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  • 201. Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Berg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Some Observations on Reporting Quality of Life in Treatment of Psoriasis in Outpatient Clinics2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 210-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 202. Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Bingefors, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Berg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Hand eczema and health-related quality of life; a comparison of EQ-5D and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) in relation to the hand eczema extent score (HEES)2013In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 138-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is associated with the extent and severity of hand eczema. We still lack a consensus about which HRQoL instrument to use as the standard, and how to measure the extent and severity of hand eczema. Objectives. To compare the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) with EQ-5D (a standardized instrument for use as a measure of health outcome), and to evaluate how the Hand Eczema Extent Score (HEES) relates to these instruments. Methods. Ninety-three patients (61 females) were included. The HEES was recorded by a dermatologist, and the DLQI and EQ-5D by the patients. The results were analysed with factor analysis and non-parametric statistics. Results. The DLQI and EQ-5D showed decreased HRQoL. Using factor analysis, we could not establish an association between the DLQI and EQ-5D. There were, however, correlations between the DLQI and the HEES (0.31), the EQ(index) and the HEES (-0.32), the DLQI and the EQ(VAS) (-0.62), and the DLQI and the EQ(index) (-0.67) (the EQ(VAS) and the EQ(index) are calculated from EQ-5D). Conclusions. We could not link factors in the DLQI to EQ-5D, which has previously been done for SF-36 (Short Form 36). On the basis of this, we cannot recommend EQ-5D over SF-36 for hand eczema studies. The DLQI correlates with the EQ(VAS) and the EQ(index), and can probably be used as an approximation for EQ-5D. Our findings with the HEES are interesting, as it can be used by patients.

  • 203.
    Lindblad, Ida
    et al.
    The Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engström, Ann-Charlotte
    Child and Youth Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    The Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder require specific support from healthcare professionals2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 12, p. 1994-1997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Managing type 1 diabetes mellitus requires efficient cognitive and executive skills, and adolescents who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may face specific challenges. This study explored young people's experiences of diabetes treatment and care.

    METHOD: In a population-based study, comprising 175 patients aged 5-16 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus in two Swedish counties, we found that eight also met criteria for ADHD. Six of these, aged 14.5-16 years, participated 2013-2014 in interviews that targeted aspects of their diabetes treatment. Conducted by two psychologists, these used the inductive qualitative, semi-structured interview format.

    RESULTS: The two boys and four girls all reported difficulties in creating routines for their diabetes treatment and that problems were aggravated during stress. They had been criticised by their parents and the diabetes team when their blood levels indicated inadequate diabetes control. They requested ongoing information, involvement of their friends, group meetings and easy access to the healthcare system during difficult times.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and concomitant ADHD faced problems with their diabetes management, especially during stressful situations. Diabetes care provision should pay particular attention to patients with co-existing neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders such as ADHD.

  • 204. Lindbäck, Camilla
    et al.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Mälardalens högskola.
    To be on sick-leave due to heart failure: a qualitative perspective2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 18-19, p. 1732-1738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to explore and describe meanings of being on sick leave due to heart failure.

    Methods: The study was conducted in Sweden during 2011-2012. Five men and one woman, aged 46 to 62, were interviewed. A reflective life-world research approach based on phenomenological philosophy was used. The result of the analysis is presented in three themes.

    Results: To be on sick leave due to heart failure implies a life situation characterized by anxiety, insecurity and uncertainty. When rehabilitation professionals do not take on their professional responsibility, sick listed people with heart failure perceive they are dismissed and abandoned. If rehabilitation professionals take on their professional responsibility it can be experienced as supportive.

    Conclusions: People who are on sick leave due to heart failure are abandoned by rehabilitation professionals and they lack opportunities to participate in their own sick leave/rehabilitation processes. Rehabilitation professionals need to take more responsibility and allow the patients to participate by connecting and recognizing patients as equal human beings. The present results can be used by rehabilitation professionals to reflect on and discuss the needs of people on sick leave due to heart failure. Implications for Rehabilitation Heart failure is a chronic condition implying a complicated life-situation. People with heart failure experience abandonment by rehabilitation professionals and lack participation in their own rehabilitation process. In order to support people on sick leave due to heart failure collaboration and coordination between rehabilitation professionals are needed.

  • 205.
    Lindqvist, Karin
    et al.
    Erica Fdn, Odengatan 9, S-11424 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ekeblad, Annika
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Thorén, Agneta
    Erica Fdn, Odengatan 9, S-11424 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Multilevel Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Feeling Word Checklist-242017In: Assessment (Odessa, Fla.), ISSN 1073-1911, E-ISSN 1552-3489, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 907-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotional reactions are a vital part of the therapeutic relationship. The Feeling Word Checklist-24 (FWC-24) is an instrument asking the clinician (or the patient) to report to what degree he or she has experienced various feelings during a therapeutic interaction. The aim of this study was to assess the factor structure of the clinician-rated FWC-24 when taking dependencies in the data into account. The sample was deliberately heterogeneous and consisted of 4,443 ratings made by 101 psychotherapists working with different psychotherapy methods in relation to 191 patients of different ages, genders, and with different primary diagnoses. A random intercept-only model revealed large intraclass correlation coefficients at the therapist level, indicating that a multilevel analysis was warranted. A two-level exploratory factor analysis with therapists as the between level and patients plus sessions as the within level was conducted. The items from FWC-24 were found to be best represented by four factors on the between level and four factors on the within level. The factor structures were largely similar on the two levels and were labeled Engaged, Inadequate, Relaxed, and Moved. The different factors explained different amounts of variance on different levels, indicating that some factors are more therapist dependent and some more patient dependent.

  • 206.
    Lipcsey, Miklós
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Castegren, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Bellomo, R
    Hemodynamic management of septic shock2015In: Minerva Anestesiologica, ISSN 0375-9393, E-ISSN 1827-1596, Vol. 81, no 11, p. 1262-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a review of the hemodynamic management of septic shock. Although substantial amount of evidence is present in this area, most key decisions on the management of these patients remain dependent on physiological reasoning and on pathophysiological principles rather than randomized controlled trials. During primary (early) resuscitation, restoration of adequate arterial pressure and cardiac output using fluids and vasopressor and/or inotropic drugs is guided by basic hemodynamic monitoring and physical examination in the emergency department. When more advanced level of monitoring is present in these patients, i.e. during secondary resuscitation (later phase in the emergency department and in the ICU), hemodynamic management can be guided by more advanced measurements of the macro--circulation. Our understanding of the microcirculation in septic shock is limited and reliable therapeutic modalities to optimize it do not yet exist. No specific hemodynamic treatment strategy, be it medications including fluids, monitoring devices or treatment algorithms has yet been proved to improve outcome. Moreover, there is virtually no data on the optimal management of the resolution phase of septic shock. Despite these gaps in knowledge, the data from observational studies and trials suggests that mortality in septic shock has been generally decreasing during the last decade.

