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  • 201.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Nordenankar, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Arvidsson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Birgner, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Mahmoudi, Souha
    Halbout, Briac
    Smith, Casey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Fortin, Guillaume M.
    Olson, Lars
    Descarries, Laurent
    Trudeau, Louis-Eric
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Levesque, Daniel
    Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Enhanced Sucrose and Cocaine Self-Administration and Cue-Induced Drug Seeking after Loss of VGLUT2 in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons in Mice2011In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 31, no 35, p. 12593-12603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mesostriatal dopamine (DA) system contributes to several aspects of responses to rewarding substances and is implicated in conditions such as drug addiction and eating disorders. A subset of DA neurons has been shown to express the type 2 Vesicular glutamate transporter (Vglut2) and may therefore corelease glutamate. In the present study, we analyzed mice with a conditional deletion of Vglut2 in DA neurons (Vglut2(f/f;DAT-Cre)) to address the functional significance of the glutamate-DA cophenotype for responses to cocaine and food reinforcement. Biochemical parameters of striatal DA function were also examined by using DA receptor autoradiography, immediate-early gene quantitative in situ hybridization after cocaine challenge, and DA-selective in vivo chronoamperometry. Mice in which Vglut2 expression had been abrogated in DA neurons displayed enhanced operant self-administration of both high-sucrose food and intravenous cocaine. Furthermore, cocaine seeking maintained by drug-paired cues was increased by 76%, showing that reward-dependent plasticity is perturbed in these mice. In addition, several lines of evidence suggest that adaptive changes occurred in both the ventral and dorsal striatum in the absence of VGLUT2: DA receptor binding was increased, and basal mRNA levels of the DA-induced early genes Nur77 and c-fos were elevated as after cocaine induction. Furthermore, in vivo challenge of the DA system by potassium-evoked depolarization revealed less DA release in both striatal areas. This study demonstrates that absence of VGLUT2 in DA neurons leads to perturbations of reward consumption as well as reward-associated memory, features of particular relevance for addictive-like behavior.

  • 202.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Olszewski, Pawel K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hallsten Norbäck, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Gunnarsson, Zandra EA
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Levine, Allen S
    Minnesota Obesity Center, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN, USA.
    Pickering, Chris
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, University of Gothenburg, Addiction Biology Unit.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Downregulation of nucleus accumbens D1 and D2 receptor expression occurs upon exposure to and persists long-term after withdrawal from palatable food: conclusions from diet-induced obesity modelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Olszewski, Pawel K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Levine, Allen S.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Feed-forward mechanisms: Addiction-like behavioral and molecular adaptations in overeating2012In: Frontiers in neuroendocrinology (Print), ISSN 0091-3022, E-ISSN 1095-6808, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 127-139Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food reward, not hunger, is the main driving force behind eating in the modern obesogenic environment. Palatable foods, generally calorie-dense and rich in sugar/fat, are thus readily overconsumed despite the resulting health consequences. Important advances have been made to explain mechanisms underlying excessive consumption as an immediate response to presentation of rewarding tastants. However, our understanding of long-term neural adaptations to food reward that oftentimes persist during even a prolonged absence of palatable food and contribute to the reinstatement of compulsive overeating of high-fat high-sugar diets, is much more limited. Here we discuss the evidence from animal and human studies for neural and molecular adaptations in both homeostatic and non-homeostatic appetite regulation that may underlie the formation of a "feed-forward" system, sensitive to palatable food and propelling the individual from a basic preference for palatable diets to food craving and compulsive, addiction-like eating behavior.

  • 204.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Olszewski, Pawel K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Norbäck, A. H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Gunnarsson, Z. E. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Levine, A. S.
    Pickering, Chris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi Birgir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Dopamine D1 receptor gene expression decreases in the nucleus accumbens upon long-term exposure to palatable food and differs depending on diet-induced obesity phenotype in rats2010In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 171, no 3, p. 779-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) mediates feeding reward; its activity reflects tastants' hedonic value. NAcc dopamine guides immediate responses to reward, however, its involvement in establishing long-term responses after a period of exposure to palatable foods has not been defined. Furthermore, reward-driven overeating propels weight increase, but the scale of weight gain depends on animals' obesity-prone (OP) or -resistant (OR) phenotype. It is unclear whether the NAcc dopamine response to palatable food depends on obesity susceptibility. We investigated the effect of unrestricted extended access to high-fat high-sugar (HFHS) diet on expression of genes encoding dopamine receptors in the NAcc of OP and OR rats. We examined persistence of HFHS diet-induced changes in D(1) and D(2) gene expression in OP and OR rats subjected to HFHS withdrawal (bland chow for 18 days). Effects of restricted access to HFHS by pair-feeding were also studied. Using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), we found that NAcc D(1) mRNA was downregulated after long-term HFHS access in OP vs. OR animals. The effect was also observed after 18 days of HFHS withdrawal. Furthermore, restricted HFHS led to downregulation of D(1) as well as of D(2) mRNA levels compared to chow-fed controls. A difference in the expression of mu opioid receptor in the NAcc was also detected between the OP and OR rats during access to palatable food but not after withdrawal. We conclude that exposure to HFHS diets has lasting consequences for the NAcc dopamine system, perhaps modifying the motivation to search for food reward. The fact that the NAcc D(1) expression changes in OP animals after long-term exposure to palatable food and that this effect extends well into the reward discontinuation phase, implicates the D(1) receptor in the propensity to overeat and, in effect, gain weight in obesity prone individuals.

  • 205.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Pickering, Chris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Motivation for sucrose in sated rats is predicted by low anxiety-like behavior2009In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 454, no 3, p. 193-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety has been implicated in obesity and in the overconsumption of highly palatable foods such as those high in fat, sugar, or both. Also, the novelty-seeking trait has been associated with failure in weight-loss programs. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of experimental anxiety and the self-administration of sucrose and high fat pellets in non-food deprived rats across different operant schedules. Male Wistar rats were subjected to the elevated plus-maze test (EPM) of anxiety-like behavior. The rats were tested for fixed ratio 5 (FR5) and progressive ratio (PR) operant responding for 50% sucrose, 95% sucrose, and high-fat pellets. PR active lever press response for 95% sucrose, but not the other pellet types, was correlated to % time spent on open arms (P=0.019) in the EPM. On the FR5 schedule, activity (closed arm entries) was correlated to the self-administration of 50% sucrose (P=0.027) and high-fat (P=0.002). This indicates an association of novelty-induced activity and self-administration of palatable food in sated rats, as well as a specific association of PR lever press response for 95% sucrose and low anxiety-like behavior. It has been argued that such active lever press response on PR may be interpreted as craving for the reinforcer; thus, our findings indicate an inverse relationship of experimental anxiety and craving for sucrose. This connection may have implications for human situations, since anxiety and novelty-seeking have been associated with obesity and failure in weight-loss programs.

