIVUS, 16 proteins were related to incident ischemic stroke using a false discovery rate of 5%. Of these, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (P=0.0032), adrenomedullin (P=0.018), and eosinophil cationic protein (P=0.0071) were replicated in ULSAM after adjustment for established stroke risk factors. In predefined secondary meta-analyses of individual data, interleukin-27 subunit , growth/differentiation factor 15, urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 6, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1, and matrix metalloproteinase-7 were also potential risk markers for ischemic stroke after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P<0.0006). The addition of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, and eosinophil cationic protein to a model with established risk factors increased the C-statistic from 0.629 to 0.689 (P=0.001). Conclusions-Our data suggest that large-scale proteomics analysis is a promising way of discovering novel biomarkers that could substantially improve the prediction of ischemic stroke.

  • 158.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ärnlov, Johan
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Stanford Cardiovasc Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Stanford Diabet Res Ctr, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Longitudinal effects of aging on plasma proteins levels in older adults - associations with kidney function and hemoglobin levels2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 2, article id e0212060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A targeted proteomics chip has been shown to be useful to discover novel associations of proteins with cardiovascular disease. We investigated how these proteins change with aging, and whether this change is related to a decline in kidney function, or to a change in hemoglobin levels. Material and methods In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, including 1,016 participants from the general population aged 70 at baseline, 84 proteins were measured at ages 70, 75, 80. At these occasions, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated and the hemoglobin levels were measured. Results Sixty-one of the 84 evaluated proteins changed significantly during the 10-year follow-up (multiple testing-adjusted alpha = 0.00059), most showing an increase. The change in eGFR was inversely related to changes of protein levels for the vast majority of proteins (74%). The change in hemoglobin was significantly related to the change in 40% of the evaluated proteins, with no obvious preference of the direction of these relationships. Conclusion The majority of evaluated proteins increased with aging in adults. Therefore, normal ranges for proteins might be given in age-strata. The increase in protein levels was associated with the degree of reduction in eGFR for the majority of proteins, while no clear pattern was seen for the relationships between the proteins and the change in hemoglobin levels. Studies on changes in urinary proteins are warranted to understand the association between the reduction in eGFR and increase in plasma protein levels.

  • 159.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stenemo, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Dalarna Univ, Dept Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden..
    Discovery of new biomarkers for atrial fibrillation using a custom-made proteomics chip2017In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 379-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Apart from several established clinical risk factors for atrial fibrillation (AF), a number of biomarkers have also been identified as potential risk factors for AF. None of these have so far been adopted in clinical practice. Objective To use a novel custom-made proteomics chip to discover new prognostic biomarkers for AF risk. Methods In two independent community-based cohorts (Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (978 participants without AF, mean age 70.1 years, 50% women, median followup 10.0 years) and Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM) (n= 725, mean age 77.5 years, median follow-up 7.9 years)), ninety-two plasma proteins were assessed at baseline by a proximity extension assay (PEA) chip. Of those, 85 proteins showed a call rate > 70% in both cohorts. Results Thirteen proteins were related to incident AF in PIVUS (148 events) using a false discovery rate of 5%. Of those, five were replicated in ULSAM at nominal multivariable p value (123 events, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP), fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)). Of those, NT-pro-BNP and FGF-23 were also associated with AF after adjusting for established AF risk factors. In a prespecified secondary analysis pooling the two data sets, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and adrenomedullin (AM) were also significantly related to incident AF in addition to the aforementioned five proteins (Bonferroni-adjustment). The addition of NT-proBNP to a model with established risk factors increased the C-statistic from 0.605 to 0.676 (p< 0.0001). Conclusions Using a novel proteomics approach, we confirmed the previously reported association between NT-pro-BNP, FGF-23, GDF-15 and incident AF, and also discovered four proteins (FABP4, IL-6, TIM-1 and AM) that could be of importance in the development of AF.

  • 160.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Stanford Cardiovasc Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Proteomic profiling of endothelium-dependent vasodilation2019In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 216-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: As endothelial dysfunction is an early event in atherosclerosis formation, we investigated if proteins previously related to cardiovascular disease also were related to endothelial function using a novel targeted proteomics approach.

    Methods: In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (n = 850970, all aged 70 years), endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) in the forearm was assessed by intraarterial infusion of acetylcholine. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) was investigated in the brachial artery by ultrasound. The same investigations were carried out in the Prospective investigation of Obesity, Energy and Metabolism (POEM) study (n = 375-461, all aged 50 years). After strict quality control, 84 cardiovascular-related proteins measured by the proximity extension assay were studied in relation to EDV and FMD in PIVUS (discovery sample) and POEM (validation sample).

    Results: Of the 15 proteins being significantly related to EDV in PIVUS (false discovery rate < 0.025), seven could be replicated in POEM at nominal significance and same effect direction when adjusted for sex and storage time. Of those, only cathepsin D remained significant following further adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (beta, -0.08; 95% confidence interval, -0.16, -0.01; P = 0.033; change in ln-transformed EDV per 1-SD increase in protein level). No protein was significantly related to FMD.

    Conclusion: Using a discovery/validation approach in two samples, our results indicate an inverse association between plasma cathepsin D levels and endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  • 161.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Use of a proximity extension assay proteomics chip to discover new biomarkers for human atherosclerosis2015In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 242, no 1, p. 205-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: We used a proteomics array to simultaneously measure multiple proteins that have been suggested to be associated with atherosclerosis and related them to plaque prevalence in carotid arteries in a human population-based study. Methods: In the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; n = 931, 50% women, all aged 70 years), the number of carotid arteries with plaques was recorded by ultrasound. Levels of 82 proteins were assessed in plasma by a proximity extension assay (Proseek Multiplex CVD, Olink Bioscience, Uppsala, Sweden) and related to carotid measures in a regression framework. Results: Following adjustment for multiple testing with Bonferroni correction, seven of the proteins were significantly related to the number of carotid arteries affected by plaques in sex-adjusted models (osteoprotegrin, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM)-1, growth/differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), matrix metalloprotease-12 (MMP-12), renin, tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14) and growth hormone). Of these, renin (odds ratio [OR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.49 per standard deviation increase), growth hormone (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.08-1.43), osteoprotegerin (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.05-1.43) and TNFSF14 (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01-1.35) were related to plaque prevalence independently of each other and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion: A novel targeted proteomics approach using the proximity extension technique discovered several new associations of candidate proteins with carotid artery plaque prevalence in a large human sample.

