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  • 151.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Seasonal variations of insulin sensitivity from a euglycemic insulin clamp in elderly men2012In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Seasonal variations in hemoglobin-A1c have been reported in diabetic patients, but the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated.

    Aims

    To study if insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and fasting plasma glucose showed seasonal variations in a Swedish population-based cohort of elderly men.

    Methods

    Altogether 1117 men were investigated with a euglycemic insulin clamp and measurements of fasting plasma glucose and insulin secretion after an oral glucose tolerance test. Values were analyzed in linear regression models with an indicator variable for winter/summer season and outdoor temperature as predictors.

    Results

     During winter, insulin sensitivity (M/I, unit = 100 × mg × min-1 × kg-1/(mU × L-1)) was 11.0% lower (4.84 versus 5.44, P = 0.0003), incremental area under the insulin curve was 16.4% higher (1167 versus 1003 mU/L, P = 0.007). Fasting plasma glucose was, however, not statistically significantly different (5.80 versus 5.71 mmol/L, P = 0.28) compared to the summer season. There was an association between outdoor temperature and M/I (0.57 units increase (95% CI 0.29–0.82, P < 0.0001) per 10°C increase of outdoor temperature) independent of winter/summer season. Adjustment for life-style factors, type 2 diabetes, and medication did not alter these results.Read More:http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/03009734.2011.628422

    Conclusions

    Insulin sensitivity showed seasonal variations with lower values during the winter and higher during the summer season. Inverse compensatory variations of insulin secretion resulted in only minor variations of fasting plasma glucose. Insulin sensitivity was associated with outdoor temperature. These phenomena should be further investigated in diabetic patients.

  • 152.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Early Insulin Response and Insulin Sensitivity are Equally Important as Predictors of Glucose Tolerance after Correction for Measurement Errors2009In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 219-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: We estimated measurement error (ME) corrected effects of   insulin sensitivity (M/I), from euglycaemic insulin clamp, and insulin   secretion, measured as early insulin response (EIR) from oral glucose   tolerance test (OGTT), on fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c and type 2   diabetes longitudinally and cross-sectional.   Methods: : In a population-based study (n = 1128 men) 17 men made   replicate measurements to estimate ME at age 71 years. Effect of 1 SD   decrease of predictors M/I and EIR on longitudinal response variables   fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c at follow-ups up to 11 years,   were estimated using uncorrected and ME-corrected (with the regression   calibration method) regression models.   Results: : Uncorrected effect on FPG at age 77 years was larger for M/I   than for EIR (effect difference 0.10 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.00;0.21), while   ME-corrected effects were similar (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.13;0.15   mmol/l). EIR had greater ME-corrected impact than M/I on HbA1c at age   82 years (-0.11%, -0.28; -0.01%).   Conclusions: : Due to higher ME effect of EIR on glycaemia is   underestimated as compared with M/I. By correcting for ME valid   estimates of relative contributions of insulin secretion and insulin   sensitivity on glycaemia are obtained.

  • 153.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Garmo, Hans
    Regional Oncologic Center, University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Correction for regression dilution bias using replicates from subjects with extreme first measurements2007In: Statistics in Medicine, ISSN 0277-6715, E-ISSN 1097-0258, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 2246-2257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The least squares estimator of the slope in a simple linear regression model will be biased towards zero when the predictor is measured with random error, i.e. intra-individual variation or technical measurement error. A correction factor can be estimated from a reliability study where one replicate is available on a subset of subjects from the main study. Previous work in this field has assumed that the reliability study constitutes a random subsample from the main study.We propose that a more efficient design is to collect replicates for subjects with extreme values on their first measurement. A variance formula for this estimator of the correction factor is presented. The variance for the corrected estimated regression coefficient for the extreme selection technique is also derived and compared with random subsampling. Results show that variances for corrected regression coefficients can be markedly reduced with extreme selection. The variance gain can be estimated from the main study data. The results are illustrated using Monte Carlo simulations and an application on the relation between insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin using data from the population-based ULSAM study.In conclusion, an investigator faced with the planning of a reliability study may wish to consider an extreme selection design in order to improve precision at a given number of subjects or alternatively decrease the number of subjects at a given precision.

  • 154.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Falun, Sweden.
    Repeated measures of body mass index and waist circumference in the assessment of mortality risk in patients with myocardial infarction2019In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 78-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Weight loss is recommended for myocardial infarction (MI) patients with overweight or obesity. It has, however, been suggested that obese patients have better prognosis than normal-weight patients have, but also that central obesity is harmful. The aim of this study was to examine associations between repeated measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and all-cause mortality.

    Methods and results: A total of 14,224 MI patients aged <75 years in Sweden between the years 2004 and 2013 had measurements of risk factors at hospital discharge. The patients' BMI and WC were recorded in secondary prevention clinics two months and one year after hospital discharge. We collected mortality data up to 8.3 years after the last visit. There were 721 deaths. We used anthropometric measures at the two-month visit and the change from the two-month to the one-year visit. With adjustments for risk factors and the other anthropometric measure the hazard ratio (HR) per standard deviation in a Cox proportional hazard regression model for mortality was 0.64 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.74) for BMI and 1.55 (95% CI 1.34-1.79) for WC, and 1.43 (95% CI 1.17-1.74) for a BMI decrease from month two to one year of more than 0.6 kg/m(2). Low BMI and high WC were associated with the highest mortality.

    Conclusion: High WC is harmful regardless of BMI in MI patients. Reduced BMI during the first year after MI is, however, associated with higher mortality, potentially being an indicator of deteriorated health.

  • 155.
    Berglund, Åke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ullen, Anders
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Solna, Sweden..
    Lisyanskaya, Alla
    City Clin Oncol Ctr, St Petersburg State Healthcare Inst, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Orlov, Sergey
    St Petersburg State Med Univ, State Educ Inst Higher Profess Educ, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Hagberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Solna, Sweden..
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Spira, Jack
    Oncopeptides AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Harmenberg, Johan
    Oncopeptides AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jerling, Markus
    Oncopeptides AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Alvfors, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ringbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Nordstrom, Eva
    Oncopeptides AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Soderlind, Karin
    Oncopeptides AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    First-in-human, phase I/IIa clinical study of the peptidase potentiated alkylator melflufen administered every three weeks to patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies2015In: Investigational new drugs, ISSN 0167-6997, E-ISSN 1573-0646, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 1232-1241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Melflufen (melphalan flufenamide, previously designated J1) is an optimized and targeted derivative of melphalan, hydrolyzed by aminopeptidases overexpressed in tumor cells resulting in selective release and trapping of melphalan, and enhanced activity in preclinical models. Methods This was a prospective, single-armed, open-label, first-in-human, dose-finding phase I/IIa study in 45 adult patients with advanced and progressive solid tumors without standard treatment options. Most common tumor types were ovarian carcinoma (n = 20) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, n = 11). Results In the dose-escalating phase I part of the study, seven patients were treated with increasing fixed doses of melflufen (25-130 mg) Q3W. In the subsequent phase IIa part, 38 patients received in total 115 cycles of therapy at doses of 30-75 mg. No dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed at 25 and 50 mg; at higher doses DLTs were reversible neutropenias and thrombocytopenias, particularly evident in heavily pretreated patients, and the recommended phase II dose (RPTD) was set to 50 mg. Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) evaluation after 3 cycles of therapy (27 patients) showed partial response in one (ovarian cancer), and stable disease in 18 patients. One NSCLC patient received nine cycles of melflufen and progressed after 7 months of therapy. Conclusions In conclusion, melflufen can safely be given to cancer patients, and the toxicity profile was as expected for alkylating agents; RPTD is 50 mg Q3W. Reversible and manageable bone marrow suppression was identified as a DLT. Clinical activity is suggested in ovarian cancer, but modest activity in treatment of refractory NSCLC.