  • 206.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Pickering, Chris
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, University of Gothenburg, Addiction Biology Unit, Gothenburg.
    Stephansson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Locomotor adaptation and elevated expression of reward-relevant genes following free-choice high-fat diet exposureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity may be induced in rodents by long-term access to dietary fat. Such treatment has been reported to have behavioural effects including reduced anxiety-like behaviour and diminished operant responding for psychostimulants. It is unclear whether such effects are secondary to metabolic changes due to excess body weight, or to the extended access to palatable food reward. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a short palatable diet exposure (10 days) on performance in the open field test of novelty-induced locomotion and anxiety-like behaviour in rats. We subjected rats to a free-choice high-fat or high-sugar diet, or both, for a period of 10 days. Increased caloric intake was observed in all groups but body weight at Day 10 did not differ from chow-fed controls. We report that consumption of the free-choice high-fat diets was associated with higher novelty-induced activity and reduced anxiety-like behaviour in the open field test. In addition, we used RT-PCR to show that the high-fat group had 39% higher expression of mu opioid receptor in the lateral hypothalamus, and that tyrosine hydroxylase expression was elevated more than two-fold in the ventral tegmental area of rats with access to both high-fat and high-sugar. In conclusion, these results show that subchronic exposure to a free-choice high-fat diet induces behavioural adaptations such as elevated locomotor activity and attenuated experimental anxiety. The changes observed in gene expression related to reward after high-fat diet exposure indicate that these behavioural adaptations are related to reward function.

  • 207.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Pickering, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Anxiolytic response after palatable diet consumption but not food restriction in rats2009In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 816-816Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Rask-Andersen, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Chavan, Rohit A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Olszewski, Pawel K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Levine, Allen S.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Exposure to a high-fat high-sugar diet causes strong up-regulation of proopiomelanocortin and differentially affects dopamine D1 and D2 receptor gene expression in the brainstem of rats2014In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 559, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strong link between obesity and dopamine (DA) has been established by studies associating body weight status to variants of genes related to DA signalling. Human and animal studies investigating this relationship have so far focused mainly on the role of DA within the mesolimbic pathway. The aim of this study was to investigate potential DA receptor dysregulation in the brainstem, where these receptors play a potential role in meal termination, during high-fat high-sugar diet (HFHS) exposure. Expression of other key genes, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC), was also analyzed. We randomized rats into three groups; ad libitum access to HFHS (n=24), restricted HFHS access (n=10), or controls (chow-fed, n=10). After 5 weeks, brainstem gene expression was investigated by qRT-PCR. We observed an increase in POMC expression in ad libitum HFHS-fed rats compared to chow-fed controls (p<0.05). Further, expression of DA D2 receptor mRNA was down-regulated in the brainstem of the HFHS ad libitum-fed rats (p<0.05), whereas expression of the DA D1 receptor was upregulated (p<0.05) in these animals compared to chow-fed rats. In control experiments, we observed no effect relative to chow-fed controls on DA-receptor or POMC gene expression in the hypothalamus of HFHS diet-exposed rats, or in the brainstem of acutely food deprived rats. The present findings suggest brainstem POMC to be responsive to palatable foods, and that DA dysregulation after access to energy-dense diets occurs not only in striatal regions, but also in the brainstem, which could be relevant for overeating and for the development and maintenance of obesity.

  • 209.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Meyerson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Anxiety-like behaviour predicts the preference for a high-carbohydrate diet in outbred rats2007In: Behavioural Pharmacology, ISSN 0955-8810, E-ISSN 1473-5849, Vol. 18, p. S41-S41Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Roman, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Olszewski, Pawel K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Jonsson, Petra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Levine, Allen S.
    Minnesota Obesity Center, VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    Meyerson, Bengt J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Inverse association of high-fat diet preference and anxiety-like behavior: a putative role for urocortin 22009In: Genes, Brain and Behavior, ISSN 1601-1848, E-ISSN 1601-183X, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 193-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the preference for a palatable high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with response to novelty and with anxiety-like behavior in rats and whether such fat preference correlates with gene expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides related to feeding. We subjected male rats to two tests of exploration of novel environments: the multivariate concentric square field (MCSF) and the elevated plus maze (EPM). The rats were then exposed to a 5-day test of preference for a palatable HFD versus reference diets. Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of 21 neuropeptides were investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found a strong positive correlation of HFD preference and open-arm activity in the EPM (% open-arm time, r(s) = 0.629, df = 26, P < 0.001). Thus, HFD preference was inversely associated with anxiety-like behavior. The same association was found for HFD preference and behavior in the MCSF (bridge entries, r(s) = 0.399, df = 23, P = 0.048). In addition, the HFD preference was positively correlated (r(s) = 0.433, df = 25, P = 0.021) with hypothalamic mRNA levels of urocortin 2 (Ucn 2). Moreover, behavior in the EPM was significantly correlated with expression levels of the receptor for Ucn 2, the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2, in the hypothalamus (r(s) = 0.382, df = 33, P = 0.022, pituitary (r(s) = 0.494, df = 31, P = 0.004) and amygdala (r(s) = 0.381, df = 30, P = 0.032). We conclude that preference for palatable HFD is inversely associated with anxiety and propose that Ucn 2 signaling may play a role in this association.

  • 211.
    Alsiö, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Stenhammar, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Montgomery, Scott M
    Clinical Research Centre; Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Edlund, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Parental food preferences are associated with body weight disturbance in preschool childrenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental factors such as stress induced by parenting and certain food preferences are suspected to promote obesity in preschool children. In this context, especially the intake of dietary fat is assumed to play a key role for the children’s risk to become obese. Here we analyzed eating behaviors in parents of 3-year-olds in order to identify parental traits that are associated with body weight in these children. We also tested for possible interactions between psychosocial factors such as stress induced by parenting and parental food cravings. Questionnaires were sent out to 1300 parents whose children’s body weight was measured during ambulatory medical care visits (parental response rate 70.4%). Using the Food Craving Inventory scale allowed examining parental preferences for the following food categories:  high-fat/high-protein, sweets, carbohydrates, and fast food. Psychosocial stress caused by parenting was assessed with the Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ). Our main finding was that the parental preference for foods rich in high-fat/high-protein nutrients displayed an inverse U-shaped function to the children’s body weight such that low preference for this category was associated with both overweight and underweight in offspring. Parental preference for sweet-foods were associated with higher odds for developing overweight in early childhood. The level of parental food preferences was significantly modulated by stress induced by parenting. In conclusion, we show that parental food preference is affected by stress and is associated with the body weight status of their children. The results suggest that parental intake of high-fat/high-protein foods protects against weight disturbances in preschool children.

