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  • 151.
    Boisvert, Catherine Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology.
    Vertebral Development of Modern Salamanders Provides Insights Into a Unique Event of Their Evolutionary History2009In: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B-Molecular and Developmental Evolution, ISSN 1552-5007, Vol. 312B, no 1, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin of salamanders and their interrelationships to the two other modern amphibian orders (frogs and caecilians) are problematic owing to an 80-100 million year gap in the fossil record between the Carboniferous to the Lower Jurassic. This is compounded by a scarcity of adult skeletal characters linking the early representatives of the modern orders to their stem-group in the Paleozoic. The use of ontogenetic characters can be of great use in the resolution of these questions. Growth series of all ten modern salamander families (a 120 cleared and stained larvae) were examined for pattern and timing of vertebral elements chondrification and ossification. The primitive pattern is that of the neural arches developing before the centra, while the reverse represents the derived condition. Both the primitive and derived conditions are observed within the family Hynobiidae, whereas only the derived condition is observed in all other salamanders. This provides support to the claims that Hynobiidae is both the most basal of modern families and potentially polyphyletic (with Ranodon and Hybobius forming the most basal clade and Salamandrella being a part of the most derived Blade). This provides insight into a unique event in salamander evolutionary history and suggests that the developmental pattern switch occurred between the Triassic and the mid-Jurassic before the last major radiation. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 31213:1-29, 2009. (C) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 152.
    Boisvert, Catherine Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Getting a hand from new technology: the pectoral fin skeleton of the near-tetrapod Panderichthys revealed by CT Scanning2007In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Boisvert, Catherine Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Mark-Kurik, Elga
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    The pectoral fin of Pandericthys rhombolepis: 3D structure and life-orientation.2007In: Ichthyolith Issues Special publication 10, p 20., 2007Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 154.
    Boisvert, Catherine Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Ericsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Sutija, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    JOhanson, Zerina
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Joss, Jean
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Are digits neomorphic structures? Some palaeontological and genetic arguments2007In: Journal of Morphology, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Boisvert, Catherine Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Joss, Jean
    Macquarie University.
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Comparative pelvic development of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) and the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri): conservation and innovation across the fish-tetrapod transition2013In: EvoDevo, ISSN 2041-9139, E-ISSN 2041-9139, Vol. 4, p. 3-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The fish-tetrapod transition was one of the major events in vertebrate evolution and was enabled by many morphological changes. Although the transformation of paired fish fins into tetrapod limbs has been a major topic of study in recent years, both from paleontological and comparative developmental perspectives, the interest has focused almost exclusively on the distal part of the appendage and in particular the origin of digits. Relatively little attention has been paid to the transformation of the pelvic girdle from a small unipartite structure to a large tripartite weight-bearing structure, allowing tetrapods to rely mostly on their hindlimbs for locomotion. In order to understand how the ischium and the ilium evolved and how the acetabulum was reoriented during this transition, growth series of the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri and the Mexican axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum were cleared and stained for cartilage and bone and immunostained for skeletal muscles. In order to understand the myological developmental data, hypotheses about the homologies of pelvic muscles in adults of Latimeria, Neoceratodus and Necturus were formulated based on descriptions from the literature of the coelacanth (Latimeria), the Australian Lungfish (Neoceratodus) and a salamander (Necturus). Results: In the axolotl and the lungfish, the chondrification of the pelvic girdle starts at the acetabula and progresses anteriorly in the lungfish and anteriorly and posteriorly in the salamander. The ilium develops by extending dorsally to meet and connect to the sacral rib in the axolotl. Homologous muscles develop in the same order with the hypaxial musculature developing first, followed by the deep, then the superficial pelvic musculature. Conclusions: Development of the pelvic endoskeleton and musculature is very similar in Neoceratodus and Ambystoma. If the acetabulum is seen as being a fixed landmark, the evolution of the ischium only required pubic pre-chondrogenic cells to migrate posteriorly. It is hypothesized that the iliac process or ridge present in most tetrapodomorph fish is the precursor to the tetrapod ilium and that its evolution mimicked its development in modern salamanders.

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  • 156.
    Boisvert, Catherine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Mark-Kurik, Elga
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    The pectoral fin of Panderichthys and the origin of digits2008In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 456, no 7222, p. 636-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the identifying characteristics of tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) is the presence of fingers and toes. Whereas the proximal part of the tetrapod limb skeleton can easily be homologized with the paired fin skeletons of sarcopterygian (lobe-finned) fish, there has been much debate about the origin of digits. Early hypotheses1 interpreted digits as derivatives of fin radials, but during the 1990s the idea gained acceptance that digits are evolutionary novelties without direct equivalents in fish fin skeletons. This was partly based on developmental genetic data2, but also substantially on the pectoral fin skeleton of the elpistostegid (transitional fish/tetrapod) Panderichthys, which appeared to lack distal digit-like radials3. Here we present a CT scan study of an undisturbed pectoral fin of Panderichthys demonstrating that the plate-like 'ulnare' of previous reconstructions is an artefact and that distal radials are in fact present. This distal portion is more tetrapod-like than that found in Tiktaalik 4 and, in combination with new data about fin development in basal actinopterygians5, sharks6 and lungfish7, makes a strong case for fingers not being a novelty of tetrapods but derived from pre-existing distal radials present in all sarcopterygian fish.