  • 162.
    Lind, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Univ Orebro, MTM Res Ctr, Sch Sci & Technol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    van Bavel, B.
    Univ Orebro, MTM Res Ctr, Sch Sci & Technol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Circulating levels of perfluoroalkyl substances and biomarkers of liver function in a large population based sample of elderly men and women from Sweden2015In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 238, no 2, p. S91-S91Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Lind, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden.
    Stubleski, Jordan
    Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden.
    Van Bavel, Bert
    Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    The changes in plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are related to the increase in carotid intima-media thickness over 10 years2017In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 263, p. E18-E18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Lind, P. Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. MTM Research Center, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    High plasma organochlorine pesticide levels are related to increased biological age as calculated by DNA methylation analysis2018In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 113, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) have been shown in the experimental setting to alter DNA methylation. Since DNA methylation changes during the life-span, formulas have been presented to calculate "DNA methylation age" as a measure of biological age.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate if circulating levels of three OCPs were related to increased DNA methylation age METHODS: 71CpG DNA methylation age (Hannum formula) was calculated based on data from the Illumina 450 k Bead Methylation chip in 1000 subjects in the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (50% women, all aged 70 years at the examination). The difference between DNA methylation age and chronological age was calculated (DiffAge). 2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and transnonachlor (TNC) levels were measured in plasma by high-resolution gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS).

    RESULTS: Increased p,p'-DDE and TNC, but not HCB, levels were related to increased DiffAge both in sex and BMI-adjusted models, as well as in multiple adjusted models (sex, education level, exercise habits, smoking, energy and alcohol consumption and BMI) (p = 0.0051 and p = 0.011, respectively). No significant interactions between the OCPs and sex or BMI regarding DiffAge were found.

    CONCLUSION: In this cross-sectional study, increased levels of two out of three OCPs were related to increased DNA methylation age, further suggesting negative health effects in humans of these widespread environmental contaminants.

  • 165.
    Lind, P. Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden.
    Stubleski, Jordan
    Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, MTM Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Changes in plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are related to increase in carotid intima-media thickness over 10 years - a longitudinal study2018In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 17, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has previously been reported that the environmental contaminants perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are linked to atherosclerosis in cross-sectional studies. Since cross-sectional studies could be subject to reverse causation, the purpose of this study was to analyze if the longitudinal changes in PFASs during a 10-year follow-up were related to the change in carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT, ultrasound) during the same period.

    Methods: In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, 1016 individuals were investigated at age 70; 826 of them were reinvestigated at age 75 and 602 at age 80 years. Eight different PFASs were measured in plasma by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), and IMT was measured at all three time points. Random-effects mixed regression models were used to examine the associations over time.

    Results: IMT increased 0.058 mm during the 10-year period (p <0.0001). Following adjustment for baseline values of PFASs (age 70) and sex, the changes in plasma levels of 6 of the 8 measured PFASs were significantly related to the change in IMT over the 10-year follow-up period in a positive fashion (p <0.0062 using Bonferroni correction for 8 tests). Further adjustment for traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (HDL and LDL cholesterol, smoking, systolic blood pressure, statin use, fasting glucose and serum triglycerides) affected these relationships only marginally.

    Conclusion: The change in plasma levels of several PFASs during 10 years was positively related to increase in IMT seen during the same period, giving prospective evidence that PFASs might interfere with the atherosclerotic process.

  • 166.
    Lind, P. Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. MTM Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    van Bavel, Bert
    MTM Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Circulating levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and carotid artery atherosclerosis2017In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 152, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: During recent years, some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been linked to atherosclerosis. One group of POPs, the poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have not been investigated with regard to atherosclerotic plaques.

    METHODS: Carotid artery atherosclerosis was assessed by ultrasound in 1016 subjects aged 70 years in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study. Eight PFASs were detected in >75% of participants' plasma by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS).

    RESULTS: No significant linear associations were observed between the PFASs and intima-media thickness (IMT), or the echogenicity in the intima-media complex (IM-GSM, a marker of lipid infiltration in the artery) when men and women were analyzed together. Neither was occurrence of carotid plaques related to PFASs levels. However, highly significant interactions were observed between some PFASs and sex regarding both IM-GSM and plaque prevalence. Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), were all related to IM-GSM in a positive fashion in women (p=0.002-0.003), while these relationships were negative in men. The levels of PFUnDA were significantly related to carotid plaque in women (OR 1.59, 95%CI 1.03-2.43, p=0.03), but not in men (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.62-1.42, p=0.75).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this cross-sectional study, a pronounced gender difference was observed regarding associations between some PFASs, especially the long-chain PFUnDA, and markers of atherosclerosis, with more pronounced relationships found in women. These findings suggest a sex-specific role for PFASs in atherosclerosis.

  • 167. Lindgren, Emma
    et al.
    Hägg, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giordano, Fosco
    Börkegren, Johan
    Ström, Lena
    Inactivation of the budding yeast cohesin loader Scc2 alters gene expression both globally and in response to a single DNA double strand break2014In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 13, no 23, p. 3645-3658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome integrity is fundamental for cell survival and cell cycle progression. Important mechanisms for keeping the genome intact are proper sister chromatid segregation, correct gene regulation and efficient repair of damaged DNA. Cohesin and its DNA loader, the Scc2/4 complex have been implicated in all these cellular actions. The gene regulation role has been described in several organisms. In yeast it has been suggested that the proteins in the cohesin network would effect transcription based on its role as insulator. More recently, data are emerging indicating direct roles for gene regulation also in yeast. Here we extend these studies by investigating whether the cohesin loader Scc2 is involved in regulation of gene expression. We performed global gene expression profiling in the absence and presence of DNA damage, in wild type and Scc2 deficient G2/M arrested cells, when it is known that Scc2 is important for DNA double strand break repair and formation of damage induced cohesion. We found that not only the DNA damage specific transcriptional response is distorted after inactivation of Scc2 but also the overall transcription profile. Interestingly, these alterations did not correlate with changes in cohesin binding.