  • 156. Bergmeijer, T. O.
    et al.
    Angiolillo, D. J.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Wagner, H.
    Brown, P. B.
    Zhou, C.
    Jakubowski, J. A.
    Moser, B. A.
    Erlinge, D.
    Ten Berg, J. M.
    Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of prasugrel 5 mg in low body weight patients and prasugrel 10 mg in higher body weight patients2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no Suppl 1, p. 315-315Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 157. Bergström, G
    et al.
    Berglund, G
    Blomberg, A
    Brandberg, J
    Engström, G
    Engvall, J
    Eriksson, M
    de Faire, U
    Flinck, A
    Hansson, Mats G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Hedblad, B
    Hjelmgren, O
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jernberg, T
    Johnsson, Å
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Löfdahl, C-G
    Melander, O
    Östgren, C J
    Persson, A
    Persson, M
    Sandström, A
    Schmidt, C
    Söderberg, S
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Toren, K
    Waldenström, A
    Wedel, H
    Vikgren, J
    Fagerberg, B
    Rosengren, A
    The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

  • 158.
    Bergström, Monica Frick
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Extent and consequences of misclassified injury diagnoses in a national hospital discharge registry2011In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 108-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Classification of injuries and estimation of injury severity on the basis of ICD-10 injury coding are powerful epidemiological tools. Little is known about the characteristics and consequences of primary coding errors and their consequences for such applications. Materials and methods From the Swedish national hospital discharge register, 15 899 incident injury cases primarily admitted to the two hospitals in Uppsala County between 2000 and 2004 were identified. Of these, 967 randomly selected patient records were reviewed. Errors in injury diagnosis were corrected, and the consequences of these changes were analysed. Results Out of 1370 injury codes, 10% were corrected, but 95% of the injury codes were correct to the third position. In 21% (95% CI 19% to 24%) of 967 hospital admissions, at least one ICD-10 code for injury was changed or added, but only 13% (127) had some change made to their injury mortality diagnosis matrix classification. Among the cases with coding errors, the mean ICD-based injury severity score changed slightly (difference 0.016; 95% CI 0.007 to 0.032). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.892 for predicting hospital mortality and remained essentially unchanged after the correction of codes (95% CI for difference -0.022 to 0.013). Conclusion Errors in ICD-10-coded injuries in hospital discharge data were common, but the consequences for injury categorisation were moderate and the consequences for injury severity estimates were in most cases minor. The error rate for detailed levels of cause-of-injury codes was high and may be detrimental for identifying specific targets for prevention.

  • 159.
    Berling Holm, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Bornefalk Hermansson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Knutsson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Örebro Univ Hosp, Dept Otolaryngol, Örebro, Sweden.
    von Unge, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Surgery for Chronic Otitis Media Causes Greater Taste Disturbance Than Surgery for Otosclerosis.2019In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 40, no 1, p. e32-e39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Patients with otosclerosis more often complain about postoperative taste disturbance than patients with chronic otitis media, which seems paradoxical. We aim to investigate if and potentially why this seems to be the case, since the chorda tympani nerve (CTN) is thought to be severely traumatized less frequently during surgery in the former than in the latter.

    Study Design: Prospective cohort study.

    Setting: Department of Otorhinolaryngology at Hospital of Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden.

    Patients: Sixty-five adults undergoing primary middle ear surgery were included. Thirty-seven were operated on for chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma (CSOM) and 28 for otosclerosis.

    Interventions: Middle ear surgery due to otosclerosis or CSOM. Subjective and objective taste measurements and quality of life (QoL) questionnaire.

    Main Outcome Measures: Taste was assessed using electrogustometry (EGM) and the filter paper disc (FPD) method before and up to 1 year after surgery. Questionnaires on taste disturbance, including a visual analogue scale (VAS), and QoL were completed before and up to 1 year after surgery.

    Results: Subjective taste disturbance anytime during the 1-year follow-up were reported by 62 and 46%, respectively. The difference in EGM 1 week after surgery compared with preoperative EGM was significantly greater among CSOM patients than otosclerosis. One year postoperatively, the difference is non-significant.

    Conclusion: Surgery for CSOM causes greater initial and more long-lasting taste disturbances as compared with surgery for otosclerosis. One-year postoperative taste normalizes for both CSOM and otosclerosis patients according to VAS and EGM measurements. No real change in QoL was seen 1-year postoperatively.

    Level of evidence: Level 2 evidence is prospective observational research with an experimental design.