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  • 157. Borg, Daniel
    et al.
    Bogdanska, Jasna
    Sundström, Maria
    Nobel, Stefan
    Håkansson, Helen
    Bergman, Åke
    DePierre, Joseph
    Halldin, Krister
    Bergström, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Perinatal tissue distribution of perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS) in mice.2009In: Abstracts of the 46th Congress of the European Societies of Toxicology, 2009, p. S147-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is an industrial chemical that has been used as a surfactant and surface protector for more than fifty years. It has during the last decade emerged as an environmental contaminant due to its widespread presence in humans and wildlife and its persistant, bioaccumulative and toxic properties. PFOS is developmentally toxic and late in utero exposure in rodents affects neonatal survival and growth. Observed symptoms suggest impaired pulmonary function, but the cause of the mortality has not been clarified. The purpose of this study was to determine the perinatal tissue distribution of S35-labelled PFOS in mice using whole-body autoradiography (WBA) combined with liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were dosed orally on gestation day (GD) 16 and sampled on GD18, GD20 and postnatal day (PND) 1 (dams + pups). The results from the WBA and the LSC were unequivocal. In dams, PFOS accumulated primarily in the liver, but also the lungs contained levels higher than the blood. PFOS was readily transferred to the fetus. At GD18 general PFOS levels were higher in the fetus than in the blood of the corresponding dam with accumulation in the liver. At GD20, general PFOS levels remained higher in the fetus than in the dam, with substantial accumulation also in the lung. The accumulation in the lung persisted at PND1. Our results show that the fetus is exposed to higher levels of PFOS than the dam and point towards the lung being the main perinatal target organ of PFOS.

  • 158. Botella, Hector
    et al.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Dorka, Markus
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Janvier, Philippe
    Jaws and teeth of the earliest bony fishes2007In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 448, no 7153, p. 583-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant jawed vertebrates, or gnathostomes, fall into two major monophyletic groups, namely chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fishes) and osteichthyans (bony fishes and tetrapods). Fossil representatives of the osteichthyan crown group are known from the latest Silurian period, 418 million years (Myr) ago, to the present. By contrast, stem chondrichthyans and stem osteichthyans are still largely unknown. Two extinct Palaeozoic groups, the acanthodians and placoderms, may fall into these stem groups or the common stem group of gnathostomes, but their relationships and monophyletic status are both debated. Here we report unambiguous evidence for osteichthyan characters in jaw bones referred to the late Silurian (423–416-Myr-old) fishes Andreolepis hedei and Lophosteus superbus, long known from isolated bone fragments, scales and teeth, and whose affinities to, or within, osteichthyans have been debated1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. The bones are a characteristic osteichthyan maxillary and dentary, but the organization of the tooth-like denticles they bear differs from the large, conical teeth of crown-group osteichthyans, indicating that they can be assigned to the stem group. Andreolepis and Lophosteus are thus not only the oldest but also the most phylogenetically basal securely identified osteichthyans known so far.

  • 159.
    Brazeau, Martin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolution�r organismbiologi.
    A new genus of rhizodontid (Sarcopterygii, Tetrapodomorpha) from the Lower Carboniferous Horton Bluff Formation of Nova Scotia, and the evolution of the lower jaws in this group.2005In: Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1481-1499Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Brazeau, Martin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    A primitive rhizodontid (Sarcopterygii, Tetrapodomorpha) from the lower carboniferous of Nova Scotia2004In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 41A-Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 161.
    Brazeau, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    A revision of the anatomy of Ptomacanthus anglicus Miles with comments on the comparative head morphology of early gnathostomesManuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 162.
    Brazeau, Martin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Building the ear of land vertebrates: evolution of the sarcopterygian hyoid arch.2005In: PaleoBios, ISSN 0031-0298, Vol. 25, no 2 (supplement), p. 22-23Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 163.
    Brazeau, Martin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Avdelningen för Evolutionär Organismbiologi.
    Rhizodontid (stem-tetrapod) hyomandibulae: insights into the paleobiology of an extinct aquatic predator2006In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 26, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Brazeau, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    The braincase and jaws of a Devonian “acanthodian” and modern gnathostome origins2009In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 457, no 7227, p. 305-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern gnathostomes ( jawed vertebrates) emerged in the early Palaeozoic era(1), but this event remains unclear owing to a scant early fossil record. The exclusively Palaeozoic 'acanthodians' are possibly the earliest(2,3) gnathostome group and exhibit amosaic of shark- and bony fish- like characters that has long given them prominence in discussions of early gnathostome evolution(1). Their relationships with modern gnathostomes have remained mysterious, partly because their un- mineralized endoskeletons rarely fossilized. Here I present the first- known braincase of an Early Devonian (approximately 418-412 Myr BP) acanthodian, Ptomacanthus anglicus(4), and re- evaluate the interrelationships of basal gnathostomes. Acanthodian braincases have previously been represented by a single genus, Acanthodes(5), which occurs more than 100 million years later in the fossil record. The braincase of Ptomacanthus differs radically from the osteichthyan- like braincase of Acanthodes(5) in exhibiting several plesiomorphic features shared with placoderms(6,7) and some early chondrichthyans(8,9). Most striking is its extremely short sphenoid region and its jaw suspension, which displays features intermediate between some Palaeozoic chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. Phylogenetic analysis resolves Ptomacanthus as either the most basal chondrichthyan or as the sister group of all living gnathostomes. These new data alter earlier conceptions of basal gnathostome phylogeny and thus help to provide a more detailed picture of the acquisition of early gnathostome characters.