  • 207. Liu, Hien Duong
    et al.
    Ahn, Kwang Woo
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hu, Zhen-Huan
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Wirk, Baldeep
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Beitinjaneh, Amer
    Univ Miami, Sylvester Canc Ctr, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Miami, FL USA..
    Rizzieri, David
    Duke Univ, Div Hematol Malignancies & Cellular Therapy, Durham, NC USA..
    Grunwald, Michael R.
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Sabloff, Mitchell
    Univ Ottawa, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bajel, Ashish
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Dept Haematol & Bone Marrow Transplant, Parkville, Vic, Australia..
    Bredeson, Christopher
    Ottawa Hosp Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Daly, Andrew
    Tom Baker Canc Clin, Dept Med, Calgary, AB, Canada.;Tom Baker Canc Clin, Dept Oncol, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Inamoto, Yoshihiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Hematopoiet Stem Cell Transplantat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Majhail, Navneet
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Saad, Ayman
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Gupta, Vikas
    Univ Hlth Network, Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Gerds, Aaron
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Malone, Adriana
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Tisch Canc Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Tallman, Martin
    Mem Sloan, Dept Med, Leukemia Serv, New York, NY USA..
    Reshef, Ran
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Columbia Ctr Translat Immunol, New York, NY USA..
    Marks, David I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Pediat Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Copelan, Edward
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Gergis, Usama
    New York Presbyterian Hosp, Weill Cornell Med Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, Hematol Malignancies & Bone Marrow Transplant, New York, NY USA..
    Savoie, Mary Lynn
    Tom Baker Canc Clin, Div Hematol & Hematol Malignancies, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Ustun, Celalettin
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Litzow, Mark R.
    Mayo Clin Rochester, Div Hematol, Rochester, MN USA.;Mayo Clin Rochester, Transplant Ctr, Rochester, MN USA..
    Cahn, Jean-Yves
    Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Grenoble, France..
    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila
    Univ Virginia Hlth Syst, Div Hematol Oncol, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Akpek, Gorgun
    Banner MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Stem Cell Transplantat & Cellular Therapy Program, Gilbert, AZ USA..
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Rowe, Jacob M.
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Dept Hematol, Jerusalem, Israel..
    Wiernik, Peter H.
    Our Lady Mercy Med Ctr, Bronx, NY USA..
    Hsu, Jack W.
    Shands HealthCare, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Gainesville, FL USA.;Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Cortes, Jorge
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Div Canc Med, Dept Leukemia, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Kalaycio, Matt
    Cleveland Clin Fdn, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, 9500 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44195 USA..
    Maziarz, Richard
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, Adult Blood & Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Sobecks, Ronald
    Cleveland Clin Fdn, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, 9500 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44195 USA..
    Popat, Uday
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Alyea, Edwin
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adult Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia2017In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 767-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is potentially curative for patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML); however, few data exist regarding prognostic factors and transplantation outcomes. We performed this retrospective study to identify prognostic factors for post-transplantation outcomes. The CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) has been validated in subjects receiving nontransplantation therapy and was included in our study. From 2001 to 2012, 209 adult subjects who received HCT for CMML were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. The median age at transplantation was 57 years (range, 23 to 74). Median follow-up was 51 months (range, 3 to 122). On multivariate analyses, CPSS scores, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and graft source were significant predictors of survival (P = .004, P = .01, P = .01, respectively). Higher CPSS scores were not associated with disease-free survival, relapse, or transplantation-related mortality. In a restricted analysis of subjects with relapse after HCT, those with intermediate-2/high risk had a nearly 2-fold increased risk of death after relapse compared to those with low/intermediate-1 CPSS scores. Respective 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival rates for low/intermediate-1 risk subjects were 61% (95% confidence interval [CI], 52% to 72%), 48% (95% CI, 37% to 59%), and 44% (95% CI, 33% to 55%), and for intermediate-2/high risk subjects were 38% (95% CI, 28% to 49%), 32% (95% CI, 21% to 42%), and 19% (95% CI, 8% to 29%). We conclude that higher CPSS score at time of transplantation, lower KPS, and a bone marrow graft are associated with inferior survival after HCT. Further investigation of CMML disease-related biology may provide insights into other risk factors predictive of post-transplantation outcomes. (C) 2017 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

  • 208. Loden, Marie
    et al.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Parvardeh, Masomeh
    Carne, Kristina Neimert
    Berg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    No skin reactions to mineral powders in nickel-sensitive subjects2012In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 210-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Cosmetic products are known to be able to induce contact dermatitis. Contact dermatitis may also be induced by nickel, and it is estimated that up to 17% of women are allergic to nickel.

    Objectives. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether nickel sensitized individuals react to make-up products containing pigments with nickel as an impurity.

    Patients/Materials/Methods. Twenty-three individuals with a clinical history of nickel allergy and/or with positive patch test reactions to nickel were exposed to mineral make-up products and individual pigments dispersed in alkylbenzoate (50%) in small Finn Chambers (R) for 48 hr. The skin reactions were evaluated visually and with a non-invasive instrument that quantifies skin erythema.

    Results. The results showed that 74% of the included individuals showed a visible reaction to the positive control nickel sulfate, and a significant correlation was found between the visual and instrumental readings. However, none of the nickel sensitive individuals reacted to the test products. A subgroup analysis of the 50% most sensitive individuals also confirmed the absence of skin reactions to the powders.

    Conclusions. The bioavailability of the trace amounts of nickel in the particles was below the level needed to elicit an eczematous reaction in any of the nickel-sensitized individuals.