  • 212.
    Althini, Sanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Bengtsson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Usoskin, Dmitry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Söderström, Stine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Kylberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Lindqvist, Eva
    Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana
    Olson, Lars
    Lindeberg, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Ebendal, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Normal Nigrostriatal Innervation but Dopamine Dysfunction in Mice Carrying Hypomorphic Tyrosine Hydroxylase Alleles2003In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 444-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the use of the mouse tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene to drive knock-in constructs in catecholaminergic neurons. Two targeting constructs representing truncated forms of either of the BMP receptors ALK-2 or BMPR-II preceded by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) were introduced into the 3' untranslated region of TH. An frt-flanked neomycin-resistance (neo(r)) cassette was placed in the 3' end of the targeting constructs. Mice homozygous for the knock-in alleles showed various degrees of hypokinetic behavior, depending mainly on whether the neo(r) cassette was removed. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that TH mRNA and protein were variously down-regulated in these mouse strains. Reduced levels of dopamine and noradrenalin were found in several brain areas. However, number and morphology of neurons in substantia nigra and their projections to striatum appeared normal in the neo(r)-positive TH hypomorphic mice as examined by markers for L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase and the dopamine transporter. Elimination of the neo(r) cassette from the knock-in alleles partially restored TH and dopamine levels. The present neo(r)-positive TH hypomorphic mice show that nigrostriatal innervation develops independently of TH and should find use as a model for conditions of reduced catecholamine synthesis, as seen in, for example, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine-responsive dystonia/infantile parkinsonism.

  • 213.
    Althini, Susanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Experimental Studies of BMP Signalling in Neuronal Cells2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The developing nervous system depends largely on extracellular cues to shape its complex network of neurons. Classically, neurotrophins are known to be important mediators in this process. More recently, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs), belonging to the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily of secreted cytokines, have been shown to exert a wide range of effects, such as cellular growth, differentiation, survival and apoptosis, both in the developing and adult nervous system. They signal via serine/threonine kinase receptor essentially to the Smad pathway, which carries the signal to the nucleus where the transcription of target genes is regulated.

    This thesis investigates the functions of BMPs in the nervous system, using a set of different models. Firstly, a targeted deletion of GDF10 (BMP3b) in the mouse was established to evaluate the role of this growth/differentiation factor in the hippocampal formation, a brain area known to be involved in memory processing. Other members of the TGFβ superfamily likely compensate for the lack of GDF10, since no detectable alterations in hippocampal function or gene transcription profile have been found. Secondly, a mouse model was set up, with the aim to study impaired BMP-signalling in dopaminergic neurons. The tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) locus was used to drive the expression of dominant negative BMP receptors by means of bicistronic mRNAs. TH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamine and the mice described, show a graded decrease of TH-activity resulting in severe to mild dopamine deficiency. The contribution of the dominant negative BMP receptors to the phenotype is however secondary to the apparent TH hypomorphism. The final theme of this thesis is the potentiating effects of BMPs on neurotrophin-induced neurite outgrowth as studied in explanted ganglia from chick embryos and in the rat phaeochromocytoma cell line PC12. A number of pharmacological inhibitors of intracellular signalling kinases were applied to the cultures in order to reveal the contribution of different pathways to the enhanced neurite outgrowth. We made the unexpected finding that inhibition of MEK signalling mimicked the potentiating effects of BMP stimulation in the chick system. The underlying mechanisms for the synergistic effects, however, are still an enigma.

    List of papers
    1. Targeted Deletion of GDF10 has no Effect on Long Term Potentiation, Contextual Learning Ability or Gene Transcription in the Hippocampus
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeted Deletion of GDF10 has no Effect on Long Term Potentiation, Contextual Learning Ability or Gene Transcription in the Hippocampus
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90335 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-04-24 Created: 2003-04-24 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Normal Nigrostriatal Innervation but Dopamine Dysfunction in Mice Carrying Hypomorphic Tyrosine Hydroxylase Alleles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Normal Nigrostriatal Innervation but Dopamine Dysfunction in Mice Carrying Hypomorphic Tyrosine Hydroxylase Alleles
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    2003 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 444-453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the use of the mouse tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene to drive knock-in constructs in catecholaminergic neurons. Two targeting constructs representing truncated forms of either of the BMP receptors ALK-2 or BMPR-II preceded by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) were introduced into the 3' untranslated region of TH. An frt-flanked neomycin-resistance (neo(r)) cassette was placed in the 3' end of the targeting constructs. Mice homozygous for the knock-in alleles showed various degrees of hypokinetic behavior, depending mainly on whether the neo(r) cassette was removed. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that TH mRNA and protein were variously down-regulated in these mouse strains. Reduced levels of dopamine and noradrenalin were found in several brain areas. However, number and morphology of neurons in substantia nigra and their projections to striatum appeared normal in the neo(r)-positive TH hypomorphic mice as examined by markers for L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase and the dopamine transporter. Elimination of the neo(r) cassette from the knock-in alleles partially restored TH and dopamine levels. The present neo(r)-positive TH hypomorphic mice show that nigrostriatal innervation develops independently of TH and should find use as a model for conditions of reduced catecholamine synthesis, as seen in, for example, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine-responsive dystonia/infantile parkinsonism.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91750 (URN)10.1002/jnr.10606 (DOI)12704806 (PubMedID)
    Note

    De två första författarna delar första författarskapet.