  • 165.
    Brazeau, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    A new look at tetrapod middle ear origins: spiracle evolution in the Tetrapodomorpha.2005In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 39A-Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 166.
    Brazeau, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Tetrapod-like middle ear architecture in a Devonian fish2006In: Nature, Vol. 439, p. 318-321Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Brazeau, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Tetrapod-like middle ear architecture in a Devonian fish.2006In: Nature, Vol. 439, p. 318-321Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Brazeau, Martin D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Endocranial Morphology and Phylogeny of Palaeozoic Gnathostomes (Jawed Vertebrates)2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gnathostomes, or jawed vertebrates, make up the overwhelming majority of modern vertebrate diversity. Among living vertebrates, they comprise the chondrichthyans (“cartilaginous fishes” such as sharks, skates, rays, chimaeras) and the osteichthyans (“bony fishes” or bony vertebrates, inclusive of tetrapods). Gnathostomes appear to have originated in the early Palaeozoic Era, but their early fossil record is fairly scant. The best fossils appear first in the Late Silurian and Devonian periods. Much of gnathostome diversity owes to unique adaptations in the internal skeleton of their head (the endocranium). The endocranium is composed of the braincase, jaws, hyoid arch, and branchial arches, which sometimes fossilise when they are composed of bone or calcified cartilage.

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe and compare the fossilised cranial endoskeletons of a variety of different Palaeozoic gnathostomes. The objective is to test current conceptions of gnathostome interrelationships (i.e. phylogeny) and infer aspects of key morphological transformations that took place during the evolution of Palaeozoic members of this group. Two key areas are examined: the morphology and interrelationships of Palaeozoic gnathostomes and the morphology of the visceral arches in sarcopterygian fishes.

    New data on the visceral arches are described from the stem tetrapods Panderichthys and rhizodontids. These provide insight into the sequence of character acquisition leading to the tetrapod middle ear. Panderichthys shows key features of the tetrapod middle ear chamber were established prior to the origin fo digited limbs. New morphological data are described from the “acanthodian” fish Ptomacanthus. Ptomacanthus provides only the second example of a well-preserved braincase from any member of this group. It shows dramatic differences from that of its counterpart, Acanthodes, providing new evidence for acanthodian paraphyly. New interpretations of basal gnathostome and osteichthyan phylogeny are presented, challenging or enriching existing views of these problems.

    List of papers
    1. Tetrapod-like middle ear architecture in a Devonian fish
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tetrapod-like middle ear architecture in a Devonian fish
    2006 (English)In: Nature, Vol. 439, p. 318-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97738 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-10-29 Created: 2008-10-29 Last updated: 2009-04-03Bibliographically approved
    2. The hyomandibulae of rhizodontids (Sarcopterygii, Stem-Tetrapoda)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The hyomandibulae of rhizodontids (Sarcopterygii, Stem-Tetrapoda)
    2008 (English)In: Journal of morphology (1931. Print), ISSN 0362-2525, E-ISSN 1097-4687, Vol. 269, no 6, p. 654-665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its important role in the study of the evolution of tetrapods, the hyomandibular bone (the homologue of the stapes in crown-group tetrapods) is known for only a few of the fish-like members of the tetrapod stem-group. The best-known example, that of the tristichopterid Eusthenopteron, has been used as an exemplar of fish-like stem-tetrapod hyomandibula morphology, but in truth the conditions at the base of the tetrapod radiation remain obscure. We report, here, four hyomandibulae, from three separate localities, which are referable to the Rhizodontida, the most basal clade of stem-tetrapods. These specimens share a number of characteristics, and are appreciably different from the small number of hyomandibulae reported for other fishlike stem-tetrapods. While it is unclear if these characteristics represent synapomorphies or symplesiomorphies, they highlight the morphological diversity of hyomandibulae within the early evolution of the tetrapod total-group. Well-preserved muscle scarring on some of these hyomandibulae permit more robust inferences of hyoid arch musculature in stem-tetrapods.

    Keywords
    Sarcopterygii, Rhizodontida, stem-tetrapod, hyomandibula, stapes, fossils
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97739 (URN)10.1002/jmor.10609 (DOI)000256598300003 ()
    Available from: 2008-10-29 Created: 2008-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Placoderm muscles and chordate interrelationships
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Placoderm muscles and chordate interrelationships
    2008 (English)In: Biology Letters, Vol. 4, p. 103-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97740 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-10-29 Created: 2008-10-29 Last updated: 2009-04-03Bibliographically approved
    4. A reappraisal of the origin and basal radiation of the Osteichthyes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A reappraisal of the origin and basal radiation of the Osteichthyes
    2010 (English)In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 36-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The earliest Actinoptergyii (ray-finned fishes) and Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes) have been studied intensely, and a consistent picture of interrelationships has begun to emerge for the latter. In contrast, there has been minimal documentation of the pattern of character acquisition leading to the osteichthyan crown. We review the synapomorphies proposed for various levels within osteichthyan phylogeny (total group; Acanthodes + crown group; crown group; Sarcoptergyii; Actinopterygii), confirming some, rejecting others, and making new additions. This distribution of characters is used to interpret the placement of problematic Siluro-Devonian genera traditionally assigned to Actinopterygii, and suggests these taxa are stem osteichthyans. Earlier placements of these forms within the crown are symptomatic of taxonomies based on unpolarized similarities rather than synapomorphies.