  • 168. Liu, C
    et al.
    Marioni, R E
    Hedman, Åsa K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pfeiffer, L
    Tsai, P-C
    Reynolds, L M
    Just, A C
    Duan, Q
    Boer, C G
    Tanaka, T
    Elks, C E
    Aslibekyan, S
    Brody, J A
    Kühnel, B
    Herder, C
    Almli, L M
    Zhi, D
    Wang, Y
    Huan, T
    Yao, C
    Mendelson, M M
    Joehanes, R
    Liang, L
    Love, S-A
    Guan, W
    Shah, S
    McRae, A F
    Kretschmer, A
    Prokisch, H
    Strauch, K
    Peters, A
    Visscher, P M
    Wray, N R
    Guo, X
    Wiggins, K L
    Smith, A K
    Binder, E B
    Ressler, K J
    Irvin, M R
    Absher, D M
    Hernandez, D
    Ferrucci, L
    Bandinelli, S
    Lohman, K
    Ding, J
    Trevisi, L
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stolk, L
    Uitterlinden, A G
    Yet, I
    Castillo-Fernandez, J E
    Spector, T D
    Schwartz, J D
    Vokonas, P
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Li, Y
    Fornage, M
    Arnett, D K
    Wareham, N J
    Sotoodehnia, N
    Ong, K K
    van Meurs, J B J
    Conneely, K N
    Baccarelli, A A
    Deary, I J
    Bell, J T
    North, K E
    Liu, Y
    Waldenberger, M
    London, S J
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Levy, D
    A DNA methylation biomarker of alcohol consumption.2018In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 23, p. 422-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of reliable measures of alcohol intake is a major obstacle to the diagnosis and treatment of alcohol-related diseases. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation may provide novel biomarkers of alcohol use. To examine this possibility, we performed an epigenome-wide association study of methylation of cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites in relation to alcohol intake in 13 population-based cohorts (ntotal=13 317; 54% women; mean age across cohorts 42-76 years) using whole blood (9643 European and 2423 African ancestries) or monocyte-derived DNA (588 European, 263 African and 400 Hispanic ancestry) samples. We performed meta-analysis and variable selection in whole-blood samples of people of European ancestry (n=6926) and identified 144 CpGs that provided substantial discrimination (area under the curve=0.90-0.99) for current heavy alcohol intake (⩾42 g per day in men and ⩾28 g per day in women) in four replication cohorts. The ancestry-stratified meta-analysis in whole blood identified 328 (9643 European ancestry samples) and 165 (2423 African ancestry samples) alcohol-related CpGs at Bonferroni-adjusted P<1 × 10(-7). Analysis of the monocyte-derived DNA (n=1251) identified 62 alcohol-related CpGs at P<1 × 10(-7). In whole-blood samples of people of European ancestry, we detected differential methylation in two neurotransmitter receptor genes, the γ-Aminobutyric acid-A receptor delta and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor subunit 1; their differential methylation was associated with expression levels of a number of genes involved in immune function. In conclusion, we have identified a robust alcohol-related DNA methylation signature and shown the potential utility of DNA methylation as a clinically useful diagnostic test to detect current heavy alcohol consumption.

  • 169.
    Ljungberg, Johan
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Janiec, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umea Univ, Dept Biobank Res, Umea, Sweden..
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Umea, Sweden..
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Proteomic Biomarkers for Incident Aortic Stenosis Requiring Valvular Replacement2018In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 138, no 6, p. 590-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is the most common indication for cardiac valve surgery; untreated AS is linked to high mortality. The etiological background of AS is unknown. Previous human studies were typically based on case-control studies. Biomarkers identified in prospective studies could lead to novel mechanistic insights.

    Methods: Within a large population survey with blood samples obtained at baseline, 334 patients were identified who later underwent surgery for AS (median age [interquartile range], 59.9 [10.4] years at survey and 68.3 [12.7] at surgery; 48% female). For each case, 2 matched referents were allocated. Plasma was analyzed with the multiplex proximity extension assay for screening of 92 cardiovascular candidate proteins. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess associations between each protein and AS, with correction for multiple testing. A separate set of 106 additional cases with 212 matched referents was used in a validation study.

    Results: Six proteins (growth differentiation factor 15, galectin-4, von Willebrand factor, interleukin 17 receptor A, transferrin receptor protein 1, and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) were associated with case status in the discovery cohort; odds ratios ranged from 1.25 to 1.37 per SD increase in the protein signal. Adjusting the multivariable models for classical cardiovascular risk factors at baseline yielded similar results. Subanalyses of case-referent triplets (n=133) who showed no visible coronary artery disease at the time of surgery in the index person supported associations between AS and growth differentiation factor 15 (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.78) and galectin-4 (odds ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.59), but these associations were attenuated after excluding individuals who donated blood samples within 5 years before surgery. In triplets (n=201), which included index individuals with concurrent coronary artery disease at the time of surgery, all 6 proteins were robustly associated with case status in all sensitivity analyses. In the validation study, the association of all but 1 (interleukin 17 receptor A) of these proteins were replicated in patients with AS with concurrent coronary artery disease but not in patients with AS without coronary artery disease.

    Conclusions: We provide evidence that 5 proteins were altered years before AS surgery and that the associations seem to be driven by concurrent atherosclerotic disease.

