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  • 151.
    Nilsson, Emil
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Den evolutionära dragkampen mellan självsterilitet och självbefruktning2006In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, Vol. 100, p. 211-219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Nilsson, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics.
    Gyllenstrand, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics.
    Wolff, K.
    Six polymorphic microsatellite markers for Plantago maritima2006In: Molecular Ecology Notes, ISSN 1471-8278, E-ISSN 1471-8286, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1093-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plantago maritima displays an extraordinary variation in breeding system. In northern Europe, the species occurs as either self-incompatible or self-compatible, and as unisexual females or co-sexual hermaphrodites. The isolation of polymorphic codominant markers will provide the necessary tools to investigate the proportion of self-fertilized seeds and levels of inbreeding depression in natural populations of this species. Isolation of microsatellite loci was achieved using a membrane-enrichment method for four loci, and a streptavidin-coated-beads method for two loci. Primers were designed in microsatellite flanking sequences and were analysed using fluorescent labels.

  • 153.
    Nilsson, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Population size, female fecundity, and sex ratio variation in gynodioecious Plantago maritima2006In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 19, p. 825-833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Nilsson, L. Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Alves-dos-Santos, Isabel
    The oligolectic solitary bee Melitta ticinta Kirby, 1802 (Sw. rödtoppebi) in Sweden (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Melittidae)2009In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 85-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Niva, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Svensson, Brita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Karlsson, P. Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Effects of light and water availability on shoot dynamics of the stoloniferous Linnaea borealis2006In: Ecoscience, ISSN 1195-6860, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 318-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many stoloniferous plant species have the ability to exploit resource-rich patches via plastic growth responses. The most efficient responses are shortened spacers and increased branching frequency. Here we experimentally investigate the ability of the stoloniferous plant Linnaea borealis to respond to patches of increased light intensity and reduced water availability in natural systems. The significance of contrasts between patches was also investigated. A three-level factorial design was used, with light, water availability, and site as the factors. Increased light intensity was achieved through mowing of the surrounding vegetation, and reduced water availability was achieved by placing wooden ledges under the stolons. The treatments were applied at three subarctic sites that differ in light conditions. Branching frequency, number of new meristems, average internode length, leaf area, and dry weight production were studied 14 months after the manipulations. Increased light intensity increased branching frequencies; the strongest effects were obtained at the site with a closed canopy. Average intemode length decreased 19% in response to increased light intensity. Root:shoot ratios decreased under increased light intensity and reduced water availability. A reduction in water availability alone did not affect any other investigated traits. We conclude that ramets of L. borealis are able to respond efficiently to small-scale variations in light intensity in natural systems, an ability of great importance for the performance of a prostrate species on shady forest floors.

  • 156.
    Niva, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Svensson, Brita
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Karlsson, P Staffan
    Nutrient resorption from senescing leaves of the clonal plant Linnaea borealis in relation to reproductive state and resource availability2003In: Functional Ecology, Vol. 17, p. 438-444Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 157. Nordin, A
    et al.
    Strengbom, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Ericson, L
    Responses to ammonium and nitrate additions by boreal plants and their natural enemies2006In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 141, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 158. Olsrud, Maria
    et al.
    Carlsson, Bengt
    Svensson, Brita M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Michelsen, Anders
    Melillo, Jerry M.
    Responses of fungal root colonization, plant cover and leaf nutrients to long-term exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 and warming in a subarctic birch forest understory2010In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1820-1829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responses of the mycorrhizal fungal community in terrestrial ecosystems to global change factors are not well understood. However, virtually all land plants form symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi, with approximately 20% of the plants' net primary production transported down to the fungal symbionts. In this study, we investigated how ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM), fine endophytes (FE) and dark septate endophytes (DSE) in roots responded to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming in the dwarf shrub understory of a birch forest in the subarctic region of northern Sweden. To place the belowground results into an ecosystem context we also investigated how plant cover and nutrient concentrations in leaves responded to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming. The ErM colonization in ericaceous dwarf shrubs increased under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but did not respond to warming following 6 years of treatment. This suggests that the higher ErM colonization under elevated CO2 might be due to increased transport of carbon belowground to acquire limiting resources such as N, which was diluted in leaves of ericaceous plants under enhanced CO2. The elevated CO2 did not affect total plant cover but the plant cover was increased under warming, which might be due to increased N availability in soil. FE colonization in grass roots decreased under enhanced CO2 and under warming, which might be due to increased root growth, to which the FE fungi could not keep up, resulting in proportionally lower colonization. However, no responses in aboveground cover of Deschampsia flexuosa were seen. DSE hyphal colonization in grass roots significantly increased under warmer conditions, but did not respond to elevated CO2. This complex set of responses by mycorrhizal and other root-associated fungi to global change factors of all the fungal types studied could have broad implications for plant community structure and biogeochemistry of subarctic ecosystems.