    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97741 (URN)10.1080/02724630903409071 (DOI)000278000400004 ()
    Available from: 2008-10-29 Created: 2008-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. The braincase and jaws of a Devonian “acanthodian” and modern gnathostome origins
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The braincase and jaws of a Devonian “acanthodian” and modern gnathostome origins
    2009 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 457, no 7227, p. 305-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Modern gnathostomes ( jawed vertebrates) emerged in the early Palaeozoic era(1), but this event remains unclear owing to a scant early fossil record. The exclusively Palaeozoic 'acanthodians' are possibly the earliest(2,3) gnathostome group and exhibit amosaic of shark- and bony fish- like characters that has long given them prominence in discussions of early gnathostome evolution(1). Their relationships with modern gnathostomes have remained mysterious, partly because their un- mineralized endoskeletons rarely fossilized. Here I present the first- known braincase of an Early Devonian (approximately 418-412 Myr BP) acanthodian, Ptomacanthus anglicus(4), and re- evaluate the interrelationships of basal gnathostomes. Acanthodian braincases have previously been represented by a single genus, Acanthodes(5), which occurs more than 100 million years later in the fossil record. The braincase of Ptomacanthus differs radically from the osteichthyan- like braincase of Acanthodes(5) in exhibiting several plesiomorphic features shared with placoderms(6,7) and some early chondrichthyans(8,9). Most striking is its extremely short sphenoid region and its jaw suspension, which displays features intermediate between some Palaeozoic chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. Phylogenetic analysis resolves Ptomacanthus as either the most basal chondrichthyan or as the sister group of all living gnathostomes. These new data alter earlier conceptions of basal gnathostome phylogeny and thus help to provide a more detailed picture of the acquisition of early gnathostome characters.

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97742 (URN)10.1038/nature07436 (DOI)000262440900037 ()
    Available from: 2008-10-29 Created: 2008-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    6. A revision of the anatomy of Ptomacanthus anglicus Miles with comments on the comparative head morphology of early gnathostomes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A revision of the anatomy of Ptomacanthus anglicus Miles with comments on the comparative head morphology of early gnathostomes
    (English)Manuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97743 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-10-29 Created: 2008-10-29 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 169.
    Brazeau, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Jeffery, Jonathan
    The hyomandibulae of rhizodontids (Sarcopterygii, Stem-Tetrapoda)2008In: Journal of morphology (1931. Print), ISSN 0362-2525, E-ISSN 1097-4687, Vol. 269, no 6, p. 654-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its important role in the study of the evolution of tetrapods, the hyomandibular bone (the homologue of the stapes in crown-group tetrapods) is known for only a few of the fish-like members of the tetrapod stem-group. The best-known example, that of the tristichopterid Eusthenopteron, has been used as an exemplar of fish-like stem-tetrapod hyomandibula morphology, but in truth the conditions at the base of the tetrapod radiation remain obscure. We report, here, four hyomandibulae, from three separate localities, which are referable to the Rhizodontida, the most basal clade of stem-tetrapods. These specimens share a number of characteristics, and are appreciably different from the small number of hyomandibulae reported for other fishlike stem-tetrapods. While it is unclear if these characteristics represent synapomorphies or symplesiomorphies, they highlight the morphological diversity of hyomandibulae within the early evolution of the tetrapod total-group. Well-preserved muscle scarring on some of these hyomandibulae permit more robust inferences of hyoid arch musculature in stem-tetrapods.

  • 170.
    Brelin, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Jämförande Fysiologi.
    Divergent Stress Coping Strategies in Brown trout (Salmo trutta)2006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 171.
    Brelin, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Stress Coping Strategies in Brown Trout (Salmo Trutta): Ecological Significance and Effects of Sea-Ranching2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two distinct stress coping strategies, proactive and reactive, have been stated in various animal studies, each associated with a set of behavioural and physiological characteristics. In a given challenging situation, proactive animals show more aggression, a higher general activity and a predominant sympathetic reaction. In contrast, the reactive copers respond more with immobility and avoidance, and a predominant parasympathetic/hypothalamic activation. This divergence in coping has also been indicated in salmonid fish. Interestingly, many of the differences reported between sea-ranched and wild fish resembles characteristics that differentiate proactive and reactive copers. In the present thesis it is shown that individuals with divergent stress coping styles are identifiable in several brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations. Further, the results show that the distribution of individuals displaying these distinct stress coping strategies differs between populations. This strongly indicates that these traits are heritable and that the variation in selection regime in the native rivers influences these traits. In addition, the results show that populations with hatchery origin are biased towards having higher frequencies of trout displaying a proactive style than populations having wild origin. Also, even though the frequency of early sexual maturation, known as a viable alternative life history in salmonids, differs between populations of brown trout, no link between stress coping strategy and early sexual maturation were found. However, this thesis show that maternal contribution, in the form of egg size, is of major importance whether the progeny will sexually mature early and that it also might be of importance for stress coping strategy. Further, correlations of traits commonly associated with stress coping strategies and behavioural syndromes across context and over time is investigated. The results show that individuals with a strong sympathetic reactivity are more prone to change their behaviour than others.