  • 160. Berndt, Sonja I.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maegi, Reedik
    Ganna, Andrea
    Wheeler, Eleanor
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Justice, Anne E.
    Monda, Keri L.
    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.
    Day, Felix R.
    Esko, Tonu
    Fall, Tove
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Gentilini, Davide
    Jackson, Anne U.
    Luan, Jian'an
    Randall, Joshua C.
    Vedantam, Sailaja
    Willer, Cristen J.
    Winkler, Thomas W.
    Wood, Andrew R.
    Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie
    Hu, Yi-Juan
    Lee, Sang Hong
    Liang, Liming
    Lin, Dan-Yu
    Min, Josine L.
    Neale, Benjamin M.
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    Yang, Jian
    Albrecht, Eva
    Amin, Najaf
    Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.
    Cadby, Gemma
    den Heijer, Martin
    Eklund, Niina
    Fischer, Krista
    Goel, Anuj
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Huffman, Jennifer E.
    Jarick, Ivonne
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johnson, Toby
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Koenig, Inke R.
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Kutalik, Zoltn
    Lamina, Claudia
    Lecoeur, Cecile
    Li, Guo
    Mangino, Massimo
    McArdle, Wendy L.
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Ngwa, Julius S.
    Nolte, Ilja M.
    Paternoster, Lavinia
    Pechlivanis, Sonali
    Perola, Markus
    Peters, Marjolein J.
    Preuss, Michael
    Rose, Lynda M.
    Shi, Jianxin
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    Surakka, Ida
    Teumer, Alexander
    Trip, Mieke D.
    Tyrer, Jonathan
    Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Waite, Lindsay L.
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Absher, Devin
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    Atalay, Mustafa
    Attwood, Antony P.
    Balmforth, Anthony J.
    Basart, Hanneke
    Beilby, John
    Bonnycastle, Lori L.
    Brambilla, Paolo
    Bruinenberg, Marcel
    Campbell, Harry
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Chines, Peter S.
    Collins, Francis S.
    Connell, John M.
    Cookson, William O.
    de Faire, Ulf
    de Vegt, Femmie
    Dei, Mariano
    Dimitriou, Maria
    Edkins, Sarah
    Estrada, Karol
    Evans, David M.
    Farrall, Martin
    Ferrario, Marco M.
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Franke, Lude
    Frau, Francesca
    Gejman, Pablo V.
    Grallert, Harald
    Groenberg, Henrik
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Hall, Alistair S.
    Hall, Per
    Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa
    Hayward, Caroline
    Heard-Costa, Nancy L.
    Heath, Andrew C.
    Hebebrand, Johannes
    Homuth, Georg
    Hu, Frank B.
    Hunt, Sarah E.
    Hyppoenen, Elina
    Iribarren, Carlos
    Jacobs, Kevin B.
    Jansson, John-Olov
    Jula, Antti
    Kahonen, Mika
    Kathiresan, Sekar
    Kee, Frank
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Kraja, Aldi T.
    Kumari, Meena
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Laitinen, Jaana H.
    Lakka, Timo A.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindstrom, Jaana
    Liu, Jianjun
    Liuzzi, Antonio
    Lokki, Marja-Liisa
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Madden, Pamela A.
    Magnusson, Patrik K.
    Manunta, Paolo
    Marek, Diana
    Maerz, Winfried
    Leach, Irene Mateo
    McKnight, Barbara
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Mihailov, Evelin
    Milani, Lili
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Mooser, Vincent
    Muehleisen, Thomas W.
    Munroe, Patricia B.
    Musk, Arthur W.
    Narisu, Narisu
    Navis, Gerjan
    Nicholson, George
    Nohr, Ellen A.
    Ong, Ken K.
    Oostra, Ben A.
    Palmer, Colin N. A.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Peden, John F.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Peters, Annette
    Polasek, Ozren
    Pouta, Anneli
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Puetter, Carolin
    Radhakrishnan, Aparna
    Raitakari, Olli
    Rendon, Augusto
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Rudan, Igor
    Saaristo, Timo E.
    Sambrook, Jennifer G.
    Sanders, Alan R.
    Sanna, Serena
    Saramies, Jouko
    Schipf, Sabine
    Schreiber, Stefan
    Schunkert, Heribert
    Shin, So-Youn
    Signorini, Stefano
    Sinisalo, Juha
    Skrobek, Boris
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Stancakova, Alena
    Stark, Klaus
    Stephens, Jonathan C.
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Stolk, Ronald P.
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Swift, Amy J.
    Theodoraki, Eirini V.
    Thorand, Barbara
    Tregouet, David-Alexandre
    Tremoli, Elena
    Van der Klauw, Melanie M.
    van Meurs, Joyce B. J.
    Vermeulen, Sita H.
    Viikari, Jorma
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Vitart, Veronique
    Waeber, Gerard
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Widen, Elisabeth
    Wild, Sarah H.
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Winkelmann, Bernhard R.
    Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.
    Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.
    Wong, Andrew
    Wright, Alan F.
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Boehm, Bernhard O.
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Caulfield, Mark J.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Cusi, Daniele
    Dedoussis, George V.
    Erdmann, Jeanette
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Froguel, Philippe
    Gieger, Christian
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Hamsten, Anders
    Harris, Tamara B.
    Hengstenberg, Christian
    Hicks, Andrew A.
    Hingorani, Aroon
    Hinney, Anke
    Hofman, Albert
    Hovingh, Kees G.
    Hveem, Kristian
    Illig, Thomas
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Joeckel, Karl-Heinz
    Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Kuh, Diana
    Laakso, Markku
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Levinson, Douglas F.
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Metspalu, Andres
    Morris, Andrew D.
    Nieminen, Markku S.
    Njolstad, Inger
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Ouwehand, Willem H.
    Palmer, Lyle J.
    Penninx, Brenda
    Power, Chris
    Province, Michael A.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Qi, Lu
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    Snieder, Harold
    Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Spector, Timothy D.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Tonjes, Anke
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    van der Harst, Pim
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Wallaschofski, Henri
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Watkins, Hugh
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Wilson, James F.
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Assimes, Themistocles L.
    Barroso, Ines
    Boehnke, Michael
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Deloukas, Panos
    Fox, Caroline S.
    Frayling, Timothy
    Groop, Leif C.
    Haritunian, Talin
    Heid, Iris M.
    Hunter, David
    Kaplan, Robert C.
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Moffatt, Miriam F.
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R.
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Schadt, Eric E.
    Schlessinger, David
    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur
    Strachan, David P.
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Visscher, Peter M.
    Di Blasio, Anna Maria
    Hirschhorn, Joel N.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Meyre, David
    Scherag, Andr
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.
    North, Kari E.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture2013In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 501-U69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.

  • 161. Berndt, Sonja I.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maegi, Reedik
    Ganna, Andrea
    Wheeler, Eleanor
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Justice, Anne E.
    Monda, Keri L.
    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.
    Day, Felix R.
    Esko, Tonu
    Fall, Tove
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Gentilini, Davide
    Jackson, Anne U.
    Luan, Jian'an
    Randall, Joshua C.
    Vedantam, Sailaja
    Willer, Cristen J.
    Winkler, Thomas W.
    Wood, Andrew R.
    Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie
    Hu, Yi-Juan
    Lee, Sang Hong
    Liang, Liming
    Lin, Dan-Yu
    Min, Josine L.
    Neale, Benjamin M.
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    Yang, Jian
    Albrecht, Eva
    Amin, Najaf
    Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.
    Cadby, Gemma
    den Heijer, Martin
    Eklund, Niina
    Fischer, Krista
    Goel, Anuj
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Huffman, Jennifer E.
    Jarick, Ivonne
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johnson, Toby
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Koenig, Inke R.
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Kutalik, Zoltn
    Lamina, Claudia
    Lecoeur, Cecile
    Li, Guo
    Mangino, Massimo
    McArdle, Wendy L.
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Ngwa, Julius S.
    Nolte, Ilja M.
    Paternoster, Lavinia
    Pechlivanis, Sonali
    Perola, Markus
    Peters, Marjolein J.
    Preuss, Michael
    Rose, Lynda M.
    Shi, Jianxin
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    Surakka, Ida
    Teumer, Alexander
    Trip, Mieke D.
    Tyrer, Jonathan
    Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Waite, Lindsay L.
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Absher, Devin
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    Atalay, Mustafa
    Attwood, Antony P.
    Balmforth, Anthony J.
    Basart, Hanneke
    Beilby, John
    Bonnycastle, Lori L.
    Brambilla, Paolo
    Bruinenberg, Marcel
    Campbell, Harry
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Chines, Peter S.
    Collins, Francis S.
    Connell, John M.
    Cookson, William O.
    de Faire, Ulf
    de Vegt, Femmie
    Dei, Mariano
    Dimitriou, Maria
    Edkins, Sarah
    Estrada, Karol
    Evans, David M.
    Farrall, Martin
    Ferrario, Marco M.
    Ferrieres, Jean
    Franke, Lude
    Frau, Francesca
    Gejman, Pablo V.
    Grallert, Harald
    Groenberg, Henrik
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Hall, Alistair S.
    Hall, Per
    Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa
    Hayward, Caroline
    Heard-Costa, Nancy L.
    Heath, Andrew C.
    Hebebrand, Johannes
    Homuth, Georg
    Hu, Frank B.
    Hunt, Sarah E.
    Hyppoenen, Elina
    Iribarren, Carlos
    Jacobs, Kevin B.
    Jansson, John-Olov
    Jula, Antti
    Kahonen, Mika
    Kathiresan, Sekar
    Kee, Frank
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Kraja, Aldi T.
    Kumari, Meena
    Kuulasmaa, Kari
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Laitinen, Jaana H.
    Lakka, Timo A.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindstrom, Jaana
    Liu, Jianjun
    Liuzzi, Antonio
    Lokki, Marja-Liisa
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Madden, Pamela A.
    Magnusson, Patrik K.
    Manunta, Paolo
    Marek, Diana
    Maerz, Winfried
    Leach, Irene Mateo
    McKnight, Barbara
    Medland, Sarah E.
    Mihailov, Evelin
    Milani, Lili
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    Mooser, Vincent
    Muehleisen, Thomas W.
    Munroe, Patricia B.
    Musk, Arthur W.
    Narisu, Narisu
    Navis, Gerjan
    Nicholson, George
    Nohr, Ellen A.
    Ong, Ken K.
    Oostra, Ben A.
    Palmer, Colin N. A.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Peden, John F.
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Peters, Annette
    Polasek, Ozren
    Pouta, Anneli
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Puetter, Carolin
    Radhakrishnan, Aparna
    Raitakari, Olli
    Rendon, Augusto
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Rudan, Igor
    Saaristo, Timo E.
    Sambrook, Jennifer G.
    Sanders, Alan R.
    Sanna, Serena
    Saramies, Jouko
    Schipf, Sabine
    Schreiber, Stefan
    Schunkert, Heribert
    Shin, So-Youn
    Signorini, Stefano
    Sinisalo, Juha
    Skrobek, Boris
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Stancakova, Alena
    Stark, Klaus
    Stephens, Jonathan C.
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Stolk, Ronald P.
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Swift, Amy J.
    Theodoraki, Eirini V.
    Thorand, Barbara
    Tregouet, David-Alexandre
    Tremoli, Elena
    Van der Klauw, Melanie M.
    van Meurs, Joyce B. J.
    Vermeulen, Sita H.
    Viikari, Jorma
    Virtamo, Jarmo
    Vitart, Veronique
    Waeber, Gerard
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Widen, Elisabeth
    Wild, Sarah H.
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Winkelmann, Bernhard R.
    Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.
    Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.
    Wong, Andrew
    Wright, Alan F.
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Boehm, Bernhard O.
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Caulfield, Mark J.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Cusi, Daniele
    Dedoussis, George V.
    Erdmann, Jeanette
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Froguel, Philippe
    Gieger, Christian
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Hamsten, Anders
    Harris, Tamara B.
    Hengstenberg, Christian
    Hicks, Andrew A.
    Hingorani, Aroon
    Hinney, Anke
    Hofman, Albert
    Hovingh, Kees G.
    Hveem, Kristian
    Illig, Thomas
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Joeckel, Karl-Heinz
    Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Kuh, Diana
    Laakso, Markku
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Levinson, Douglas F.
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    Metspalu, Andres
    Morris, Andrew D.
    Nieminen, Markku S.
    Njolstad, Inger
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Ouwehand, Willem H.
    Palmer, Lyle J.
    Penninx, Brenda
    Power, Chris
    Province, Michael A.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Qi, Lu
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    Snieder, Harold
    Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Spector, Timothy D.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Tonjes, Anke
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    van der Harst, Pim
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Wallaschofski, Henri
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Watkins, Hugh
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Wilson, James F.
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Assimes, Themistocles L.
    Barroso, Ines
    Boehnke, Michael
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Deloukas, Panos
    Fox, Caroline S.
    Frayling, Timothy
    Groop, Leif C.
    Haritunian, Talin
    Heid, Iris M.
    Hunter, David
    Kaplan, Robert C.
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Moffatt, Miriam F.
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    O'Connell, Jeffrey R.
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Schadt, Eric E.
    Schlessinger, David
    Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur
    Strachan, David P.
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Visscher, Peter M.
    Di Blasio, Anna Maria
    Hirschhorn, Joel N.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Meyre, David
    Scherag, Andr
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.
    North, Kari E.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture2013In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 501-U69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.