    Available from: 2004-04-21 Created: 2004-04-21 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Blocked MAP kinase activity selectively enhances neurotrophic growth responses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blocked MAP kinase activity selectively enhances neurotrophic growth responses
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1044-7431, E-ISSN 1095-9327, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 345-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 4 and 6 as well as MEK inhibitors PD98059 and U0126 potentiate neurotrophin 3 (NT3)- and neurturin (NTN)-induced neurite outgrowth and survival of peripheral neurons from the E9 chicken embryo. Preexposure to BMP4 or PD98059 was sufficient to prime the potentiation of subsequently added NT3. Phosphorylation of Erk2, induced by NT3, was reduced by MEK inhibition but unaffected by BMP signaling. Real-time PCR showed that neither BMP stimulation nor MEK inhibition increased Trk receptor expression and that the BMP-induced genes Smad6 and Id1 were not upregulated by PD98059. In contrast, both MEK inhibition and BMP signaling suppressed transcription of the serum-response element (SRE)-driven Egr1 gene. A reporter assay using NGF-stimulated PC12 cells demonstrated that MEK/Erk/Elk-driven transcriptional activity was inhibited by Smad1/5 and by PD98059. Thus, suppression of SRE-controlled transcription represents a likely convergence point for pathways regulating neurotrophic responses.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90337 (URN)10.1016/j.mcn.2003.10.015 (DOI)15019950 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2003-04-24 Created: 2003-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Bone morphogenetic protein signalling in NGF-stimulated PC12 cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bone morphogenetic protein signalling in NGF-stimulated PC12 cells
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    2003 (English)In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 307, no 3, p. 632-639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are shown to potentiate NGF-induced neuronal differentiation in PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells grown on collagen under low-serum conditions. Whereas, cell bodies remained rounded in control medium or with only BMPs present, addition of BMP4 or BMP6 robustly increased the neuritogenic effect of NGF within 2 days. NGF-increased phosphorylation of p44(Erk1) and p42(Erk2) between 2 and 24h was unaffected by addition of BMP6. PC12 cells transfected with the SBE(4x)-luc reporter showed that BMP4 significantly increased receptor-activated Smad activity. Expression of constitutively active BMP receptor ALK2 activating Smad1 and Smad5 resulted in a strong increase in the SBE(4x)-luc reporter response. Adding the inhibitory Smad7 drastically reduced this signal. In contrast to wild-type (wt) Smad5, a Smad5 variant lacking five Erk phosphorylation sites in the linker region (designated Smad5/5SA) showed a strong background transcriptional activity. A fusion construct (Gal4-Smad5/5SA) was also highly transcriptionally active. Addition of the MEK inhibitor U0126 to PC12 cells expressing Gal4-Smad5/wt did not increase background transcriptional activity. However, upon activation by constitutively active ALK2 both Gal4-Smad5/wt and Gal4-Smad5/5SA strongly stimulated transcription. The data show that serine residues of the linker region of Smad5 reduce spontaneous transcriptional activity and that NGF-activated Erk does not antagonise BMP signalling at this site. Hence, NGF and BMP signals are likely to interact further downstream at the transcriptional level in neuronal differentiation of the PC12 cells.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-90338 (URN)10.1016/S0006-291X(03)01236-1 (DOI)12893270 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2003-04-24 Created: 2003-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 214.
    Althini, Susanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Usoskin, Dmitry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Kylberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Kaplan, Paul L.
    Ebendal, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Blocked MAP kinase activity selectively enhances neurotrophic growth responses2004In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1044-7431, E-ISSN 1095-9327, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 345-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 4 and 6 as well as MEK inhibitors PD98059 and U0126 potentiate neurotrophin 3 (NT3)- and neurturin (NTN)-induced neurite outgrowth and survival of peripheral neurons from the E9 chicken embryo. Preexposure to BMP4 or PD98059 was sufficient to prime the potentiation of subsequently added NT3. Phosphorylation of Erk2, induced by NT3, was reduced by MEK inhibition but unaffected by BMP signaling. Real-time PCR showed that neither BMP stimulation nor MEK inhibition increased Trk receptor expression and that the BMP-induced genes Smad6 and Id1 were not upregulated by PD98059. In contrast, both MEK inhibition and BMP signaling suppressed transcription of the serum-response element (SRE)-driven Egr1 gene. A reporter assay using NGF-stimulated PC12 cells demonstrated that MEK/Erk/Elk-driven transcriptional activity was inhibited by Smad1/5 and by PD98059. Thus, suppression of SRE-controlled transcription represents a likely convergence point for pathways regulating neurotrophic responses.

  • 215.
    Althini, Susanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Usoskin, Dmitry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Kylberg, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    ten Dijke, Peter
    Ebendal, Ted
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Bone morphogenetic protein signalling in NGF-stimulated PC12 cells2003In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 307, no 3, p. 632-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are shown to potentiate NGF-induced neuronal differentiation in PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells grown on collagen under low-serum conditions. Whereas, cell bodies remained rounded in control medium or with only BMPs present, addition of BMP4 or BMP6 robustly increased the neuritogenic effect of NGF within 2 days. NGF-increased phosphorylation of p44(Erk1) and p42(Erk2) between 2 and 24h was unaffected by addition of BMP6. PC12 cells transfected with the SBE(4x)-luc reporter showed that BMP4 significantly increased receptor-activated Smad activity. Expression of constitutively active BMP receptor ALK2 activating Smad1 and Smad5 resulted in a strong increase in the SBE(4x)-luc reporter response. Adding the inhibitory Smad7 drastically reduced this signal. In contrast to wild-type (wt) Smad5, a Smad5 variant lacking five Erk phosphorylation sites in the linker region (designated Smad5/5SA) showed a strong background transcriptional activity. A fusion construct (Gal4-Smad5/5SA) was also highly transcriptionally active. Addition of the MEK inhibitor U0126 to PC12 cells expressing Gal4-Smad5/wt did not increase background transcriptional activity. However, upon activation by constitutively active ALK2 both Gal4-Smad5/wt and Gal4-Smad5/5SA strongly stimulated transcription. The data show that serine residues of the linker region of Smad5 reduce spontaneous transcriptional activity and that NGF-activated Erk does not antagonise BMP signalling at this site. Hence, NGF and BMP signals are likely to interact further downstream at the transcriptional level in neuronal differentiation of the PC12 cells.

  • 216.
    Althini, Susanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Åbrink, Magnus
    Söderström, Stine
    Lindeberg, Jonas
    Kylberg, Annika
    Jensen, Vidar
    Hvalby, Öivind
    Ebendal, Ted
    Targeted Deletion of GDF10 has no Effect on Long Term Potentiation, Contextual Learning Ability or Gene Transcription in the HippocampusManuscript (Other academic)
  • 217. Althof, Stanley E.
    et al.
    Buvat, Jacques
    Gutkin, Stephen W.
    Belger, Mark
    Stothard, Diane R.
    Fugl-Meyer, Axel R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Sexual Satisfaction in Men with Erectile Dysfunction: Correlates and Potential Predictors2010In: The journal of sexual medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Sexual satisfaction is an important treatment objective for men with erectile dysfunction (ED). Aims. To evaluate potential associations between International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) satisfaction at study endpoint and a range of baseline, on-treatment, and endpoint variables. Methods. An exploratory analysis was conducted involving 3,935 subjects with ED randomized to on-demand tadalafil (N = 2,824) or placebo (N = 1,111) in randomized, controlled trials across 28 countries. Patients achieving scores >= 16 on IIEF questions 7, 8, 13, and 14 at study endpoint were operationally defined as satisfied (vs. < 16, not satisfied). Multivariate logistic regression and other analyses were conducted to ascertain correlates and potential predictors of improvements in the IIEF-erectile function domain (IIEF-EF). Main Outcome Measures. Satisfaction on the IIEF at study endpoint, on-treatment improvements in IIEF-EF, and endpoint sexual frequency. Results. Patients who were satisfied with sexual function were on average younger and had less severe ED, a shorter history of the condition, and no history of vascular disorders, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus/insulin use at baseline (P < 0.01 vs. not satisfied for each). Satisfied patients were also more likely to experience a >= 4-point increase on the IIEF-EF domain on treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 22.4; 95% CI = 17.6-28.5; P < 0.0001) or IIEF-EF >= 26 at endpoint (adjusted OR = 41.0; 95% CI = 33.6-50.2; P < 0.0001). Satisfaction emerged as a strong correlate of a >= 4-point increase in the IIEF-EF on treatment; however, as a correlate of endpoint sexual frequency, baseline sexual frequency was stronger than endpoint satisfaction. Conclusions. Satisfaction is associated with certain baseline, on-treatment, and endpoint variables in ED patients. Further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary findings and explore their meaning for female partners. Althof SE, Buvat J, Gutkin SW, Belger M, Stothard DR, and Fugl-Meyer AR. Sexual satisfaction in men with erectile dysfunction: Correlates and potential predictors. J Sex Med 2010;7:203-215.