    List of papers
    1. Divergent stress coping strategies in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Divergent stress coping strategies in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta)
    2005 (English)In: Annals of New York Academy of Sciences, Trends in comparative endocrinology and neurobiology, Vol. 1040, p. 239-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96939 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-28 Created: 2008-03-28 Last updated: 2009-04-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Frequency distribution of coping strategies in four populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequency distribution of coping strategies in four populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta)
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Hormones and Behavior, ISSN 0018-506X, E-ISSN 1095-6867, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 546-556Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In a challenging situation some animals respond by active avoidance, aggression and an activation of the sympathetic nervous system whereas others respond by immobility, low levels of aggression and a predominant adrenocortical stress response. When consistent over time and across situations such inter-individual differences in behaviourul and physiological stress responses are referred to as stress coping strategies. In a previous study we reported the existence of two distinct stress coping strategies in a sea-ranched brown trout (Salmo trutta) population. Using the same method, we here show that four brown trout populations with different origin, but reared under identical conditions, differ in their endocrine stress response, behaviour during hypoxia and aggression. Further more, if individuals are classified as high- and low responsive based on post-stress blood plasma noradrenalin levels (indicator of sympathetic reactivity) the frequency distribution shows that populations with hatchery origin are biased towards having higher frequencies of high responsive individuals. However, the number of high responsive trout ranges from 14-48% in the different populations which shows that generally the frequency is biased towards lower levels of high responsive individuals. We discuss different frequency-dependent mechanisms that maintain multiple phenotypes in populations and speculate about differences in selection regime among the studied populations.

    Keywords
    Fish, Proactive, Reactive, Stress, Noradrenalin, Adrenalin, Cortisol, Hypoxia, Animal personality;, Behavioural syndrome
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96940 (URN)10.1016/j.yhbeh.2007.12.011 (DOI)000255100700006 ()18280474 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-03-28 Created: 2008-03-28 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Is precocious sexual maturation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) associated with a proactive coping style?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is precocious sexual maturation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) associated with a proactive coping style?
    Show others...
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96941 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-28 Created: 2008-03-28 Last updated: 2009-04-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Intra individual variation in behavioural and physiological stress responses in brown trout (Salmo trutta)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra individual variation in behavioural and physiological stress responses in brown trout (Salmo trutta)
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96942 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-03-28 Created: 2008-03-28 Last updated: 2009-04-05Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
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    COVER01
  • 172.
    Brelin, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Petersson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Dannewitz, Johan
    Dahl, Jonas
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Frequency distribution of coping strategies in four populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta)2008In: Hormones and Behavior, ISSN 0018-506X, E-ISSN 1095-6867, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 546-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a challenging situation some animals respond by active avoidance, aggression and an activation of the sympathetic nervous system whereas others respond by immobility, low levels of aggression and a predominant adrenocortical stress response. When consistent over time and across situations such inter-individual differences in behaviourul and physiological stress responses are referred to as stress coping strategies. In a previous study we reported the existence of two distinct stress coping strategies in a sea-ranched brown trout (Salmo trutta) population. Using the same method, we here show that four brown trout populations with different origin, but reared under identical conditions, differ in their endocrine stress response, behaviour during hypoxia and aggression. Further more, if individuals are classified as high- and low responsive based on post-stress blood plasma noradrenalin levels (indicator of sympathetic reactivity) the frequency distribution shows that populations with hatchery origin are biased towards having higher frequencies of high responsive individuals. However, the number of high responsive trout ranges from 14-48% in the different populations which shows that generally the frequency is biased towards lower levels of high responsive individuals. We discuss different frequency-dependent mechanisms that maintain multiple phenotypes in populations and speculate about differences in selection regime among the studied populations.

  • 173.
    Brelin, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Petersson, Erik
    Ian, Mayer
    Dannewitz, Johan
    Dahl, Jonas
    Winberg, Svante
    Is precocious sexual maturation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) associated with a proactive coping style?Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Brelin, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Petersson, Erik
    Winberg, Svante
    Divergent stress coping strategies in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta)2005In: Annals of New York Academy of Sciences, Trends in comparative endocrinology and neurobiology, Vol. 1040, p. 239-245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Brelin, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology. jämförande fysiologi.
    Petersson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology. populationsbiologi.
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology. jämförande fysiologi.
    Divergent stress coping styles in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta)2005In: ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES: TRENDS IN COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY AND NEUROBIOLOGY, Vol. 1040, p. 239-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two distinct stress coping styles, proactive and reactive, have been stated in various animal studies. This divergence in coping has also been indicated in salmonid fish. Here, we test the hypothesis that divergent stress coping styles are identifiable in a sea-ranched brown trout population. To that end, we used a series of tests on individual juvenile brown trout, with each test including a common key aspect of the two different coping styles. Using a clustering method (SAS: PROC FASTCLUS), two groups that clearly differed both in blood chemistry (noradrenalin and adrenalin levels) following confinement and in behavior during hypoxia were identified.