  • 162.
    Berne, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Flyvbjerg, A.
    Gronbaek, H.
    Jensevik, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    The association between IGFBP-1 and type 2 diabetes is modified by degrees of insulin sensitivity and early insulin response2010In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 53Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Berntson, Lillemor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Fasth, Anders
    Aalto, Kristiina
    Herlin, Troels
    Nielsen, Susan
    Nordal, Ellen
    Rygg, Marite
    Zak, Marek
    Assessment of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The number and the size of joints matter2007In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 2106-2111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA. METHODS: One randomly chosen hospital visit was studied for each of 312 patients with JIA, with regard to disease activity variables. The physician global assessment score visual analog scale (physician GA) was used as a dependent variable in comparisons between potential disease activity variables. Previous studies have shown this variable to be the most sensitive to changes in JIA disease activity and to be comparable between patients. RESULTS: Based on Spearman's rank order correlation the number of active joints had a strong association with the physician GA. The median physician GA score rose markedly for each active large joint, but less for small joints, although small joints were also statistically important in assessing disease activity. Among the laboratory data, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and platelet count showed weak correlations to the physician GA. CONCLUSION: In preparation of a disease activity score for children with JIA the importance of both the number and size of joints involved needs further evaluation.

  • 164.
    Besingi, Welisane
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Smoke-related DNA methylation changes in the etiology of human disease2014In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 2290-2297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to environmental and lifestyle factors, such as cigarette smoking, affect the epigenome and might mediate risk for diseases and cancers. We have performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study to determine the effect of smoke and snuff (smokeless tobacco) on DNA methylation. A total of 95 sites were differentially methylated [false discovery rate (FDR) q-values < 0.05] in smokers and a subset of the differentially methylated loci were also differentially expressed in smokers. We found no sites, neither any biological functions nor molecular processes enriched for smoke-less tobacco-related differential DNA methylation. This suggests that methylation changes are not caused by the basic components of the tobacco but from its burnt products. Instead, we see a clear enrichment (FDR q-value < 0.05) for genes, including CPOX, CDKN1A and PTK2, involved in response to arsenic-containing substance, which agrees with smoke containing small amounts of arsenic. A large number of biological functions and molecular processes with links to disease conditions are also enriched (FDR q-value < 0.05) for smoke-related DNA methylation changes. These include 'insulin receptor binding', and 'negative regulation of glucose import' which are associated with diabetes, 'positive regulation of interleukin-6-mediated signaling pathway', 'regulation of T-helper 2 cell differentiation', 'positive regulation of interleukin-13 production' which are associated with the immune system and 'sertoli cell fate commitment' which is important for male fertility. Since type 2 diabetes, repressed immune system and infertility have previously been associated with smoking, our results suggest that this might be mediated by DNA methylation changes.

  • 165.
    Beskow, Anna H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Uppsala Biobank-the development of a biobank organization in a local, regional, and national setting2019In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 6-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A biobank is generally in an international setting considered as a sample collection with linked data. In Sweden we have a lot of sample collections, but the definition of a biobank has changed, and it has become an organization that administrates many sample collections as well as an infrastructure to support research. Uppsala Biobank was started in September 2008 as a joint biobank organization between Uppsala County Council and Uppsala University. At the start there were 138 registered biobanks in Uppsala for these two principals. The decision was to have only one biobank, where all previous biobanks would be transformed to be sample collections. Uppsala Biobank has gone from the wish to centralize biobanking administration to be a research infrastructure, a national model for hospital-integrated biobanking, a support structure for biobanking activities in the health care region, and the local competence center for all biobank issues in Uppsala.