  • 159.
    Olsson, K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Latitudinal population differentiation in phenology, life history and flower morphology in the perennial herb Lythrum salicaria.2002In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 983-996 Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In plants with a wide distribution, phenological characters can be expected to vary clinally along climatic gradients, whereas other characters important for adaptation to local biotic and abiotic factors may vary in a more mosaic fashion. We used common-garden experiments and controlled crosses to examine population differentiation in phenology, life history and morphology in the perennial herb Lythrum salicaria along a latitudinal transect through Sweden (57°N to 66°N). Northern populations initiated growth and flowering earlier, flowered for a shorter period, were shorter, produced more and larger winter buds, and were older at first reproduction than southern populations. Flower morphology varied significantly among populations, but was, with the exception of calyx length, not significantly related to latitude of origin. Survival in the common garden (at 63°49′N) was positively correlated with latitude of origin and the size and number of winter buds produced in the preceding year. The results suggest that the among-population differences in phenology and life history have evolved in response to latitudinal variation in length of the growing season. Further studies are required to determine whether population differentiation in flower morphology is maintained by selection.

  • 160. Onipchenko, VG
    et al.
    Makarov, MI
    van der Maarel, E
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Influence of alpine plants on soil nutrient concentrations in a monoculture experiment2001In: Folia Geobotanica, Vol. 36, p. 225-241Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 161. Papini, A
    et al.
    Simeone, M C
    Bellarosa, R
    Spada, Francesco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Schirone, B
    Quercus macranthera Fisch. & Mey. ex Hohen. and Quercus iberica M. Bieb.: taxonomic definition and systematic relationships with European oaks inferred from nuclear ITS data2009In: Plant Biosystems, ISSN 1126-3504, E-ISSN 1724-5575Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 162. Pedersén, M
    et al.
    Snoeijs, Pauli
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Patterns of macroalgal diversity, community composition and long-term changes along the Swedish west coast2001In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 459, p. 83-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 163. Peperzak, L
    et al.
    Sandee, B
    Scholin, C
    Miller, P
    van Nieuwerburgh, Lies
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Application and flow cytometric detection of antibody and rRNA probes to Gymnodinium mikimotoi (Dinophyceae) and Pseudonitzschia multiseries (Bacillariophyceae)2001In: Harmful algal blooms, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO , 2001, p. 206-209Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Pinto, E., Van Nieuwerburgh, L., Paes de Barros, M., Pedersén, M., Colepicolo, P. and Snoeijs, P.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. PLANT ECOLGY.
    Density-dependent patters of thiamine and pigment production in Nitzschia microcephala2003In: Phytochemistry, Vol. 63, p. 155-163Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 165. Poulton, Alex J.
    et al.
    Holligan, Patrick M.
    Hickman, Anna
    Kim, Young-Nam
    Adey, Tim R.
    Stinchcombe, Mark C.
    Holeton, Claire
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Root, Sarah
    Woodward, E. Malcolm S.
    Phytoplankton carbon fixation, chlorophyll-biomass and diagnostic pigments in the Atlantic Ocean2006In: Deep-sea research. Part II, Topical studies in oceanography, ISSN 0967-0645, E-ISSN 1879-0100, Vol. 53, no 14-16, p. 1593-1610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have made daily measurements of phytoplankton pigments, size-fractionated (< 2 and > 2-mu m) carbon fixation and chlorophyll-a concentration during four Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) cruises in 2003-04. Surface rates of carbon fixation ranged from < 0.2-mmol C m(-3) d(-1) in the subtropical gyres to 0.2-0.5-mmol C m(-3) d(-1) in the tropical equatorial Atlantic. Significant intercruise variability was restricted to the subtropical gyres, with higher chlorophyll-a concentrations and carbon fixation in the subsurface chlorophyll maximum during spring in either hemisphere. In surface waters, although picoplankton (<-mu m) represented the dominant fraction in terms of both carbon fixation (50-70%) and chlorophyll-alpha (80-90%), nanoplankton (> 2-mu m) contributions to total carbon fixation (30-50%) were higher than to total chlorophyll-alpha (10-20%). However, in the subsurface chlorophyll maximum picoplankton dominated both carbon fixation (70-90%) and chlorophyll-alpha (70-90%). Thus, in surface waters chlorophyll-normalised carbon fixation was 2-3 times higher for nanoplankton and differences in picoplankton and nanoplankton carbon to chlorophyll-alpha ratios may lead to either higher or similar growth rates. These low chlorophyll-normalised carbon fixation rates for picoplankton may also reflect losses of fixed carbon (cell leakage or respiration), decreases in photosynthetic efficiency, grazing losses during the incubations, or some combination of all these. Comparison of nitrate concentrations in the subsurface chlorophyll maximum with estimates of those required to support the observed rates of carbon fixation (assuming Redfield stoichiometry) indicate that primary production in the chlorophyll maximum may be light rather than nutrient limited.

