uu.seUppsala universitets publikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1234 151 - 176 av 176
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 151.
    Rozental, Alexander
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden;UCL, Inst Child Hlth, London, England.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmo Univ, Fac Hlth & Soc, Malmo, Sweden.
    Forsstrom, David
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N.T.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boettcher, Johanna
    Free Univ Berlin, Dept Clin Psychol & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Psychol, Odense, Denmark.
    The Negative Effects Questionnaire: psychometric properties of an instrument for assessing negative effects in psychological treatments2019Ingår i: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, ISSN 1352-4658, E-ISSN 1469-1833, Vol. 47, nr 5, s. 559-572Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychological treatments provide many benefits for patients with psychiatric disorders, but research also suggests that negative effects might occur from the interventions involved. The Negative Effects Questionnaire (NEQ) has previously been developed as a way of determining the occurrence and characteristics of such incidents, consisting of 32 items and six factors. However, the NEQ has yet to be examined using modern test theory, which could help to improve the understanding of how well the instrument works psychometrically.

    Aims: The current study investigated the reliability and validity of the NEQ from both a person and item perspective, establishing goodness-of-fit, item bias, and scale precision.

    Method: The NEQ was distributed to 564 patients in five clinical trials at post-treatment. Data were analysed using Rasch analysis, i.e. a modern test theory application.

    Results: (1) the NEQ exhibits fairness in testing across sociodemographics, (2) shows comparable validity for a final and condensed scale of 20 instead of 32 items, (3) uses a rating scale that advances monotonically in steps of 0 to 4, and (4) is suitable for monitoring negative effects on an item-level.

    Conclusions: The NEQ is proposed as a useful instrument for investigating negative effects in psychological treatments, and its newer shorter format could facilitate its use in clinical and research settings. However, further research is needed to explore the relationship between negative effects and treatment outcome, as well as to test it in more diverse patient populations.

  • 152. Tillfors, M
    et al.
    Carlbring, P
    Furmark, T
    Uppsala universitet.
    Lewenhaupt, S
    Eriksson, A
    Spak, M
    Ekelius, L
    Westling, B
    Uppsala universitet.
    Andersson, G
    University students with social phobia and public speaking fears: A randomized trial of Internet delivered self-help with or without live group exposure.2006Ingår i: Second international meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (28-29 April), 2006Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 153.
    Tillfors, M
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, T
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekselius, L
    Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Fredrikson, M
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Social phobia and avoidant personality disorder as related to parental history of social anxiety: a general population study.2001Ingår i: Behav Res Ther, ISSN 0005-7967, Vol. 39, nr 3, s. 289-98Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a validated and DSM-IV compatible questionnaire, the present study related family history of excessive social anxiety to social phobia and avoidant personality disorder (APD) in epidemiologically identified probands in the general population. Probands met diagnostic criteria for social phobia with or without APD and APD with or without social phobia. A two- to three-fold increased relative risk of social anxiety was observed for all diagnostic groups. Increasing severity in probands by varying diagnostic criteria did not affect the relative risk. Because familial aggregation of social anxiety was not modulated by Axis I or II diagnosis or diagnostic cut-off levels, data imply that social phobia and APD may represent a dimension of social anxiety rather than separate disorders. Thus, having an affected family member is associated with a two- to three-fold risk increase for both social phobia and APD.

  • 154. Tillfors, Maria
    et al.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Psykiatri, Akademiska sjukhuset.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Lewenhaupt, Susanne
    Karlsson, Anders
    Carlbring, Per
    A randomized trial of Internet delivered treatment for social anxiety disorder in high school students2011Ingår i: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 40, nr 2, s. 147-157Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been shown effective for university students with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and public speaking fears. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the promising results can be transferred to high school students suffering from this condition. A total of 19 speech-anxious high school students with SAD were randomized either into 9 weeks of Internet-delivered CBT or to a wait-list control group. Significant improvements were found on measures of social anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Effects were maintained at 1-year follow-up. The average within- and between-group effect sizes (Cohen's d) for the primary social anxiety scales at posttest were 0.98 and 1.38, respectively. However, the average number of completed modules in the CBT program was low. Although compliance can be improved, the results suggest that Internet-based guided self-help is effective in the treatment of high school students with SAD.