  • 218.
    Al-walai, Somar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Characterization of solutecarrier SLC38A62012Student paper other, 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Transport across the membrane of a cell is of crucial importance for cellular functions. The solute carrier family,SLC38 is a family of membrane proteins that transports various substances through the membrane and thusperforms many physiologically important functions, for example, transport of glutamine from astrocyte toneurons in the central nervous system. In this paper, we demonstrate that one of the transporters in this familynamed SLC38A6 forms several protein complexes with a variety of proteins in the membrane and in synapticvesicles, suggesting that SLC38A6 is involved in the synaptic release of neurotransmitters in synapses. Weperformed sensitive protein interaction analysis between the protein of interest and a variety of proteinsexpressed at different sites in the neuronal cell. We showed that SLC38A6 interacts with proteins in the cellmembrane as well as in the membrane of synaptic vesicles. The current theory is that SLC38A6 interact withthese proteins when the synaptic vesicles are in close proximity with the cell membrane during the release of theneurotransmitters.

  • 219.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Axelson, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Comparison between adaptive and fixed stimulus paired-pulsetranscranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) in normal subjects2017In: Clinical Neurophysiology Practice, ISSN 2467-981X, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS) examines cortical excitability but may require lengthy test procedures and fine tuning of stimulus parameters due to the inherent variability of the elicited motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and their tendency to exhibit a ‘ceiling/floor effects’ in inhibition trials. Aiming to overcome some of these limitations, we implemented an ‘adaptive’ ppTMS protocol and compared the obtained excitability indices with those from ‘conventional’ fixed-stimulus ppTMS.

    Methods

    Short- and long interval intracortical inhibition (SICI and LICI) as well as intracortical facilitation (ICF) were examined in 20 healthy subjects by adaptive ppTMS and fixed-stimulus ppTMS. The test stimulus intensity was either adapted to produce 500 μV MEPs (by a maximum likelihood strategy in combination with parameter estimation by sequential testing) or fixed to 120% of resting motor threshold (rMT). The conditioning stimulus was 80% rMT for SICI and ICF and 120% MT for LICI in both tests.

    Results

    There were significant (p < 0.05) intraindividual correlations between the two methods for all excitability measures. There was a clustering of SICI and LICI indices near maximal inhibition (‘ceiling effect’) in fixed-stimulus ppTMS which was not observed for adaptive SICI and LICI.

    Conclusions

    Adaptive ppTMS excitability data correlates to those acquired from fixed-stimulus ppTMS.

    Significance

    Adaptive ppTMS is easy to implement and may serve as a more sensitive method to detect changes in cortical inhibition than fixed stimulus ppTMS. Whether equally confident data are produced by less stimuli with our adaptive approach (as already confirmed for motor threshold estimation) remains to be explored.

  • 220.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Utredning av epileptiska anfall och misstänkt epilepsi: Anamnes och vittnesbeskrivning är avgörande för rätt diagnos2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115, article id E47DArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 221.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Estrogenic influences in pain processing2013In: Frontiers in neuroendocrinology (Print), ISSN 0091-3022, E-ISSN 1095-6808, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 329-349Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gonadal hormones not only play a pivotal role in reproductive behavior and sexual differentiation, they also contribute to thermoregulation, feeding, memory, neuronal survival, and the perception of somatosensory stimuli. Numerous studies on both animals and human subjects have also demonstrated the potential effects of gonadal hormones, such as estrogens, on pain transmission. These effects most likely involve multiple neuroanatomical circuits as well as diverse neurochemical systems and they therefore need to be evaluated specifically to determine the localization and intrinsic characteristics of the neurons engaged. The aim of this review is to summarize the morphological as well as biochemical evidence in support for gonadal hormone modulation of nociceptive processing, with particular focus on estrogens and spinal cord mechanisms.

  • 222.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Elf, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Grindlund, Margareta E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Punga, Anna R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Diagnostic Utility of Repetitive Nerve Stimulation in a Large Cohort of Patients With Myasthenia Gravis2017In: Journal of clinical neurophysiology, ISSN 0736-0258, E-ISSN 1537-1603, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 400-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Optimizing the diagnostic utility of repetitive nerve stimulation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may include tailoring the examination to clinical phenotype. Therefore, we analyzed all available repetitive nerve stimulation parameters in a large cohort of patients with confirmed MG diagnosis.

    METHODS: All repetitive nerve stimulation examinations at the Uppsala University Hospital rendering an MG diagnosis during 1996 to 2014 were analyzed. The deltoid, trapezius, anconeus, nasalis, abductor digiti quinti, and frontalis muscles were examined.

    RESULTS: Two hundred one patients with MG were diagnosed. Abnormal amplitude decrement was found in 54% of patients with ocular MG, 77% of patients with predominantly bulbar fatigue, and in 83% of patients with predominantly limb fatigue. The deltoid muscle had the highest sensitivity in all MG subtypes, with a mean of 77% sensitivity in all clinical subtypes, and the most pronounced decrement for amplitude (P = 0.0002) and area (P < 0.0001). Technical issues were rare.

    CONCLUSIONS: These data contribute to further optimization of repetitive nerve stimulation strategies regarding muscle selection and technical performance in the electrodiagnostic workup of MG.