  • 166.
    Puentes, Adriana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Bazely, D.R
    Huss-Danell, K
    Endophytic fungi in Festuca pratensis grown in Swedish agricultural grasslands with different managements2007In: Symbiosis, ISSN 0334-5114, E-ISSN 1878-7665, Vol. 44, no 1/3, p. 121-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cool-season forage grasses infected with asexual endophytic fungi (Neotyphodium spp.) often have advantages over uninfected grasses, including increased herbivore resistance. Since these fungi reproduce by growing into the developing seeds of the host, hyphal loading (amount of fungal hyphae in the plant) gives important information about the balance between host and endophyte in the symbiosis. This work provides insights into how ecological factors external to the symbiosis may influence the symbiosis. By repeated sampling of the same infected plants, we investigated how hyphal loading changes in Festuca pratensis through the growing season and how it is affected by fertilization and ley age in northern Sweden. Infection frequency in F. pratensis ranged from 25-65%. Hyphal loading, based on standard curves of immunoblot assay imprint intensity versus counts of hyphal density across grass leaf sheaths, increased significantly during the growing season and was correlated with cumulative degree days. There were no clear effects of fertilization treatment or ley age on hyphal loading. The symbiosis deserves furher study with respect to plant physiology, ecology, crop production and forage quality.

  • 167. Rammul, Ü
    et al.
    Oksanen, T.
    Oksanen, L.
    Lehtelä, J.
    Virtanen, R.
    Olofsson, J.
    Strengbom, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Rammul, I.
    Ericson, L.
    Vole-vegetation interactions in an experimental, enemy free taiga floor system2007In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 116, no 9, p. 1501-1513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vole–vegetation interactions in a predation-free taiga environment of northern Fennoscandia were studied by transferring vegetation from natural Microtus habitats into a greenhouse, where three habitat islands of about 30  m2 were created. The 'islands' were subjected to simulated summer conditions and a paired female field vole, Microtusagrestis, was introduced to each 'island'. The development of the female and her young was followed by recurrent live trapping. The development of the vegetation was followed by recurrent marking and censusing of plant shoots at intervals of five days. In the next growing season, two 'islands' were subjected to a new grazing treatment to study the impacts of repeated grazing on the vegetation and on the growth and reproduction of voles. Plant biomasses were harvested at the end of each trial. In all trials, the biomasses of graminoids and non-toxic herbs other than ferns, fireweeds and rosaceous plants were profoundly decimated. Even the biomass of a toxic herb Aconitum lycoctonum decreased largely at pace with the palatable herbs. The least preferred plant categories maintained their biomasses at control levels. Their neutral collective response was created by opposite species-level trends. Species typical for moist and nutrient-rich forests suffered from vole grazing, whereas the biomass of species adapted to disturbed habitats increased.

    In spite of the dramatic changes in the vegetation, the introduced female voles survived throughout the trials and reproduced normally. The young of their first litters survived well and reached the final weights typical for individuals starting to winter as immatures. We conclude that most of the plant biomass found on productive boreal forest floors is potential food for field voles and remains palatable for them even when subjected to recurrent, severe grazing. If nothing else than summer resources were limiting the growth of the field vole populations, the plants currently dominating moist and nutrient-rich taiga floors could not survive in this habitat.