  • 209.
    Lopez-Fauqued, Marta
    et al.
    GSK, Ave Fleming 20, B-1300 Wavre, Belgium.
    Campora, Laura
    GSK, Ave Fleming 20, B-1300 Wavre, Belgium.
    Delannois, Frederique
    GSK, Ave Fleming 20, B-1300 Wavre, Belgium.
    El Idrissi, Mohamed
    GSK, Rixensart, Belgium.
    Oostvogels, Lidia
    GSK, Ave Fleming 20, B-1300 Wavre, Belgium;CureVac AG, Tubingen, Germany.
    De Looze, Ferdinandus J.
    AusTrials Pty Ltd, Sherwood, Qld, Australia;Univ Queensland, Sch Med, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Diez-Domingo, Javier
    Fdn Fomento Invest Sanitaria & Biomed, Vaccine Res Unit, Valencia, Spain.
    Heineman, Thomas C.
    GSK, King Of Prussia, PA USA;Halozyme Therapeut, San Diego, CA USA.
    Lal, Himal
    GSK, King Of Prussia, PA USA;Pfizer Vaccine Inc, Collegeville, PA USA.
    McElhaney, Janet E.
    Hlth Sci North Res Inst, Sudbury, ON, Canada.
    McNeil, Shelly A.
    Dalhousie Univ, Canadian Ctr Vaccinol, Halifax, NS, Canada;Dalhousie Univ, IWK Hlth Ctr, Halifax, NS, Canada;Dalhousie Univ, Nova Scotia Hlth Author, Halifax, NS, Canada.
    Yeo, Wilfred
    Univ Wollongong, Sch Med, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    Tavares-Da-Silva, Fernanda
    GSK, Ave Fleming 20, B-1300 Wavre, Belgium.
    Ahonen, Anitta
    Univ Tampere, Jarvenpaa Vaccine Clin, Tampere, Finland.
    Avelino-Silva, Thiago Junquera
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Med, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Fernando Barba-Gomez, Jose
    Inst Dermatol Jalisco, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.
    Berglund, Johan
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Brotons Cuixart, Carlos
    EAP Sardenya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Caso, Covadonga
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Chlibek, Roman
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Choi, Won Suk
    Korea Univ, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Cunningham, Anthony L.
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Desole, Maria Guiseppina
    Serv Igiene Pubbl, Sassari, Italy.
    Eizenberg, Peter
    Doctors Ivanhoe, Ivanhoe, Australia.
    Esen, Meral
    Univ Clin Tubingen, Inst Tropenmed, Tubingen, Germany.
    Espie, Emmanuelle
    GSK, Brussels, Belgium.
    Gervais, Pierre
    Q&T Res Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
    Ghesquiere, Wayne
    Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Godeaux, Olivier
    GSK, Brussels, Belgium.
    Gorfinkel, Iris
    York Univ, N York, ON, Canada.
    Hui, David Shu Cheong
    Prince Wales Hosp, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Hwang, Shinn-Jang
    Taipei Vet Gen Hosp, Taipei, Taiwan;Natl Yang Ming Univ, Sch Med, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Korhonen, Tiina
    Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Vaccine Res Ctr, Tampere, Finland.
    Kovac, Martina
    GSK, New York, NY USA.
    Ledent, Edouard
    GSK, Rixensart, Belgium.
    Leung, Edward
    Hong Kong Assoc Gerontol, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Levin, Myron J.
    Univ Colorado, Anschutz Med Campus, Aurora, CO USA.
    Narejos Perez, Silvia
    CAP Centelles, Centelles, Spain.
    Neto, Jose Luiz
    Inst AZ Pesquisa & Ensino, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil.
    Pauksen, Karlis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Poder, Airi
    Kliiniliste Uuringute Keskus, Tartu, Estonia.
    Rodriguez de la Pinta, Maria Luisa
    Hosp Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, Spain.
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Schwarz, Tino F.
    Standort Juliusspital, Wurzburg, Germany.
    Smetana, Jan
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Staniscia, Tommaso
    Univ G dAnnunzio, Chieti, Italy.
    Tinoco, Juan Carlos
    Hosp Gen Durango, Durango, Mexico.
    Toma, Azhar
    Manna Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Vastiau, Ilse
    GSK, Ave Fleming 20, B-1300 Wavre, Belgium.
    Vesikari, Timo
    Univ Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Volpi, Antonio
    AO Univ Policlin Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Watanabe, Daisuke
    Kobe Univ, Grad Sch Med, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan.
    Weckx, Lily Yin
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Zahaf, Toufik
    GSK, Brussels, Belgium.
    Safety profile of the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine: Pooled analysis of two large randomised phase 3 trials2019In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 37, no 18, p. 2482-2493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ZOE-50 (NCT01165177) and ZOE-70 (NCT01165229) phase 3 clinical trials showed that the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) was >= 90% efficacious in preventing herpes zoster in adults. Here we present a comprehensive overview of the safety data from these studies.

    Methods: Adults aged >= 50 (ZOE-50) and >= 70 (ZOE-70) years were randomly vaccinated with RZV or placebo. Safety analyses were performed on the pooled total vaccinated cohort, consisting of participants receiving at least one dose of RZV or placebo. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were collected for 7 and 30 days after each vaccination, respectively. Serious AEs (SAEs) were collected from the first vaccination until 12 months post-last dose. Fatal AEs, vaccination-related SAEs, and potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs) were collected during the entire study period.

    Results: Safety was evaluated in 14,645 RZV and 14,660 placebo recipients. More RZV than placebo recipients reported unsolicited AEs (50.5% versus 32.0%); the difference was driven by transient injection site and solicited systemic reactions that were generally seen in the first week post-vaccination. The occurrence of overall SAEs (RZV: 10.1%; Placebo: 10.4%), fatal AEs (RZV: 4.3%; Placebo: 4.6%), and pIMDs (RZV: 1.2%; Placebo: 1.4%) was balanced between groups. The occurrence of possible exacerbations of pIMDs was rare and similar between groups. Overall, except for the expected local and systemic symptoms, the safety results were comparable between the RZV and Placebo groups irrespective of participant age, gender, or race.

    Conclusions: No safety concerns arose, supporting the favorable benefit-risk profile of RZV. 