  • 223.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Hallsson, Lara R.
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Male Courtship Pheromones Affect Female Behaviour in the Swordtail Characin ( Corynopoma riisei)2014In: Ethology, ISSN 0179-1613, E-ISSN 1439-0310, Vol. 120, no 5, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pheromones constitute an important cue used by both males and females during courtship. Here, we investigate the effect of male pheromones on female behaviour in the swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei), a species of fish where males have a caudal pheromone gland which has been suggested to affect female behaviour during courtship. We subjected female C.riisei to male courtship pheromones and investigated the effect on both female behaviour and brain serotonergic activity levels compared to a control group. While no difference in serotonergic activity was found, the pheromone-treated females showed lower stress levels compared to the control group. Furthermore, pheromone-treated females increased locomotor activity over time, while a decrease in locomotor activity was observed in the control group. These results suggest that the male courtship pheromones may serve to reduce female stress and increase female activity, possibly to aid males in gaining access to females and facilitating sperm transfer.

  • 224.
    Ammoun, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Orexin Receptors in Recombinant CHO Cells: Signaling to Short- and Long-Term Cell Responses2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently discovered neuropeptides orexins (orexin-A and -B) act as endogenous ligands for G-protein-coupled receptors called OX1 and OX2 receptors. Our previous studies have established model systems for investigation of the pharmacology and signaling of these receptors in recombinant CHO cells. OX1 receptor-expressing CHO cells were mainly utilized in this thesis.

    Orexin-A and -B activate both OX1 and OX2 receptors. However, orexin-B is less potent in activating OX1 receptors than orexin-A, whereas the peptides are equipotent on OX2 receptors. We have performed mutagenesis on orexin-A to investigate the basis for this selectivity. We show that OX2 receptor is generally less affected by the mutations and thus OX2 receptor appears to have less strict requirements for ligand binding, likely explaining the lack of difference in affinity/potency between orexin-A and orexin-B on OX2 receptor.

    The other studies focus on orexin receptor signaling. OX1 receptors are shown to regulate adenylyl cyclase both in positive and negative manner, activate different MAP-kinases (ERK1/2 and p38) and induce cell death after long-lasting stimulation. Adenylyl cyclase regulation occurs likely through three different G-protein families, Gi, Gs and Gq. For ERK1/2, several downstream pathways, such as Ras, Src, PI3-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) are implicated. OX1 receptor-mediated activation of ERK is suggested to be cytoprotective whereas p38 MAP-kinase induces programmed cell death.

    Three particularly interesting findings were made. Firstly, novel PKC δ (delta) is suggested to regulate adenylyl cyclase, whereas conventional and atypical PKCs are involved in activation of ERK. Secondly, adenylyl cyclase and ERK activation is fully dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Further experiments suggest that the previously discovered receptor-operated Ca2+ influx is not affecting the downstream effectors of orexin receptors but that it instead enables orexin receptors to couple to several signal cascades. Thirdly, upon inhibition of caspases, classical mediators of programmed cell death, OX1 receptor-mediated cell death is not reversed, but instead the pathways to death are altered so de novo gene transcription is no longer required for cell death.