  • 168.
    Ray, S., Klenell, M., Choo, K.-S., Pedersén, M and Snoeijs, P.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. PLANT ECOLGY.
    Carbon acquisition mechanisms in Chara tomentosa2003In: Aquat. Bot., Vol. 76, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 169. Ray, S
    et al.
    Pekkari, S
    Snoeijs, Pauli
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Oospore dimensions and wall ornamentation patterns in Swedish charophytes2001In: Nordic Journal of Botany, Vol. 21, p. 207-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 170. Reid, P.C.
    et al.
    Johns, D.G.
    Edwards, M.
    Starr, M.
    Poulin, M.
    Snoeijs, Pauli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    A biological consequence of reducing Arctic ice cover: Arrival of the Pacific diatom Neodenticula seminae in the North Atlantic for the first time in 800000 years2007In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1910-1921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder survey has monitored plankton in the Northwest Atlantic at monthly intervals since 1962, with an interegnum between 1978 and 1990. In May 1999, large numbers of the Pacific diatom Neodenticula seminae were found in Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) samples in the Labrador Sea as the first record in the North Atlantic for more than 800 000 years. The event coincided with modifications in Arctic hydrography and circulation, increased flows of Pacific water into the Northwest Atlantic and in the previous year the exceptional occurrence of extensive ice-free water to the North of Canada. These observations indicate that N. seminae was carried in a pulse of Pacific water in 1998/early 1999 via the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and/or Fram Strait. The species occurred previously in the North Atlantic during the Pleistocene from∼1.2 to∼0.8 Ma as recorded in deep sea sediment cores. The reappearance of N. seminae in the North Atlantic is an indicator of the scale and speed of changes that are taking place in the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans as a consequence of regional climate warming. Because of the unusual nature of the event it appears that a threshold has been passed, marking a change in the circulation between the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans via the Arctic. Trans-Arctic migrations from the Pacific into the Atlantic are likely to occur increasingly over the next 100 years as Arctic ice continues to melt affecting Atlantic biodiversity and the biological pump with consequent feedbacks to the carbon cycle.

  • 171.
    Rosén, Ejvind
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Alvar vegetation of Öland – changes, monitoring and restoration2006In: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, Vol. 106B, p. 387-399Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 172.
    Rosén, Ejvind
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Ecological Research Station, Ölands Skogsby. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Kultur och natur i Gråborg och Borgs by på Öland2005Book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 173.
    Rosén, Ejvind
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Bakker, JP
    Effects of agri-environment schemes on scrub clearance, livestock grazing and plant diversity in a low-intensity farming system on Öland, Sweden2005In: Basic and Applied Ecology, Vol. 6, p. 195-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Rydin, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Population and community ecology of bryophytes2009In: Bryophyte biology / [ed] Shaw, A J & Goffinet, B, Cambridge Univ Press , 2009, 2. ed., p. 393-444Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Rydin, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Gunnarsson, Urban
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Sundberg, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    The role of Sphagnum in peatland development and persistence2006In: Boreal peatland ecosystems, Springer-Verlag , 2006, p. 47-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Rydin, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Jeglum, JK
    The biology of peatlands2006Book (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Sandring, Saskia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Plant-Animal Interactions and Evolution of Floral Display and Flowering Phenology in Arabidopsis lyrata2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I combined comparative and experimental approaches to examine selection on reproductive traits, and population differentiation in the insect-pollinated, outcrossing, perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata. More specifically, I (1) determined whether selection on flowering phenology and floral display can be attributed to interactions with pollinators and herbivores, (2) examined whether population differentiation in flowering phenology and floral display is correlated with current selection on these traits, and (3) tested for local adaptation from contrasting environments in Europe.

    A field experiment conducted in a Swedish population demonstrated, that interactions with pollinators may markedly affect selection on both floral display and phenology of flowering. In an alpine population in Norway, grazing damage to inflorescences strongly influenced selection on floral display. The results suggest that variation in the abundance of pollinators and herbivores should contribute to spatio-temporal variation in selection on flowering phenology and floral display in A. lyrata.

    A common-garden experiment showed that flowering phenology and floral display vary among Scandinavian populations of A. lyrata. For some traits patterns of population differentiation were consistent with differences in the direction and strength of phenotypic selection determined in comparisons (a) between an alpine population in Norway and a coastal population in Sweden, and (b) among coastal populations in Sweden. This suggests that current selection contributes to the maintenance of genetic differentiation in these traits.

    Adaptive differentiation among populations was examined in a reciprocal transplant experiment that included populations from three contrasting environments, alpine Norway, coastal Sweden and lowland, continental Germany. The experiment provided evidence for local adaptation, and indicated that populations have diverged in traits affecting plant establishment and early growth.