  • 210.
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.;Cty Council Ostergotland, Rehab Vast, Motala, Sweden..
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.;Cty Council Sormland, Katrineholm, Sweden..
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Phys Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linkoping Univ, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    One- And Two-Year Follow-Up Of A Randomized Trial Of Neck Specific Exercise With Or Without A Behavioural Approach Compared With Prescription Of Physical Activity In Chronic Whiplash Disorder2016In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore whether neck-specific exercise, with or without a behavioural approach, has benefits after 1 and 2 years compared with prescribed physical activity regarding pain, self-rated functioning/disability, and self-efficacy in management of chronic whiplash. Design: Follow-up of a randomized, assessor blinded, clinical trial. Patients: A total of 216 volunteers with chronic whiplash associated disorders, grades 2 or 3. Methods: Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 exercise interventions: neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioural approach, or physical activity prescription. Self-rated pain (visual analogue scale), disability/functioning (Neck Disability Index/Patient Specific Functional Scale) and self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale) were evaluated after 1 and 2 years. Results: Both neck-specific exercise groups maintained more improvement regarding disability/functioning than the prescribed physical activity group at both time-points (p <= 0.02). At 1 year, 61% of subjects in the neck-specific group reported at least 50% pain reduction, compared with 26% of those in the physical activity prescription group (p < 0.001), but at 2 years the difference was not significant. Conclusion: After 1-2 years, participants with chronic whiplash who were randomized to neck-specific exercise, with or without a behavioural approach, remained more improved than participants who were prescribed general physical activity.

  • 211.
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Physiotherapy, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil, Cty Council Ostergotland, Rehab Vast, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Physiotherapy, Linkoping, Sweden .
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Physiotherapy, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Neck-specific exercise may reduce radiating pain and signs of neurological deficits in chronic whiplash: Analyses of a randomized clinical trial2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 12409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Up to 90% of people with neurological deficits following a whiplash injury do not recover and cervical muscle dysfunction is common. The aim of this multicentre, randomized controlled trial was to examine whether two versions of neck-specific exercise or prescription of physical activity (PPA) can improve radiating arm pain and clinical signs that can be associated with neurological deficits in people with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD). Participants with chronic WAD, arm symptoms and signs associated with neurological deficits (n = 171) were randomized to: 12 weeks of neck-specific exercise without (NSE) or with a behavioural approach (NSEB), or PPA. Pain/bothersomeness frequency, six measures of arm pain/paraesthesia (VAS scales), and four clinical neurological tests were evaluated after 3 months. The NSE group reported the lowest frequency and lowest levels of arm pain, the highest proportion of participants with at least 50% pain reduction and the highest proportion of normal arm muscle force. The NSEB group reported increased normal tendon reflexes. No improvements were recorded for the PPA group. Neck-specific exercise may improve arm pain and decrease signs of neurological deficits, but the addition of a behavioural approach does not seem to be of additional benefit.

  • 212. Ludvigsson, Maria Landén
    et al.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    O'Leary, Shaun
    Dedering, Asa
    Peolsson, Anneli
    The Effect of Neck-specific Exercise with, or without a Behavioral Approach, on Pain, Disability and Self-efficacy in Chronic Whiplash-associated Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 249-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:: The aim of this study was to compare the effect on self-rated pain, disability and self-efficacy of three interventions for the management of chronic Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD): physiotherapist-led neck-specific exercise, physiotherapist-led neck-specific exercise with the addition of a behavioral approach, or prescription of physical activity.

    METHODS:: Two hundred and sixteen volunteers with chronic WAD participated in this randomized, assessor blinded, clinical trial of three exercise interventions. Self-rated pain/pain bothersomeness (Visual Analogue Scale), disability (Neck Disability Index) and self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale) were evaluated at baseline and at three and six months.

    RESULTS:: The proportion of patients reaching substantial reduction in pain bothersomness (at least 50% reduction) was more evident (P<0.01) in the two neck-specific exercise groups (29-48%) compared to the prescription of physical activity group (5%) at three months. At six months 39-44% of the patients in the two neck-specific groups and 28% in the prescription of physical activity group reported substantial pain reduction. Reduction of disability was also larger in the two neck-specific exercise groups at both three and six months (P<0.02). Self-efficacy was only improved in the neck-specific exercise group without a behavioral approach (P=0.02). However there were no significant differences in any outcomes between the two physiotherapist-led neck-specific exercise groups.

    DISCUSSION:: Neck-specific exercise resulted in superior outcomes compared to prescription of physical activity in this study, but the observed benefits of adding a behavioral approach to the implementation of exercise in this study were inconclusive.

  • 213.
    Lyckner, S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Böregård, I-L
    Zetterlund, E-L
    Chew, M S
    Validation of the Swedish version of Quality of Recovery score -15: a multicentre, cohort study.2018In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Quality of recovery (QoR) after surgery is often focused on morbidity, mortality and physiological changes, while well-being and emotional state are other important aspects that are often ignored. QoR is poorly investigated in clinical settings and a psychometrically tested questionnaire, QoR-15, has recently been developed. QoR-15 has not been validated for Swedish conditions. The aim of this study was to translate, adapt and validate QoR-15 to Swedish conditions (QoR-15swe).

    METHODS: A translation and cultural adaption was performed resulting in a Swedish version of the instrument, QoR-15swe. Patients answered the QoR-15swe before surgery, 24 and 48 h after surgery. Feasibility, validity, reliability and responsiveness of the QoR-15swe were evaluated.

    RESULTS: The QoR-15swe was feasible in 85.5% of the eligible patients. Construct validity was good, with significant correlations between QoR-15swe score and, ASA-PS class, grade of surgery, length of surgery and time in the post-anaesthesia care unit. The instrument demonstrated good internal consistency with an inter-item Cronbach's α of 0.83-0.87, and inter-dimension Cronbach's α was acceptable 0.71-0.76. Test-retest repeatability was also good with Cronbach's alpha > 0.99 and an interclass correlation coefficient of 0.992 (CI: 0.981-0.997). There were no floor and ceiling effects. Responsiveness assessed by Cliff's effect size was -0.23 indicating a moderate ability to detect change at 24 h postoperatively.

    CONCLUSION: We have translated and culturally adapted the QoR-15 into Swedish. The score demonstrated acceptable validity, reliability and responsiveness. The QoR-15swe is a clinically acceptable and feasible outcome measure after surgery in a Swedish population.

  • 214.
    Lännerström, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Sick Leave Questions in Telephone Nursing: Perspectives of Persons on Sick Leave and Registered Nurses in Primary Health Care2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and methods: To explore experiences of being on sick leave by interviewing 16 persons on sick leave and using a phenomenological approach. To explore registered nurses’ work in the care of persons on sick leave by performing three focus group discussions with registered nurses. To explore the effect and experiences of an educational intervention in social insurance medicine with registered nurses by studying the effect of a randomized controlled study with 100 registered nurses and by interviewing 12 registered nurses who participated in the intervention.

    Findings: The essential meaning of being on long-term sick leave was losing one’s independence. This loss was connected to mostly negative experiences of being absent from work, the social insurance rules, and experiences in encounters with many professionals.