  • 176.
    Brelin, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Petersson, Erik
    Winberg, Svante
    Intra individual variation in behavioural and physiological stress responses in brown trout (Salmo trutta)Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Brunelli, Elvira
    et al.
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Bernabó, Ilaria
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Berg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Bonacci, Antonella
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Tripepi, Sandro
    Department of Animal Biology, University of Calabria, Italy.
    Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Endosulfan Impair Development, Metamorphosis and Behaviour in Bufo bufo Tadpoles2009In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 135-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endosulfan is a widely used organochlorine pesticide with well-documented neurotoxic effects in both humans and laboratory animals (mammals and fish). Neurotoxicity has been implied also in amphibians after short-term exposure to endosulfan. Little is known about effects of chronic exposure of endosulfan in amphibians. Previously, we examined the short-term toxicity of endosulfan in common toad (Bufo bufo) tadpoles and determined the LC50 value to 0.43 mg/L. In the present study, we investigated the effects of endosulfan on B. bufo tadpoles after chronic exposure to ecologically relevant concentrations. Tadpoles were exposed in a static renewal test, from shortly after hatching (Gosner stage 25) to completed metamorphosis, to 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 mg endosulfan/L (nominal). The exposure period lasted 43–52 days. Mortality, larval growth (mass), development (reached Gosner stage at various times and deformities presence), metamorphosis and behaviour (swimming activity) were monitored regularly over the entire course of larval development. Our results show that 0.05 and 0.1 mg endosulfan/L caused impaired behaviour, prolonged time to metamorphosis, increased incidences of mouth and skeletal malformations as well as mortality, and reduced body weight (observed also at 0.01 mg/L) in B. bufo tadpoles. Behavioural effects occurred at exposure day 4, before any other effects occurred, indicating a neurotoxic effect. Endosulfan levels found in groundwater and surface water range from 0.1 to 100 μg/L and after extraordinary runoff events, concentrations exceed 0.5 mg/L in surface water.

  • 178. Brunner, Sandra
    et al.
    Colman, Dvora
    Travis, Alexander J.
    Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.
    Shi, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Feil, Silke
    Imsand, Coni
    Nelson, Jacquelyn
    Grimm, Christian
    Ruelicke, Thomas
    Fundele, Reinald
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Neidhardt, John
    Berger, Wolfgang
    Overexpression of RPGR leads to male infertility in mice due to defects in flagellar assembly2008In: Biology of Reproduction, ISSN 0006-3363, E-ISSN 1529-7268, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 608-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Male infertility is one possible consequence of a group of disorders arising from dysfunction of cilia. Ciliopathies include primary ciliary dyskinesia, polycystic kidney disease, Usher syndrome, nephronophthisis, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Alstrom syndrome, and Meckel-Gruber syndrome as well as some forms of retinal degenerations. Mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene (RPGR) are best known for leading to retinal degeneration but have also been associated with ciliary dysfunctions affecting other tissues. To further study the involvement of RPGR in ciliopathies, transgenic mouse lines overexpressing RPGR were generated. Animals carrying the transgene in varying copy numbers were investigated. We found that infertility due to aberrant spermatozoa correlated with increased copy numbers. In animals with moderately increased gene copies of Rpgr, structural disorganization in the flagellar midpiece, outer dense fibers, and fibrous sheath was apparent. In contrast, in animals with high copy numbers, condensed sperm heads were present, but the flagellum was absent in the vast majority of spermatozoa, although early steps of flagellar biogenesis were observed. This complexity of defects in flagellar assembly suggests a role of RPGR in intraflagellar transport processes.

  • 179.
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Ekotoxikologi.
    Windows of vulnerability2007In: Reproductive Toxicology in Environmental Research: a report from the ReproSafe-programme, ISSN 0282-7298, Vol. Report 5729Article, review/survey (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 180.
    Brunström, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Axelsson, Jeanette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Halldin, Krister
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Effects of endocrine modulators on sex differentiation in birds.2003In: Ecotoxicology, ISSN 0963-9292, Vol. 12, no 1-4, p. 287-95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Brunström, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Axelsson, Jeanette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Mattsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Halldin, Krister
    Effects of estrogens on sex differentiation in Japanese quail and chicken2009In: General and Comparative Endocrinology, ISSN 0016-6480, E-ISSN 1095-6840, Vol. 163, no 1-2, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estrogen production by the female avian embryo induces development of a female phenotype of the reproductive organs whereas the low estrogen concentration in the male embryo results in a male phenotype. Treatment of female embryos with exogenous estrogens disrupts Müllerian duct development resulting in malformations and impaired oviductal function. Exposure of male embryos to estrogens results in ovotestis formation and persisting Müllerian ducts in the embryos and testicular malformations, reduced semen production and partially developed oviducts in the adult bird. Furthermore, studies in Japanese quail show that the male copulatory behavior is impaired by embryonic estrogen treatment. Results from our experiments with selective agonists for ERalpha and ERbeta suggest that the effects of estrogens on the reproductive organs are mediated via activation of ERalpha. Abundant expression of ERalpha mRNA was shown in gonads and Müllerian ducts of early Japanese quail embryos. Both ERalpha and ERbeta transcripts were detected by real-time PCR in early embryo brains of Japanese quail indicating that both receptors may be involved in sex differentiation of the brain. However, in 9-day-old quail embryo brains in situ hybridization showed expression of ERbeta mRNA, but not of ERalpha mRNA, in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm), areas implicated in copulatory behavior of adult male quail. Furthermore, embryonic treatment with the selective ERalpha agonist propyl pyrazol triol (PPT) had no effect on the male copulatory behavior. These results suggest that ERbeta may be important for the effects of estrogens on brain differentiation.