    List of papers
    1. Pollinator-mediated selection on floral display and flowering time in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pollinator-mediated selection on floral display and flowering time in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata
    2009 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 1292-1300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The evolution of floral display and flowering time in animal-pollinated plants is commonly attributed to pollinator-mediated selection. Yet, the causes of selection on flowering phenology and traits contributing to floral display have rarely been tested experimentally in natural populations. We quantified phenotypic selection on morphological and phenological characters in the perennial, outcrossing herb Arabidopsis lyrata in two years using female reproductive success as a proxy of fitness. To determine whether selection on floral display and flowering   phenology can be attributed to interactions with pollinators, selection   was quantified both for open-pollinated controls and for plants receiving supplemental hand-pollination. We documented directional selection for many flowers, large petals, late start of flowering, and early end of flowering. Seed output was pollen-limited in both years   and supplemental hand-pollination reduced the magnitude of selection on number of flowers, and reversed the direction of selection on end of flowering. The results demonstrate that interactions with pollinators may affect the strength of selection on floral display and the   direction of selection on phenology of flowering in natural plant populations. They thus support the contention that pollinators can drive the evolution of both floral display and flowering time.

    Keywords
    Floral display, flower size, flowering phenology, natural selection, pollen limitation, selection gradients
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95495 (URN)10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00624.x (DOI)000265145800014 ()
    Available from: 2007-03-12 Created: 2007-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Selection on flowering time and floral display in an alpine and a lowland population of Arabidopsis lyrata
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selection on flowering time and floral display in an alpine and a lowland population of Arabidopsis lyrata
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 558-567Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To determine whether population differentiation in flowering time is consistent with differences in current selection, we quantified phenotypic selection acting through female reproductive success on flowering phenology and floral display in two Scandinavian populations of the outcrossing, perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata in two years. One population was located in an alpine environment strongly affected by grazing, whereas the other was close to sea level and only moderately affected by herbivory. Multiple regression models indicated directional selection for early end of flowering in one year in the lowland population, and directional selection for early start of flowering in one year in the alpine population. As expected, there was selection for more inflorescences in the lowland population. However, in the alpine population, plants with many inflorescences were selectively grazed and the number of inflorescences produced was negatively related to female fitness in one year and not significantly related to female fitness in the second year. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that genetic differentiation in flowering phenology between the study populations is adaptive, and indicate that interactions with selective grazers may strongly influence selection on floral display in A. lyrata.

    Keywords
    Arabidopsis lyrata, floral display, flowering time, herbivory, phenology, plant–animal interaction, selection analysis
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95496 (URN)10.1111/j.1420-9101.2006.01260.x (DOI)000244244300015 ()
    Available from: 2007-03-12 Created: 2007-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Population differentiation and phenotypic selection in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population differentiation and phenotypic selection in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95497 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-03-12 Created: 2007-03-12 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Local adaptation in European populations of Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local adaptation in European populations of Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae)
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95498 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-03-12 Created: 2007-03-12 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 178.
    Sandring, Saskia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Riihimäki, Mona
    Savolainen, Outi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Selection on flowering time and floral display in an alpine and a lowland population of Arabidopsis lyrata2007In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 558-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine whether population differentiation in flowering time is consistent with differences in current selection, we quantified phenotypic selection acting through female reproductive success on flowering phenology and floral display in two Scandinavian populations of the outcrossing, perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata in two years. One population was located in an alpine environment strongly affected by grazing, whereas the other was close to sea level and only moderately affected by herbivory. Multiple regression models indicated directional selection for early end of flowering in one year in the lowland population, and directional selection for early start of flowering in one year in the alpine population. As expected, there was selection for more inflorescences in the lowland population. However, in the alpine population, plants with many inflorescences were selectively grazed and the number of inflorescences produced was negatively related to female fitness in one year and not significantly related to female fitness in the second year. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that genetic differentiation in flowering phenology between the study populations is adaptive, and indicate that interactions with selective grazers may strongly influence selection on floral display in A. lyrata.