  • 155. Tillfors, Maria
    et al.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Social phobia in Swedish university students: prevalence, subgroups and avoidant behavior2007Ingår i: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 42, nr 1, s. 79-86Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Public speaking is a common situation that university students have to endure. This situation is feared or avoided by most individuals with social phobia, which has been associated with low levels of educational attainment. However, epidemiological data on social phobia in university students are scarce. The present study examined the prevalence of social phobia and its subgroups in a university student population. Demographic characteristics and avoidant behavior in educational settings were also examined. METHODS: The Social Phobia Screening Questionnaire (SPSQ)--a validated and DSM-IV compatible instrument, was distributed as a postal survey to 753 randomly selected university students in Sweden. Interpretable questionnaires were obtained from 523 students (69.5%). To investigate subgroups, students who met the SPSQ diagnostic criteria of social phobia were analyzed by hierarchical cluster analysis. RESULTS: The point prevalence of social phobia among the Swedish university students was 16.1%, comparable with 15.6% previously reported for the general population. Two clusters were distinguished consisting of students scoring either low (discrete subgroup) or high (generalized subgroup) on all cluster variables. The discrete subgroup was more common representing 83% of the cases. Social phobia was associated with use of dysfunctional avoidant strategies in educational situations and in anticipation of public speaking. The disorder was less common among students following a pedagogic university program. CONCLUSIONS: Social phobia was highly prevalent among Swedish university students, most cases pertaining to a mild or discrete form of the disorder. The commonness and severity of social phobia in students did not deviate significantly from the general population suggesting that socially anxious individuals do apply for higher education. However, since avoidance and low educational attainment are commonly reported features, future studies should investigate whether sufferers of social phobia underachieve or abolish their studies prematurely.

  • 156. Tillfors, Maria
    et al.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Carlbring, Per
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Risk profiles for poor treatment response to internet-delivered CBT in people with social anxiety disorder2015Ingår i: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 33, s. 103-109Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In social anxiety disorder (SAD) co-morbid depressive symptoms as well as avoidance behaviors have been shown to predict insufficient treatment response. It is likely that subgroups of individuals with different profiles of risk factors for poor treatment response exist. This study aimed to identify subgroups of social avoidance and depressive symptoms in a clinical sample (N=167) with SAD before and after guided internet-delivered CBT, and to compare these groups on diagnostic status and social anxiety. We further examined individual movement between subgroups over time. Using cluster analysis we identified four subgroups, including a high-problem cluster at both time-points. Individuals in this cluster showed less remission after treatment, exhibited higher levels of social anxiety at both assessments, and typically remained in the high-problem cluster after treatment. Thus, in individuals with SAD, high levels of social avoidance and depressive symptoms constitute a risk profile for poor treatment response. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 157.
    Tillfors, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Social phobia and avoidant personality disorder: One spectrum disorder?2004Ingår i: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 58, s. 147-152Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 158.
    Tillfors, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Functional neuroanatomy of anticipatory anxiety in social phobics: A PET study2000Ingår i: Neuroimage, vol 11, 2000, s. S211-Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 159. Tillfors, Maria
    et al.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Cerebral blood flow during anticipation of public speaking in social phobia: a PET study.2002Ingår i: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 52, nr 11, s. 1113-1119Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    The aim was to examine the neural correlates of anxiety elicited by the anticipation of public speaking in individuals with social phobia. Positron emission tomography and (15)O-water was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow in subjects with DSM-IV defined social phobia during anxiety anticipation. Heart rate and subjective anxiety were also recorded. While being scanned, subjects were speaking alone either before or after speaking in public. To evaluate anticipatory anxiety we compared individuals speaking alone before they were speaking in front of an audience with those who did the reverse.