  • 182.
    Brunström, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Lund, Bert-Ove
    Bergman, Anders
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Jensen, Sören
    Örberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Reproductive toxicity in mink (Mustela vison) chronically exposed to environmentally relevant PCB concentrations.2001In: Environ. Toxicol. Chem., Vol. 20, p. 2318-2327Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Brunström, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Hormones in the Environment and Animal Production - A Public Health Concern?: Proceedings from a symposium at the Ultuna Campus Uppsala, March 13, 20012001Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Brunström, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Magnusson, Ulf
    ReproSafe; ett svenskt forskningsprogram2003In: Kungliga Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5350, Vol. 142, no 12, p. 61-64Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 185. Bugge, Anne
    et al.
    Siersbaek, Majken
    Madsen, Maria S.
    Göndör, Anita
    Rougier, Carole
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Mandrup, Susanne
    A Novel Intronic Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor gamma Enhancer in the Uncoupling Protein (UCP) 3 Gene as a Regulator of Both UCP2 and-3 Expression in Adipocytes2010In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 285, no 23, p. 17310-17317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncoupling Proteins (UCPs) are integral ion channels residing in the inner mitochondrial membrane. UCP2 is ubiquitously expressed, while UCP3 is found primarily in muscles and adipose tissue. Although the exact molecular mechanism of action is controversial, it is generally agreed that both homologues function to facilitate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. UCP2 and -3 expression is activated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), but so far no PPAR response element has been reported in the vicinity of the Ucp2 and Ucp3 genes. Using genome-wide profiling of PPAR gamma occupancy in 3T3-L1 adipocytes we demonstrate that PPAR gamma associates with three chromosomal regions in the vicinity of the Ucp3 locus and weakly with a site in intron 1 of the Ucp2 gene. These sites are isolated from the nearest neighboring sites by >900 kb. The most prominent PPAR gamma binding site in the Ucp2 and Ucp3 loci is located in intron 1 of the Ucp3 gene and is the only site that facilitates PPAR gamma transactivation of a heterologous promoter. This site furthermore transactivates the endogenous Ucp3 promoter, and using chromatin conformation capture we show that it loops out to specifically interact with the Ucp2 promoter and intron 1. Our data indicate that PPAR gamma transactivation of both UCP2 and -3 is mediated through this novel enhancer in Ucp3 intron 1.

  • 186. Burke, Les J
    et al.
    Zhang, Ru
    Bartkuhn, Marek
    Tiwari, Vijay K
    Tavoosidana, Gholamreza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu
    Weth, Christine
    Leers, Joerg
    Galjart, Niels
    Ohlsson, Rolf
    CTCF binding and higher order chromatin structure of the H19 locus are maintained in mitotic chromatin2005In: European Molecular Biology Organization, ISSN 0261 - 4189, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 187. Burke, Les J
    et al.
    Zhang, Ru
    Bartkuhn, Marek
    Tiwari, Vijay K
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics. zoologisk utvecklingsbiologi.
    Tavoosidana, Gholamreza
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics. zoologisk utvecklingsbioloig.
    Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics. zoologisk utvecklingsbiologi.
    Weth, Christine
    Leers, Joerg
    Galjart, Niels
    Ohlsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics. zoologisk utvecklingsbiologi.
    Renkawitz, Rainer
    CTCF binding and higher order chromatin structure of the H19 locus are maintained in mitotic chromatin.2005In: EMBO J, ISSN 0261-4189, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 3291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 188. Burke, Les J
    et al.
    Zhang, Ru
    Bartkuhn, Marek
    Tiwari, Vijay Kumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Tavosidana, Gholamreza
    Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu
    Weth, Christine
    Leers, Joerg
    Galjart, Niels
    Ohlsson, Rolf
    CTCF binding and higher order chromatin structure of the H19 locus are maintained in mitotic chromatin2005In: EMBO journal, ISSN 0261-4189, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 3291-3300Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 189. Callier, Viviane
    et al.
    Clack, Jennifer A.
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology.
    Contrasting developmental trajectories in the earliest known tetrapod forelimbs2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 324, no 5925, p. 364-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ichthyostega and Acanthostega are the earliest tetrapods known from multiple near-complete skeletons, with Acanthostega generally considered the more primitive. New material indicates differing ontogenetic trajectories for their forelimbs: In Ichthyostega, the   pattern of muscle attachment processes on small humeri (upper armbones) resembles that in "fish" members of the tetrapod stem group such as Tiktaalik, whereas large humeri approach (but fail to attain) the tetrapod crown-group condition; in Acanthostega, both small and large humeri exhibit the crown-group pattern. We infer that Ichthyostega   underwent greater locomotory terrestrialization during ontogeny. The newly recognized primitive characteristics also suggest that Ichthyostega could be phylogenetically more basal than Acanthostega.