  • 170. Locke, Adam E
    et al.
    Kahali, Bratati
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Justice, Anne E
    Pers, Tune H
    Day, Felix R
    Powell, Corey
    Vedantam, Sailaja
    Buchkovich, Martin L
    Yang, Jian
    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C
    Esko, Tonu
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kutalik, Zoltán
    Luan, Jian'an
    Mägi, Reedik
    Randall, Joshua C
    Winkler, Thomas W
    Wood, Andrew R
    Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie
    Faul, Jessica D
    Smith, Jennifer A
    Hua Zhao, Jing
    Zhao, Wei
    Chen, Jin
    Fehrmann, Rudolf
    Hedman, Åsa K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Karjalainen, Juha
    Schmidt, Ellen M
    Absher, Devin
    Amin, Najaf
    Anderson, Denise
    Beekman, Marian
    Bolton, Jennifer L
    Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L
    Buyske, Steven
    Demirkan, Ayse
    Deng, Guohong
    Ehret, Georg B
    Feenstra, Bjarke
    Feitosa, Mary F
    Fischer, Krista
    Goel, Anuj
    Gong, Jian
    Jackson, Anne U
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Kleber, Marcus E
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Lim, Unhee
    Lotay, Vaneet
    Mangino, Massimo
    Mateo Leach, Irene
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Medland, Sarah E
    Nalls, Michael A
    Palmer, Cameron D
    Pasko, Dorota
    Pechlivanis, Sonali
    Peters, Marjolein J
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Stančáková, Alena
    Strawbridge, Rona J
    Ju Sung, Yun
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Teumer, Alexander
    Trompet, Stella
    van der Laan, Sander W
    van Setten, Jessica
    Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Yengo, Loïc
    Zhang, Weihua
    Isaacs, Aaron
    Albrecht, Eva
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arscott, Gillian M
    Attwood, Antony P
    Bandinelli, Stefania
    Barrett, Amy
    Bas, Isabelita N
    Bellis, Claire
    Bennett, Amanda J
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Blagieva, Roza
    Blüher, Matthias
    Böhringer, Stefan
    Bonnycastle, Lori L
    Böttcher, Yvonne
    Boyd, Heather A
    Bruinenberg, Marcel
    Caspersen, Ida H
    Ida Chen, Yii-Der
    Clarke, Robert
    Warwick Daw, E
    de Craen, Anton J M
    Delgado, Graciela
    Dimitriou, Maria
    Doney, Alex S F
    Eklund, Niina
    Estrada, Karol
    Eury, Elodie
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Fraser, Ross M
    Garcia, Melissa E
    Geller, Frank
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Gigante, Bruna
    Go, Alan S
    Golay, Alain
    Goodall, Alison H
    Gordon, Scott D
    Gorski, Mathias
    Grabe, Hans-Jörgen
    Grallert, Harald
    Grammer, Tanja B
    Gräßler, Jürgen
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Groves, Christopher J
    Gusto, Gaëlle
    Haessler, Jeffrey
    Hall, Per
    Haller, Toomas
    Hallmans, Goran
    Hartman, Catharina A
    Hassinen, Maija
    Hayward, Caroline
    Heard-Costa, Nancy L
    Helmer, Quinta
    Hengstenberg, Christian
    Holmen, Oddgeir
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    James, Alan L
    Jeff, Janina M
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jolley, Jennifer
    Juliusdottir, Thorhildur
    Kinnunen, Leena
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Kratzer, Wolfgang
    Laitinen, Jaana
    Lamina, Claudia
    Leander, Karin
    Lee, Nanette R
    Lichtner, Peter
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindström, Jaana
    Sin Lo, Ken
    Lobbens, Stéphane
    Lorbeer, Roberto
    Lu, Yingchang
    Mach, François
    Magnusson, Patrik K E
    Mahajan, Anubha
    McArdle, Wendy L
    McLachlan, Stela
    Menni, Cristina
    Merger, Sigrun
    Mihailov, Evelin
    Milani, Lili
    Moayyeri, Alireza
    Monda, Keri L
    Morken, Mario A
    Mulas, Antonella
    Müller, Gabriele
    Müller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Musk, Arthur W
    Nagaraja, Ramaiah
    Nöthen, Markus M
    Nolte, Ilja M
    Pilz, Stefan
    Rayner, Nigel W
    Renstrom, Frida
    Rettig, Rainer
    Ried, Janina S
    Ripke, Stephan
    Robertson, Neil R
    Rose, Lynda M
    Sanna, Serena
    Scharnagl, Hubert
    Scholtens, Salome
    Schumacher, Fredrick R
    Scott, William R
    Seufferlein, Thomas
    Shi, Jianxin
    Vernon Smith, Albert
    Smolonska, Joanna
    Stanton, Alice V
    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Stringham, Heather M
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Swertz, Morris A
    Swift, Amy J
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tan, Sian-Tsung
    Tayo, Bamidele O
    Thorand, Barbara
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    Tyrer, Jonathan P
    Uh, Hae-Won
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Verhulst, Frank C
    Vermeulen, Sita H
    Verweij, Niek
    Vonk, Judith M
    Waite, Lindsay L
    Warren, Helen R
    Waterworth, Dawn
    Weedon, Michael N
    Wilkens, Lynne R
    Willenborg, Christina
    Wilsgaard, Tom
    Wojczynski, Mary K
    Wong, Andrew
    Wright, Alan F
    Zhang, Qunyuan
    Brennan, Eoin P
    Choi, Murim
    Dastani, Zari
    Drong, Alexander W
    Eriksson, Per
    Franco-Cereceda, Anders
    Gådin, Jesper R
    Gharavi, Ali G
    Goddard, Michael E
    Handsaker, Robert E
    Huang, Jinyan
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Kathiresan, Sekar
    Keildson, Sarah
    Kiryluk, Krzysztof
    Kubo, Michiaki
    Lee, Jong-Young
    Liang, Liming
    Lifton, Richard P
    Ma, Baoshan
    McCarroll, Steven A
    McKnight, Amy J
    Min, Josine L
    Moffatt, Miriam F
    Montgomery, Grant W
    Murabito, Joanne M
    Nicholson, George
    Nyholt, Dale R
    Okada, Yukinori
    Perry, John R B
    Dorajoo, Rajkumar
    Reinmaa, Eva
    Salem, Rany M
    Sandholm, Niina
    Scott, Robert A
    Stolk, Lisette
    Takahashi, Atsushi
    Tanaka, Toshihiro
    Van't Hooft, Ferdinand M
    Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E
    Westra, Harm-Jan
    Zheng, Wei
    Zondervan, Krina T
    Heath, Andrew C
    Arveiler, Dominique
    Bakker, Stephan J L
    Beilby, John
    Bergman, Richard N
    Blangero, John
    Bovet, Pascal
    Campbell, Harry
    Caulfield, Mark J
    Cesana, Giancarlo
    Chakravarti, Aravinda
    Chasman, Daniel I
    Chines, Peter S
    Collins, Francis S
    Crawford, Dana C
    Adrienne Cupples, L
    Cusi, Daniele
    Danesh, John
    de Faire, Ulf
    den Ruijter, Hester M
    Dominiczak, Anna F
    Erbel, Raimund
    Erdmann, Jeanette
    Eriksson, Johan G
    Farrall, Martin
    Felix, Stephan B
    Ferrannini, Ele
    Ferrières, Jean
    Ford, Ian
    Forouhi, Nita G
    Forrester, Terrence
    Franco, Oscar H
    Gansevoort, Ron T
    Gejman, Pablo V
    Gieger, Christian
    Gottesman, Omri
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hall, Alistair S
    Harris, Tamara B
    Hattersley, Andrew T
    Hicks, Andrew A
    Hindorff, Lucia A
    Hingorani, Aroon D
    Hofman, Albert
    Homuth, Georg
    Kees Hovingh, G
    Humphries, Steve E
    Hunt, Steven C
    Hyppönen, Elina
    Illig, Thomas
    Jacobs, Kevin B
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Johansen, Berit
    Jousilahti, Pekka
    Wouter Jukema, J
    Jula, Antti M
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Kastelein, John J P
    Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A
    Knekt, Paul
    Kooner, Jaspal S
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Kovacs, Peter
    Kraja, Aldi T
    Kumari, Meena
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Lakka, Timo A
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Lyssenko, Valeriya
    Männistö, Satu
    Marette, André
    Matise, Tara C
    McKenzie, Colin A
    McKnight, Barbara
    Moll, Frans L
    Morris, Andrew D
    Morris, Andrew P
    Murray, Jeffrey C
    Nelis, Mari
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J
    Ong, Ken K
    Madden, Pamela A F
    Pasterkamp, Gerard
    Peden, John F
    Peters, Annette
    Postma, Dirkje S
    Pramstaller, Peter P
    Price, Jackie F
    Qi, Lu
    Raitakari, Olli T
    Rankinen, Tuomo
    Rao, D C
    Rice, Treva K
    Ridker, Paul M
    Rioux, John D
    Ritchie, Marylyn D
    Rudan, Igor
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Samani, Nilesh J
    Saramies, Jouko
    Sarzynski, Mark A
    Schunkert, Heribert
    Schwarz, Peter E H
    Sever, Peter
    Shuldiner, Alan R
    Sinisalo, Juha
    Stolk, Ronald P
    Strauch, Konstantin
    Tönjes, Anke
    Trégouët, David-Alexandre
    Tremblay, Angelo
    Tremoli, Elena
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Vohl, Marie-Claude
    Völker, Uwe
    Waeber, Gérard
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Witteman, Jacqueline C
    Zillikens, M Carola
    Adair, Linda S
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Asselbergs, Folkert W
    Assimes, Themistocles L
    Bochud, Murielle
    Boehm, Bernhard O
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Bornstein, Stefan R
    Bottinger, Erwin P
    Bouchard, Claude
    Cauchi, Stéphane
    Chambers, John C
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Cooper, Richard S
    de Bakker, Paul I W
    Dedoussis, George
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Franks, Paul W
    Froguel, Philippe
    Groop, Leif C
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Hamsten, Anders
    Hui, Jennie
    Hunter, David J
    Hveem, Kristian
    Kaplan, Robert C
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Kuh, Diana
    Laakso, Markku
    Liu, Yongmei
    Martin, Nicholas G
    März, Winfried
    Melbye, Mads
    Metspalu, Andres
    Moebus, Susanne
    Munroe, Patricia B
    Njølstad, Inger
    Oostra, Ben A
    Palmer, Colin N A
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Perola, Markus
    Pérusse, Louis
    Peters, Ulrike
    Power, Chris
    Quertermous, Thomas
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Saaristo, Timo E
    Saleheen, Danish
    Sattar, Naveed
    Schadt, Eric E
    Schlessinger, David
    Eline Slagboom, P
    Snieder, Harold
    Spector, Tim D
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Uitterlinden, André G
    Uusitupa, Matti
    van der Harst, Pim
    Walker, Mark
    Wallaschofski, Henri
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Watkins, Hugh
    Weir, David R
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Wilson, James F
    Zanen, Pieter
    Borecki, Ingrid B
    Deloukas, Panos
    Fox, Caroline S
    Heid, Iris M
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R
    Strachan, David P
    Stefansson, Kari
    van Duijn, Cornelia M
    Abecasis, Gonçalo R
    Franke, Lude
    Frayling, Timothy M
    McCarthy, Mark I
    Visscher, Peter M
    Scherag, André
    Willer, Cristen J
    Boehnke, Michael
    Mohlke, Karen L
    Lindgren, Cecilia M
    Beckmann, Jacques S
    Barroso, Inês
    North, Kari E
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hirschhorn, Joel N
    Loos, Ruth J F
    Speliotes, Elizabeth K
    Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 518, no 7538, p. 197-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10−8), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ~2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.