    RESULTS

    Heart rate and subjective anxiety measures confirmed anticipatory anxiety in social phobics who performed their private speech before their public. This was accompanied by enhanced cerebral blood flow in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left inferior temporal cortex, and in the left amygdaloid-hippocampal region. Brain blood flow was lower in the left temporal pole and bilaterally in the cerebellum in the anticipation group.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Brain regions with altered perfusion presumably reflect changes in neural activity associated with worry about anticipated public performance. We speculate that anticipatory anxiety in social phobics originates in an affect sensitive fear network encompassing the amygdaloid-hippocampal region, prefrontal, and temporal areas.

  • 160.
    Ågren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Bjurström, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Signaler och System.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Linnman, Clas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Faria, Vanda
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Signaler och System.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Effective brain connectivity in social anxiety disorder: a Bayesian approach2007Ingår i: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 61, nr 8, s. 47S-47SArtikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 161.
    Ågren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Björkstrand, Johannes
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Faria, Vanda
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    No link between amygdala reactivity to emotional faces and fear conditioning2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 162.
    Ågren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Björkstrand, Johannes
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för radiologi, onkologi och strålningsvetenskap, Enheten för radiologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Disruption of reconsolidation erases a fear memory trace in the human amygdala2012Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 337, nr 6101, s. 1550-1552Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Memories become labile when recalled. In humans and rodents alike, reactivated fear memories can be attenuated by disrupting reconsolidation with extinction training. Using functional brain imaging, we found that, after a conditioned fear memory was formed, reactivation and reconsolidation left a memory trace in the basolateral amygdala that predicted subsequent fear expression and was tightly coupled to activity in the fear circuit of the brain. In contrast, reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation suppressed fear, abolished the memory trace, and attenuated fear-circuit connectivity. Thus, as previously demonstrated in rodents, fear memory suppression resulting from behavioral disruption of reconsolidation is amygdala-dependent also in humans, which supports an evolutionarily conserved memory-update mechanism.

  • 163.
    Ågren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Faria, Vanda
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    No link between amygdalareactivity to emotional faces and fear conditioning2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 164.
    Ågren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Faria, Vanda
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Effective Connectivity of Fear Circuitry and Emotion Regulation in Specific Phobia2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the present study was to characterize effective brain connectivity patterns in patients with specific phobia.

    Methods: Sixteen patients with specific phobia were exposed to phobic and fear-relevant but non-phobic stimuli while regional cerebral blood flow was measured using [15O]-labelled water and positron emission tomography. Self reported state anxiety was also evaluated using the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). Different connectivity architectures were built based on five regions of interest (ROIs): the amygdala; subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC) area 25; anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) area 24; insular cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area 8. The ROIs were chosen based on their role in generating and attenuating fear. Structural equations modelling and Bayesian inference were used to assign probabilities to all possible architectures.

    Results: Top ranking models reveal different connectivity patterns resulting from phobic and non-phobic exposure. When exposed to phobic stimuli sACC appear to be driving the network. In contrast, when exposed to non-phobic stimuli the DLPFC is more active and dampen amygdala activity. This could reflect successful reappraisal processes during non-phobic exposure. The DLPFC correlated negatively (r=-0.49) with STAI-S during non-phobic exposure, but not phobic exposure also suggesting that emotional regulation fails in phobia. No direct correlation between amygdala activity and STAI-S was evident during either phobic or non-phobic conditions.

    Conclusions: These results suggest that emotional control processes operative when exposed to fear-relevant, but non-phobic cues are impaired during exposure to phobic stimuli.