  • 166.
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    et al.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Heart & Vasc Ctr, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Fox, Kim
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England;Royal Brompton Hosp, London, England.
    Harrington, Robert A.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, SCCR, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Leiter, Lawrence A.
    Univ Toronto, St Michaels Hosp, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Mehta, Shamir R.
    Hamilton Hlth Sci, Populat Hlth Res Inst, Hamilton, ON, Canada;McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Simon, Tabassome
    Sorbonne Univ Paris, Hop St Antoine, AP HP, Dept Clin Pharmacol URCEST, Paris, France.
    Andersson, Marielle
    AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Dept Cardiovasc Renal & Metab, Molndal, Sweden.
    Himmelmann, Anders
    AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Dept Cardiovasc Renal & Metab, Molndal, Sweden.
    Ridderstrale, Wilhelm
    AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Dept Cardiovasc Renal & Metab, Molndal, Sweden.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Dept Med Sci, Cardiol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Steg, Philippe Gabriel
    Univ Paris Diderot, Hop Bichat, AP HP, Dept Hosp Univ FIRE,F CRIN Network,FACT, Paris, France;Univ Paris Diderot, Hop Bichat, AP HP, Dept Hosp Univ FIRE,INSERM,U 1148, Paris, France;Imperial Coll, Royal Brompton Hosp, NHLI, London, England.
    Steg, Gabriel
    Diaz, Rafael
    Amerena, John
    Huber, Kurt
    Sinnaeve, Peter
    Nicolau, Jose Carlos
    Kerr Saraiva, Jose Francisco
    Petrov, Ivo
    Corbalan, Ramon
    Ge, Junbo
    Zhao, Qiang
    Botero, Rodrigo
    Widimsky, Petr
    Kristensen, Steen Dalby
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Danchin, Nicolas
    Darius, Harald
    Fat, Tse Hung
    Kiss, Robert Gabor
    Pais, Prem
    Lev, Eli
    De Luca, Leonardo
    Goto, Shinya
    Ramos Lopez, Gabriel Arturo
    Cornel, Jan Hein
    Kontny, Frederic
    Medina, Felix
    Babilonia, Noe
    Opolski, Grzegorz
    Vinereanu, Dragos
    Zateyshchikov, Dmitry
    Ruda, Mikhail
    Elamin, Omer
    Kovar, Frantisek
    Dalby, Anthony John
    Jeong, Myung Ho
    Bueno, Hector
    James, Stefan
    Chiang, Chern-En
    Tresukosol, Damras
    Ongen, Zeki
    Ray, Kausik
    Parkhomenko, Alexander
    McGuire, Darren
    Kosiborod, Mikhail
    Nguyen, Tuan Quang
    Wallentin, Lars
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    Eikelboom, John W.
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Lee, Kerry L.
    Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.
    Ellis, Stephen J.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Holmgren, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Heldestad, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hallberg, Theresa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Renlund Grausne, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Alm, Cristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michelgård Palmquist, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svanberg, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Capell, Warren H.
    Nehler, Mark R.
    Hiatt, William R.
    Bonaca, Marc P.
    Houser, Stacey
    Bachler, Susie
    Jaeger, Nicole
    Aunes, Maria
    Brusehed, Asa
    Chen, Jersey
    Dahlof, Bjorn
    Dolezalova, Jitka
    Domzol, Maciej
    Findley, Magdalena
    Holmberg, Niclas
    Jahreskog, Marianne
    Knutsson, Mikael
    Kruszewski, Jakub
    Leonsson-Zachrisson, Maria
    Stark, Maj
    Winder, Elin
    Rationale, design and baseline characteristics of the effect of ticagrelor on health outcomes in diabetes mellitus patients Intervention study2019In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 498-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the setting of prior myocardial infarction, the oral antiplatelet ticagrelor added to aspirin reduced the risk of recurrent ischemic events, especially, in those with diabetes mellitus. Patients with stable coronary disease and diabetes are also at elevated risk and might benefit from dual antiplatelet therapy. The Effect of Ticagrelor on Health Outcomes in diabEtes Mellitus patients Intervention Study (THEMIS, NCT01991795) is a Phase 3b randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of ticagrelor vs placebo, on top of low dose aspirin. Patients >= 50 years with type 2 diabetes receiving anti-diabetic medications for at least 6 months with stable coronary artery disease as determined by a history of previous percutaneous coronary intervention, bypass grafting, or angiographic stenosis of >= 50% of at least one coronary artery were enrolled. Patients with known prior myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke were excluded. The primary efficacy endpoint is a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The primary safety endpoint is Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction major bleeding. A total of 19 220 patients worldwide have been randomized and at least 1385 adjudicated primary efficacy endpoint events are expected to be available for analysis, with an expected average follow-up of 40 months (maximum 58 months). Most of the exposure is on a 60 mg twice daily dose, as the dose was lowered from 90 mg twice daily partway into the study. The results may revise the boundaries of efficacy for dual antiplatelet therapy and whether it has a role outside acute coronary syndromes, prior myocardial infarction, or percutaneous coronary intervention.

  • 167.
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    et al.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Heart & Vasc Ctr, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Steg, Philippe Gabriel
    Univ Paris, Hop Bichat, AP HP,INSERM,U1148, French Alliance Cardiovasc Trials,Dept Hosp Univ, Paris, France;Royal Brompton Hosp, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.
    Mehta, Shamir R.
    Hamilton Hlth Sci, Populat Hlth Res Inst, Hamilton, ON, Canada;McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Leiter, Lawrence A.
    Univ Toronto, St Michaels Hosp, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Simon, Tabassome
    Sorbonne Univ, Hop St Antoine, AP HP, Dept Clin Pharmacol,Clin Res Platform URCEST CRB, Paris, France.
    Fox, Kim
    Royal Brompton Hosp, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Andersson, Marielle
    AstraZeneca BioPharmaceut Res & Dev, Late Stage Dev, Cardiovasc Renal & Metab, Molndal, Sweden.
    Himmelmann, Anders
    AstraZeneca BioPharmaceut Res & Dev, Late Stage Dev, Cardiovasc Renal & Metab, Molndal, Sweden.
    Ridderstrale, Wilhelm
    AstraZeneca BioPharmaceut Res & Dev, Late Stage Dev, Cardiovasc Renal & Metab, Molndal, Sweden.
    Chen, Jersey
    AstraZeneca BioPharmaceut Res & Dev, Late Stage Dev, Cardiovasc Renal & Metab, Gaithersburg, MD USA.
    Song, Yang
    Baim Inst Clin Res, Boston, MA USA.
    Diaz, Rafael
    Estudios Clin Latino Amer, Dept Med, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina.
    Goto, Shinya
    Tokai Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med Cardiol, Isehara, Kanagawa, Japan.
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ray, Kausik K.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Primary Care & Publ Hlth, Imperial Ctr Cardiovasc Dis Prevent, London, England.
    Parkhomenko, Alexander N.
    Inst Cardiol, Emergency Cardiol Dept, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Kosiborod, Mikhail N.
    Univ Missouri Kansas City, St Lukes Mid Amer Heart Inst, Kansas City, MO USA;Univ New South Wales, George Inst Global Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    McGuire, Darren K.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Harrington, Robert A.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Ticagrelor in patients with diabetes and stable coronary artery disease with a history of previous percutaneous coronary intervention (THEMIS-PCI): a phase 3, placebo-controlled, randomised trial2019In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 394, no 10204, p. 1169-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patients with stable coronary artery disease and diabetes with previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), particularly those with previous stenting, are at high risk of ischaemic events. These patients are generally treated with aspirin. In this trial, we aimed to investigate if these patients would benefit from treatment with aspirin plus ticagrelor.