  • 171.
    Loley, Christina
    et al.
    Univ Lubeck, Univ Klinikum Schleswig Holstein, Inst Med Biometrie & Stat, Campus Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Hamburg Lubeck Kiel, Lubeck, Germany..
    Alver, Maris
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia.;Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Tartu, Estonia..
    Assimes, Themistocles L.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med Stanford, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA USA..
    Bjonnes, Andrew
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Goel, Anuj
    Univ Oxford, Div Cardiovasc Med, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hernesniemi, Jussi
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland.;Heart Hosp, Dept Cariol, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Tampere, Finland..
    Hopewell, Jemma C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, CTSU, Oxford, England..
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Queen Mary Univ London, Barts & London Sch Med & Dent, William Harvey Res Inst, London, England..
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med 5, Mannheim, Germany..
    Lau, King Wai
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, CTSU, Oxford, England..
    Lu, Yingchang
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland..
    Nelson, Christopher P.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leicester, Leics, England.;Glenfield Hosp, NIHR Leicester Cardiovasc Biomed Res Unit, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Nikpay, Majid
    Univ Ottawa, Inst Heart, Ruddy Canadian Cardiovasc Genet Ctr, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Qu, Liming
    Univ Penn, Dept Biostat & Epidemiol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Salfati, Elias
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med Stanford, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA USA..
    Scholz, Markus
    Univ Leipzig, Fac Med, Inst Med Informat Stat & Epidemiol, Leipzig, Germany.;LIFE Res Ctr Civilizat Dis, Leipzig, Germany..
    Tukiainen, Taru
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Analyt & Translat Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Willenborg, Christina
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Hamburg Lubeck Kiel, Lubeck, Germany.;Univ Lubeck, Univ Klinikum Schleswig Holstein, Inst Integrat & Expt Genom, Campus Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany.;Univ Heart Ctr Luebeck, Campus Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany..
    Won, Hong-Hee
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Samsung Med Ctr, SAIHST, Seoul, South Korea..
    Zeng, Lingyao
    Tech Univ Munich, Deutsch Herzzentrum Munchen, Munich, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany..
    Zhang, Weihua
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Ealing Hosp Natl Hlth Serv NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England..
    Anand, Sonia S.
    McMaster Univ, Populat Hlth Res Inst, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Beutner, Frank
    LIFE Res Ctr Civilizat Dis, Leipzig, Germany.;Univ Leipzig, Heart Ctr Leipzig, Cardiol, Leipzig, Germany..
    Bottinger, Erwin P.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Clarke, Robert
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, CTSU, Oxford, England..
    Dedoussis, George
    Harokopio Univ Athens, Athens, Greece..
    Do, Ron
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Ctr Stat Genet, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Icahn Inst Genom & Multiscale Biol, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Zena & Michael A Weiner Cardiovasc Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Esko, Tonu
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Eskola, Markku
    Heart Hosp, Dept Cariol, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Tampere, Finland..
    Farrall, Martin
    Univ Oxford, Div Cardiovasc Med, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Gauguier, Dominique
    INSERM, Ctr Rech Cordeliers, UMRS1138, Paris, France..
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Granger, Christopher B.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Durham, NC USA..
    Hall, Alistair S.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Genet Hlth & Therapeut, Leeds LS2 9JT, W Yorkshire, England..
    Hamsten, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Atherosclerosis Res Unit, Cardiovasc Genet & Genom Grp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hazen, Stanley L.
    Cleveland Clin, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Huang, Jie
    Boston VA Res Inst Inc, Boston, MA USA..
    Kahonen, Mika
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere, Finland..
    Kyriakou, Theodosios
    Univ Oxford, Div Cardiovasc Med, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Laaksonen, Reijo
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland.;Zora Biosci, Espoo, Finland..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;MIT, Broad Inst, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Marouli, Eirini
    Queen Mary Univ London, Barts & London Sch Med & Dent, William Harvey Res Inst, London, England..
    Mihailov, Evelin
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia..
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Nikus, Kjell
    Heart Hosp, Dept Cariol, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Tampere, Finland..
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rallidis, Loukianos
    Univ Gen Hosp Attikon, Dept Cardiol 2, Athens, Greece..
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Chron Dis Prevent, Helsinki, Finland..
    Shah, Svati H.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Durham, NC USA..
    Stewart, Alexandre F. R.
    Univ Ottawa, Inst Heart, Ruddy Canadian Cardiovasc Genet Ctr, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Thompson, John R.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Hlth Sci, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Zalloua, Pierre A.
    Lebanese Amer Univ, Sch Med, Beirut, Lebanon.;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA USA..
    Chambers, John C.
    Ealing Hosp Natl Hlth Serv NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England.;McMaster Univ, Populat Hlth Res Inst, Hamilton, ON, Canada.;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England..
    Collins, Rory
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, CTSU, Oxford, England..
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Iribarren, Carlos
    Kaiser Permanente, Div Res, Oakland, CA USA..
    Karhunen, Pekka J.
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Forens Med, Tampere, Finland..
    Kooner, Jaspal S.
    McMaster Univ, Populat Hlth Res Inst, Hamilton, ON, Canada.;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, Cardiovasc Sci, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England..
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere, Finland..
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Mindich Child Hlth & Dev Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Maerz, Winfried
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med 5, Mannheim, Germany.;Synlab Serv GmbH, Synlab Acad, Mannheim, Germany.;Med Univ Graz, Clin Inst Med & Chem Lab Diagnost, Graz, Austria..
    McPherson, Ruth
    Univ Ottawa, Inst Heart, Ruddy Canadian Cardiovasc Genet Ctr, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Metspalu, Andres
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia.;Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Tartu, Estonia..
    Reilly, Muredach P.
    Univ Penn, Cardiovasc Inst, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Kaiser Permanente, Div Res, Oakland, CA USA.;Univ Helsinki, Hjelt Inst, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland..
    Sanghera, Dharambir K.
    Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Coll Med, Dept Pediat, Oklahoma City, OK 73190 USA.;Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Coll Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Oklahoma City, OK 73190 USA.;Oklahoma Ctr Neurosci, Oklahoma City, OK USA..
    Thiery, Joachim
    LIFE Res Ctr Civilizat Dis, Leipzig, Germany.;Univ Hosp Leipzig, Fac Med, Inst Lab Med Clin Chem & Mol Diagnost, Leipzig, Germany..
    Watkins, Hugh
    Univ Oxford, Div Cardiovasc Med, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Deloukas, Panos
    Queen Mary Univ London, Barts & London Sch Med & Dent, William Harvey Res Inst, London, England.;Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge, England.;King Abdulaziz Univ, Princess Al Jawhara Al Brahim Ctr Excellence Res, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia..
    Kathiresan, Sekar
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leicester, Leics, England.;Glenfield Hosp, NIHR Leicester Cardiovasc Biomed Res Unit, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Schunkert, Heribert
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany.;Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England..
    Erdmann, Jeanette
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Hamburg Lubeck Kiel, Lubeck, Germany.;Univ Lubeck, Univ Klinikum Schleswig Holstein, Inst Integrat & Expt Genom, Campus Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany.;Univ Heart Ctr Luebeck, Campus Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany..
    Koenig, Inke R.
    Univ Lubeck, Univ Klinikum Schleswig Holstein, Inst Med Biometrie & Stat, Campus Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Hamburg Lubeck Kiel, Lubeck, Germany..
    No Association of Coronary Artery Disease with X-Chromosomal Variants in Comprehensive International Meta-Analysis2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 35278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies have identified 58 independent risk loci for coronary artery disease (CAD) on the autosome. However, due to the sex-specific data structure of the X chromosome, it has been excluded from most of these analyses. While females have 2 copies of chromosome X, males have only one. Also, one of the female X chromosomes may be inactivated. Therefore, special test statistics and quality control procedures are required. Thus, little is known about the role of X-chromosomal variants in CAD. To fill this gap, we conducted a comprehensive X-chromosome-wide meta-analysis including more than 43,000 CAD cases and 58,000 controls from 35 international study cohorts. For quality control, sex-specific filters were used to adequately take the special structure of X-chromosomal data into account. For single study analyses, several logistic regression models were calculated allowing for inactivation of one female X-chromosome, adjusting for sex and investigating interactions between sex and genetic variants. Then, meta-analyses including all 35 studies were conducted using random effects models. None of the investigated models revealed genome-wide significant associations for any variant. Although we analyzed the largest-to-date sample, currently available methods were not able to detect any associations of X-chromosomal variants with CAD.

  • 172. Loth, Daan W
    et al.
    Artigas, María Soler
    Gharib, Sina A
    Wain, Louise V
    Franceschini, Nora
    Koch, Beate
    Pottinger, Tess D
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Duan, Qing
    Oldmeadow, Chris
    Lee, Mi Kyeong
    Strachan, David P
    James, Alan L
    Huffman, Jennifer E
    Vitart, Veronique
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Wang, Xin-Qun
    Trochet, Holly
    Kähönen, Mika
    Flexeder, Claudia
    Albrecht, Eva
    Lopez, Lorna M
    de Jong, Kim
    Thyagarajan, Bharat
    Alves, Alexessander Couto
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Omenaas, Ernst
    Joshi, Peter K
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Viñuela, Ana
    Launer, Lenore J
    Loehr, Laura R
    Fornage, Myriam
    Li, Guo
    Wilk, Jemma B
    Tang, Wenbo
    Manichaikul, Ani
    Lahousse, Lies
    Harris, Tamara B
    North, Kari E
    Rudnicka, Alicja R
    Hui, Jennie
    Gu, Xiangjun
    Lumley, Thomas
    Wright, Alan F
    Hastie, Nicholas D
    Campbell, Susan
    Kumar, Rajesh
    Pin, Isabelle
    Scott, Robert A
    Pietiläinen, Kirsi H
    Surakka, Ida
    Liu, Yongmei
    Holliday, Elizabeth G
    Schulz, Holger
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Davies, Gail
    Vonk, Judith M
    Wojczynski, Mary
    Pouta, Anneli
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wild, Sarah H
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Völzke, Henry
    Hysi, Pirro G
    Eiriksdottir, Gudny
    Morrison, Alanna C
    Rotter, Jerome I
    Gao, Wei
    Postma, Dirkje S
    White, Wendy B
    Rich, Stephen S
    Hofman, Albert
    Aspelund, Thor
    Couper, David
    Smith, Lewis J
    Psaty, Bruce M
    Lohman, Kurt
    Burchard, Esteban G
    Uitterlinden, André G
    Garcia, Melissa
    Joubert, Bonnie R
    McArdle, Wendy L
    Musk, A Bill
    Hansel, Nadia
    Heckbert, Susan R
    Zgaga, Lina
    van Meurs, Joyce B J
    Navarro, Pau
    Rudan, Igor
    Oh, Yeon-Mok
    Redline, Susan
    Jarvis, Deborah L
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Rantanen, Taina
    O'Connor, George T
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Scott, Rodney J
    Karrasch, Stefan
    Grallert, Harald
    Gaddis, Nathan C
    Starr, John M
    Wijmenga, Cisca
    Minster, Ryan L
    Lederer, David J
    Pekkanen, Juha
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Campbell, Harry
    Morris, Andrew P
    Gläser, Sven
    Hammond, Christopher J
    Burkart, Kristin M
    Beilby, John
    Kritchevsky, Stephen B
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Hancock, Dana B
    Williams, O Dale
    Polasek, Ozren
    Zemunik, Tatijana
    Kolcic, Ivana
    Petrini, Marcy F
    Wjst, Matthias
    Kim, Woo Jin
    Porteous, David J
    Scotland, Generation
    Smith, Blair H
    Viljanen, Anne
    Heliövaara, Markku
    Attia, John R
    Sayers, Ian
    Hampel, Regina
    Gieger, Christian
    Deary, Ian J
    Boezen, H Marike
    Newman, Anne
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Wilson, James F
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Stricker, Bruno H
    Teumer, Alexander
    Spector, Timothy D
    Melén, Erik
    Peters, Marjolein J
    Lange, Leslie A
    Barr, R Graham
    Bracke, Ken R
    Verhamme, Fien M
    Sung, Joohon
    Hiemstra, Pieter S
    Cassano, Patricia A
    Sood, Akshay
    Hayward, Caroline
    Dupuis, Josée
    Hall, Ian P
    Brusselle, Guy G
    Tobin, Martin D
    London, Stephanie J
    Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity2014In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 46, p. 669-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.