    List of papers
    1. Distinct Recognition of OX1 and OX2 Receptors by Orexin Peptides
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinct Recognition of OX1 and OX2 Receptors by Orexin Peptides
    Show others...
    2003 (English)In: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, ISSN 0022-3565, E-ISSN 1521-0103, Vol. 305, no 2, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have compared the abilities of orexin-A and orexin-B and variants of orexin-A to activate different Ca(2+) responses (influx and release) in human OX(1) and OX(2) receptor- expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells. Responses mediated by activation of both receptor subtypes with either orexin-A or -B were primarily dependent on extracellular Ca(2+), suggesting similar activation of Ca(2+) influx as we have previously shown for orexin-A and OX(1) receptors. Amino acid-wise truncation of orexin-A reduced its ability to activate OX(1) and OX(2) receptors, but the response mediated by the OX(2) receptor was more resistant to truncation than the response mediated by the OX(1) receptor. We also performed a sequential replacement of amino acids 14 to 26 with alanine in the truncated orexin-A variant orexin-A(14-33). Replacement of the same amino acids produced a fall in the potency for each receptor subtype, but the reduction was less prominent for the OX(2) receptor. The most marked reduction was produced by the replacement of Leu20, Asp25, and His26 with alanine. Interestingly, extracellular Ca(2+) dependence of responses to some of the mutated peptides was different from those of orexin-A and -B. The mutagenesis also suggests that although the determinants required from orexin-A for binding to and activation of the receptor are highly conserved between the orexin receptor subtypes, the OX(2) receptor requires fewer determinants. This might in part explain why orexin-B has the affinity and potency equal to orexin-A for this subtype, although it has 10- to 100-fold lower affinity and potency for the OX(1) receptor.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93307 (URN)10.1124/jpet.102.048025 (DOI)12606634 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2005-09-01 Created: 2005-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. OX1 orexin receptors couple to adenylyl cyclase regulation via multiple mechanisms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>OX1 orexin receptors couple to adenylyl cyclase regulation via multiple mechanisms
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 280, no 8, p. 6570-6579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the mechanism of OX(1) orexin receptors to regulate adenylyl cyclase activity when recombinantly expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was investigated. In intact cells, stimulation with orexin-A led to two responses, a weak (21%), high potency (EC(50) approximately 1 nm) inhibition and a strong (4-fold), low potency (EC(50) = approximately 300 nm) stimulation. The inhibition was reversed by pertussis toxin, suggesting the involvement of G(i/o) proteins. Orexin-B was, surprisingly, almost equally as potent as orexin-A in elevating cAMP (pEC(50) = approximately 500 nm). cAMP elevation was not caused by Ca(2+) elevation or by Gbetagamma. In contrast, it relied in part on a novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCdelta, as determined using pharmacological inhibitors. Yet, PKC stimulation alone only very weakly stimulated cAMP production (1.1-fold). In the presence of G(s) activity, orexins still elevated cAMP; however, the potencies were greatly increased (EC(50) of orexin-A = approximately 10 nm and EC(50) of orexin-B = approximately 100 nm), and the response was fully dependent on PKCdelta. In permeabilized cells, only a PKC-independent low potency component was seen. This component was sensitive to anti-Galpha(s) antibodies. We conclude that OX(1) receptors stimulate adenylyl cyclase via a low potency G(s) coupling and a high potency phospholipase C --> PKC coupling. The former or some exogenous G activation is essentially required for the PKC to significantly activate adenylyl cyclase. The results also suggest that orexin-B-activated OX(1) receptors couple to G(s) almost as efficiently as the orexin-A-activated receptors, in contrast to Ca(2+) elevation and phospholipase C activation, for which orexin-A is 10-fold more potent.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93308 (URN)10.1074/jbc.M407397200 (DOI)15611118 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2005-09-01 Created: 2005-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. OX1 orexin receptors activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase in Chinese hamster ovary cells via multiple mechanisms: the role of Ca2+ influx in OX1 receptor signaling
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>OX1 orexin receptors activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase in Chinese hamster ovary cells via multiple mechanisms: the role of Ca2+ influx in OX1 receptor signaling
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Molecular Endocrinology, ISSN 0888-8809, E-ISSN 1944-9917, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 80-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Activation of OX1 orexin receptors heterologously expressedin Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells led to a rapid, strong,and long-lasting increase in ERK phosphorylation (activation).Dissection of the signal pathways to ERK using multiple inhibitorsand dominant-negative constructs indicated involvement of Ras,protein kinase C, phosphoinositide-3-kinase, and Src. Most interestingly,Ca2+ influx appeared central for the ERK response in CHO cells,and the same was indicated in recombinant neuro-2a cells andcultured rat striatal neurons. Detailed investigations in CHOcells showed that inhibition of the receptor- and store-operatedCa2+ influx pathways could fully attenuate the response, whereasinhibition of the store-operated Ca2+ influx pathway alone orthe Ca2+ release was ineffective. If the receptor-operated pathwaywas blocked, an exogenously activated store-operated pathwaycould take its place and restore the coupling of OX1 receptorsto ERK. Further experiments suggested that Ca2+ influx, as such,may not be required for ERK phosphorylation, but that Ca2+,elevated via influx, acts as a switch enabling OX1 receptorsto couple to cascades leading to ERK phosphorylation, cAMP elevation,and phospholipase C activation. In conclusion, the data suggestthat the primary coupling of orexin receptors to Ca2+ influxallows them to couple to other signal pathways; in the absenceof coupling to Ca2+ influx, orexin receptors can act as signalintegrators by taking advantage of other Ca2+ influx pathways.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93309 (URN)10.1210/me.2004-0389 (DOI)16141359 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2005-09-01 Created: 2005-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. G-protein-coupled OX1 Orexin/hcrtr-1 Hypocretin Receptors Induce Caspase-dependent and -independent Cell Death through p38 Mitogen-/Stress-activated Protein Kinase
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>G-protein-coupled OX1 Orexin/hcrtr-1 Hypocretin Receptors Induce Caspase-dependent and -independent Cell Death through p38 Mitogen-/Stress-activated Protein Kinase
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 281, p. 834-842Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the signaling of OX1 receptors to cell death using Chinese hamster ovary cells as a model system. OX1 receptor stimulation with orexin-A caused a delayed cell death independently of cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. The classical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, ERK and p38, were strongly activated by orexin-A. p38 was essential for induction of cell death, whereas the ERK pathway appeared protective. A pathway often implicated in the p38-mediated cell death, activation of p53, did not mediate the cell death, as there was no stabilization of p53 or increase in p53-dependent transcriptional activity, and dominant-negative p53 constructs did not inhibit cell demise. Under basal conditions, orexin-A-induced cell death was associated with compact chromatin condensation and it required de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis, the classical hallmarks of programmed (apoptotic) cell death. However, though the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-(O-methyl)fluoromethyl ketone (Z-VAD-fmk) fully inhibited the caspase activity, it did not rescue the cells from orexin-A-induced death. In the presence of Z-VAD-fmk, orexin-A-induced cell death was still dependent on p38 and de novo protein synthesis, but it no longer required gene transcription. Thus, caspase inhibition causes activation of alternative, gene transcription-independent death pathway. In summary, the present study points out mechanisms for orexin receptor-mediated cell death and adds to our general understanding of the role of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in cell death by suggesting a pathway from G-protein-coupled receptors to cell death via p38 mitogen-/stress-activated protein kinase independent of p53 and caspase activation.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93310 (URN)10.1074/jbc.M508603200 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-09-01 Created: 2005-09-01 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 225.
    Ammoun, Sylwia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Holmqvist, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Shariatmadari, Ramin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Oonk, Hendrica B.
    Detheux, Michel
    Parmentier, Marc
    Åkerman, Karl E. O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Kukkonen, Jyrki P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Distinct Recognition of OX1 and OX2 Receptors by Orexin Peptides2003In: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, ISSN 0022-3565, E-ISSN 1521-0103, Vol. 305, no 2, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have compared the abilities of orexin-A and orexin-B and variants of orexin-A to activate different Ca(2+) responses (influx and release) in human OX(1) and OX(2) receptor- expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells. Responses mediated by activation of both receptor subtypes with either orexin-A or -B were primarily dependent on extracellular Ca(2+), suggesting similar activation of Ca(2+) influx as we have previously shown for orexin-A and OX(1) receptors. Amino acid-wise truncation of orexin-A reduced its ability to activate OX(1) and OX(2) receptors, but the response mediated by the OX(2) receptor was more resistant to truncation than the response mediated by the OX(1) receptor. We also performed a sequential replacement of amino acids 14 to 26 with alanine in the truncated orexin-A variant orexin-A(14-33). Replacement of the same amino acids produced a fall in the potency for each receptor subtype, but the reduction was less prominent for the OX(2) receptor. The most marked reduction was produced by the replacement of Leu20, Asp25, and His26 with alanine. Interestingly, extracellular Ca(2+) dependence of responses to some of the mutated peptides was different from those of orexin-A and -B. The mutagenesis also suggests that although the determinants required from orexin-A for binding to and activation of the receptor are highly conserved between the orexin receptor subtypes, the OX(2) receptor requires fewer determinants. This might in part explain why orexin-B has the affinity and potency equal to orexin-A for this subtype, although it has 10- to 100-fold lower affinity and potency for the OX(1) receptor.

  • 226.
    Ammoun, Sylwia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Johansson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Ekholm, Marie E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Holmqvist, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Danis, Alexander S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Korhonen, Laura
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Sergeeva, Olga A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Haas, Helmut L.
    Åkerman, Karl E. O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Kukkonen, Jyrki P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    OX1 orexin receptors activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase in Chinese hamster ovary cells via multiple mechanisms: the role of Ca2+ influx in OX1 receptor signaling2006In: Molecular Endocrinology, ISSN 0888-8809, E-ISSN 1944-9917, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 80-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activation of OX1 orexin receptors heterologously expressedin Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells led to a rapid, strong,and long-lasting increase in ERK phosphorylation (activation).Dissection of the signal pathways to ERK using multiple inhibitorsand dominant-negative constructs indicated involvement of Ras,protein kinase C, phosphoinositide-3-kinase, and Src. Most interestingly,Ca2+ influx appeared central for the ERK response in CHO cells,and the same was indicated in recombinant neuro-2a cells andcultured rat striatal neurons. Detailed investigations in CHOcells showed that inhibition of the receptor- and store-operatedCa2+ influx pathways could fully attenuate the response, whereasinhibition of the store-operated Ca2+ influx pathway alone orthe Ca2+ release was ineffective. If the receptor-operated pathwaywas blocked, an exogenously activated store-operated pathwaycould take its place and restore the coupling of OX1 receptorsto ERK. Further experiments suggested that Ca2+ influx, as such,may not be required for ERK phosphorylation, but that Ca2+,elevated via influx, acts as a switch enabling OX1 receptorsto couple to cascades leading to ERK phosphorylation, cAMP elevation,and phospholipase C activation. In conclusion, the data suggestthat the primary coupling of orexin receptors to Ca2+ influxallows them to couple to other signal pathways; in the absenceof coupling to Ca2+ influx, orexin receptors can act as signalintegrators by taking advantage of other Ca2+ influx pathways.