    The registered nurses’ work in handling sick leave questions included assessing, dispositioning, supporting, and collaborating actions. They expressed lacking competence, had different understandings of their role, and experienced stress connected to contradictory demands in their roles as carers, co-workers, and distributors of organizational resources.

    The short educational intervention in social insurance medicine seemed to have had an effect, but due to the small study population, the effect was inconclusive. The process evaluation showed that the educational intervention was perceived to have contributed to registered nurses gaining role clarity in their work with sick leave questions. The registered nurses described increasing their knowledge and skills as well as taking on more of the traditional actions related to telephone nursing, for example giving more information and being more attentive, coaching, and encouraging towards patients.

    Conclusions: Being on long-term sick leave can be experienced negatively, and can be connected to several dimensions of life. Registered nurses at the studied primary health care centres had a role in the care of patients on sick leave, but had different understandings of their role that affected how they handled telephone calls with them. The educational intervention failed to show a conclusive effect due to the rather small study population. However, the registered nurses experienced that participating had enhanced their competence.

    List of papers
    1. Losing independence: the lived experience of being long-term sick-listed
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Losing independence: the lived experience of being long-term sick-listed
    2013 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, p. 745-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sickness absence is a multifaceted problem. Much is known about risk factors for being long-term sick-listed, but there is still little known about the various aftermaths and experiences of it. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe, analyze and understand long-term sickness-absent people's experiences of being sick-listed.

    METHODS: The design was descriptive and had a phenomenological approach. Sixteen long-term sickness-absent individuals were purposively sampled from three municipalities in Sweden in 2011, and data were collected through semi-structured, individual interviews. The interview questions addressed how the participants experienced being sick-listed and how the sick-listing affected their lives. Transcribed interviews were analysed using Giorgi's phenomenological method.

    RESULTS: The interviews revealed that the participants' experiences of being sick-listed was that they lost their independence in the process of stepping out of working society, attending the mandatory steps in the rehabilitation chain and having numerous encounters with professionals. The participants described that their life-worlds were radically changed when they became sick-listed. Their experiences of their changing life-worlds were mostly highly negative, but there were also a few positive experiences. The most conspicuous findings were the fact that stopping working brought with it so many changes, the participants' feelings of powerlessness in the process, and their experiences of offensive treatment by and/or encounters with professionals.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sick-listed persons experienced the process of being on long-term sickness absent as very negative. The negative experiences are linked to consequences of stopping to work, consequences of social insurance rules and to negative encounters with professionals handling the sickness absence. The positive experiences of being sick-listed were few in the present study. There is a need to further examine the extent of these negative experiences are and how they affect sick-listed people's recovery and return to work. Long-term sickness absence; sick leave; experiences; interviews; phenomenology; Sweden.

    Keywords
    long-term sickness absence, sick leave, experiences, interviews, phenomenology, Sweden
    National Category
    Other Basic Medicine
    Research subject
    Family Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205547 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-13-745 (DOI)000323311900001 ()23938128 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-08-19 Created: 2013-08-19 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
    2. Nurses' experiences of managing sick-listing issues in telephone advisory services at primary health care centres
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' experiences of managing sick-listing issues in telephone advisory services at primary health care centres
    2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 857-863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Over the last decade Swedish health care has focused on improving the management of sick-listing issues. At primary health care centres sick-listing is mainly dealt with by the patient’s physician but when patients have requests related to sick-listing and contact the telephone advisory service nurses will be involved. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of managing sick-listing issues in telephone advisory services in a primary health care setting.

    Methods:

    The study was a qualitative focus group study. Data collection was conducted in three focus group conversations in a county in central Sweden in 2009. The conversations were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The study included fourteen nurses, purposively sampled as having current experience of telephone advisory services at primary health care centres.

    Findings:

    The management of sick-listing issues was described by the nurses as Nurses Actions which were affected by Enabling conditions and Obstructing conditions. The Nurses’ Actions included making an assessment for appropriate action, making an appointment and/or giving information and guidance to the patient and/or monitoring patient’s rights. Enabling conditions included documentation, routines, supportive co-operation and training in insurance medicine. The obstructing conditions were related to patients’ expectations, co-operation with other professionals, lack of training and the nurses’ professional role.

    Conclusion:

    The nurses experienced stress and difficulties related to being gatekeepers and related to the act of balancing different demands from patients, co-workers and the organisation. This in combination with the lack of training caused the nurses to state that they did not want responsibility for managing sick-listing issues. Sufficient documentation, education, routines, support of and discussions with other professionals at the primary health care centre could be ways of improving nurses’ and other professionals’ management of sick-listing issues.

    Keywords
    sick listing, telephone advisory services, primary health care, nursing, focus group, qualitative content analysis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-185457 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01093.x (DOI)000328140200010 ()
    Available from: 2012-11-25 Created: 2012-11-25 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
    3. The effect of a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine: A randomised controlled trial.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine: A randomised controlled trial.
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    General Practice
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362239 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2018-10-04
    4. Gaining role clarity in working with sick leave questions - Registered Nurses' experiences of an educational intervention
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gaining role clarity in working with sick leave questions - Registered Nurses' experiences of an educational intervention
    2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe how a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine was experienced by Registered Nurses and what changes it brought to their work with sick leave questions in telephone nursing.

    Design

    Qualitative explorative interview study.

    Methods

    Interviews with 12 purposively sampled Registered Nurses were conducted and analysed using manifest content analysis.

    Results

    The intervention increased Registered Nurses’ knowledge of the sick leave process and changed their work habits as they now have more of the skills needed to handle sick leave questions. In this way, they gained role clarity in their work with sick leave questions. The new knowledge included rules and regulations, actors’ roles and patients’ experiences. Learning from peers, reflecting and having the opportunity to ask questions were also described as increasing their knowledge. The skills following the participation were described as knowing what to say and do and knowing where to turn for support.

    Keywords
    cluster randomized controlled study, educational intervention, interviews, sick leave, social insurance medicine, telephone nursing
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361653 (URN)10.1002/nop2.201 (DOI)000461835600004 ()30918675 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
  • 215.
    Lännerström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Possible causes of experiencing problems with sick leave questions in telephone nursing2017In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 249-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Registered nurses at primary health care centres in Sweden receive about 20 million telephone calls annually. Questions related to sick leave occur regularly. Previous studies conclude that those calls often are perceived as problematic. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with problems regarding sick leave questions in telephone nursing.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all registered nurses (n = 185) working with telephone nursing in 26 Swedish primary health care centres, of whom 114 (61.6%) responded. Based on the results of a Spearman correlation analysis a logistic regression analysis was performed of significant exposure variables on outcome (perceived problems).