  • 173.
    Love-Gregory, Latisha
    et al.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Ctr Human Nutr, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Kraja, Aldi T.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Div Stat Genom, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Allum, Fiona
    McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada..
    Aslibekyan, Stella
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA..
    Hedman, Åsa K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Duan, Yanan
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Div Stat Genom, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Div Stat Genom, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Arnett, Donna K.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA..
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Churchill Hosp, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford OX3 7JU, England.;Churchill Hosp, Oxford Natl Inst Hlth Res, Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford OX3 7JU, England..
    Deloukas, Panos
    Queen Mary Univ London, William Harvey Res Inst, London EC1M 6BQ, England..
    Ordovas, Jose M.
    Tufts Univ, JM USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Hopkins, Paul N.
    Univ Utah, Cardiovasc Genet Res, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 USA..
    Grundberg, Elin
    McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G1, Canada..
    Abumrad, Nada A.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Ctr Human Nutr, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Higher chylomicron remnants and LDL particle numbers associate with CD36 SNPs and DNA methylation sites that reduce CD362016In: Journal of Lipid Research, ISSN 0022-2275, E-ISSN 1539-7262, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 2176-2184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) variants influence fasting lipids and risk of metabolic syndrome, but their impact on postprandial lipids, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is unclear. We determined the effects of SNPs within a approximate to 410 kb region encompassing CD36 and its proximal and distal promoters on chylomicron (CM) remnants and LDL particles at fasting and at 3.5 and 6 h following a high-fat meal (Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study, n = 1,117). Five promoter variants associated with CMs, four with delayed TG clearance and five with LDL particle number. To assess mechanisms underlying the associations, we queried expression quantitative trait loci, DNA methylation, and ChIP-seq datasets for adipose and heart tissues that function in postprandial lipid clearance. Several SNPs that associated with higher serum lipids correlated with lower adipose and heart CD36 mRNA and aligned to active motifs for PPAR, a major CD36 regulator. The SNPs also associated with DNA methylation sites that related to reduced CD36 mRNA and higher serum lipids, but mixed-model analyses indicated that the SNPs and methylation independently influence CD36 mRNA. The findings support contributions of CD36 SNPs that reduce adipose and heart CD36 RNA expression to inter-individual variability of postprandial lipid metabolism and document changes in CD36 DNA methylation that influence both CD36 expression and lipids.