  • 179.
    Sandring, Saskia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Pollinator-mediated selection on floral display and flowering time in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata2009In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 1292-1300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolution of floral display and flowering time in animal-pollinated plants is commonly attributed to pollinator-mediated selection. Yet, the causes of selection on flowering phenology and traits contributing to floral display have rarely been tested experimentally in natural populations. We quantified phenotypic selection on morphological and phenological characters in the perennial, outcrossing herb Arabidopsis lyrata in two years using female reproductive success as a proxy of fitness. To determine whether selection on floral display and flowering   phenology can be attributed to interactions with pollinators, selection   was quantified both for open-pollinated controls and for plants receiving supplemental hand-pollination. We documented directional selection for many flowers, large petals, late start of flowering, and early end of flowering. Seed output was pollen-limited in both years   and supplemental hand-pollination reduced the magnitude of selection on number of flowers, and reversed the direction of selection on end of flowering. The results demonstrate that interactions with pollinators may affect the strength of selection on floral display and the   direction of selection on phenology of flowering in natural plant populations. They thus support the contention that pollinators can drive the evolution of both floral display and flowering time.

  • 180.
    Sandring, Saskia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Ågren, Jon
    Population differentiation and phenotypic selection in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrataManuscript (Other academic)
  • 181. Sandström, A
    et al.
    Eriksson, Britas Klemens
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Isaeus, M
    Schreiber, H
    Karås, P
    Boating and navigation activities influence the recruitment of fish in a Baltic Sea archipelago area2005In: Ambio, Vol. 34, p. 125-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 182. Schelin, M
    et al.
    Tigabu, Mulualem
    Eriksson, I
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Sawadogo, L
    Odén, P
    Effects of scarification, giberellic acid and dry heat treatments on the germination of Balanites aegyptiaca seeds from Sudanian savanna in Burkina Faso2003In: Seed Science and Technology, Vol. 31, p. 605-617Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 183. Schelin, M
    et al.
    Tigabu, Mulualem
    Eriksson, I
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Sawadogo, L
    Odén, P
    Predispersal seed predation in Acacia macrostachya, its impact on seed viability, and germination responses to scarification and dry heat treatments2004In: New Forests, Vol. 27, p. 251-267Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 184. Schubert, H.
    et al.
    Andersson, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Snoeijs, Pauli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Relationship between photosynthesis and non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence in two red algae with different carotenoid compositions2006In: Marine Biology, ISSN 0025-3162, E-ISSN 1432-1793, Vol. 149, no 5, p. 1003-1013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Algae are continuously exposed to short-term fluctuations in irradiance. We investigate how two red algae species regulate photosynthetic efficiency to cope with such changes and identify some strategies that differ from higher plants. Two red algae, Gracilaria domingensis and Kappaphycus alvarezii, with antheraxanthin and lutein as major xanthophylls, respectively, reacted to the onset of low light (below E-k) with a substantial decrease of NPQ. This is different from higher plants, but similar to previous observations in, e.g. cyanobacteria where it indicates an increase in the effective absorbance cross-section of Photosystem II (PSII) by state transition. Kinetic studies in continuous light revealed a high susceptibility of PSII to light stress ((1-q(P))/NPQ) in K. alvarezii immediately after the sudden onset of high light, followed by a decrease. This was caused by a slower onset of NPQ in K. alvarezii, followed by acclimation. In G. domingensis, susceptibility of PSII to light stress was stable with time, but absolute values of (1-q(P))/NPQ were higher than in K. alvarezii. These observations suggest that K. alvarezii may be better adapted to high light levels, but is less well prepared for large sudden changes in irradiation. In K. alvarezii, photosynthesis continued to increase with increasing irradiation when NPQ was saturated. As (1-q(P)) and NPQ were still balanced in this situation, most likely, processes other than photosynthetic oxygen release are responsible for the increasing net O-2 production observed.