    RESULTS: Significant exposure variables were: experience of telephone nursing, age, being educated in social insurance medicine, and frequency of telephone calls with sick leave questions. Young age was associated with more problems than old age. Those having education in social insurance medicine reported fewer problems than those who had not, and so did those having few telephone calls with sick leave questions as compared with those who had many.

    CONCLUSIONS: Young age, lack of education in insurance medicine, and high frequency of sick leave questions increased the perceived problem level in telephone nursing.

  • 216.
    Lännerström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Mälardalens Högskola, Akademien för hälsa, vård och välfärd Mälardalen University School of health, care and social welfare.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    The effect of a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine: A randomised controlled trial.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Lännerström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    von Celsing, Anna-Sophia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Holmström, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Registered nurses' work with sick leave questions by telephone in primary health care2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 5/6, p. 641-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To describe registered nurses' work with sick leave questions by telephone.

    BACKGROUND:

    In Sweden, when a sick person needs to request a sickness certification, it is common to contact the primary healthcare centre. The main access to primary health care is by telephone, with a registered nurse answering the care seeker's questions, triaging and helping care seekers to the right level of care. Registered nurses' work with sick leave questions has not been studied, except for two qualitative interview studies.

    DESIGN:

    A descriptive cross-sectional study.

    METHODS:

    A questionnaire with 120 questions was distributed to 185 registered nurses in one county in central Sweden. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis.

    RESULTS:

    Response rate was 62% (n = 114). Registered nurses (n = 105) in this study talked weekly to persons on, or at risk, for sick leave. A large part (n = 78) felt they had a role in the care of persons on sick leave, consisting of booking appointments as well as acting as a pilot, advisor, caretaker and coordinator. For 74 of 114 registered nurses, it was problematic to handle the phone calls weekly. Measures were 'often' booking appointments with physicians (n = 67) and 'seldom' providing information on social insurance rules ('never' n = 51). The registered nurses expressed a great need for more education.

    CONCLUSION:

    Registered nurses in this study reported having a role in the care of persons on sick leave when handling sick leave questions by telephone. The telephone calls were problematic to handle, and the registered nurses expressed a great need for education and training in social insurance medicine.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    There is a need to educate and train registered nurses in social insurance medicine to provide high-quality nursing for patients on or at risk for sick leave.

  • 218.
    Lännerström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Holmström, Inger K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Losing independence: the lived experience of being long-term sick-listed2013In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, p. 745-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sickness absence is a multifaceted problem. Much is known about risk factors for being long-term sick-listed, but there is still little known about the various aftermaths and experiences of it. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe, analyze and understand long-term sickness-absent people's experiences of being sick-listed.

    METHODS: The design was descriptive and had a phenomenological approach. Sixteen long-term sickness-absent individuals were purposively sampled from three municipalities in Sweden in 2011, and data were collected through semi-structured, individual interviews. The interview questions addressed how the participants experienced being sick-listed and how the sick-listing affected their lives. Transcribed interviews were analysed using Giorgi's phenomenological method.

    RESULTS: The interviews revealed that the participants' experiences of being sick-listed was that they lost their independence in the process of stepping out of working society, attending the mandatory steps in the rehabilitation chain and having numerous encounters with professionals. The participants described that their life-worlds were radically changed when they became sick-listed. Their experiences of their changing life-worlds were mostly highly negative, but there were also a few positive experiences. The most conspicuous findings were the fact that stopping working brought with it so many changes, the participants' feelings of powerlessness in the process, and their experiences of offensive treatment by and/or encounters with professionals.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sick-listed persons experienced the process of being on long-term sickness absent as very negative. The negative experiences are linked to consequences of stopping to work, consequences of social insurance rules and to negative encounters with professionals handling the sickness absence. The positive experiences of being sick-listed were few in the present study. There is a need to further examine the extent of these negative experiences are and how they affect sick-listed people's recovery and return to work. Long-term sickness absence; sick leave; experiences; interviews; phenomenology; Sweden.

  • 219.
    Lännerström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, Sweden.
    Gaining role clarity in working with sick leave questions - Registered Nurses' experiences of an educational intervention2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe how a short educational intervention in social insurance medicine was experienced by Registered Nurses and what changes it brought to their work with sick leave questions in telephone nursing.

    Design

    Qualitative explorative interview study.

    Methods

    Interviews with 12 purposively sampled Registered Nurses were conducted and analysed using manifest content analysis.

    Results

    The intervention increased Registered Nurses’ knowledge of the sick leave process and changed their work habits as they now have more of the skills needed to handle sick leave questions. In this way, they gained role clarity in their work with sick leave questions. The new knowledge included rules and regulations, actors’ roles and patients’ experiences. Learning from peers, reflecting and having the opportunity to ask questions were also described as increasing their knowledge. The skills following the participation were described as knowing what to say and do and knowing where to turn for support.

  • 220.
    Lövvik, Tone S.
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Trondheim, Norway.
    Carlsen, Sven M.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Trondheim, Norway.
    Salvesen, Öyvind
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, Trondheim, Norway.
    Steffensen, Berglind
    Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bixo, Marie
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Gomez-Real, Francisco
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.
    Lönnebotn, Marianne
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Bergen, Norway.
    Hestvold, Kristin, V
    Vestre Viken Hosp Trust, Womens Clin, Drammen, Norway.
    Zabielska, Renata
    Vestfold Hosp Trust, Womens Clin, Tonsberg, Norway.
    Hirschberg, Angelica L.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Reprod Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Trouva, Anastasia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thorarinsdottir, Solveig
    Telemark Hosp Trust, Womens Clink, Skien, Norway.
    Hjelle, Sissel
    Alesund Hosp, Womens Clin, Alesund, Norway.
    Berg, Ann Hilde
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Womens Clink, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Andrae, Frida
    Nordlands Hosp Trust, Womens Clin, Bodo, Norway.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Mohlin, Johanna
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Umea, Sweden;Sadersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Underdal, Maria
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Trondheim, Norway.
    Vanky, Eszter
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Trondheim, Norway.
    Use of metformin to treat pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PregMet2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial2019In: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, E-ISSN 2213-8595, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 256-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of pregnancy complications. Epi-analysis of two previous randomised controlled trials that compared metformin with placebo during pregnancy in women with PCOS showed a significant reduction in late miscarriages and preterm births in the metformin group. The aim of this third randomised trial (PregMet2) was to test the hypothesis that metformin prevents late miscarriage and preterm birth in women with PCOS.

    Methods: PregMet2 was a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicentre trial done at 14 hospitals in Norway, Sweden, and Iceland. Singleton pregnant women with PCOS aged 18-45 years were eligible for inclusion. After receiving information about the study at their first antenatal visit or from the internet, women signed up individually to participate in the study. Participants were randomly assigned (1: 1) to receive metformin or placebo by computer-generated random numbers. Randomisation was in blocks of ten for each country and centre; the first block had a random size between one and ten to assure masking. Participants were assigned to receive oral metformin 500 mg twice daily or placebo during the first week of treatment, which increased to 1000 mg twice daily or placebo from week 2 until delivery. Placebo tablets and metformin tablets were identical and participants and study personnel were masked to treatment allocation. The primary outcome was the composite incidence of late miscarriage (between week 13 and week 22 and 6 days) and preterm birth (between week 23 and week 36 and 6 days), analysed in the intention-to-treat population. Secondary endpoints included the incidence of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and admission of the neonate to the neonatal intensive care unit. We also did a post-hoc individual participant data analysis of pregnancy outcomes, pooling data from the two previous trials with the present study. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials. gov, number NCT01587378, and EudraCT, number 2011-002203-15.

    Findings: The study took place between Oct 19, 2012, and Sept 1, 2017. We randomly assigned 487 women to metformin (n=244) or placebo (n=243). In the intention-to-treat analysis, our composite primary outcome of late miscarriage and preterm birth occurred in 12 (5%) of 238 women in the metformin group and 23 (10%) of 240 women in the placebo group (odds ratio [OR] 0.50, 95% CI 0.22- 1.08; p = 0.08). We found no significant differences for our secondary endpoints, including incidence of gestational diabetes (60 [25%] of 238 women in the metformin group vs 57 [24%] of 240 women in the placebo group; OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.69-1.66; p=0.75). We noted no substantial between-group differences in serious adverse events in either mothers or offspring, and no serious adverse events were considered drug-related by principal investigators. In the post-hoc pooled analysis of individual participant data from the present trial and two previous trials, 18 (5%) of 397 women had late miscarriage or preterm delivery in the metformin group ]compared with 40 (10%) of 399 women in the placebo group (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.23-0.79; p=0.004). Interpretation In pregnant women with PCOS, metformin treatment from the late first trimester until delivery might reduce the risk of late miscarriage and preterm birth, but does not prevent gestational diabetes. 

  • 221. Mahindra, Anuj
    et al.
    Raval, Girindra
    Mehta, Paulette
    Brazauskas, Ruta
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Zhong, Xiaobo
    Bird, Jennifer M
    Freytes, César O
    Hale, Gregory A
    Herzig, Roger
    Holmberg, Leona A
    Kamble, Rammurti T
    Kumar, Shaji
    Lazarus, Hillard M
    Majhail, Navneet S
    Marks, David I
    Moreb, Jan S
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Saber, Wael
    Savani, Bipin N
    Schiller, Gary J
    Tay, Jason
    Vogl, Dan T
    Waller, Edmund K
    Wiernik, Peter H
    Wirk, Baldeep
    Lonial, Sagar
    Krishnan, Amrita Y
    Dispenzieri, Angela
    Brandenburg, Nancy A
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Hari, Parameswaran
    New Cancers after Autotransplantations for Multiple Myeloma2015In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 738-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe baseline incidence and risk factors for new cancers in 4161 persons receiving autotransplants for multiple myeloma in the United States from 1990 to 2010. Observed incidence of invasive new cancers was compared with expected incidence relative to the US population. The cohort represented 13,387 person-years at-risk. In total, 163 new cancers were observed, for a crude incidence rate of 1.2 new cancers per 100 person-years and cumulative incidences of 2.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.09 to 3.17), 4.2% (95% CI, 3.49 to 5.00), and 6.1% (95% CI, 5.08 to 7.24) at 3, 5, and 7 years, respectively. The incidence of new cancers in the autotransplantation cohort was similar to age-, race-, and gender-adjusted comparison subjects with an observed/expected (O/E) ratio of 1.00 (99% CI, .81 to 1.22). However, acute myeloid leukemia and melanoma were observed at higher than expected rates with O/E ratios of 5.19 (99% CI, 1.67 to 12.04; P = .0004), and 3.58 (99% CI, 1.82 to 6.29; P < .0001), respectively. Obesity, older age, and male gender were associated with increased risks of new cancers in multivariate analyses. This large data set provides a baseline for comparison and defines the histologic type specific risk for new cancers in patients with MM receiving postautotransplantation therapies, such as maintenance.

  • 222. Malki, Ninoa
    et al.
    Hägg, Sara
    Tiikkaja, Sanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Sparén, Pär
    Ploner, Alexander
    Short-term and long-term case-fatality rates for myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke by socioeconomic position and sex: a population-based cohort study in Sweden, 1990-1994 and 2005-2009.2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e026192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Case-fatality rates (CFRs) for myocardial infarction (MI) and ischaemic stroke (IS) have decreased over time due to better prevention, medication and hospital care. It is unclear whether these improvements have been equally distributed according to socioeconomic position (SEP) and sex. The aim of this study is to analyse differences in short-term and long-term CFR for MI and IS by SEP and sex between the periods 1990-1994 to 2005-2009 for the entire Swedish population.

    DESIGN: Population-based cohort study based on Swedish national registers.

    METHODS: We used logistic regression and flexible parametric models to estimate short-term CFR (death before reaching the hospital or on the disease event day) and long-term CFR (1 year case-fatality conditional on surviving short-term) across five distinct SEP groups, as well as CFR differences (CFRDs) between SEP groups for both MI and IS from 1990-1994 to 2005-2009. : Result S: Overall short-term CFR for both MI and IS decreased between study periods. For MI, differences in short-term and long-term CFR between the least and most favourable SEP group were generally stable, except in long-term CFR among women; intermediate SEP groups mostly managed to catch up with the most favourable SEP group. For IS, short-term CFRD generally decreased compared with the most favourable group; but long-term CFRD were mostly stable, except for an increase for older subjects.

    CONCLUSION: Despite a general decline in CFR for MI and IS across all SEP groups and both sexes as well as some reductions in CFRD, we found persistent and even increasing CFRD among the least advantaged SEP groups, older patients and women. We speculate that targeted prevention rather than treatment strategies have the potential to reduce these inequalities.