  • 174. Lu, Yingchang
    et al.
    Day, Felix R
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Buchkovich, Martin L
    Na, Jianbo
    Bataille, Veronique
    Cousminer, Diana L
    Dastani, Zari
    Drong, Alexander W
    Esko, Tõnu
    Evans, David M
    Falchi, Mario
    Feitosa, Mary F
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Hedman, Åsa K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Haring, Robin
    Hysi, Pirro G
    Iles, Mark M
    Justice, Anne E
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Lagou, Vasiliki
    Li, Rui
    Li, Xin
    Locke, Adam
    Lu, Chen
    Mägi, Reedik
    Perry, John R B
    Pers, Tune H
    Qi, Qibin
    Sanna, Marianna
    Schmidt, Ellen M
    Scott, William R
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Teumer, Alexander
    Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E
    Walker, Ryan W
    Westra, Harm-Jan
    Zhang, Mingfeng
    Zhang, Weihua
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Zhu, Zhihong
    Afzal, Uzma
    Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh
    Bakker, Stephan J L
    Bellis, Claire
    Bonnefond, Amélie
    Borodulin, Katja
    Buchman, Aron S
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Choh, Audrey C
    Choi, Hyung Jin
    Curran, Joanne E
    de Groot, Lisette C P G M
    De Jager, Philip L
    Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M
    Enneman, Anke W
    Eury, Elodie
    Evans, Daniel S
    Forsen, Tom
    Friedrich, Nele
    Fumeron, Frédéric
    Garcia, Melissa E
    Gärtner, Simone
    Han, Bok-Ghee
    Havulinna, Aki S
    Hayward, Caroline
    Hernandez, Dena
    Hillege, Hans
    Ittermann, Till
    Kent, Jack W
    Kolcic, Ivana
    Laatikainen, Tiina
    Lahti, Jari
    Mateo Leach, Irene
    Lee, Christine G
    Lee, Jong-Young
    Liu, Tian
    Liu, Youfang
    Lobbens, Stéphane
    Loh, Marie
    Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Nalls, Mike A
    Nielson, Carrie M
    Oozageer, Laticia
    Pascoe, Laura
    Paternoster, Lavinia
    Polašek, Ozren
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Sarzynski, Mark A
    Shin, Chan Soo
    Narančić, Nina Smolej
    Spira, Dominik
    Srikanth, Priya
    Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth
    Sung, Yun Ju
    Swart, Karin M A
    Taittonen, Leena
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Tikkanen, Emmi
    van der Velde, Nathalie
    van Schoor, Natasja M
    Verweij, Niek
    Wright, Alan F
    Yu, Lei
    Zmuda, Joseph M
    Eklund, Niina
    Forrester, Terrence
    Grarup, Niels
    Jackson, Anne U
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Kuulasmaa, Teemu
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Lichtner, Peter
    Luan, Jian'an
    Mahajan, Anubha
    Männistö, Satu
    Palmer, Cameron D
    Ried, Janina S
    Scott, Robert A
    Stancáková, Alena
    Wagner, Peter J
    Demirkan, Ayse
    Döring, Angela
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Kiel, Douglas P
    Kühnel, Brigitte
    Mangino, Massimo
    Mcknight, Barbara
    Menni, Cristina
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R
    Oostra, Ben A
    Shuldiner, Alan R
    Song, Kijoung
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    van Duijn, Cornelia M
    Vollenweider, Peter
    White, Charles C
    Boehnke, Michael
    Boettcher, Yvonne
    Cooper, Richard S
    Forouhi, Nita G
    Gieger, Christian
    Grallert, Harald
    Hingorani, Aroon
    Jørgensen, Torben
    Jousilahti, Pekka
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Kumari, Meena
    Laakso, Markku
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Linneberg, Allan
    Luke, Amy
    Mckenzie, Colin A
    Palotie, Aarno
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Peters, Annette
    Strauch, Konstantin
    Tayo, Bamidele O
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Bennett, David A
    Bertram, Lars
    Blangero, John
    Blüher, Matthias
    Bouchard, Claude
    Campbell, Harry
    Cho, Nam H
    Cummings, Steven R
    Czerwinski, Stefan A
    Demuth, Ilja
    Eckardt, Rahel
    Eriksson, Johan G
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Franco, Oscar H
    Froguel, Philippe
    Gansevoort, Ron T
    Hansen, Torben
    Harris, Tamara B
    Hastie, Nicholas
    Heliövaara, Markku
    Hofman, Albert
    Jordan, Joanne M
    Jula, Antti
    Kähönen, Mika
    Kajantie, Eero
    Knekt, Paul B
    Koskinen, Seppo
    Kovacs, Peter
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Liu, Yongmei
    Orwoll, Eric S
    Osmond, Clive
    Perola, Markus
    Pérusse, Louis
    Raitakari, Olli T
    Rankinen, Tuomo
    Rao, D C
    Rice, Treva K
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Rudan, Igor
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Sørensen, Thorkild I A
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Tönjes, Anke
    Towne, Bradford
    Tranah, Gregory J
    Tremblay, Angelo
    Uitterlinden, André G
    van der Harst, Pim
    Vartiainen, Erkki
    Viikari, Jorma S
    Vitart, Veronique
    Vohl, Marie-Claude
    Völzke, Henry
    Walker, Mark
    Wallaschofski, Henri
    Wild, Sarah
    Wilson, James F
    Yengo, Loïc
    Bishop, D Timothy
    Borecki, Ingrid B
    Chambers, John C
    Cupples, L Adrienne
    Dehghan, Abbas
    Deloukas, Panos
    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh
    Fox, Caroline
    Furey, Terrence S
    Franke, Lude
    Han, Jiali
    Hunter, David J
    Karjalainen, Juha
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Kaplan, Robert C
    Kooner, Jaspal S
    McCarthy, Mark I
    Murabito, Joanne M
    Morris, Andrew P
    Bishop, Julia A N
    North, Kari E
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Ong, Ken K
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Richards, J Brent
    Schadt, Eric E
    Spector, Tim D
    Widén, Elisabeth
    Willer, Cristen J
    Yang, Jian
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Mohlke, Karen L
    Hirschhorn, Joel N
    Pospisilik, John Andrew
    Zillikens, M Carola
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas Oskari
    Loos, Ruth J F
    New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 10495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effect on BF% than on BMI, suggestive of a primary association with adiposity, while five loci showed larger effects on BMI than on BF%, suggesting association with both fat and lean mass. In particular, the loci more strongly associated with BF% showed distinct cross-phenotype association signatures with a range of cardiometabolic traits revealing new insights in the link between adiposity and disease risk.

  • 175. Luis, Desiree