  • 227.
    Ammoun, Sylwia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Lindholm, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Wootz, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Åkerman, Karl E. O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Kukkonen, Jyrki P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    G-protein-coupled OX1 Orexin/hcrtr-1 Hypocretin Receptors Induce Caspase-dependent and -independent Cell Death through p38 Mitogen-/Stress-activated Protein Kinase2006In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 281, p. 834-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the signaling of OX1 receptors to cell death using Chinese hamster ovary cells as a model system. OX1 receptor stimulation with orexin-A caused a delayed cell death independently of cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. The classical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, ERK and p38, were strongly activated by orexin-A. p38 was essential for induction of cell death, whereas the ERK pathway appeared protective. A pathway often implicated in the p38-mediated cell death, activation of p53, did not mediate the cell death, as there was no stabilization of p53 or increase in p53-dependent transcriptional activity, and dominant-negative p53 constructs did not inhibit cell demise. Under basal conditions, orexin-A-induced cell death was associated with compact chromatin condensation and it required de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis, the classical hallmarks of programmed (apoptotic) cell death. However, though the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-(O-methyl)fluoromethyl ketone (Z-VAD-fmk) fully inhibited the caspase activity, it did not rescue the cells from orexin-A-induced death. In the presence of Z-VAD-fmk, orexin-A-induced cell death was still dependent on p38 and de novo protein synthesis, but it no longer required gene transcription. Thus, caspase inhibition causes activation of alternative, gene transcription-independent death pathway. In summary, the present study points out mechanisms for orexin receptor-mediated cell death and adds to our general understanding of the role of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in cell death by suggesting a pathway from G-protein-coupled receptors to cell death via p38 mitogen-/stress-activated protein kinase independent of p53 and caspase activation.

  • 228.
    Anderberg, Leif
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Aldskogius, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neuroanatomy.
    Holtz, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Spinal cord injury: scientific challenges for the unknown future2007In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 259-288Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of spinal cord injuries starts with the ancient Egyptian medical papyrus known as the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus. The papyrus, written about 2500 B. C. by the physician and architect of the Sakkara pyramids Imhotep, describes "crushed vertebra in his neck" as well as symptoms of neurological deterioration. An ailment not to be treated was the massage to the patients at that time. This fatalistic attitude remained until the end of World War II when the first rehabilitation centre focused on the rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients was opened. Our knowledge of the pathophysiological processes, both the primary as well as the secondary, has increased tremendously. However, all this knowledge has only led to improved medical care but not to any therapeutic method to restore, even partially, the neurological function. Neuroprotection is defined as measures to counteract secondary injury mechanisms and/or limit the extent of damage caused by self-destructive cellular and tissue processes. The co-existence of several distinctly different injury mechanisms after trauma has provided opportunities to explore a large number of potentially neuroprotective agents in animal experiments such as methylprednisolone sodium succinate. The results of this research have been very discouraging and pharmacological neuroprotection for patients with spinal cord injury has fallen short of the expectations created by the extensive research and promising observations in animal experiments. The focus of research has now, instead, been transformed to the field of neural regeneration. This field includes the discovery of regenerating obstacles in the nerve cell and/or environmental factors but also various regeneration strategies such as bridging the gap at the site of injury as well as transplantation of foetal tissue and stem cells. The purpose of this review is to highlight selected experimental and clinical studies that form the basis for undertaking future challenges in the research field of spinal cord injury. We will focus our discussion on methods either preventing the consequences of secondary injury in the acute period ( neuroprotection) and/or various techniques of neural regeneration in the sub-acute and chronic phase and finally expose some thoughts about future avenues within this scientific field.

  • 229.
    Anderberg, Ulla Maria
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fibromyalgi - en stresssjukdom? Neuroendokrinologiska och hormonella aspekter1999In: Reuamtikertidningen, Vol. 2, p. 810-Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 230.
    Anderberg, Ulla Maria
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fibromyalgi - könshormonella aspekter1999In: Svensk rehabiliteringArticle in journal (Other scientific)
  • 231.
    Anderberg, Ulla Maria
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fibromyalgia syndrome in women - a stress disorder?: Neurobiological and hormonal aspects1999Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The FMS is almost exclusively a female disorder, as 90% of the patients struck by it are women. About 7% of all women in modern society have this disorder.

    The studies in this thesis demonstrated that variations in the female sex hormones over the menstrual cycle and in different hormonal states are important with respect to the severity of pain and other symptoms, global functioning and well being of FMS patients. The hormonal state is also of importance in the inter-connection with the monoaminergic systems, stress systems and pain processing systems. Besides the symptoms, this also appears as perturbed levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY), nociceptin and oxytocin in plasma.

    The importance of estrogen to pain processing peptides was shown in an animal study. In that study it was revealed that estrogen increase reduces pain sensitivity, and that estrogen is also able to change the levels of pain processing peptides such as substance P (SP) and met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe (MEAP) in certain brain areas, spinal cord and serum. It is suggested that stress may elicit pain through several neuroendocrinological mechanisms.

    All FMS patients scored higher than healthy women on mood and tension related symptoms, which is interpreted as an increased sensitivity and reaction to stress. FMS patients at the time of menstruation, and older, postmenopausal FMS patients were the most sensitive to these changes.

    The increased sensitivity to stress was also demonstrated in a personality study using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), which showed that many female FMS patients are more anxious and worried and therefore also become easily fatigued.

    It is likely that development of the FMS is due to numerous biological events occurring in response to long-term stress. Women with stressful life experiences and anxious personality traits are probably more prone to develop this disorder, although various and sufficient stressful events of different origins can most likely lead to this disorder in any woman over the long run.

  • 232.
    Anderberg, Ulla Maria
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fibromyalgia Syndrome in Women - a Stress Disorder? neurobiological and Hormonal Aspects1999Other (Other scientific)
  • 233.
    Anderberg, Ulla Maria
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.