    Methods

    The Effect of Ticagrelor on Health Outcomes in diabEtes Mellitus patients Intervention Study (THEMIS) was a phase 3 randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, done in 1315 sites in 42 countries. Patients were eligible if 50 years or older, with type 2 diabetes, receiving anti-hyperglycaemic drugs for at least 6 months, with stable coronary artery disease, and one of three other mutually non-exclusive criteria:a history of previous PCI or of coronary artery bypass grafting, or documentation of angiographic stenosis of 50% or more in at least one coronary artery. Eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to either ticagrelor or placebo, by use of an interactive voice-response or web-response system. The THEMIS-PCI trial comprised a prespecified subgroup of patients with previous PCI. The primary efficacy outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke (measured in the intention-to-treat population).

    Findings

    Between Feb 17, 2014, and May 24, 2016, 11 154 patients (58% of the overall THEMIS trial) with a history of previous PCI were enrolled in the THEMIS-PCI trial. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (IQR 2.8-3.8). In the previous PCI group, fewer patients receiving ticagrelor had a primary efficacy outcome event than in the placebo group (404 [7.3%] of 5558 vs 480 [8.6%] of 5596; HR 0.85 [95% CI 0.74-0.97], p=0.013). The same effect was not observed in patients without PCI (p=0.76, p(interaction)=0.16). The proportion of patients with cardiovascular death was similar in both treatment groups (174 [3.1%] with ticagrelor vs 183 (3.3%) with placebo; HR 0.96 [95% CI 0.78-1.18], p=0.68), as well as all-cause death (282 [5.1%] vs 323 [5.8%]; 0.88 [0.75-1.03], p=0.11). TIMI major bleeding occurred in 111 (2.0%) of 5536 patients receiving ticagrelor and 62 (1.1%) of 5564 patients receiving placebo (HR 2.03 [95% CI 1.48-2.76], p<0.0001), and fatal bleeding in 6 (0.1%) of 5536 patients with ticagrelor and 6 (0.1%) of 5564 with placebo (1.13 [0.36-3.50], p=0.83). Intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 33 (0.6%) and 31 (0.6%) patients (1.21 [0.74-1.97], p=0.45). Ticagrelor improved net clinical benefit:519/5558 (9.3%) versus 617/5596 (11.0%), HR=0.85, 95% CI 0.75-0.95, p=0.005, in contrast to patients without PCI where it did not, p(interaction)=0.012. Benefit was present irrespective of time from most recent PCI.

    Interpretation

    In patients with diabetes, stable coronary artery disease, and previous PCI, ticagrelor added to aspirin reduced cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke, although with increased major bleeding. In that large, easily identified population, ticagrelor provided a favourable net clinical benefit (more than in patients without history of PCI). This effect shows that long-term therapy with ticagrelor in addition to aspirin should be considered in patients with diabetes and a history of PCI who have tolerated antiplatelet therapy, have high ischaemic risk, and low bleeding risk.

  • 168. Biasucci, LM
    et al.
    Koenig, W
    Mair, J
    Mueller, C
    Plebani, M
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rifai, N
    Venge, P
    Hamm, C
    Giannitsis, E
    Huber, K
    Galvani, M
    Tubaro, M
    Collinson, P
    Alpert, JS
    Hasin, Y
    Katus, Hugo A
    Jaffe, AS
    Thygesen, K
    How to use C-reactive protein in acute coronary care2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 48, p. 3687-3690Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala-Örebro, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    King's College London, Medical School, Division of Cancer Studies, London, UK.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Johansson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Rider, Jennifer R
    Long-term Distress After Radical Prostatectomy Versus Watchful Waiting in Prostate Cancer: A Longitudinal Study from the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-4 Randomized Clinical Trial2013In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 920-928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Studies enumerating the dynamics of physical and emotional symptoms following prostate cancer (PCa) treatment are needed to guide therapeutic strategy. Yet, overcoming patient selection forces is a formidable challenge for observational studies comparing treatment groups.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To compare patterns of symptom burden and distress in men with localized PCa randomized to radical prostatectomy (RP) or watchful waiting (WW) and followed up longitudinally.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

    The three largest, Swedish, randomization centers for the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-4 trial conducted a longitudinal study to assess symptoms and distress from several psychological and physical domains by mailed questionnaire every 6 mo for 2 yr and then yearly through 8 yr of follow-up.

    INTERVENTION:

    RP compared with WW.

    OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

    A questionnaire was mailed at baseline and then repeatedly during follow-up with questions concerning physical and mental symptoms. Each analysis of quality of life was based on a dichotomization of the outcome (yes vs no) studied in a binomial response, generalized linear mixed model.

    RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS:

    Of 347 randomized men, 272 completed at least five questionnaires during an 8-yr follow-up period. Almost all men reported that PCa negatively influenced daily activities and relationships. Health-related distress, worry, feeling low, and insomnia were consistently reported by approximately 30-40% in both groups. Men in the RP group consistently reported more leakage, impaired erection and libido, and fewer obstructive voiding symptoms. For men in the WW group, distress related to erectile symptoms increased gradually over time. Symptom burden and distress at baseline was predictive of long-term outlook.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Cancer negatively influenced daily activities among almost all men in both treatment groups; health-related distress was common. Trade-offs exist between physiologic symptoms, highlighting the importance of tailored treatment decision-making. Men who are likely to experience profound long-term distress can be identified early in disease management.

  • 170.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Kings Coll London, Sch Med, Div Canc Studies, London, England;Kings Coll London, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Kings Coll London, Sch Med, Div Canc Studies, London, England.
    Taari, Kimmo
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Busch, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Nordling, Stig
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Andren, Ove
    Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Sahlgrens Acad, Div Clin Canc Epidemiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Harvard TC Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Univ Oslo, Inst Hlth & Soc, Clin Effectiveness Res Grp, Oslo, Norway.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Radical Prostatectomy or Watchful Waiting in Prostate Cancer: 29-Year Follow-up2018In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 379, no 24, p. 2319-2329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Radical prostatectomy reduces mortality among men with clinically detected localized prostate cancer, but evidence from randomized trials with long-term followup is sparse.

    METHODS We randomly assigned 695 men with localized prostate cancer to watchful waiting or radical prostatectomy from October 1989 through February 1999 and collected follow-up data through 2017. Cumulative incidence and relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for death from any cause, death from prostate cancer, and metastasis were estimated in intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses, and numbers of years of life gained were estimated. We evaluated the prognostic value of histopathological measures with a Cox proportional-hazards model.

    RESULTS By December 31, 2017, a total of 261 of the 347 men in the radical-prostatectomy group and 292 of the 348 men in the watchful-waiting group had died; 71 deaths in the radical-prostatectomy group and 110 in the watchful-waiting group were due to prostate cancer (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 to 0.74; P<0.001; absolute difference in risk, 11.7 percentage points; 95% CI, 5.2 to 18.2). The number needed to treat to avert one death from any cause was 8.4. At 23 years, a mean of 2.9 extra years of life were gained with radical prostatectomy. Among the men who underwent radical prostatectomy, extracapsular extension was associated with a risk of death from prostate cancer that was 5 times as high as that among men without extracapsular extension, and a Gleason score higher than 7 was associated with a risk that was 10 times as high as that with a score of 6 or lower (scores range from 2 to 10, with higher scores indicating more aggressive cancer).

    CONCLUSIONS Men with clinically detected, localized prostate cancer and a long life expectancy benefited from radical prostatectomy, with a mean of 2.9 years of life gained. A high Gleason score and the presence of extracapsular extension in the radical prostatectomy specimens were highly predictive of death from prostate cancer.