  • 165.
    Ågren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Eriksson, Elias
    Sektionen för farmakologi, Göteborgs universitet.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Human fear reconsolidation and allelic differences in serotonergic and dopaminergic genes2012Ingår i: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 2, artikel-id e76Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear memory persistence, central for the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders, is partially genetically controlled. Recently, consolidation and reconsolidation processes have been reported to affect fear memory stability and integrity. This study explored the impact of reconsolidation processes and genetic make-up on fear reacquisition by manipulating reconsolidation using extinction performed outside or inside a reconsolidation interval. Reacquisition measured by skin conductance responses was stronger in individuals that extinguished outside (6 h) than inside (10 min) the reconsolidation interval. However, the effect was predominantly present in val/val homozygotes of the functional val158met polymorphism of the Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme and in short allele carriers of the serotonin transporter length 5-HTTLPR polymorphism. These results demonstrate that reconsolidation of human fear memory is influenced by dopamine and serotonin related genes.

  • 166.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Bjurström, A
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Pissiota, A
    Linnman, Clas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Michelgård, A
    Appel, L
    Bani, M
    Merlo Pich, E
    Zancan, S
    Långström, B
    Gustavsson, M
    Connectivity analyses of regional cerebral blood flow during public speaking in individuals with social anxiety disorder2005Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 167.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Human serotonin transporter availability predicts fear conditioning2015Ingår i: International Journal of Psychophysiology, ISSN 0167-8760, E-ISSN 1872-7697, Vol. 98, nr 3, s. 515-519Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 168.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Långström, B.
    Appel, L.
    Wolff, O. T.
    Kirschbaum, C.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Hypothalamic blood flow correlates positively with stress-induced cortisol levels in subjects with social anxiety disorder2006Ingår i: Psychosomatic Medicine, ISSN 0033-3174, E-ISSN 1534-7796, Vol. 68, nr 6, s. 859-862Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The adrenal excretion of cortisol in animals is dependent on the production of corticotropin-releasing factor in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. The a priori hypothesis of this study was that hypothalamic regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) would correlate positively with salivary cortisol levels in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) during anxiety provocation. Another objective was to evaluate whether salivary cortisol levels correlated with rCBF in other brain areas. Method: Regional CBF was measured with oxygen-15-labeled water and positron emission tomography during a public speaking task before and after placebo treatment in 12 subjects with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-defined SAD. Cortisol concentrations in saliva were measured 15 minutes after the task. The a priori hypothesis of a salivary cortisol-dependent activation of the hypothalamus was studied with region-of-interest analysis. In addition, the covariation between rCBF and salivary cortisol was studied in the whole brain using the general linear model. Results: The region-of-interest analysis revealed a positive correlation between salivary cortisol and hypothalamic rCBF. In the whole brain analysis, a positive covariation between rCBF and salivary cortisol levels was found in a midbrain cluster encompassing the hypothalamus with its statistical maximum in the mamillary bodies. Negative covariations were observed in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the motor and premotor cortices. Conclusion: Like in animals, stress-induced cortisol excretion in humans may be inhibited by activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and enhanced by activity in the hypothalamus.

  • 169.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gingnell, Malin
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Within-session effect of repeated stress exposure on extinction circuitry function in social anxiety disorder2017Ingår i: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 261, s. 85-90Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety reduction following repeated exposure to stressful experiences is generally held to depend on neural processes involved in extinction of conditioned fear. We predicted that repeated exposure to stressful experiences would change activity throughout the circuitry serving extinction, including ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), the hippocampus and the amygdala. To test this prediction, 36 participants diagnosed with SAD performed two successive speeches in front of an observing audience while regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was recorded using positron emission tomography. To control for non-anxiolytic effects of repeated exposure, rCBF was also measured during repeated presentations of neutral and angry facial expressions. Results showed that anxiety ratings and heart rate decreased from the first to the second speech, indicating an anxiolytic effect of repeated exposure. Exposure attenuated rCBF in the amygdala whereas no change in rCBF was observed in the vmPFC or hippocampus. The rCBF-reductions in the amygdala were greater following repetition of the speech task than repetition of face exposure indicating that they were specific to anxiety attenuation and not due to a reduced novelty. Our findings suggest that amygdala-related attenuation processes are key to understanding the working mechanisms of exposure therapy.