  • 185. Simeone, Marco Cosmio
    et al.
    Papini, Alessio
    Vessella, Federico
    Bellarosa, Rosanna
    Spada, Francesco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Schirone, Bartolomeo
    Multiple genome relationships and a complex biogeographic history in the eastern range of Quercus suber L. (Fagaceae) implied by nuclear and chloroplast DNA variation2009In: Caryologia (Firenze), ISSN 0008-7114, E-ISSN 2165-5391, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 236-252Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Sjögren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Azorean bryophyte communities - a revision of differential species2003In: Arquipélago. Life and Marine Sciences, Vol. 20A, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 187.
    Sjögren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Distribution of Azorean bryophytes up to 1999, their island distribution and information on their presence elsewhere, including Madeira and the Canary Islands2001In: Boletim do Museu Municipal do Funchal (História natural) Suplemento, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 188.
    Sjögren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Plants and flowers of the Azores2001Book (Other scientific)
  • 189.
    Sjörs, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Kärlväxtfloran i Sävja – diversitet och dynamik2004In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, Vol. 98, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190. Sletvold, Nina
    et al.
    Grindeland, John M.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Pollinator-mediated selection on floral display, spur length and flowering phenology in the deceptive orchid Dactylorhiza lapponica2010In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 188, no 2, p. 385-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonrewarding animal-pollinated plants commonly experience severe pollen limitation, which should result in strong selection on traits affecting the success of pollination. However, the importance of pollinators as selective agents on floral traits in deceptive species has not been quantified experimentally. Here, we quantified pollinator-mediated selection (Delta beta(poll)) on floral morphology and start of flowering in the deceptive orchid Dactylorhiza lapponica by subtracting estimates of selection gradients for plants receiving supplemental hand-pollination from estimates obtained for open-pollinated control plants. There was directional selection for taller plants with more flowers and longer spurs, but no statistically significant selection on corolla size or flowering start. Pollinator-mediated selection accounted for all observed selection on spur length (Delta beta(poll) = 0.32), 76% of the selection on plant height (Delta beta(poll) = 0.19) and 42% of the selection on number of flowers (Delta beta(poll) = 0.30). Sixteen per cent of developing fruits were consumed by insect herbivores, but fruit herbivory had only minor effects on the strength of pollinator-mediated selection. Our results demonstrate that pollinators mediate selection on floral traits likely to affect both pollinator attraction and pollination efficiency, and are consistent with the hypothesis that deceptive species experience strong selection for increased display and mechanical fit between flower and pollinator.

  • 191.
    Sletvold, Nina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Huttunen, Piritta
    Handley, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Karkkainen, Katri
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Cost of trichome production and resistance to a specialist insect herbivore in Arabidopsis lyrata2010In: Evolutionary Ecology, ISSN 0269-7653, E-ISSN 1573-8477, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 1307-1319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theory predicts that trade-offs between resistance to herbivory and other traits positively affecting fitness can maintain genetic variation in resistance within plant populations. In the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata, trichome production is a resistance trait that exhibits both qualitative and quantitative variation. Using a paternal half-sib design, we conducted two greenhouse experiments to ask whether trichomes confer resistance to oviposition and leaf herbivory by the specialist moth Plutella xylostella, and to examine potential genetic constraints on evolution of increased resistance and trichome density. In addition, we examined whether trichome production is induced by insect herbivory. We found strong positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between leaf trichome density and resistance to leaf herbivory, demonstrating that the production of leaf trichomes increases resistance to leaf damage by P. xylostella. Also resistance to oviposition tended to increase with increasing leaf trichome density, but genetic and phenotypic correlations were not statistically significant. Trichome density and resistance to leaf herbivory were negatively correlated genetically with plant size in the absence of herbivores, but not in the presence of herbivores. There was no evidence of increased trichome production after leaf damage by P. xylostella. The results suggest that trichome production and resistance to leaf herbivory are associated with a cost and that the direction of selection on resistance and trichome density depends on the intensity of herbivory.

  • 192. Sletvold, Nina
    et al.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Pollinator-Mediated Selection on Floral Display and Spur Length in the Orchid Gymnadenia conopsea2010In: International journal of plant sciences, ISSN 1058-5893, E-ISSN 1537-5315, Vol. 171, no 9, p. 999-1009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Floral diversification and specialization are thought to be driven largely by interactions with pollinators, but the extent to which current selection on floral traits is mediated by pollinators has rarely been determined experimentally. We documented selection through female function on floral traits in two populations of the rewarding orchid Gymnadenia conopsea in two years and quantified pollinator-mediated selection (Delta beta(poll)) by subtracting estimates of selection gradients for plants receiving supplemental hand pollination from estimates obtained for open-pollinated control plants. There was directional selection for taller plants, more flowers, larger corollas, and longer spurs in the study populations. Pollinator-mediated selection ranged from weak to moderately strong (Delta beta(poll), range -0.01-0.21, median 0.08). All observed selection on spur length could be attributed to interactions with pollinators, while the proportion of observed selection on plant height (0%-77%), number of flowers (13%-42%), and corolla size (13%-97%) caused by pollinators varied among populations and years. Our results demonstrate that pollinators can mediate selection on both traits likely to be involved in pollinator attraction and traits affecting pollination efficiency. They further show that spatiotemporal variation in the strength of pollinator-mediated selection can contribute substantially to differences in selection between years and populations.

  • 193.
    Snoeijs, P
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Wakuru Murasi, L
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Symbiosis between diatoms and cyanobacterial colonies2004In: Vie Milieu, Vol. 54, p. 163-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Snäll, Tord
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Ehrlén, Johan
    Rydin, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Colonization-extinction dynamics of an epiphyte metapopulation in a dynamic landscape2005In: Ecology, Vol. 86, p. 106-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Snäll, Tord
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics. Växtekologi.
    Fogelqvist, J
    Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics. evolutionär funktionsgenomik.
    Ribeiro Jr., P.J.
    Lascoux, M
    Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics. evolutionär funktionsgenomik.
    Spatial genetic structure in two congeneric epiphytes with different dispersal strategies analysed by three different methods2004In: Molecular Ecology, Vol. 13, p. 2109-2119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Snäll, Tord
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Hagström, A
    Rudolphi, J
    Rydin, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Distribution pattern of the epiphyte Neckera pennata on three spatial scales - importance of past landscape structure, connectivity and local conditions2004In: Ecography, Vol. 27, p. 757-766Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Snäll, Tord
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. Växtekologi.
    Jonsson, BG
    Edge effects on six polyporous fungi used as old-growth indicators in Swedish boreal forest2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Snäll, Tord
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology.
    Pennanen, J
    Kivistö, L
    Hanski, I
    Modelling epiphyte dynamics in a dynamic forest landscape2005In: Oikos, Vol. 109, p. 209-222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 199. Sonesson, Mats
    et al.
    Sveinbjörnsson, Bjartmar
    Tehler, Anders
    Carlsson, Bengt Å.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    A comparison of the physiology, anatomy and ribosomal DNA in alpine and subalpine populations of the lichen Nephroma arcticum – the effects of an eight-year transplant experiment2007In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 244-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thalli of Nephroma arcticum were transplanted between and within a high-elevation alpine heath (1100 m) and a low-elevation subalpine mountain birch forest (380 m) in northern Swedish Lapland and harvested after eight years. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between control samples for dark respiration rates, photon use efficiencies (apparent quantum yields) and light compensation points (all were higher in the high-altitude population). The following traits were significantly affected by transplanting: (1) epicortex thickness, (2) upper cortex thickness in the low-altitude population, (3) maximum photosynthetic rates, (4) dark respiration rates and (5) light compensation point. Of these malleable traits, all reduce the differences between the controls although there seems to be over-compensation in maximum net photosynthesis and under-compensation in dark respiration rate of the low-altitude population. Conservative traits, i.e., those that did not change significantly with transplantation were: (1) thallus thickness, (2) algal layer thickness, (3) algal cell diameter and (4) light saturation level. Small, yet significant differences in anatomy and physiology suggest that an ecotypic differentiation was established although the two internal transcribed DNA spacers ITS 1 and ITS 2 showed no corresponding variation between the populations.

  • 200.
    Spada, Francesco
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Ecological Botany.
    Cutini, M.
    Paura, B.
    Floristic changes along the topographical gradient in montane grasslands in Monti Picentini (Campania, SW Italy)2010In: Annali di Botanica, ISSN 0365-0812, Vol. 9, p. 86-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Populations of xerotolerant species (Achnatherum calamagrostis, Stipa crassiculmis subsp. picentina, are scattered along a wide altitudinal gradient on slopes at mid- and high elevation in Monti Picentini, a subcoastal mesozoic limestone ridge in Tyrrhenian Southern Italy. Their stands are widespread in grasslands of mostly secondary origin. At lower altitudes these grasslands replace former deciduous forest communities dominated by oaks or beech, while at higher altitudes they reach the summits, where they apparently merge into the remnants of the still partially grazed, zonal climatogenic, grasslands ranging above the local tree-line. Nevertheless primary stands of these grasslands are to be found around the many clusters of highly dynamic sites of the montane and sub-alpine levels, scattered around screes and rocky outcrops of the prevalently dolomitic morphology of the slopes. This virtual continuity of non arboreal communities across more than 1000 metres of the local topographical gradient, where azonal, relic stands of Pinus nigra s.l. are transitional between the grasslands and the surrounding zonal broadleaved forest vegetation, stresses patterns of the coenological changes between Festuco-Brometea and Elyno-Seslerietea along the catena, which suggest fragmentary persistence of a paleozonation.

123456 151 - 200 of 259
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