  • 190. Cantillana, T.
    et al.
    Lindström, V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Eriksson, L.
    Brandt, I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Bergman, A.
    Interindividual differences in o,p'-DDD enantiomer kinetics examined in Göttingen minipigs2009In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five minipigs were given a single oral dose of a racemic mixture of o,p'-DDD (30 mg kg(-1)b.w., EF=0.49). Blood plasma and subcutaneous adipose tissue were collected for analysis, at different time-points over 180 d. At the end of the experiment also liver, kidney and brain tissue were collected. Low concentrations of o,p'-DDD still remained after 180 d in plasma (mean 0.5+/-0.3 ng g(-1)f.w.) and in adipose tissue (mean 40+/-40 ng g(-1)f.w.). The mean concentrations in liver and kidney were 500+/-300 pg g(-1)f.w. and 90+/-50 pg g(-1)f.w., respectively. The enantiomers of o,p'-DDD were isolated by HPLC and the absolute configuration of the enantiomers were determined by X-ray crystallography and polarimetry as R-(+)-o,p'-DDD and S-(-)-o,p'-DDD. The enantiomer fractions (EFs) of o,p'-DDD were determined in plasma, adipose tissue and kidney using GC/ECD equipped with a chiral column. The EFs of o,p'-DDD in the individual minipigs showed large variability, ranging from 0.2 to 0.6 after 24h in plasma and from 0.2 to 0.7 after 90 d in adipose tissue. Hence in two of the minipigs, the S-(-)-o,p'-DDD enantiomer was dominating while the other enantiomer, R-(+)-o,p'-DDD was dominating in three minipigs. We propose that a yet not identified factor related to polymorphism, regulating the metabolism and/or elimination of the enantiomeric o,p'-DDD, is responsible for the differences in enantiomeric retention of the compound in the minipigs.

  • 191. Cantillana, Tatiana
    et al.
    Hermansson, Veronica
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Ekotoxikologi.
    Hovander, Lotta
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Ekotoxikologi.
    Bergman, Åke
    Analysis of chiral o,p'-DDD in plasma and adipose tissue from Göttingen minipigs2006In: Organohalogen Compounds, 2006, p. vol 68 s 992-995Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 192. Carlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    A new scolenaspidid (Osteostraci) from the lower Devonian of Podolia, Ukraine2008In: Paläontologische Zeitschrift, ISSN 0031-0220, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 314-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new osteostracan genus and species. Victoraspis longicornualis n. gen., n. sp., is described based on material from Rakovets', present day Ukraine. This new taxon shares characters with the two genera Stensiopelta DENISON, 1951 and Zychaspis JANVIER, 1985. A phylogenetic analysis supports the position of Victoraspis as the sister group to a monophyletic Stensiopelta, while the interrelationships of the various species of Zychaspis are poorly resolved. A morphometric analysis is carried out in an attempt to further resolve the taxonomic affinity. This analysis groups all examined Zychaspis species closely together, and further supports the establishment of Victoraspis as separate, genus.

  • 193.
    Carlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    A new scolenaspidid (Osteostraci) from the Lower Devonian of Podolia, Ukraine2007In: 40th Anniversary Symposium on Early Vertebrates/Lower Vertebrates Uppsala, Sweden, August 13-16, 2007H, 2007, p. 24-Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 194.
    Carlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Organism Biology.
    A new scolenaspidid (Osteostraci) from the Lower Devonian of Podolia, Ukraine2007In: Lundadagarna i historisk geologi och paleontologi, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 195.
    Carlsson, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Bahrami, Fariba
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Behavioural changes related to olfactory mucosal metaplasia and bulbar glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) induction in methylsulphonyl-dichlorobenzene-treated mice.2002In: Arch Toxicol, ISSN 0340-5761, Vol. 76, no 8, p. 474-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 196. Carlsson, Carina
    et al.
    Harju, Mikael
    Bahrami, Fariba
    Cantillana, Tatiana
    Tysklind, Mats
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Avd för ekotoxikologi.
    Olfactory mucosal toxicity screening and multivariate QSAR modeling for chlorinated benzene derivatives.2004In: Arch Toxicol, ISSN 0340-5761, Vol. 78, no 12, p. 706-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Carlsson, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Pärt, Peter
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    7-Ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase induction in rainbow trout gill epithelium cultured on permeable supports: asymmetrical distribution of substrate metabolites.2001In: Aquat Toxicol, ISSN 0166-445X, Vol. 54, no 1-2, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 198. Carroll, RL
    et al.
    Boisvert, Catherine
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Bolt, J
    Green, DM
    Philip, N
    Rolian, C
    Schoch, R
    Tarenko, A
    Changing patterns of ontogeny from osteolepiform fish through Permian tetrapods as a guide to the early evolution of land vertebrates2004In: Recent Advances in the Origin and Early Radiation of Vertebrates, p. 321-343Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 199.
    Cerenius, Lage
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology. Jämförande fysiologi.
    Aphanomyces astaci (Crayfish plague)2006In: Atlas of European Crayfish Distribution and Diseases, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, Patrimoines Naturels. , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 200.
    Cerenius, Lage
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Babu, Ramesh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    In vitro effects on bacterial growth of phenoloxidase reaction products2010In: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, ISSN 0022-2011, E-ISSN 1096-0805, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 21-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An active phenoloxidase preparation from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited a strong antibacterial effect in vitro on the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae whereas a weaker but still significant effect against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In most cases reduction of bacterial growth was stronger when dopamine was used as substrate as compared to L-dopa. The effect on bacteria was abolished if no substrate was available for the phenoloxidase or in the presence of the phenoloxidase inhibitor phenylthiourea.

1234567 151 - 200 of 807
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