  • 170.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Michelgård Palmquist, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Psykiatri, Akademiska sjukhuset.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Liberzon, Israel
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Arousal modulation of memory and amygdala-parahippocampal connectivity: A PET-psychophysiology study in specific phobia2011Ingår i: Psychophysiology, ISSN 0048-5772, E-ISSN 1469-8986, Vol. 48, nr 11, s. 1463-1469Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Phobic fear is accompanied by intense bodily responses modulated by the amygdala. An amygdala moderated psychophysiological measure related to arousal is electrodermal activity. We evaluated the contributions of electrodermal activity to amygdala-parahippocampal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during phobic memory encoding in subjects with spider or snake phobia. Recognition memory was increased for phobia-related slides and covaried with rCBF in the amygdala and the parahippocampal gyrus. The covariation between parahippocampal rCBF and recognition was related to electrodermal activity suggesting that parahippocampal memory processes were associated with sympathetic activity. Electrodermal activity further mediated the amygdala effect on parahippocampal activity. Memory encoding during phobic fear therefore seems contingent on amygdala's influence on arousal and parahippocampal activity.

  • 171.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Michelgård Palmquist, Åsa
    Pissiota, Anna
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Cortico-Striatal Substance P Release Correlates with Phobia Related Trait Anxiety2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 172.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Wolf, O.T.
    Kirschbaum, C.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Furmark, Tomas
    Central neural correlates of salivary cortisol during stress in subjects with social phobia2004Ingår i: Biological Psychiatry, 55, Suppl. 8, 2004, s. 211S-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 173.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Psykiatri, Akademiska sjukhuset.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för onkologi, radiologi och klinisk immunologi.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Arousal gates amygdala interaction with the parahippocampal cortex during encoding of phobic picturesArtikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 174.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala universitet.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Bodily arousal gates amygdala-hippocampal interaction in phobic memory encoding2009Ingår i: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 65, nr 8, s. 126S-126SArtikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 175.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala universitet.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Functional connectivity of the amygdala in specific phobia2008Ingår i: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 63, nr 7, s. 169S-169SArtikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 176.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Psykiatri, Ulleråker, Akademiska sjukhuset.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för radiologi, onkologi och strålningsvetenskap, Enheten för nuklearmedicin och PET.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Disentangling the web of fear: amygdala reactivity and functional connectivity in spider and snake phobia2009Ingår i: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 172, nr 2, s. 103-108Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to study effects of fear on brain activity, functional connectivity and brain-behavior relationships during symptom provocation in subjects with specific phobia. Positron emission tomography (PET) and (15)O water was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 16 women phobic of either snakes or spiders but not both. Subjects watched pictures of snakes and spiders serving either as phobic or fear-relevant, but non-phobic, control stimuli depending on phobia type. Presentation of phobic as compared with non-phobic cues was associated with increased activation of the right amygdala and cerebellum as well as the left visual cortex and circumscribed frontal areas. Activity decreased in the prefrontal, orbitofrontal and ventromedial cortices as well as in the primary somatosensory cortex and auditory cortices. Furthermore, amygdala activation correlated positively with the subjective experience of distress. Connectivity analyses of activity in the phobic state revealed increased functional couplings between voxels in the right amygdala and the periamygdaloid area, fusiform gyrus and motor cortex. During non-phobic stimulation, prefrontal activity correlated negatively with amygdala rCBF, suggesting a phobia-related functional decoupling. These results suggest that visually elicited phobic reactions activate object recognition areas and deactivate prefrontal areas involved in cognitive control over emotion-triggering areas like the amygdala, resulting in motor readiness to support fight or flight.

1234 151 - 176 av 176
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf