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  • 201.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hjorthén, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Flachskampf, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Changes in global longitudinal strain and left ventricular ejection fraction during the first year after myocardial infarction: results from a large consecutive cohort2018In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1165-1173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To determine changes of global longitudinal strain (GLS) and their predictors in relation to classical echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) function, over 1 year, in consecutive patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and initially normal or impaired LV ejection fraction (EF).

    Methods and results: A total of 285 patients with MI prospectively included in the REBUS (RElevance of Biomarkers for future risk of thromb-oembolic events in UnSelected post-myocardial infarction patients) study underwent echocardiography within 72 h from admission and after 1 year. At baseline, 213 (74.7%) of MI patients had a normal EF (≥52% in men or ≥54% in women), but in 70.4% of them, an impaired GLS ( ≥ -18.0%) was observed. During 1-year follow-up, in patients with normal EF at baseline, GLS improved from -15.8% to - 17.4% (10.1% relative change); EF decreased from 62.5% to 59.9% (4.0% relative change); indexed end-diastolic volume, indexed end-systolic volume, and indexed stroke volume increased with 15.6%, 24.8%, and 10.0% of relative change, respectively (P < 0.001 for all the comparisons). In the whole cohort, initial impairment of LV function [by EF, wall motion score index (WMSI), or GLS], male gender, non-smoking, and treatment with beta-blockers were the independent predictors of GLS improvement. In the group with initially impaired EF, over 1 year GLS improved from -11.9% to - 14.8% (24.4% relative change) and EF from 44.6% to 52.6% (18.2% relative change) (P < 0.001 for both). Improvement in GLS significantly correlated with EF increase in the group with impaired EF (r = -0.41, P = 0.001) but not in the patients with normal EF (r = -0.14, P = ns).

    Conclusions: Despite diveregent evolution of GLS compared with EF and ventricular volumes, one year after MI GLS significantly improved in patients with initially both normal and impaired EF. Initial impairment of LV function (by EF, WMSI, or GLS), male gender, non-smoking, and treatment with beta-blockers were independent predictors of GLS improvement. LV remodelling was present even in patients with normal EF at baseline and during follow-up, confirming limited functional assessment by EF alone.

  • 202.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science.
    Johansson, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    How frequent are signs of left ventricular dysfunction in acute myocardial infarction patients with normal ejection fraction?: Impact of the latest chamber quantification recommendations2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 937-937Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Simultaneous 4-Chamber Strain More and Faster Analysis, But Is It Good Enough?2016In: Circulation Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1941-9651, E-ISSN 1942-0080, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e004544Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Flachskampf, Frank A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Johansson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Usefulness of traditional echocardiographic parameters in assessment of left ventricular function in patients with normal ejection fraction early after acute myocardial infarction: results from a large consecutive cohort2016In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 413-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of left ventricular (LV) systolic function impairment using classical echocardiographic parameters and their relation to myocardial damage in patients hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (MI) with normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥52% in males or ≥54% in females).

    METHODS AND RESULTS: All 421 consecutive patients with MI included in the REBUS (RElevance of Biomarkers for future risk of thromboembolic events in UnSelected post-myocardial infarction patients) study underwent two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography within 72 h after admission. A normal LVEF was present in 262 (73.8%) of the 355 patients ultimately enrolled in the study. Patients with normal LVEF more often presented with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and had less comorbidities when compared with those with impaired LVEF. No differences in demographic factors or relevant medications were observed. Higher value of mean annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE), lower wall motion score index (WMSI), lower LV as well as left atrial volumes characterized patients with normal LVEF. Impaired MAPSE was present in 64.4%, WMSI >1 in 72.1%, and dilated left atrium in 33.6% of those patients. Maximal cardiac troponin concentration reflecting infarct size showed the strongest association with WMSI (β = 0.35), followed by LVEF (β = -0.29), MAPSE (β = -0.25), and indexed LV end-systolic volume (β = 0.19; P < 0.001 for all the models).

    CONCLUSION: In two-third of patients with MI and normal LVEF, at least one of the other markers of systolic function was outside of the normal range. WMSI reflected the size of MI better than global LV function parameters as LVEF or MAPSE.

  • 205.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University Hospital , 751 85 Uppsala , Sweden;Uppsala Clinical Research , 751 85 Uppsala , Sweden.
    Gerovasileiou, Spyridon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University Hospital , 751 85 Uppsala , Sweden;VO Medicin, Lasarettet i Enköping , all 785 81 Uppsala , Sweden.
    Flachskampf, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    The role of imaging in the selection of patients for HFpEF therapy2023In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1343-1351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) traditionally has been characterized as a form of heart failure without therapeutic options, in particular with a lack of response to the established therapies of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). However, this is no longer true. Besides physical exercise, risk factor modification, aldosterone blocking agents, and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors, specific therapies are emerging for specific HFpEF etiologies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or cardiac amyloidosis. This development justifies increased efforts to arrive at specific diagnoses within the umbrella of HFpEF. Cardiac imaging plays by far the largest role in this effort and is discussed in the following review.

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  • 206.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hambraeus, K.
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Falun, Sweden..
    Erlinge, D.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Jernberg, T.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Background characteristics and prognosis in non-invasively treated patients with type 1 and type 2 myocardial infarction. Data from the SWEDEHEART registry2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 927-927Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Hambraeus, K.
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Falun, Sweden..
    Erlinge, D.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Jernberg, T.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Background characteristics, treatment and long-term prognosis in patients with significant coronary artery stenosis classified as type 1 or type 2 myocardial infarction: Data from SWEDEHEART registry2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 930-930, article id P5384Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hambraeus, K.
    Erlinge, D.
    Jernberg, T.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    How common is significant coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 myocardial infarction?: Data from the SWEDEHEART registry 2011-20132014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 141-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 209.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hambraeus, K.
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Falun, Sweden..
    Erlinge, D.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Jernberg, T.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Type 1 or type 2 myocardial infarction in patients without significant coronary artery disease - do we choose clinical type by chance?: Data from the SWEDEHEART registry2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 934-934Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hambraeus, K.
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Falun, Sweden..
    Erlinge, D.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Jernberg, T.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Type 2 myocardial infarction - does the presence of stenosis matter?: Data from the SWEDEHEART registry2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no Suppl. 1, p. 934-934Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Falun, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden..
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Reply to: Prognosis in Patients with Different Types of Myocardial Infarction and Presence of Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease Reply2017In: American Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0002-9343, E-ISSN 1555-7162, Vol. 130, no 9, p. E417-E418Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Erlinge, David
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Type 2 myocardial infarction in clinical practice2015In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective We aimed to assess differences in incidence, clinical features, current treatment strategies and outcome in patients with type 2 vs. type 1 acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods and results All 20 138 hospitalisations in Sweden with a diagnosis of AMI registered during 2011 in the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies were classified into types 1-5 in accordance with the universal definition of myocardial infarction (MI) from 2007. Type 1 AMI was present in 88.5% of the cases while 7.1% were classified as type 2 AMI. Higher age, female sex, comorbidities, impaired renal function, anaemia and smaller extent of myocardial necrosis characterised patients with type 2 AMI. While normal coronary arteries were more frequently seen (42.4% vs. 7.4%), an invasive treatment was less common, and antiplatelet medications were less prescribed in patients with type 2 AMI compared with type 1 AMI. The group with type 2 AMI had significantly higher crude 1-year mortality compared with the group with type 1 AMI (24.7% vs. 13.5%, p< 0.001). However, after adjustment, the HR for 1-year mortality in patients with type 2 AMI was 1.03 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.23). Conclusions In this real-life study, 7.1% of myocardial infarctions were classified as type 2 AMI. These patients were older, predominantly women and had more comorbidities. Invasive treatment strategies and cardioprotective medications were less used. Patients with type 2 AMI had higher crude mortality compared with type 1 patients with MI. However, after adjustment, the 1-year mortality was similar.

  • 213.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Örndahl, Lovisa Holm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Comparison of left ventricular volumes and regurgitant volumes by echocardiography and magnetic resonance in patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, p. 1239-1239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 214.
    Bath, Jonathan
    et al.
    Univ Missouri, Div Vasc Surg, Columbia, MO 65212 USA..
    D'Oria, Mario
    Univ Hosp Trieste ASUGI, Cardiovasc Dept, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Trieste, Italy..
    Rogers, Richard T.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Surg, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Rochester, NY USA..
    Colglazier, Jill J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Surg, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Rochester, NY USA..
    Braet, Drew J.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Coleman, Dawn M.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Scali, Salvatore T.
    Univ Florida, Div Vasc & Endovasc Therapy, Coll Med, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Back, Martin R.
    Univ Florida, Div Vasc & Endovasc Therapy, Coll Med, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Magee, Gregory A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Surg, Div Vasc & Endovasc Therapy, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Plotkin, Anastasia
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Surg, Div Vasc & Endovasc Therapy, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Dueppers, Philip
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Dept Vasc Surg, Zurich, Switzerland.;Univ Messina, Dept Med Sci & Morphofunct Imaging, Div Vasc Surg, Messina, Italy..
    Zimmermann, Alexander
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Dept Vasc Surg, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Affi, Rana O.
    UTHealth, Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, McGovern Med Sch, Houston, TX USA..
    Khan, Sophia
    UTHealth, Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, McGovern Med Sch, Houston, TX USA..
    Zarkowsky, Devin
    Univ Colorado, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Sch Med, Aurora, CO USA..
    Dyba, Gregory
    Univ Colorado, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Sch Med, Aurora, CO USA..
    Soult, Michael C.
    Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch Sch Med, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg & Endovasc Therapy, Maywood, IL USA..
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Setacci, Carlo
    Univ Siena, Dept Med Surg & Neurosci, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Siena, Italy..
    Lenti, Massimo
    Univ Siena, Dept Med Surg & Neurosci, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Siena, Italy..
    Kabbani, Loay S.
    Henry Ford Hosp, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Detroit, MI USA..
    Weaver, Mitchelle R.
    Henry Ford Hosp, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Detroit, MI USA..
    Bissacco, Daniele
    IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Dept Vasc Surg, Milan, Italy..
    Trimarchi, Santi
    IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Dept Vasc Surg, Milan, Italy..
    Stoecker, Jordan B.
    Hosp Univ Penn, Div Vasc Surg & Endovasc Therapy, Dept Surg, Philadelphia, PA USA..
    Wang, Grace J.
    Hosp Univ Penn, Div Vasc Surg & Endovasc Therapy, Dept Surg, Philadelphia, PA USA..
    Szeberin, Zoltan
    Semmelweis Univ, Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Budapest, Hungary..
    Pomozi, Eniko
    Semmelweis Univ, Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Budapest, Hungary..
    Moffatt, Clare
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Dept Surg, David Geffen Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Gelabert, Hugh A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Dept Surg, David Geffen Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Tish, Shahed
    Univ Missouri, Div Vasc Surg, Columbia, MO 65212 USA..
    Hoel, Andrew W.
    Northwestern Univ, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Feinberg Sch Med, Chicago, IL USA..
    Cortolillo, Nicholas S.
    Northwestern Univ, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Feinberg Sch Med, Chicago, IL USA..
    Spangler, Emily L.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg & Endovasc Therapy, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Passman, Marc A.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg & Endovasc Therapy, Birmingham, AL USA..
    De Caridi, Giovanni
    Univ Messina, Dept Med Sci & Morphofunct Imaging, Div Vasc Surg, Messina, Italy..
    Benedetto, Filippo
    Zhou, Wei
    Univ Arizona, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Tucson, AZ USA..
    Abuhakmeh, Yousef
    Univ Arizona, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Tucson, AZ USA..
    Newton, Daniel H.
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Sch Med, Richmond, VA USA..
    Liu, Christopher M.
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Sch Med, Richmond, VA USA..
    Tinelli, Giovanni
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Fdn Policlin Univ A Gemelli IRCCS, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Unit Vasc Surg, Rome, Italy..
    Tshomba, Yamume
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Fdn Policlin Univ A Gemelli IRCCS, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Unit Vasc Surg, Rome, Italy..
    Katoh, Airi
    Univ Calif San Francisco Fresno, Dept Surg, Fresno, CA USA..
    Siada, Sammy S.
    Univ Calif San Francisco Fresno, Dept Surg, Fresno, CA USA..
    Khashram, Manar
    Univ Auckland, Dept Surg, Waikato, New Zealand..
    Gormley, Sinead
    Univ Auckland, Dept Surg, Waikato, New Zealand..
    Mullins, John R.
    CoxHealth, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Springfield, MO USA..
    Schmittling, Zachary C.
    CoxHealth, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Springfield, MO USA..
    Maldonado, Thomas S.
    New York Univ Langone Hlth, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, New York, NY USA..
    Politano, Amani D.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Surg, Div Vasc Surg, Portland, OR USA..
    Rynio, Pawel
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Vasc Surg, Szczecin, Poland..
    Kazimierczak, Arkadiusz
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Vasc Surg, Szczecin, Poland..
    Gombert, Alexander
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, European Vasc Ctr Aachen Maastricht, Dept Vasc Surg, Aachen, Germany..
    Jalaie, Houman
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, European Vasc Ctr Aachen Maastricht, Dept Vasc Surg, Aachen, Germany..
    Spath, Paolo
    Univ Bologna, Dept Vasc Surg, DIMES, Bologna, Italy..
    Gallitto, Enrico
    Univ Bologna, Dept Vasc Surg, DIMES, Bologna, Italy..
    Czerny, Martin
    Albert Ludwigs Univ Freiburg, Univ Heart Ctr Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Univ Clin Freiburg, Clin Cardiovasc Surg, Freiburg, Germany..
    Berger, Tim
    Albert Ludwigs Univ Freiburg, Univ Heart Ctr Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Univ Clin Freiburg, Clin Cardiovasc Surg, Freiburg, Germany..
    Davies, Mark G.
    UT Hlth San Antonio, Long Sch Med, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Stilo, Francesco
    Montelione, Nunzio
    Univ Campus Biomed Rome, Dept Med & Surg, Operat Res Unit Vasc Surg, Rome, Italy..
    Mezzetto, Luca
    Integrated Univ Hosp Verona, Div Vasc Surg, Verona, Italy..
    Veraldi, Gian Franco
    Integrated Univ Hosp Verona, Div Vasc Surg, Verona, Italy..
    Lepidi, Sandro
    Univ Hosp Trieste ASUGI, Cardiovasc Dept, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Trieste, Italy..
    Lawrence, Peter
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Dept Surg, David Geffen Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Woo, Karen
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Dept Surg, David Geffen Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Contemporary outcomes after treatment of aberrant subclavian artery and Kommerell's diverticulum2023In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0741-5214, E-ISSN 1097-6809, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 1339-1348.e6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Aberrant subclavian artery (ASA) and Kommerell's diverticulum (KD) are rare vascular anomalies that may be associated with lifestyle-limiting and life-threatening complications. The aim of this study is to report contemporary outcomes after invasive treatment of ASA/KD using a large international dataset.

    Methods: Patients who underwent treatment for ASA/KD (2000-2020) were identified through the Vascular Low Frequency Disease Consortium, a multi-institutional collaboration to investigate uncommon vascular disorders. We report the early and mid-term clinical outcomes including stroke and mortality, technical success, and other operative outcomes including reintervention rates, patency, and endoleak.

    Results: Overall, 285 patients were identified during the study period. The mean patient age was 57 years; 47% were female and 68% presented with symptoms. A right-sided arch was present in 23%. The mean KD diameter was 47.4 mm (range, 13.0-108.0 mm). The most common indication for treatment was symptoms (59%), followed by aneurysm size (38%). The most common symptom reported was dysphagia (44%). A ruptured KD was treated in 4.2% of cases, with a mean diameter of 43.9 mm (range, 18.0-100.0 mm). An open procedure was performed in 101 cases (36%); the most common approach was ASA ligation with subclavian transposition. An endovascular or hybrid approach was performed in 184 patients (64%); the most common approach was thoracic endograft and carotid-subclavian bypass. A staged operative strategy was employed more often than single setting repair (55% vs 45%). Compared with endovascular or hybrid approach, those in the open procedure group were more likely to be younger (49 years vs 61 years; P < .0001), female (64% vs 36%; P < .0001), and symptomatic (85% vs 59%; P < .0001). Complete or partial symptomatic relief at 1 year after intervention was 82.6%. There was no association between modality of treatment and symptom relief (open 87.2% vs endovascular or hybrid approach 78.9%; P = .13). After the intervention, 11 subclavian occlusions (4.5%) occurred; 3 were successfully thrombectomized resulting in a primary and secondary patency of 95% and 96%, respectively, at a median follow-up of 39 months. Among the 33 reinterventions (12%), the majority were performed for endoleak (36%), and more reinterventions occurred in the endovascular or hybrid approach than open procedure group (15% vs 6%; P = .02). The overall survival rate was 87.3% at a median follow-up of 41 months. The 30-day stroke and death rates were 4.2% and 4.9%, respectively. Urgent or emergent presentation was independently associated with increased risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio [OR], 19.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3-116.6), overall mortality (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.2-11.2) and intraoperative complications (OR, 8.3; 95% CI, 2.8-25.1). Females had a higher risk of reintervention (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.0-6.5). At an aneurysm size of 44.4 mm, receiver operator characteristic curve analysis suggested that 60% of patients would have symptoms.

    Conclusions: Treatment of ASA/KD can be performed safely with low rates of mortality, stroke and reintervention and high rates of symptomatic relief, regardless of the repair strategy. Symptomatic and urgent operations were associated with worse outcomes in general, and female gender was associated with a higher likelihood of reintervention. Given the worse overall outcomes when symptomatic and the inherent risk of rupture, consideration of repair at 40 mm is reasonable in most patients. ASA/KD can be repaired in asymptomatic patients with excellent outcomes and young healthy patients may be considered better candidates for open approaches versus endovascular or hybrid modalities, given the lower likelihood of reintervention and lower early mortality rate.

  • 215.
    Batra, Gorav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Atrial Fibrillation in the setting of Coronary Artery Disease: Risks and outcomes with different treatment options2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide and atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent arrhythmia associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity. Despite improved outcome in both diseases, there is a need to further describe the prevalence, outcome and management of CAD in patients with concomitant AF.

    AF was a common finding among patients with MI, with 16% having new-onset, paroxysmal or chronic AF. Patients post-MI with concomitant AF, regardless of subtype, were at increased risk of composite cardiovascular outcome of mortality, MI or ischemic stroke, including mortality and ischemic stroke alone. No major difference in outcome was observed between AF subtypes. At discharge, an oral anticoagulant was prescribed to 27% of the patients with MI and AF undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Aspirin or clopidogrel plus warfarin versus dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin plus clopidogrel were associated with similar 0-90-day and lower 91-365-day risk of cardiovascular outcome, without increased risk of major bleeding events. Triple therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel plus warfarin versus dual antiplatelet therapy was associated with non-significant lower risk of cardiovascular outcome, but with increased risk of bleeding events. Treatment with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors post-MI was associated with lower risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with and without congestive heart failure and/or AF. However, RAS inhibition in patients without AF was not associated with lower risk of new-onset AF. Approximately 1 in 3 patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had pre- or postoperative AF. Patients with AF, regardless of subtype, were at higher risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and congestive heart failure. Furthermore, postoperative AF was associated with higher risk of recurrent AF.

    In conclusion, AF was a common finding in the setting of MI and CABG. AF, irrespectively if in the setting of MI or CABG was associated with higher risk of ischemic events and mortality. Also, postoperative AF was associated with recurrent AF. Oral anticoagulants post-MI and PCI in patients with AF was underutilized, however, optimal antithrombotic therapy is still unknown. RAS inhibition post-MI seems beneficial, however, it was not associated with lower incidence of new-onset AF.

    List of papers
    1. All types of atrial fibrillation in the setting of myocardial infarction are associated with impaired outcome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>All types of atrial fibrillation in the setting of myocardial infarction are associated with impaired outcome
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    2016 (English)In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 102, no 12, p. 926-933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate 90-day cardiovascular outcome in patients after myocardial infarction (MI) in relation to different subtypes of atrial fibrillation (AF) and MI. Methods We studied 155 071 hospital survivors of MI between 2000 and 2009 in Swedish registries. AF subtypes were defined according to history of AF and in-hospital ECG recordings. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with multivariable Cox models. Results AF was documented in 24 023 (15.5%) cases. The AF subtypes were new-onset AF with sinus rhythm at discharge (3.7%), new-onset AF with AF at discharge (3.9%), paroxysmal AF (4.9%) and chronic AF (3.0%). The event rate per 100 person-years for the composite cardiovascular outcome (all-cause mortality, MI or ischaemic stroke) was 90.9 in patients with any type of AF versus 45.2 in patients with sinus rhythm, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% CI (HR) 1.28 (1.19 to 1.37). There were no significant differences in the composite cardiovascular outcome between AF subtypes. AF was associated with higher risk of mortality, HR 1.59 (1.41 to 1.80), reinfarction, HR 1.14 (1.05 to 1.24), and ischaemic stroke, HR 2.29 (1.92 to 2.74), respectively. In subgroup analysis, AF was associated with a higher risk of composite cardiovascular outcome in the non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and STelevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) cohort, HR 1.24 (1.13 to 1.36) and HR 1.34 (1.21 to 1.48), respectively, with p value for interaction= 0.23. Conclusions AF is common in the setting of MI and is associated with a higher risk of composite cardiovascular outcome and the individual components; mortality, reinfarction and ischaemic stroke, respectively. No major difference in outcome was observed between AF subtypes. No difference in outcome for AF was observed between the NSTEMI and STEMI cohort.

    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299058 (URN)10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308678 (DOI)000377548100010 ()26928408 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , KF10-0024
    Available from: 2016-07-13 Created: 2016-07-13 Last updated: 2020-02-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention
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    2018 (English)In: European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy, ISSN 2055-6837, E-ISSN 2055-6845, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Optimal antithrombotic therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and atrial fibrillation is uncertain. In this study, we compared antithrombotic regimes with regard to a composite cardiovascular outcome of all-cause mortality, MI or ischaemic stroke, and major bleeds.

    Methods and results: Patients between October 2005 and December 2012 were identified in Swedish registries, n = 7116. Landmark 0-90 and 91-365 days of outcome were evaluated with Cox-regressions, with dual antiplatelet therapy as reference. At discharge, 16.2% received triple therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin), 1.9% aspirin plus warfarin, 7.3% clopidogrel plus warfarin, and 60.8% dual antiplatelets. For cardiovascular outcome, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval (HR) for triple therapy was 0.86 (0.70-1.07) for 0-90 days and 0.78 (0.58-1.05) for 91-365 days. A HR of 2.16 (1.48-3.13) and 1.61 (0.98-2.66) during 0-90 and 91-365 days, respectively, was observed for major bleeds. For aspirin plus warfarin, HR 0.82 (0.54-1.26) and 0.62 (0.48-0.79) was observed for cardiovascular outcome and 1.30 (0.60-2.85) and 1.01 (0.63-1.62) for major bleeds during 0-90 and 91-365 days, respectively. For clopidogrel plus warfarin, HR of 0.90 (0.68-1.19) and 0.68 (0.49-0.95) was observed for cardiovascular outcome and 1.28 (0.71-2.32) and 1.08 (0.57-2.04) for major bleeds during 0-90 and 91-365 days, respectively.

    Conclusion: Compared to dual antiplatelets, aspirin or clopidogrel plus warfarin therapy was associated with similar 0-90 days and lower 91-365 days of risk of the cardiovascular outcome, without higher risk of major bleeds. Triple therapy was associated with non-significant lower risk of cardiovascular outcome and higher risk of major bleeds.

    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320310 (URN)10.1093/ehjcvp/pvx033 (DOI)000419693700010 ()29126156 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , KF10-0024
    Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
    3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers are associated with improved outcome but do not prevent new-onset atrial fibrillation after acute myocardial infarction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers are associated with improved outcome but do not prevent new-onset atrial fibrillation after acute myocardial infarction
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    2017 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 3, article id e005165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Treatment with renin‐angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors might restrain the structural/electrical remodeling associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Limited evidence exists regarding the potential benefits of RAS inhibition post‐acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with AF. This study sought to assess the association between RAS inhibition and all‐cause mortality and new‐onset AF in patients with/without congestive heart failure (CHF) post‐AMI.

    Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for AMI between 2006 and 2012 were identified in Swedish registries. Patients were stratified in 4 subgroups; patients with CHF and AF (n=11 489); patients with CHF without AF (n=31 676); patients with AF without CHF (n=10 066); and patients without both CHF and AF (n=59 417). Patients exposed to RAS inhibition were compared to nontreated. Three‐year risk of all‐cause mortality and new‐onset AF was assessed using adjusted Cox regression analyses. At discharge, 83 291 (73.9%) patients received RAS inhibition. RAS inhibition was associated with lower 3‐year risk of all‐cause mortality in CHF patients with AF, adjusted hazard ratio (HR) with 95% CI 0.75 (0.70–0.81), CHF patients without AF, HR 0.65 (0.60–0.69), AF patients without CHF, HR 0.82 (0.75–0.90), and in patients without CHF and AF, HR 0.76 (0.72–0.81), respectively. RAS inhibition was not associated with lower 3‐year risk of new‐onset AF in patients without AF but with/without CHF; HR 0.96 (0.84–1.10) and 1.12 (1.02–1.22), respectively.

    Conclusions RAS inhibition post‐AMI was associated with lower risk of all‐cause mortality. In patients with/without CHF, RAS inhibition was not associated with lower incidence of new‐onset AF.

    Keywords
    atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317878 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.116.005165 (DOI)000399322900044 ()28320744 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research
    Available from: 2017-03-21 Created: 2017-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
    4. Atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery is associated with adverse outcome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery is associated with adverse outcome
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    2019 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to determine the association between atrial fibrillation (AF) and outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

    Methods: All patients undergoing CABG between January 2010 and June 2013 were identified in the Swedish Heart Surgery Registry. Outcomes studied were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, ischemic stroke, and recurrent AF. Patients with history of AF prior to surgery (preoperative AF) and patients without history of AF but with AF episodes post-surgery (postoperative AF) were compared to patients with no AF using adjusted Cox regression models.

    Results: Among 9,107 identified patients, 8.1% (n = 737) had preoperative AF, and 25.1% (n = 2,290) had postoperative AF. Median follow-up was 2.2 years. Compared to no AF, preoperative AF was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval (HR) 1.76 (1.33-2.33); cardiovascular mortality, HR 2.43 (1.68-3.50); and congestive heart failure, HR 2.21 (1.72-2.84). Postoperative AF was associated with risk of all-cause mortality, HR 1.27 (1.01-1.60); cardiovascular mortality, HR 1.52 (1.10-2.11); congestive heart failure, HR 1.47 (1.18-1.83); and recurrent AF, HR 4.38 (2.46-7.78). No significant association was observed between pre- or postoperative AF and risk for myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke.

    Conclusions: Approximately 1 in 3 patients undergoing CABG had pre- or postoperative AF. Patients with pre- or postoperative AF were at higher risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and congestive heart failure, but not of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Postoperative AF was associated with higher risk of recurrent AF.

    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320311 (URN)10.1080/03009734.2018.1504148 (DOI)000461811100015 ()30265179 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research
    Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2020-05-18Bibliographically approved
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  • 216.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med & Hlth, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Orebro, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindhagen, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wickbom, Anders
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med & Hlth, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Orebro, Sweden.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery is associated with adverse outcome2019In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to determine the association between atrial fibrillation (AF) and outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

    Methods: All patients undergoing CABG between January 2010 and June 2013 were identified in the Swedish Heart Surgery Registry. Outcomes studied were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, ischemic stroke, and recurrent AF. Patients with history of AF prior to surgery (preoperative AF) and patients without history of AF but with AF episodes post-surgery (postoperative AF) were compared to patients with no AF using adjusted Cox regression models.

    Results: Among 9,107 identified patients, 8.1% (n = 737) had preoperative AF, and 25.1% (n = 2,290) had postoperative AF. Median follow-up was 2.2 years. Compared to no AF, preoperative AF was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval (HR) 1.76 (1.33-2.33); cardiovascular mortality, HR 2.43 (1.68-3.50); and congestive heart failure, HR 2.21 (1.72-2.84). Postoperative AF was associated with risk of all-cause mortality, HR 1.27 (1.01-1.60); cardiovascular mortality, HR 1.52 (1.10-2.11); congestive heart failure, HR 1.47 (1.18-1.83); and recurrent AF, HR 4.38 (2.46-7.78). No significant association was observed between pre- or postoperative AF and risk for myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke.

    Conclusions: Approximately 1 in 3 patients undergoing CABG had pre- or postoperative AF. Patients with pre- or postoperative AF were at higher risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and congestive heart failure, but not of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Postoperative AF was associated with higher risk of recurrent AF.

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  • 217.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Aktaa, Suleman
    Benson, Lina
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Hage, Camilla
    Savarese, Gianluigi
    Vasko, Peter
    Gale, Chris P.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Association between heart failure quality of care and mortality: a population-based cohort study using nationwide registries2022In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 24, no 11, p. 2066-2077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the quality of heart failure (HF) care using the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) quality indicators (QIs) for HF and to assess whether better quality of care is associated with improved outcomes.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a nationwide cohort study using the Swedish HF registry, consisting of patients with any type of HF at their first outpatient visit or hospitalization. Independent participant data for quality of HF care was evaluated against the ESC QIs for HF, and association with mortality estimated using multivariable Cox regression. In total, 43 704 patients from 80 hospitals across Sweden enrolled between 2013-2019 were included, with median follow-up 23.6 months. Of the 16 QIs for HF, 13 could be measured and 5 were inversely associated with all-cause mortality during follow-up. Higher attainment (≥50% vs. <50% attainment) of the composite opportunity-based score (combination of QIs into a single score) for patients with reduced ejection fraction was associated with lower all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.72-0.91). Attainment of the composite score was less in the outpatient than inpatient setting (adjusted odds ratio 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.72-0.99). Quality of care varied across hospitals, with assessment of health-related quality of life being the indicator with the widest variation in attainment (interquartile range 61.7%).

    CONCLUSION: Quality of HF care may be measured using the ESC HF QIs. In Sweden, attainment of HF care evaluated using the QIs demonstrated between and within hospital variation, and many QIs were inversely associated with mortality.

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  • 218.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Aktaa, Suleman
    Camm, A. John
    Costa, Francisco
    Di Biase, Luigi
    Duncker, David
    Fauchier, Laurent
    Fragakis, Nikolaos
    Frost, Lars
    Hijazi, Ziad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Juhlin, Tord
    Merino, José L.
    Mont, Lluis
    Nielsen, Jens C.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Polewczyk, Anna
    Potpara, Tatjana
    Sacher, Frederic
    Sommer, Philipp
    Tilz, Roland
    Maggioni, Aldo P.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Casadei, Barbara
    Gale, Chris P.
    Data standards for atrial fibrillation/flutter and catheter ablation: The European Unified Registries for Heart Care Evaluation and Randomized Trials (EuroHeart)2023In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, E-ISSN 2058-1742, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 609-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Standardized data definitions are essential for monitoring and assessment of care and outcomes in observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The European Unified Registries for Heart Care Evaluation and Randomized Trials (EuroHeart) project of the European Society of Cardiology aimed to develop contemporary data standards for atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF/AFL) and catheter ablation.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We used the EuroHeart methodology for development of data standards and formed a Working Group comprising 23 experts in AF/AFL and catheter ablation registries, as well as representatives from the European Heart Rhythm Association and EuroHeart. We conducted a systematic literature review of AF/AFL and catheter ablation registries and data standard documents to generate candidate variables. We used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus on a final variable set. For each variable, the Working Group developed permissible values and definitions, and agreed as to whether the variable was mandatory (Level 1) or additional (Level 2). In total, 70 Level 1 and 92 Level 2 variables were selected and reviewed by a wider Reference Group of 42 experts from 24 countries. The Level 1 variables were implemented into the EuroHeart IT platform as the basis for continuous registration of individual patient data.

    CONCLUSION: By means of a structured process and working with international stakeholders, harmonized data standards for AF/AFL and catheter ablation for AF/AFL were developed. In context of the EuroHeart project, this will facilitate country-level quality of care improvement, international observational research, registry-based RCTs and post-marketing surveillance of devices and pharmacotherapies.

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  • 219.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Aktaa, Suleman
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Med, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.;Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Data Analyt, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.;Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Maggioni, Aldo P.
    Italian Assoc Hosp Cardiologists Res Ctr ANMCO, Florence, Italy..
    Ludman, Peter
    Univ Birmingham, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Casadei, Barbara
    Univ Oxford, NIHR Oxford Biomed Res Ctr, Div Cardiovasc Med, Oxford, England..
    Gale, Chris P.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Cardiovasc & Metab Med, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.;Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Data Analyt, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.;Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Data standards for acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention: the European Unified Registries for Heart Care Evaluation and Randomised Trials (EuroHeart)2022In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 43, no 24, p. 2269-2285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardized data definitions are essential for monitoring and benchmarking the quality of care and patient outcomes in observational studies and randomized controlled trials. There are no contemporary pan-European data standards for the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The European Unified Registries for Heart Care Evaluation and Randomised Trials (EuroHeart) project of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) aimed to develop such data standards for ACS and PCI. Following a systematic review of the literature on ACS and PCI data standards and evaluation of contemporary ACS and PCI registries, we undertook a modified Delphi process involving clinical and registry experts from 11 European countries, as well as representatives from relevant ESC Associations, including the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) and Acute CardioVascular Care (ACVC). This resulted in final sets of 68 and 84 'mandatory' variables and several catalogues of optional variables for ACS and PCI, respectively. Data definitions were provided for these variables, which have been programmed as the basis for continuous registration of individual patient data in the online EuroHeart IT platform. By means of a structured process and the interaction with major stakeholders, internationally harmonized data standards for ACS and PCI have been developed. In the context of the EuroHeart project, this will facilitate country-level quality of care improvement, international observational research, registry-based randomized trials, and post-marketing surveillance of devices and pharmacotherapies.

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  • 220.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Aktaa, Suleman
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Maggioni, Aldo P
    Wilkinson, Chris
    Casadei, Barbara
    Gale, Chris P
    Methodology for the development of international clinical data standards for common cardiovascular conditions: European Unified Registries for Heart Care Evaluation and Randomised Trials (EuroHeart)2021In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, E-ISSN 2058-1742, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 161-168, article id qcab052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Data standards are consensual specifications for the representation of data arising from different sources. If provided with internationally harmonised variables, permissible values, and clinical definitions they have the potential to enable reliable between and within country analysis of care and outcomes. The European Unified Registries for Heart Care Evaluation and Randomised Trials (EuroHeart) is a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) project that allows participating countries to collect patient data to undertake quality improvement, observational studies, drug and device surveillance, and registry-based randomised controlled trials for cardiovascular conditions. This document describes the methodology for development of harmonised data standards for EuroHeart.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We adopted a five-step process for the development of harmonised data standards. The process includes: (1) identification of clinical domains for data standard development by evaluating specific cardiovascular conditions with high prevalence and opportunities for quality improvement; (2) construction of data standard specifications by systematic review of the literature; (3) selection of variables by a domain specific Working Group using a modified Delphi method; (4) validation of data standards by a domain specific Reference Group; and (5) implementation of the developed data standards into an IT platform.

    CONCLUSION: This document describes the approach adopted by EuroHeart for the development of clinical data standards for cardiovascular disease. The methodology has been developed and is used by EuroHeart to create a suite of international data standards for cardiovascular diseases. The EuroHeart data standards may be used to systematically capture individual patient data about clinical care and for research.

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    fulltext
  • 221.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Andell, P.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Erlinge, D.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindhagen, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Spaak, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers are associated with improved outcome but do not prevent new-onset atrial fibrillation after acute myocardial infarction2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, no Suppl. 1, p. 1387-1387, article id Abstr. P6570Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Friberg, Leif
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Kardiologi, Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik (MEB), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Antithrombotic Medication And Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction In Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Not Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention2015In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 65, no 10, p. A207-A207Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Friberg, Leif
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Kardiologi, Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik (MEB), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Outcome In Relation To Antithrombotic Therapy After Myocardial Infarction And Percutaneous Coronary Intervention In Patients With Atrial Fibrillation2015In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 65, no 10, p. A16-A16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 224.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Ghukasyan, Tatevik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    White, Harvey D
    Green Lane Cardiovascular Service, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Stewart, Ralph A H
    Green Lane Cardiovascular Service, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
    Cannon, Christopher P
    Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
    Budaj, Andrzej
    Department of Cardiology, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Grochowski Hospital, Warsaw, Poland.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Coagulation and inflammation science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Interleukin 6 and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Coronary Syndrome2021In: JAMA cardiology, ISSN 2380-6583, E-ISSN 2380-6591, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 1440-1445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Inflammation promotes cardiovascular disease and anti-inflammatory treatment reduces cardiovascular events in patients with chronic coronary syndrome. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is unclear how inflammation mediated by interleukin 6 (IL-6) in patients with CKD is linked to cardiovascular disease.

    Objective: To investigate associations between IL-6 and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with chronic coronary syndrome in association with kidney function.

    Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter cohort study included patients enrolled at 663 centers in 39 countries with chronic coronary syndrome who were included in the Stabilization of Atherosclerotic Plaque by Initiation of Darapladib Therapy (STABILITY) trial. Patients were enrolled between December 2008 and April 2010 and were followed up for a median length of 3.7 years. Analysis in this substudy began September 2020.

    Exposures: Exposures were IL-6 and creatinine estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR), which were collected at baseline. Associations between continuous and categorical levels (<2.0 ng/L vs ≥2.0 ng/L) of IL-6 and cardiovascular outcomes were tested in association with eGFR cutoffs (normal eGFR level [≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2], mildly decreased eGFR level [60-90 mL/min/1.73 m2], and moderately to severely decreased eGFR level [<60 mL/min/1.73 m2]).

    Main Outcomes and Measures: Main outcome was major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke.

    Results: This substudy of the STABILITY trial included 14 611 patients with available IL-6 levels at baseline. The median (interquartile range) age was 65 (59-71) years, and 2700 (18.5%) were female. During follow-up, MACE occurred in 1459 individuals (10.0%). Higher levels of IL-6 were in continuous models independently associated with risk of MACE (P < .001) in all CKD strata. Using predefined strata, elevated IL-6 level (≥2.0 vs <2.0 ng/L) was associated with increased risk of MACE at normal kidney function (2.9% vs 1.9% events/y [hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.02-1.78]), mild CKD (3.3% vs 1.9% [hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.35-1.83]), and moderate to severe CKD (5.0% vs 2.9% [hazard ratio, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.28-1.99]).

    Conclusions and Relevance: In patients with chronic coronary syndrome, elevated levels of IL-6 were associated with risk of MACE in all CKD strata. Thus, IL-6 and CKD stage may help when identifying patients with chronic coronary syndrome for anti-inflammatory treatment.

  • 225.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Becker, Richard C.
    Univ Cincinnati, Coll Med, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Heart Lung & Vasc Inst, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Harrington, Robert A.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Stanford, CA USA..
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Kempf, Tibor
    Hannover Med Sch, Div Mol & Translat Cardiol, Dept Cardiol & Angiol, Hannover, Germany..
    Lopes, Renato D.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Cardiol,Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA..
    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.
    Stanford Univ, Stanford Ctr Clin Res, Dept Med, Stanford, CA USA..
    Steg, Philippe Gabriel
    Univ Paris, Hop Bichat, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Inst Natl Sante & Rech Med,Unite 1148, Paris, France..
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Infect Immun & Cardiovasc Dis, Sheffield, England..
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Wollert, Kai C.
    Hannover Med Sch, Div Mol & Translat Cardiol, Dept Cardiol & Angiol, Hannover, Germany..
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Biomarker-Based Prediction of Recurrent Ischemic Events in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes2022In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 80, no 18, p. 1735-1747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), there is residual and variable risk of recurrent ischemic events.

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to develop biomarker-based prediction models for 1-year risk of cardiovascular (CV) death and myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    METHODS: We included 10,713 patients from the PLATO (A Comparison of Ticagrelor [AZD6140] and Clopidogrel in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome) trial in the development cohort and externally validated in 3,508 patients from the TRACER (Thrombin Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction in Acute Coronary Syndrome) trial. Variables contributing to risk of CV death/MI were assessed using Cox regression models, and a score was derived using subsets of variables approximating the full model.

    RESULTS: There were 632 and 190 episodes of CV death/MI in the development and validation cohorts. The most important predictors of CV death/MI were the biomarkers, growth differentiation factor 15, and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which had greater prognostic value than all candidate variables. The final model included 8 items: age (A), biomarkers (B) (growth differentiation factor 15 and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide), and clinical variables (C) (extent of coronary artery disease, previous vascular disease, Killip class, ACS type, P2Y12 inhibitor). The model, named ABC-ACS ischemia, was well calibrated and showed good discriminatory ability for 1-year risk of CV death/MI with C-indices of 0.71 and 0.72 in the development and validation cohorts, respectively. For CV death, the score performed better, with C-indices of 0.80 and 0.84 in the development and validation cohorts, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: An 8-item score for the prediction of CV death/MI was developed and validated for patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The ABC-ACS ischemia score showed good calibration and discrimination and might be useful for risk prediction and decision support in patients with ACS. (A Comparison of Ticagrelor [AZD6140] and Clopidogrel in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome [PLATO]; NCT00391872; Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar [SCH 530348; MK-5348] in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Participants With Acute Coronary Syndrome [TRACER]; NCT00527943)

  • 226.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Modica, Angelo
    Pfizer AB, Sollentuna, Sweden..
    Renlund, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Oral anticoagulants, time in therapeutic range and renal function over time in real-life patients with atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease2022In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 9, no 2, article id e002043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To describe the use of warfarin and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), to evaluate changes in renal function over time and predictors of rapid decline, and to describe time in therapeutic range (TTR) and predictors of poor TTR among patients on warfarin.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Using data from AuriculA, the Swedish oral anticoagulation registry, patients with AF on warfarin or DOAC were identified between 2013 and 2018 (N=6567). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated and categorised into normal (≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), mild CKD (60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2), moderate CKD (30-59 mL/min/1.73 m2), severe CKD (15-29 mL/min/1.73 m2) and end-stage CKD (<15 mL/min/1.73 m2)/dialysis. TTR was estimated using international normalised ratio (INR) measurements. Predictors of eGFR decline over time and of poor TTR were estimated using regression analysis. Between 2013 and 2018, use of DOAC increased from 9.2% to 89.3%, with a corresponding decline in warfarin. A similar trend was observed in patients with mild to moderate CKD, while DOAC over warfarin increased slower among patients with severe to end-stage CKD/dialysis. In patients treated with warfarin, the median TTR was 77.1%. Worse TTR was observed among patients with severe CKD (70.0%) and end-stage CKD/dialysis (67.5%). A gradual annual decline in eGFR was observed (-1.1 mL/min/1.73 m2), with a more rapid decline among patients with older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus and/or heart failure.

    CONCLUSION: In patients with AF, use of DOAC has steadily increased across different CKD stages, but not in patients with severe to end-stage CKD/dialysis despite these patients having poor INR control. Patients with AF have a gradual decline in renal function, with a more rapid decline among a subgroup of patients.

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  • 227.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Renlund, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Kunadian, Vijay
    Newcastle Univ, Fac Med Sci, Translat & Clin Res Inst, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Freeman Hosp, Cardiothorac Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Infect Immun & Cardiovasc Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Steg, P. Gabriel
    Univ Paris, Hop Bichat, AP HP, French Alliance Cardiovasc Trials, Paris, France.;INSERM, U1148, Paris, France..
    Katus, Hugo A.
    Univ Klinikum Heidelberg, Med Klin, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Harrington, Robert A.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA. Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA USA. Grochowski Hosp, Ctr Postgrad Med Educ, Dept Cardiol, Warsaw, Poland..
    Gibson, C. Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Budaj, Andrzej
    Center of Postgraduate Medical Education, Grochowski Hospital, Warsaw, Poland.
    Siegbahn, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Effects of early myocardial reperfusion and perfusion on myocardial necrosis/dysfunction and inflammation in patients with ST-segment and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome: results from the PLATelet inhibition and patients Outcomes (PLATO) trial2022In: European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care, ISSN 2048-8726, E-ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 336-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Restoration of myocardial blood flow and perfusion during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) measured using Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow grade (TFG) and perfusion grade (TMPG) is associated with improved outcomes in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Associations between TFG/TMPG and changes in biomarkers reflecting myocardial damage/dysfunction and inflammation is unknown. Methods and results Among 2606 patients included, TFG was evaluated in 2198 and TMPG in 1874 with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment ACS (NSTE-ACS). Biomarkers reflecting myocardial necrosis [troponin T (TnT)], myocardial dysfunction [N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)], inflammation [interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP)], and oxidative stress/ageing/inflammation [growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15)] were measured at baseline, discharge, and 1- and 6-month post-randomization. Associations between TFG/TMPG and changes in biomarker levels were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon signed test. In total, 1423 (54.6%) patients had STEMI and 1183 (45.4%) NSTE-ACS. Complete reperfusion after PCI with TFG = 3 was achieved in 1110 (85.3%) with STEMI and in 793 (88.5%) with NSTE-ACS. Normal myocardial perfusion with TMPG = 3 was achieved in 475 (41.6%) with STEMI and in 396 (54.0%) with NSTE-ACS. Levels of TnT, NT-proBNP, IL-6, CRP, and GDF-15 were substantially lower at discharge in patients with complete vs. incomplete TFG and STEMI (P < 0.01). This pattern was not observed for patients with NSTE-ACS. Patients with normal vs. abnormal TMPG and NSTE-ACS had lower levels of NT-proBNP at discharge (P = 0.01). Conclusions Successful restoration of epicardial blood flow in STEMI was associated with less myocardial necrosis/dysfunction and inflammation. Attainment of normal myocardial perfusion was associated with less myocardial dysfunction in NSTE-ACS.

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  • 228.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johanson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    All types of atrial fibrillation in the setting of myocardial infarction are associated with impaired outcome2016In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 102, no 12, p. 926-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate 90-day cardiovascular outcome in patients after myocardial infarction (MI) in relation to different subtypes of atrial fibrillation (AF) and MI. Methods We studied 155 071 hospital survivors of MI between 2000 and 2009 in Swedish registries. AF subtypes were defined according to history of AF and in-hospital ECG recordings. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with multivariable Cox models. Results AF was documented in 24 023 (15.5%) cases. The AF subtypes were new-onset AF with sinus rhythm at discharge (3.7%), new-onset AF with AF at discharge (3.9%), paroxysmal AF (4.9%) and chronic AF (3.0%). The event rate per 100 person-years for the composite cardiovascular outcome (all-cause mortality, MI or ischaemic stroke) was 90.9 in patients with any type of AF versus 45.2 in patients with sinus rhythm, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% CI (HR) 1.28 (1.19 to 1.37). There were no significant differences in the composite cardiovascular outcome between AF subtypes. AF was associated with higher risk of mortality, HR 1.59 (1.41 to 1.80), reinfarction, HR 1.14 (1.05 to 1.24), and ischaemic stroke, HR 2.29 (1.92 to 2.74), respectively. In subgroup analysis, AF was associated with a higher risk of composite cardiovascular outcome in the non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and STelevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) cohort, HR 1.24 (1.13 to 1.36) and HR 1.34 (1.21 to 1.48), respectively, with p value for interaction= 0.23. Conclusions AF is common in the setting of MI and is associated with a higher risk of composite cardiovascular outcome and the individual components; mortality, reinfarction and ischaemic stroke, respectively. No major difference in outcome was observed between AF subtypes. No difference in outcome for AF was observed between the NSTEMI and STEMI cohort.

  • 229.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Do we need to reconsider how we design and conduct randomized controlled trials?2022In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, E-ISSN 2058-1742, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 374-376Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 230.
    Baur Opstad, Trine
    et al.
    Center for Clinical Heart Research, Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, P.O. Box 4950, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway..
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 222, Skøyen, N-0213 Oslo, Norway..
    Aaseth, Jan
    Department of Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, P.O. Box 104, N-2381 Brumunddal, Norway..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Seljeflot, Ingebjørg
    Center for Clinical Heart Research, Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, P.O. Box 4950, Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway..
    Alehagen, Urban
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden..
    Increased SIRT1 Concentration Following Four Years of Selenium and Q10 Intervention Associated with Reduced Cardiovascular Mortality at 10-Year Follow-Up-Sub-Study of a Previous Prospective Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial2023In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Selenium and coenzyme Q10 (SeQ10) possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, potentially mediated via Sirtuin1 (SIRT1). We aimed to investigate the influence of a SeQ10 intervention on SIRT1 concentration, with potential interactions with microRNAs.

    Methods: In this sub-study of a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, healthy subjects (mean age 76 years) were randomized to receive an active treatment (n = 165, combined 200 µg/day of Se and 200 mg/day of Q10) or a placebo (n = 161). SIRT1 concentration and microRNAs were measured with ELISA and PCR, respectively.

    Results: After four years, SIRT1 concentration was increased in the active treatment group, with mean (SD) ng/mL of 469 (436) vs. 252 (162), p < 0.001, and decreased in the placebo group, 190 (186) vs. 269 (172), p = 0.002, and the differences between the groups were significant (p = 0.006, adjusted). Those who suffered CV death during a 10-year follow-up (n = 25 and n = 52 in the active treatment and placebo groups, respectively) had significantly lower baseline SIRT1 concentrations compared to the survivors (p < 0.001). MiR-130a-3p was significantly downregulated during the intervention and correlated inversely with SIRT1 at baseline (r = -0.466, p = 0.007).

    Conclusion: The increased SIRT1 concentration after the SeQ10 intervention associated with reduced CV mortality, partly mediated via miR-1303a-3p, suggests that SIRT1 is an additional mediator of the intervention, preventing vascular ageing.

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  • 231.
    Bay, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Nursing, Umeå, Sweden..
    Berghammer, Malin
    Univ West, Inst Hlth Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Queen Silvia Children Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Burstrom, Asa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holstad, Ylva
    Umeå Univ, Dept Nursing, Umeå, Sweden..
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Trzebiatowska-Krzynska, Aleksandra
    Linköping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Sorensson, Peder
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Thilen, Ulf
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Johansson, Bengt
    Umeå Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umeå, Sweden..
    Symptoms during pregnancy in primiparous women with congenital heart disease2024In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 58, no 1, article id 2302135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As more women with congenital heart disease (CHD) are reaching childbearing age, it becomes more common for their symptoms to be evaluated during pregnancy. However, pregnancy-related symptoms are similar to those caused by heart disease. This study investigated the prevalence of factors associated with symptoms during pregnancy in women with CHD. Methods: The national birth register was searched for primiparous women with CHD who were registered in the national quality register for patients with CHD. Results: Symptoms during the third trimester were reported in 104 of 465 evaluated women. The most common symptom was palpitations followed by dyspnea. Factors associated with symptoms were tested in a univariable model; higher NYHA classification (>1) (OR 11.3, 95%CI 5.5-23.2), low physical activity (<= 3 h/week) (OR 2.1 95%CI 1.3-3.6) and educational level <= 12 years (OR 1.9 95%CI 1.2-3.0) were associated with having symptoms. In multivariable analysis, low physical activity level (OR 2.4 95%CI 1.2-5.0) and higher NYHA class (OR 11.3 95%CI 5.0-25.6) remained associated with symptoms during pregnancy. There were no cases with new onset of impaired systemic ventricular function during pregnancy. Conclusion: Symptoms during pregnancy are common in women with CHD but are often already present before pregnancy. Because ordinary symptoms during pregnancy often overlap with symptoms of heart disease, it is important to know if symptoms were present before pregnancy and if they became worse during pregnancy. These results should be included in pre-pregnancy counselling and considered in the monitoring during pregnancy.

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  • 232. Beck, AW
    et al.
    Sedrakyan, A
    Mao, J
    Venermo, M
    Faizer, R
    Debus, S
    Behrendt, CA
    Scali, S
    Altreuther, M
    Schermerhorn, M
    Beiles, B
    Szeberin, Z
    Eldrup, N
    Danielsson, G
    Thomson, I
    Wigger, P
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Cronenwett, JL
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    International Consortium of Vascular Registries,
    Variations in abdominal aortic aneurysm care: a report from the International consortium of vascular registries2016In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This project by the ICVR (International Consortium of Vascular Registries), a collaboration of 11 vascular surgical quality registries, was designed to evaluate international variation in the contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with relation to recommended treatment guidelines from the Society for Vascular Surgery and the European Society for Vascular Surgery.

    Methods: Registry data for open and endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) during 2010 to 2013 were collected from 11 countries. Variations in patient selection and treatment were compared across countries and across centers within countries.

    Results: Among 51 153 patients, 86% were treated for intact AAA (iAAA) and 14% for ruptured AAA. Women constituted 18% of the entire cohort (range, 12% in Switzerland–21% in the United States; P<0.01). Intact AAAs were repaired at diameters smaller than recommended by guidelines in 31% of men (<5.5 cm; range, 6% in Iceland–41% in Germany; P<0.01) and 12% of women with iAAA (<5 cm; range, 0% in Iceland–16% in the United States; P<0.01). Overall, use of EVAR for iAAA varied from 28% in Hungary to 79% in the United States (P<0.01) and for ruptured AAA from 5% in Denmark to 52% in the United States (P<0.01). In addition to the between-country variations, significant variations were present between centers in each country in terms of EVAR use and rate of small AAA repair. Countries that more frequently treated small AAAs tended to use EVAR more frequently (trend: correlation coefficient, 0.51; P=0.14). Octogenarians made up 23% of all patients, ranging from 12% in Hungary to 29% in Australia (P<0.01). In countries with a fee-for-service reimbursement system (Australia, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States), the proportions of small AAA (33%) and octogenarians undergoing iAAA repair (25%) were higher compared with countries with a population-based reimbursement model (small AAA repair, 16%; octogenarians, 18%; P<0.01). In general, center-level variation within countries in the management of AAA was as important as variation between countries.

    Conclusions: Despite homogeneous guidelines from professional societies, significant variation exists in the management of AAA, most notably for iAAA diameter at repair, use of EVAR, and the treatment of elderly patients. ICVR provides an opportunity to study treatment variation across countries and to encourage optimal practice by sharing these results.

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  • 233. Becker, Richard C
    et al.
    Bassand, Jean Pierre
    Budaj, Andrzej
    Wojdyla, Daniel M
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Cornel, Jan H
    French, John
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Horrow, Jay
    Husted, Steen
    Lopez-Sendon, Jose
    Lassila, Riitta
    Mahaffey, Kenneth W
    Storey, Robert F
    Harrington, Robert A
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bleeding complications with the P2Y12 receptor antagonists clopidogrel and ticagrelor in the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 23, p. 2933-2944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    More intense platelet-directed therapy for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may increase bleeding risk. The aim of the current analysis was to determine the rate, clinical impact, and predictors of major and fatal bleeding complications in the PLATO study.

    Methods and results

    PLATO was a randomized, double-blind, active control international, phase 3 clinical trial in patients with acute ST elevation and non-ST-segment elevation ACS. A total of 18 624 patients were randomized to either ticagrelor, a non-thienopyridine, reversibly binding platelet P2Y(12) receptor antagonist, or clopidogrel in addition to aspirin. Patients randomized to ticagrelor and clopidogrel had similar rates of PLATO major bleeding (11.6 vs. 11.2%; P = 0.43), TIMI major bleeding (7.9 vs. 7.7%, P = 0.56) and GUSTO severe bleeding (2.9 vs. 3.1%, P = 0.22). Procedure-related bleeding rates were also similar. Non-CABG major bleeding (4.5 vs. 3.8%, P = 0.02) and non-procedure-related major bleeding (3.1 vs. 2.3%, P = 0.05) were more common in ticagrelor-treated patients, primarily after 30 days on treatment. Fatal bleeding and transfusion rates did not differ between groups. There were no significant interactions for major bleeding or combined minor plus major bleeding between treatment groups and age ≥75 years, weight <60 kg, region, chronic kidney disease, creatinine clearance <60 mL/min, aspirin dose >325 mg on the day of randomization, pre-randomization clopidogrel administration, or clopidogrel loading dose.

    Conclusion

    Ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel was associated with similar total major bleeding but increased non-CABG and non-procedure-related major bleeding, primarily after 30 days on study drug treatment. Fatal bleeding was low and did not differ between groups.

  • 234. Befekadu, Rahel
    et al.
    Christiansen, Kjeld
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Increased plasma cathepsin S and trombospondin-1 in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction2019In: Cardiology journal, ISSN 1897-5593, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 385-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The role of cathepsins in the pathological progression of atherosclerotic lesions in ischemic heart disease have been defined in detail more than numerous times. This investigation examined the platelet-specific biomarker trombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and platelet function ex vivo, and compared this with cathepsin S (Cat-S; a biomarker unrelated to platelet activation but also associated this with increased mortality risk) in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).

    METHODS: The STEMI patients were divided into two groups depending on the degree of coronary vessel occlusion: those with closed (n = 90) and open culprit vessel (n = 40). Cat-S and TSP-1 were analyzed before, 1-3 days after and 3 months after percutanous coronary intervention (PCI).

    RESULTS: During acute STEMI, plasma TSP-1 was significantly elevated in patients with closed culprit lesions, but rapidly declined after PCI. In fact, TSP-1 after PCI was significantly lower inpatient samples compared to healthy individuals. In comparison, plasma Cat-S was significantly elevated both before and after PCI. In patients with closed culprit lesions, Cat-S was significantly higher compared to patients with open culprit lesions 3 months after PCI. Although troponin-I were higher (p < 0.01) in patients with closed culprit lesion, there was no correlation with Cat-S and TSP-1.

    CONCLUSIONS: Cat-S but not TSP-1 may be a useful risk biomarker in relation to the severity of STEMI. However, the causality of Cat-S as a predictor for long-term mortality in STEMI remains to be ascertained in future studies.

  • 235.
    Befekadu, Rahel
    et al.
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Sect Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, S-70185 Örebro, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, S-70185 Örebro, Sweden..
    Grenegard, Magnus
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, S-70185 Örebro, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Karlstad Cent Hosp, S-65230 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Ramstroem, Sofia
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, S-70185 Örebro, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Clin Chem, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden..
    Dynamic Changes in Pentraxin-3 and Neprilysin in ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction2022In: Biomedicines, E-ISSN 2227-9059, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) and neprilysin have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic inflammatory disease and heart failure, but these biomarkers have been studied less in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We investigated the dynamic changes in these biomarkers, as well as the well-known C-reactive protein (CRP), in STEMI patients. PTX3, neprilysin and CRP were measured in samples from 165 STEMI patients, collected at the acute stage, 1-3 days after and 3 months after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and from 40 healthy donors. Patient survival was followed for approximately 8 years after the PCI. As compared with samples from healthy donors, plasma levels of CRP and PTX3 were significantly increased in the acute samples and 1-3 days after PCI, but not at 3 months. CRP levels peaked at 1-3 days, while PTX3 was similarly high in both acute and 1-3 days samples. For neprilysin, no significant differences were observed at the group level. We found no significant differences when comparing patients with patent versus occluded culprit vessels or between patients having a thrombus aspiration or not. However, we found a significant reduction in survival for individuals with PTX3 above the median, both for samples collected at the acute stage and 1-3 days after PCI (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0008, respectively). For CRP, no significant differences were observed using this approach, but patients above the reference range for healthy donors in the acute samples showed significantly lower survival (p = 0.0476). Conclusions: Survival analysis suggests that PTX3 might be a promising marker to predict mortality in this patient population.

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  • 236.
    Befekadu, Rahel
    et al.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, 70185, Örebro, Sweden.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Cardiovascular Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Cardiovascular Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 are associated with survival after ST segment elevation myocardial infarction2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 14762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) are suggested to play dual roles on physiological and pathophysiological actions of TNF-α. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic changes of these biomarkers in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Blood was collected from 165 STEMI patients at admission, 1-3 days and 3 months after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and from 40 healthy blood donors. sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were measured with ELISA. The plasma levels of both sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were significantly higher than in healthy donors at all three time points. We found no significant differences in sTNFR1 or sTNFR2 when comparing patients with patent versus occluded culprit vessels, or between patients having a thrombus aspiration or not. Survival analysis was performed comparing patients with levels of biomarkers above and below the median values at that time point. We found significant differences in survival for sTNFR2 in acute samples (p = 0.0151) and for both sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 in samples 1-3 days after PCI (p = 0.0054 and p = 0.0003, respectively). Survival analyses suggest that sTNFR1 or sTNFR2 could be promising markers to predict mortality in STEMI patients after PCI.

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  • 237.
    Behan, Miles W.
    et al.
    Edinburgh Heart Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Haude, Michael
    Lukaskrankenhaus GmbH, Stadt Kliniken Neuss, Med Clin 1, Neuss, Germany..
    Oldroyd, Keith G.
    Golden Jubilee Natl Hosp, West Scotland Heart & Lung Ctr, Clydebank, Scotland..
    Lansky, Alexandra J.
    Yale Univ, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, New Haven, CT USA..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Baumbach, Andreas
    Bristol Heart Inst, Bristol BS2 8HW, Avon, England..
    Will this trial change my practice?: TOTAL a randomised trial of thrombus aspiration in ST-elevation myocardial infarction2015In: EuroIntervention, ISSN 1774-024X, E-ISSN 1969-6213, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 361-363Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Behrendt, Christian-Alexander
    et al.
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Vasc Med, Res Grp GermanVasc, Hamburg, Germany..
    Sigvant, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Kuchenbecker, Jenny
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Vasc Med, Res Grp GermanVasc, Hamburg, Germany..
    Grima, Matthew J.
    Univ Malta, Mater Dei Hosp, Fac Med & Surg, Dept Surg,Vasc Unit, Msida, Malta..
    Schermerhorn, Marc
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Div Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Boston, MA USA..
    Thomson, Ian A.
    Univ Otago, Dept Surg Sci, Dunedin, New Zealand..
    Altreuther, Martin
    St Lays Hosp, Dept Vasc Surg, Trondheim, Norway..
    Setacci, Carlo
    Univ Siena, Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Siena, Italy..
    Svetlikov, Alexei
    II Mechnikov North Western State Med Univ, Dept Cardiovasc Surg, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Laxdal, Elin H.
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Vasc Surg, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Goncalves, Frederico Bastos
    CHULC, NOVA Med Sch, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Secemsky, Eric A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Div Cardiol, Boston, MA USA..
    Debus, ESebastian
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Vasc Med, Res Grp GermanVasc, Hamburg, Germany..
    Cassar, Kevin
    Univ Malta, Mater Dei Hosp, Fac Med & Surg, Dept Surg,Vasc Unit, Msida, Malta..
    Beiles, Barry
    Australian & New Zealand Soc Vasc Surg, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Beck, Adam W.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Div Vasc Surg & Endovasc Therapy, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Bertges, Daniel
    Univ Vermont Med Ctr, Div Vasc Surg, Burlington, VT USA..
    International Variations and Sex Disparities in the Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Report from VASCUNET and the International Consortium of Vascular Registries2020In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 873-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine sex specific differences in the invasive treatment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) between member states participating in the VASCUNET and International Consortium of Vascular Registries. Methods: Data on open surgical revascularisation and peripheral vascular intervention (PVI) of symptomatic PAOD from 2010 to 2017 were collected from population based administrative and registry data from 11 countries. Differences in age, sex, indication, and invasive treatment modality were analysed. Results: Data from 11 countries covering 671 million inhabitants and 1 164 497 hospitalisations (40% women, mean age 72 years, 49% with intermittent claudication, 54% treated with PVI) in Europe (including Russia), North America, Australia, and New Zealand were included. Patient selection and treatment modality varied widely for the proportion of female patients (23% in Portugal and 46% in Sweden), the proportion of patients with claudication (6% in Italy and 69% in Russia), patients' mean age (70 years in the USA and 76 years in Italy), the proportion of octogenarians (8% in Russia and 33% in Sweden), and the proportion of PVI (24% in Russia and 88% in Italy). Numerous differences between females and males were observed in regard to patient age (72 vs. 70 years), the proportion of octogenarians (28% vs. 15%), proportion of patients with claudication (45% vs. 51%), proportion of PVI (57% vs. 51%), and length of hospital stay (7 days vs. 6 days). Conclusion: Remarkable differences regarding the proportion of peripheral vascular interventions, patients with claudication, and octogenarians were seen across countries and sexes. Future studies should address the underlying reasons for this, including the impact of national societal guidelines, reimbursement, and differences in health maintenance.

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  • 239.
    Beijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    SUS Malmo, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Elmstahl, Solve
    Lund Univ, Div Geriatr Med, Dept Hlth Sci, Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Interaction between physical activity and television time on blood pressure level: cross-sectional data from 45000 individuals2018In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 1041-1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:The aim was to investigate if there is an interaction between sitting time and leisure time physical activity on blood pressure and if there are age differences and sex differences in this respect.

    Methods:Linear regression analysis on cross-sectional data was performed in more than 45000 men and women from two Swedish cohort studies, EpiHealth (45-75 years) and LifeGene (18-45 years). Self-reported leisure time physical activity was given in five levels from low (level 1) to vigorous physical activity (level 5) and television time was used as a proxy measure of sitting time.

    Results:High physical activity was associated with lower DBP (P=0.001), but not SBP. Active middle-aged men had lower DBP (-1.1mmHg; 95% CI -1.7 to -0.4) compared with inactive participants. Prolonged television time was associated with higher SBP (P<0.001) and DBP (P=0.011) in both sexes and in most age groups. Watching 3h instead of 1h television per day was associated with higher SBP in middle-aged women (SBP: 1.1mmHg; 95% CI 0.7-1.4) and men (SBP: 1.2mmHg; 95% CI 0.8-1.6). Only in young men, a high physical activity (level 4 instead of level 1) could compensate for a prolonged television time (3h per day) in terms of DBP.

    Conclusion:Prolonged television time was associated with higher SBP and DBP in both sexes and at most ages, whereas an increased physical activity was mainly associated with a lower DBP. Only in young men, a high physical activity could compensate for prolonged television time regarding DBP.

  • 240.
    Bekwelem, Wobo
    et al.
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Lillehei Heart Inst, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.;Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Connolly, Stuart J.
    McMaster Univ, Dept Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Halperin, Jonathan L.
    Mt Sinai Sch Med, New York, NY USA..
    Adabag, Selcuk
    Minneapolis Vet Adm Med Ctr, Div Cardiol, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Duval, Sue
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Lillehei Heart Inst, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.;Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Chrolavicius, Susan
    McMaster Univ, Dept Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Pogue, Janice
    McMaster Univ, Dept Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Ezekowitz, Michael D.
    Lankenau Inst Med Res, Wynnewood, PA USA..
    Eikelboom, John W.
    McMaster Univ, Dept Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Yusuf, Salim
    McMaster Univ, Dept Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada..
    Hirsch, Alan T.
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Lillehei Heart Inst, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.;Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Extracranial Systemic Embolic Events in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Incidence, Risk Factors, and Outcomes2015In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 132, no 9, p. 796-803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation is a major cause of thromboembolic events. In comparison with atrial fibrillation-related stroke, extracranial systemic embolic events (SEEs) remain poorly defined. Methods and Results All suspected SEEs reported among 37973 participants of 4 large contemporary randomized clinical trials of anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation were independently readjudicated for clinical and objective evidence of sudden loss of perfusion of a limb or organ. Over 91746 patient-years of follow-up, 221 SEEs occurred in 219 subjects. The SEE incidence was 0.24 of 100 and stroke incidence was 1.92 of 100 patient-years. In comparison with patients with stroke, those with SEE were more often female (56% versus 47%; P=0.01) and had comparable mean age (73.18.5 versus 73.5 +/- 8.8 years; P=0.57) and mean CHADS(2) scores (2.4 +/- 1.3 versus 2.5 +/- 1.2; P=0.33). SEEs more frequently involved the lower extremity (58%) than visceral-mesenteric (31%) or upper extremity (10%). SEE-related care involved clinic assessment alone in 5%, 30% were hospitalized without procedures, 60% underwent endovascular or surgical intervention, and 5% underwent amputation. Within 30 days, 54% of patients recovered fully, 20% survived with deficits, and 25% died. Thirty-day mortality was greater after visceral-mesenteric than lower- or upper-extremity SEE (55%, 17%, and 9%, respectively, P0.0001). The relative risk of death throughout follow-up was 4.33 (95% confidence interval, 3.29-5.70) after SEE versus 6.79 (95% confidence interval, 6.22-7.41) after stroke in comparison with patients without either event. Conclusions SEE constituted 11.5% of clinically recognized thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and was associated with high morbidity and mortality. SEE mortality was comparable to that of ischemic stroke and varied by anatomic site.

  • 241.
    Bell, Katy J. L.
    et al.
    Univ Sydney, Sydney Sch Publ Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Azizi, Lamiae
    Univ Sydney, Sch Math & Stat, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hayen, Andrew
    UTS, Australian Ctr Publ & Populat Hlth Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Irwig, Les
    Univ Sydney, Sydney Sch Publ Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Östgren, Carl J.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Prognostic impact of systolic blood pressure variability in people with diabetes2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0194084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Blood pressure variability (BPV) has been associated with risk of cardiovascular events in observational studies, independently of mean BP levels. In states with higher autonomic imbalance, such as in diabetes, the importance of BP variability may theoretically be even greater. We aimed to investigate the incremental value of BPV for prediction of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: We identified 9,855 patients without pre-existing cardiovascular disease who did not change BP-lowering treatment during the observation period from a Swedish primary health care cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. BPV was summarized as the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), or variation independent of mean (VIM). Patients were followed for a median of 4 years and associations with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were investigated using Cox proportional hazards models.

    Results: BPV was not associated with cardiovascular specific or all-cause mortality in the total sample. In patients who were not on BP-lowering drugs during the observation period (n = 2,949), variability measures were associated with all-cause mortality: hazard ratios were 1.05, 1.04 and 1.05 for 50% increases in SD, CV and VIM, respectively, adjusted for Framingham risk score risk factors, including mean BP. However, the addition of the variability measures in this subgroup only led to very minimal improvement in discrimination, indicating they may have limited clinical usefulness (change in C-statistic ranged from 0.000–0.003 in all models).

    Conclusions: Although BPV was independently associated with all-cause mortality in diabetes patients in primary care who did not have pre-existing cardiovascular disease or BP-lowering drugs, it may be of minimal clinical usefulness above and beyond that of other routinely measured predictors, including mean BP.

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  • 242. Bell, Katy J. L.
    et al.
    Beller, Elaine
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    McGeechan, Kevin
    Hayen, Andrew
    Irwig, Les
    Neal, Bruce
    Glasziou, Paul
    Ambulatory blood pressure adds little to Framingham Risk Score for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in older men: secondary analysis of observational study data2014In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 9, p. e006044-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine the incremental value of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in predicting cardiovascular risk when the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) is known. Methods: We included 780 men without cardiovascular disease from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, all aged approximately 70 years at baseline. We first screened ambulatory systolic BP (ASBP) parameters for their incremental value by adding them to a model with 10-year FRS. For the best ASBP parameter we estimated HRs and changes in discrimination, calibration and reclassification. We also estimated the difference in the number of men started on treatment and in the number of men protected against a cardiovascular event. Results: Mean daytime ASBP had the highest incremental value; adding other parameters did not yield further improvements. While ASBP was an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, addition to FRS led to only small increases to the overall model fit, discrimination (a 1% increase in the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve), calibration and reclassification. We estimated that for every 10 000 men screened with ASBP, 141 fewer would start a new BP-lowering treatment (95% CI 62 to 220 less treated), but this would result in 7 fewer cardiovascular events prevented over the subsequent 10 years (95% CI 21 fewer events prevented to 7 more events prevented). Conclusions: In addition to a standard cardiovascular risk assessment it is not clear that ambulatory BP measurement provides further incremental value. The clinical role of ambulatory BP requires ongoing careful consideration.

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  • 243. Bellavia, Andrea
    et al.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Orsini, Nicola
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Cannon, Christopher P
    Himmelmann, Anders
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Renlund, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lytsy, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Time-based measures of treatment effect: reassessment of ticagrelor and clopidogrel from the PLATO trial2017In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 4, no 2, article id e000557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Treatment effects to binary endpoints using time-to-event data in randomised controlled trials are typically summarised by reporting HRs derived with Cox proportional hazard models. Alternative and complementary methods include summarising the between-treatment differences on the metric time scale, quantifying the effect as delay of the event (DoE). The aim of this study was to reassess data from the PLATO study expressing the effects as the time by which the main outcomes are delayed or hastened due to treatment.

    METHODS: PLATO was a randomised controlled double-blind multicentre study (n=18,624), conducted between 2006 and 2008, which demonstrated superiority of the antiplatelet treatment ticagrelor over clopidogrel in reducing risk of several cardiovascular events. In the present study, four of the main PLATO outcomes were reassessed by calculating the time by which an event may be delayed due to the treatment.

    RESULTS: The effects of ticagrelor, as compared with clopidogrel, consisted of a substantial delay of the evaluated outcomes, ranging from 83 to 98 days over 400-day follow-up. The Delay of Events Curves showed that the effects progressively increased over time, and the significant findings were concordant with those presented in the original PLATO study.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed evidence of a beneficial effect of ticagrelor over clopidogrel, and provided the magnitude of such effects in terms of delayed event time. Investigating time-to-event data with a percentile approach allows presenting treatment effects from randomised controlled studies as absolute measures of the time by which an event may be delayed due to the treatment.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PLATO (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00391872); Results.

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  • 244.
    Bengts, Sophy
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Drug Res, Linköping, Sweden..
    Shamoun, Levar
    Jönköping Cty, Dept Lab Med, Div Med Diagnost, Jönköping, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Cell Biol, BOX 571, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kunath, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Drug Res, Linköping, Sweden..
    Welander, Martin
    Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Cardiovasc Med, Linköping, Sweden..
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Drug Res, Linköping, Sweden..
    Altered IL-32 Signaling in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm2020In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Objective:Interleukin (IL)-32 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine not previously studied in relation to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The aim of this study was to elucidate the expression and localization of IL-32 in AAA.Methods:Expression and localization of IL-32 in human aortic tissue was studied with immunohistochemical analysis and Western blot (AAA:n= 5; controls:n= 4). ELISA was used to measure IL-32 in human plasma samples (AAA:n= 140; controls:n= 37) and in media from cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 3 healthy donors. IL-32 mRNA in PBMCs, endothelial cells, aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and aortic tissue samples of AAA (n= 16) and control aortas (n= 9) was measured with qPCR.Results:IL-32 was predominantly expressed in SMCs and T-cell-rich areas. Highest mRNA expression was observed in the intima/media layer of the AAA. A weaker protein expression was detected in non-aneurysmal aortas. Expression of IL-32 was confirmed in isolated T cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, and SMCs, where expression was also inducible by cytokines such as interferon-gamma. There was no difference in IL-32 expression in plasma between patients and controls.Conclusion:IL-32 signaling is altered locally in AAA and could potentially play an important role in aneurysm development. Further studies using animal models would be helpful to study its potential role in AAA disease.

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  • 245. Bengtsson, Anna
    et al.
    Norberg, Margareta
    Ng, Nawi
    Carlberg, Bo
    Grönlund, Christer
    Hultdin, Johan
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Nyman, Emma
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Wester, Per
    Näslund, Ulf
    The beneficial effect over 3 years by pictorial information to patients and their physician about subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk: Results from the VIPVIZA randomized clinical trial2021In: American journal of preventive cardiology, ISSN 2666-6677, Vol. 7, article id 100199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Non-adherence to guidelines and preventive measures is a major challenge, particularly so to obtain long-term adherence to lifestyle changes and recommended medication. The objective was to investigate if pictorial information regarding subclinical carotid atherosclerosis provided to individuals and physicians gave sustained effects on cardiovascular risk beyond the previously reported effect after 1 year and up to 3 years.