  • 171. Bingisser, Roland
    et al.
    Cairns, Charles B.
    Christ, Michael
    Collinson, Paul
    Hausfater, Pierre
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Mair, Johannes
    Price, Christopher
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Measurement of natriuretic peptides at the point of care in the emergency and ambulatory setting: Current status and future perspectives2013In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 166, no 4, p. 614-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The measurement of natriuretic peptides (NPs), B-type NP or N-terminal pro-B-type NP, can be an important tool in the diagnosis of acute heart failure in patients presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) with acute dyspnea, according to international guidelines. Studies and subsequent meta-analyses are mixed on the absolute value of routine NP assessment of ED patients. However, levels of NPs are likely to be used also to guide treatment and to assess risk of adverse outcomes in other patients at risk of developing heart failure, including those with pulmonary embolism or diabetes, or receiving chemotherapy. Natriuretic peptide levels, like other biomarkers, can now be measured at the point of care (POC). We have reviewed the current status of NP measurement together with the potential contribution of POC measurement of NPs to clinical care delivery in the emergency and other settings. Several POC systems for measuring NP levels are now available: these produce test results within 15 minutes and appear sufficiently sensitive and robust to be used routinely in diagnostic evaluations. Point-of-care systems could be used to assess NP levels in the ED and community outpatient settings to monitor the risk of acute heart failure. Furthermore, the use of protocol-driven POC testing of NP within the time frame of a patient consultation in the ED may facilitate and accelerate the throughput and disposition of at-risk patients. Appropriately designed clinical trials will be needed to confirm these potential benefits. It is also important that processes of care delivery are redesigned to take full advantage of the faster turnaround times provided by POC technology.

  • 172. Bingisser, Roland
    et al.
    Cairns, Charles
    Christ, Michael
    Hausfater, Pierre
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Mair, Johannes
    Panteghini, Mauro
    Price, Christopher
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Cardiac troponin: a critical review of the case for point-of-care testing in the ED2012In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1639-1649Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The measurement of cardiac troponin concentrations in the blood is a key element in the evaluation of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, according to current guidelines, and contributes importantly to the ruling in or ruling out of acute myocardial infarction. The introduction of point-of-care testing for cardiac troponin has the potential to reduce turnaround time for assay results, compared with central laboratory testing, optimizing resource use. Although, in general, many point-of-care cardiac troponin tests are less sensitive than cardiac troponin tests developed for central laboratory-automated analyzers, point-of-care systems have been used successfully within accelerated protocols for the reliable ruling out of acute coronary syndromes, without increasing subsequent readmission rates for this condition. The impact of shortened assay turnaround times with point-of-care technology on length of stay in the emergency department has been limited to date, with most randomized evaluations of this technology having demonstrated little or no reduction in this outcome parameter. Accordingly, the point-of-care approach has not been shown to be cost-effective relative to central laboratory testing. Modeling studies suggest, however, that reengineering overall procedures within the emergency department setting, to take full advantage of reduced therapeutic turnaround time, has the potential to improve the flow of patients through the emergency department, to shorten discharge times, and to reduce cost. To properly evaluate the potential contribution of point-of-care technology in the emergency department, including its costeffectiveness, future evaluations of point-of-care platforms will need to be embedded completely within a local decision-making structure designed for its use.

  • 173.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Folkvaljon, Folke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, London, England.
    Besses, Carlos
    Hosp del Mar, IMIM, Dept Haematol, Barcelona, Spain.
    Griesshammer, Martin
    Johannes Wesling Med Ctr, Hematol & Oncol, Minden, Germany.
    Gugliotta, Luigi
    St Orsola Malpighi Hosp, Dept Haematol L&A Seragnoli, Bologna, Italy.
    Wu, Jingyang
    Shire Pharmaceut, Global Biometr, Lexington, MA USA.
    Achenbach, Heinrich
    Shire GmbH, Res & Dev, Zug, Switzerland.
    Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques
    St Louis Hosp, APHP, Clin Invest Ctr, Paris, France.
    Harrison, Claire N.
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Haematol, London, England.
    Leukemic transformation and second cancers in 3649 patients with high-risk essential thrombocythemia in the EXELS study2018In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 74, p. 105-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    EXELS, a post-marketing observational study, is the largest prospective study of high-risk essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients, with an observation time of 5 years. EXELS found higher event rates of acute leukemia transformation in patients treated with hydroxycarbamide (HC). In the current analysis, we report age-adjusted rates of malignant transformation from 3460 EXELS patients exposed to HC, anagrelide (ANA), or both. At registration, 481 patients had ANA treatment without HC exposure, 2305 had HC without ANA exposure, and 674 had been exposed to both. Standard incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated using data from the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents database to account for differences in age-, gender-, and country-specific background rates. SIRs for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were high in ET patients. SIRs for AML were high in HC-treated patients, but AML was rare in ANA-treated patients; no cases of AML were found in patients only treated with ANA. No statistically significant difference was seen between SIRs for ANA and HC treatment for AML or skin cancer. SIRs for other cancers were similar in the HC and ANA groups and close to 1, indicating little difference in risk. Although statistically inconclusive, this study strengthens concerns regarding possible leukemogenic risk with HC treatment. (NCT00202644)

  • 174.
    Bixby, Honor
    et al.
    Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Lytsy, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Ezzati, Majid
    Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Rising rural body-mass index is the main driver of the global obesity epidemic in adults2019In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 569, no 7755, p. 260-264Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Body-mass index (BMI) has increased steadily in most countries in parallel with a rise in the proportion of the population who live in cities1,2. This has led to a widely reported view that urbanization is one of the most important drivers of the global rise in obesity3,4,5,6. Here we use 2,009 population-based studies, with measurements of height and weight in more than 112 million adults, to report national, regional and global trends in mean BMI segregated by place of residence (a rural or urban area) from 1985 to 2017. We show that, contrary to the dominant paradigm, more than 55% of the global rise in mean BMI from 1985 to 2017-and more than 80% in some low- and middle-income regions-was due to increases in BMI in rural areas. This large contribution stems from the fact that, with the exception of women in sub-Saharan Africa, BMI is increasing at the same rate or faster in rural areas than in cities in low- and middle-income regions. These trends have in turn resulted in a closing-and in some countries reversal-of the gap in BMI between urban and rural areas in low- and middle-income countries, especially for women. In high-income and industrialized countries, we noted a persistently higher rural BMI, especially for women. There is an urgent need for an integrated approach to rural nutrition that enhances financial and physical access to healthy foods, to avoid replacing the rural undernutrition disadvantage in poor countries with a more general malnutrition disadvantage that entails excessive consumption of low-quality calories.

  • 175.
    Bjorck, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Renlund, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lip, Gregory Y. H.
    Univ Birmingham, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.;Aalborg Univ, Dept Clin Med, Aalborg Thrombosis Res Unit, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Wester, Per
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.;Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svensson, Peter J.
    Lund Univ, Dept Coagulat Disorders, Malmo, Sweden..
    Sjalander, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Outcomes in a Warfarin-Treated Population With Atrial Fibrillation2016In: JAMA cardiology, ISSN 2380-6583, E-ISSN 2380-6591, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 172-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Vitamin K antagonist (eg, warfarin) use is nowadays challenged by the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). NOAC studies were based on comparisons with warfarin arms with times in therapeutic range (TTRs) of 55.2% to 64.9%, making the results less credible in health care systems with higher TTRs. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the efficacy and safety of well-managed warfarin therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, the risk of complications, especially intracranial bleeding, in patients with concomitant use of aspirin, and the impact of international normalized ratio (INR) control. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective, multicenter cohort study based on Swedish registries, especially AuriculA, a quality register for AF and oral anticoagulation, was conducted. The register contains nationwide data, including that from specialized anticoagulation clinics and primary health care centers. A total of 40 449 patients starting warfarin therapy owing to nonvalvular AF during the study period were monitored until treatment cessation, death, or the end of the study. The study was conducted from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2011, and data were analyzed between February 1 and November 15, 2015. Associating complications with risk factors and individual INR control, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of warfarin treatment in patients with concomitant aspirin therapy and those with no additional antiplatelet medications. EXPOSURES Use of warfarin with and without concomitant therapy with aspirin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Annual incidence of complications in association with individual TTR (iTTR), INR variability, and aspirin use and identification of factors indicating the probability of intracranial bleeding. RESULTS Of the 40 449 patients included in the study, 16 201 (40.0%) were women; mean (SD) age of the cohort was 72.5 (10.1) years, and the mean CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc (cardiac failure or dysfunction, hypertension, age >= 75 years [doubled], diabetes mellitus, stroke [doubled]-vascular disease, age 65-74 years, and sex category [female]) score was 3.3 at baseline. The annual incidence, reported as percentage (95% CI) of all-cause mortality was 2.19% (2.07-2.31) and, for intracranial bleeding, 0.44%(0.39-0.49). Patients receiving concomitant aspirin had annual rates of any major bleeding of 3.07%(2.70-3.44) and thromboembolism of 4.90% (4.43-5.37), and those with renal failure were at higher risk of intracranial bleeding (hazard ratio, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.32-3.82). Annual rates of any major bleeding and any thromboembolism in iTTR less than 70% were 3.81% (3.51-4.11) and 4.41% (4.09-4.73), respectively, and, in high INR variability, were 3.04%(2.85-3.24) and 3.48% (3.27-3.69), respectively. For patients with iTTR 70% or greater, the level of INR variability did not alter event rates. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Well-managed warfarin therapy is associated with a low risk of complications and is still a valid alternative for prophylaxis of AF-associated stroke. Therapy should be closely monitored for patients with renal failure, concomitant aspirin use, and poor INR control.

  • 176.
    Bjorck, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Sanden, Per
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Renlund, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svensson, Peter J.
    Lund Univ, Dept Coagulat Disorders, Malmo, Sweden..
    Sjalander, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Warfarin treatment quality is consistently high in both anticoagulation clinics and primary care setting in Sweden2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 216-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Warfarin treatment in Sweden holds a high standard with time in therapeutic range (TTR) over 75%. Internationally, specialized anticoagulation clinics (ACC) have shown higher TTR compared to primary health care centres (PHCC). Objectives: To compare warfarin treatment quality in Sweden for ACC versus PHCC, thereby clarifying whether centralization is for the better. Patients/methods: In total 77.058 patients corresponding to 217.058 treatment years with warfarin in the Swedish national quality register AuriculA from 1. Jan 2006 to 31. Dec 2011. Information regarding TTR was calculated from AuriculA, while patient characteristics and complications were retrieved from the Swedish National Patient Register. Results: Of the 100.554 treatment periods examined, 78.7% were monitored at ACC. Mean TTR for INR 2-3 for all patients irrespective of intended target range was 76.5% with an annual risk of bleeding or thrombotic events of 2.24% and 2.66%, respectively. TTR was significantly higher in PHCC compared to ACC (79.6% vs. 75.7%, p < 0.001), with no significant difference in overall risk of complications. Treatment periods for atrial fibrillation, except intended direct current conversion, showed similar results between ACC and PHCC without significant difference in annual risk of bleeding (2.50% vs. 2.51%) or thrombosis (3.09% vs. 3.16%). After propensity score matching there was still no significant difference in complication risk found. Conclusions: Warfarin treatment quality is consistently high in both ACC and PHCC when monitored through AuriculA in Sweden, both measured as TTR and as risk of complications. In this setting, centralized warfarin monitoring is not likely to improve the results.

  • 177.
    Bjorck, L.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Emergency & Cardiovasc Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nielsen, S.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Emergency & Cardiovasc Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Kok, W. K.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Emergency & Cardiovasc Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sandstrom, T.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Emergency & Cardiovasc Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rosengren, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Emergency & Cardiovasc Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Absence of chest pain and long-term mortality in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 415-415Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 178. Bjorkander, Inge
    et al.
    Forslund, Lennart
    Kahan, Thomas
    Ericson, Mats
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Rehnqvist, Nina
    Hjemdahl, Paul
    Differential Index: A Simple Time Domain Heart Rate Variability Analysis with Prognostic Implications in Stable Angina Pectoris2008In: Cardiology, ISSN 0008-6312, E-ISSN 1421-9751, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the usefulness of time domain heart rate variability (HRV) measurements by a simple graphical method, the differential index (DI), in prognostic assessments of patients with chronic stable angina pectoris. METHODS: HRV measurements in the time domain by DI were compared to conventional measurements of standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), percent of differences between adjacent normal RR intervals >50 ms (PNN50) and square root of the mean of the sum of squares of differences between adjacent normal RR intervals (RMSSD) from 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings in 678 patients in the Angina Prognosis Study in Stockholm. The patients received double-blind treatment with metoprolol or verapamil. Main outcome measures were cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction during follow-up (median 40 months). RESULTS: Patients suffering cardiovascular death (n = 30) had lower DI, SDNN and PNN50 (all p < 0.001). In a multivariate Cox model, DI below median independently predicted cardiovascular death (p = 0.002), as did SDNN (p = 0.016) and PNN50 (p = 0.030), but not RMSSD (p = 0.10). The separation of survival curves was most pronounced and specificity was slightly better with DI. DI and PNN50 increased with metoprolol but not verapamil treatment. Short-term treatment effects were not related to prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: Low time domain HRV carries independent prognostic information regarding cardiovascular death in stable angina pectoris. The simple DI method provided equally good or better prognostic information than conventional, more laborious HRV methods.

  • 179. Bjurman, Christian
    et al.
    Larsson, Mårten
    Johanson, Per
    Petzold, Max
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Fu, Michael Lx
    Hammarsten, Ola
    Small changes in Troponin T levels are common in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and are linked to higher mortality2013In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 62, no 14, p. 1231-1238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To examine the extent of change in Troponin T levels in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI).

    BACKGROUND:

    Changes in cardiac troponin levels are required for the diagnosis of NSTEMI, according to the new universal definition of acute myocardial infarction. A relative change of 20-230 % and an absolute change of 7- 9 ng/L have been suggested as cut-off points.

    METHOD:

    In a clinical setting, where a change in cTnT was not mandatory for the diagnosis of NSTEMI, serial samples of cTnT were measured with a high-sensitive cTnT (hs-cTnT) assay, and 37 clinical parameters were evaluated in 1178 patients with a final diagnosis of NSTEMI presenting <24h after symptom onset.

    RESULTS:

    After six hours of observation, the relative change in the hs-cTnT level remained <20 % in 26 % and the absolute change <9 ng/L in 12 % of the NSTEMI patients. A relative hs-cTnT change <20% was linked to higher long-term mortality across quartiles (p=0.002) and in multivariate analyses (HR 1.61 (1.17-2.21) p=0.004), whereas 30-day mortality was similar across quartiles of relative hs-cTnT change

    CONCLUSION:

    Because stable hs-TnT levels are common in patients with a clinical diagnosis of NSTEMI in our hospital, a small hs-cTnT change may not be useful to exclude NSTEMI, particularly as these patients show both short-term and long-term mortality at least as high as patients with large changes in hs-cTnT.