    Methods: A Prospective Randomized Open Blinded End-point (PROBE) trial. Within a CVD prevention program in Västerbotten County, Sweden, 3532 healthy individuals aged 40, 50 or 60 years were enrolled and 1:1 randomized to intervention (n = 1749; pictorial information with additional prevention materials to participants and physicians) or control group (n = 1783; no pictorial information to participants and physicians). Preventive measures were managed within primary care. Participants were investigated at baseline during 2013-2016 and at follow-up after 1 and 3 years.

    Results: A beneficial effect on cardiovascular risk was observed at 3-year follow-up; Framingham Risk Score (FRS) was 13.38 for the intervention group and 14.08 for the control group (p = 0.047) and SCORE was 1.69 vs. 1.82 (p = 0.022). The effect observed at 1-year was sustained over 3 years after adjustment for sex and education and more pronounced among participants with a severe atherosclerotic picture at baseline.

    Conclusions: This study provides evidence of sustained beneficial effects on the adherence to prevention guidelines over 3 years of pictorial information about subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, resulting in lower cardiovascular risk regardless of sex and educational level. Direct visualization of the underlying still subclinical atherosclerotic disease, rather than just indirect information about risk factors and statistical risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke and death, is one way to tackle the problem of non-adherence to prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

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  • 246.
    Bengtsson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Igelström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Åsenlöf: Physiotheraphy.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Bodén, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Ambulatory Heart Rate Variability in Schizophrenia or Depression: Impact of Anticholinergic Burden and Other Factors2021In: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0271-0749, E-ISSN 1533-712X, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been found reduced in patients with schizophrenia and depression. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how demographic, lifestyle, and pharmacological factors contribute to the reduction in HRV in these patients.

    METHODS: We recruited 37 patients with schizophrenia, 43 patients with unipolar depression, and 64 healthy controls. A combined chest-worn HRV and accelerometer device was used in an ambulatory measurement. Age, sex, anticholinergic burden of medication, nicotine use, body mass index, and ongoing physical activity were assessed in multiple regression models regarding their influence on HRV, measured as the standard deviation of all the RR intervals (SDNN).

    RESULTS: In the fully adjusted model, schizophrenia (β = -0.23, P = 0.019), depression (β = -0.18, P = 0.028), age (β = -0.34, P < 0.000), ongoing physical activity (β = -0.23, P = 0.001), and anticholinergic burden (β = -0.19, P = 0.025) influenced SDNN negatively. Sex, nicotine use, and BMI had negligible effects on SDNN.

    CONCLUSIONS: We show for the first time that a quantified score of anticholinergic burden of medication has a negative relationship to HRV in patients with schizophrenia or depression, but that the diagnoses themselves still exhibit an effect on HRV.

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  • 247. Bengtsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Kasperowski, Dick
    Ring, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Developing an interactive mobile phone self-report system for self-management of hypertension. Part 1: Patient and professional perspectives2014In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 288-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low adherence remains a struggle in hypertension management, despite improvement efforts. Presuming that increased patient participation is a possible approach, we collaborated with patients and healthcare professionals to design a self-report system to support self-management. The study aimed to explore and describe relevant aspects of hypertension and hypertension treatment, for use in the development of an interactive mobile phone self-report system. It further aimed to suggest which clinical measures, lifestyle measures, symptoms and side-effects of treatment would be meaningful to include in such a system. Five focus group interviews were performed with 15 patients and 12 healthcare professionals, and data was analysed using thematic analysis. Patients suggested trust, a good relationship with caregivers, and well-being as important aspects of hypertension self-management. Furthermore, they regarded blood pressure, dizziness, stress, headache and tiredness as important outcomes to include. Patients sought to understand interconnections between symptoms and variations in blood pressure, whilst healthcare professionals doubted patients' ability to do so. Healthcare professionals emphasized accessibility, clear and consistent counselling, complication prevention and educational efforts. The study presents aspects of importance for follow-up to understand the interplay between blood pressure and daily life experiences for patients with hypertension.

  • 248. Bengtsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Hoefer, Stefan
    Taft, Charles
    Ring, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Developing an interactive mobile phone self-report system for self-management of hypertension. Part 2: Content validity and usability2014In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 296-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-management support tools using technology may improve adherence to hypertension treatment. There is a need for user-friendly tools facilitating patients' understanding of the interconnections between blood pressure, wellbeing and lifestyle. This study aimed to examine comprehension, comprehensiveness and relevance of items, and further to evaluate the usability and reliability of an interactive hypertension-specifi c mobile phone self-report system. Areas important in supporting self-management and candidate items were derived from five focus group interviews with patients and healthcare professionals (n = 27), supplemented by a literature review. Items and response formats were drafted to meet specifications for mobile phone administration and were integrated into a mobile phone data-capture system. Content validity and usability were assessed iteratively in four rounds of cognitive interviews with patients (n = 21) and healthcare professionals (n = 4). Reliability was examined using a test-retest. Focus group analyses yielded six areas covered by 16 items. The cognitive interviews showed satisfactory item comprehension, relevance and coverage; however, one item was added. The mobile phone self-report system was reliable and perceived easy to use. The mobile phone self-report system appears efficiently to capture information relevant in patients' self-management of hypertension. Future studies need to evaluate the effectiveness of this tool in improving self-management of hypertension in clinical practice.

  • 249.
    Benson, Tyler W.
    et al.
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Conrad, Kelsey A.
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Pathobiol & Mol Med Grad Program, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Li, Xinmin S.
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Ctr Microbiome & Human Hlth, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Wang, Zeneng
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Ctr Microbiome & Human Hlth, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Helsley, Robert N.
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Schugar, Rebecca. C.
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Coughlin, Taylor M.
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Pathobiol & Mol Med Grad Program, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Wadding-Lee, Caris
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Pathobiol & Mol Med Grad Program, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Fleifil, Salma
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Russell, Hannah M.
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Pathobiol & Mol Med Grad Program, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Stone, Timothy
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Environm Hlth, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Biostat & Bioinformat, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Brooks, Michael
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Buffa, Jennifer A.
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Ctr Microbiome & Human Hlth, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Sangwan, Naseer
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Ctr Microbiome & Human Hlth, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Biddinger, Sudha
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Endocrinol, Boston, MA USA..
    Bhandari, Rohan
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Heart Vasc & Thorac Inst, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Ademoya, Akiirayi
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Pascual, Crystal
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Tang, W. H. Wilson
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Ctr Microbiome & Human Hlth, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Heart Vasc & Thorac Inst, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Tranter, Michael
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Pathobiol & Mol Med Grad Program, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Cameron, Scott J.
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Heart Vasc & Thorac Inst, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Brown, J. Mark
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Ctr Microbiome & Human Hlth, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Hazen, Stanley L.
    Cleveland Clin, Dept Cardiovasc & Metab Sci, Learner Res Inst, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Ctr Microbiome & Human Hlth, Cleveland, OH USA.;Cleveland Clin, Heart Vasc & Thorac Inst, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Owens, A. Phillip, III
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Internal Med, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Div Cardiovasc Hlth & Dis, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Pathobiol & Mol Med Grad Program, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Gut Microbiota-Derived Trimethylamine N-Oxide Contributes to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Through Inflammatory and Apoptotic Mechanisms2023In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 147, no 14, p. 1079-1096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Large-scale human and mechanistic mouse studies indicate a strong relationship between the microbiome-dependent metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and several cardiometabolic diseases. This study aims to investigate the role of TMAO in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and target its parent microbes as a potential pharmacological intervention.

    Methods:TMAO and choline metabolites were examined in plasma samples, with associated clinical data, from 2 independent patient cohorts (N=2129 total). Mice were fed a high-choline diet and underwent 2 murine AAA models, angiotensin II infusion in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice or topical porcine pancreatic elastase in C57BL/6J mice. Gut microbial production of TMAO was inhibited through broad-spectrum antibiotics, targeted inhibition of the gut microbial choline TMA lyase (CutC/D) with fluoromethylcholine, or the use of mice genetically deficient in flavin monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3(-/-)). Finally, RNA sequencing of in vitro human vascular smooth muscle cells and in vivo mouse aortas was used to investigate how TMAO affects AAA.

    Results:Elevated TMAO was associated with increased AAA incidence and growth in both patient cohorts studied. Dietary choline supplementation augmented plasma TMAO and aortic diameter in both mouse models of AAA, which was suppressed with poorly absorbed oral broad-spectrum antibiotics. Treatment with fluoromethylcholine ablated TMAO production, attenuated choline-augmented aneurysm initiation, and halted progression of an established aneurysm model. In addition, Fmo3(-/-) mice had reduced plasma TMAO and aortic diameters and were protected from AAA rupture compared with wild-type mice. RNA sequencing and functional analyses revealed choline supplementation in mice or TMAO treatment of human vascular smooth muscle cells-augmented gene pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, specifically the endoplasmic reticulum stress kinase PERK.

    Conclusions:These results define a role for gut microbiota-generated TMAO in AAA formation through upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related pathways in the aortic wall. In addition, inhibition of microbiome-derived TMAO may serve as a novel therapeutic approach for AAA treatment where none currently exist.

  • 250.
    Bent-Ennakhil, Nawal
    et al.
    Lundbeck SAS, Paris, France.
    Périer, Marie Cécile
    Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Paris, France.
    Sobocki, Patrik
    Pygargus AB, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Unit Clin Epidemiol, Solna, Sweden.
    Gothefors, Dan
    Karsudden Hosp, Katrineholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Milea, Dominique
    Lundbeck SAS, Paris, France.
    Empana, Jean-Philippe
    Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Paris, France.
    Incidence of cardiovascular diseases and type-2-diabetes mellitus in patients with psychiatric disorders2018In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 72, no 7, p. 455-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and type-2-diabetes in patients with psychiatric disorders.

    Methods: A population-based study was conducted using the Swedish national health registries. Patients were identified from the Electronic Medical Records (EMR) in 20 primary care centers and were categorized in four diagnosis cohorts according to their first psychiatric diagnosis: bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, or other mood disorder. A control cohort of patients with no psychiatric disorders followed in the same primary care centers was also identified. Incident CVD and type-2-diabetes were defined as the presence of a diagnosis of CVD or diabetes during the follow-up period in patients without prior event.

    Results: The age and sex standardized incidence rate of CVD was 13.5 per 1000 patient-year in the patients with any psychiatric disorder versus 6.3 per 1000 patient-year in the controls. A similar trend was observed for incident diabetes (5.7 versus 3.4 per 1000 patient-year, respectively). The bipolar disorder and the schizophrenia cohorts showed the highest standardized incidence rates.

    Conclusion: Incidence of CVD and to a lesser extent type-2-diabetes was particularly high in patients with psychiatric disorders. This carries strong clinical implications for the prevention of CVD and type-2-diabetes in these patients.

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