  • 223. Marks, David I
    et al.
    Woo, Kwang Ahn
    Zhong, Xiaobo
    Appelbaum, Frederick R
    Bachanova, Veronika
    Barker, Juliet N
    Brunstein, Claudio G
    Gibson, John
    Kebriaei, Partow
    Lazarus, Hillard M
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Perales, Miguel-Angel
    Pidala, Joseph
    Savani, Bipin
    Rocha, Vanderson
    Eapen, Mary
    Unrelated umbilical cord blood transplant for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first and second complete remission: a comparison with allografts from adult unrelated donors.2014In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 322-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation has an established role in the treatment of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose survival when recipients of grafts from adult unrelated donors approaches that of recipients of grafts from sibling donors. Our aim was to determine the role of mismatched unrelated cord blood grafts in transplantation for 802 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first or second complete remission. Using Cox regression we compared outcomes after 116 mismatched single or double cord blood transplants, 546 peripheral blood progenitor cell transplants and 140 bone marrow transplants. The characteristics of the recipients and their diseases were similar except cord blood recipients were younger, more likely to be non-Caucasians and more likely to have a low white blood cell count at diagnosis. There were differences in donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen-match depending on the source of the graft. Most adult donor transplants were matched at the allele-level considering human leukocyte antigens-A, -B, -C and -DRB1. In contrast, most cord blood transplants were mismatched and considered antigen-level matching; 57% were mismatched at two loci and 29% at one locus whereas only 29% of adult donor transplants were mismatched at one locus and none at two loci. There were no differences in the 3-year probabilities of survival between recipients of cord blood (44%), matched adult donor (44%) and mismatched adult donor (43%) transplants. Cord blood transplants engrafted slower and were associated with less grade 2-4 acute but similar chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse, and transplant-related mortality. The survival of cord blood graft recipients was similar to that of recipients of matched or mismatched unrelated adult donor grafts and so cord blood should be considered a valid alternative source of stem cells for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the absence of a matched unrelated adult donor.

  • 224.
    Marusik, C
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frykholm, C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ericson, Katharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Diagnosis of Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia with a focus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)2017In: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0960-7692, E-ISSN 1469-0705, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 410-412Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Mauri, Davide
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece.
    Zafeiri, Georgia
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece.
    Yerolatsite, Melina
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece.
    Tsali, Lampriani
    Gen Hosp Arta, Dept Internal Med, Arta, Greece.
    Zarkavelis, Georgios
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece.
    Tsiare, Anna
    Alexandra Gen Hosp, Dept Med Oncol, Athens, Greece.
    Polyzos, Nikolaos P.
    Hosp Univ Dexeus, Barcelona, Spain.
    Valachis, Antonis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Kalopita, Konastantina
    Alexandra Gen Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol & Pain Med, Athens, Greece.
    Kampletsas, Eleftherios
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece.
    Papadaki, Alexandra
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece;EMEKEN, Ioannina, Greece.
    Peponi, Evangelia
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Radiotherapy, Ioannina, Greece.
    Kapoulitsa, Fani
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece.
    Filis, Panagiotis
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece.
    Pentheroudakis, Georgios
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Dept Med Oncol, Ioannina 45500, Greece;EMEKEN, Ioannina, Greece.
    Global coverage and consistency of guideline recommendations for cancer cachexia on the Web in 2011 and 20182019In: Contemporary Oncology / Wspólczesna Onkologia, ISSN 1428-2526, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Cancer cachexia is a common associate of cancer and has a negative impact on both patients' quality of life and overall survival. Nonetheless its management remains suboptimal in clinical practice. Provision of medical recommendations in websites is of extreme importance for medical decision making and translating evidence into clinical practice. Aim of the study: To scrutinize the magnitude, consistency and changes over time of cancer-cachexia recommendations for physicians on the Web among oncology related societies. Intercontinental, continental, national and socioeconomic variations were further analyzed. Material and methods: Web identification of oncology related societies and prospective analyses of relative Web guideline recommendations for physicians on cancer-cachexia at different time-points. Results: In June 2011, we scrutinized 144,000 Web pages. We identified 275 societies, of which 270 were eligible for analyses: 67 were international (African, American, Asian, European, Oceania and Intercontinental), 109 belonged to the top 10 countries with the highest development index and 94 pertained to 10 countries with a long lasting tradition in medical oncology. Conclusions: The magnitude of cancer cachexia recommendations for physicians on the Web at a global level was scant both for coverage and consistency, and at any time-point considered: 3.7% (10/270) in 2011 and 8.1% (22/270) in 2018. The proportion of societies giving evidence-based and updated recommendations for cancer cachexia for physicians was only 1.1% (3/270) in 2011 and 2.96% (8/270) in 2018. Continent, national highest developmental index, oncology tradition and economic-geographic areas were not found to influence Web guideline provision.

  • 226. McClune, Brian L.
    et al.
    Ahn, Kwang Woo
    Wang, Hai-Lin
    Antin, Joseph H.
    Artz, Andrew S.
    Cahn, Jean-Yves
    Deol, Abhinav
    Freytes, Cesar O.
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Holmberg, Leona A.
    Jagasia, Madan H.
    Jakubowski, Ann A.
    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Miller, Alan M.
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Pedersen, Tanya L.
    Pidala, Joseph
    Pulsipher, Michael A.
    Rowe, Jacob M.
    Saber, Wael
    van Besien, Koen W.
    Waller, Edmund K.
    Aljurf, Mahmoud D.
    Akpek, Goergun
    Bacher, Ulrike
    Chao, Nelson J.
    Chen, Yi-Bin
    Cooper, Brenda W.
    Dehn, Jason
    de Lima, Marcos J.
    Hsu, Jack W.
    Lewis, Ian D.
    Marks, David I.
    McGuirk, Joseph
    Cairo, Mitchell S.
    Schouten, Harry C.
    Szer, Jeffrey
    Ramanathan, Muthalagu
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Seftel, Matthew
    Socie, Gerard
    Vij, Ravi
    Warlick, Erica D.
    Weisdorf, Daniel J.
    Allotransplantation for Patients Age >= 40 Years with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Encouraging Progression-Free Survival2014In: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 960-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) disproportionately affects older patients, who do not often undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We analyzed Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data on 1248 patients age >= 40 years receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning HCT for aggressive (n = 668) or indolent (n = 580) NHL Aggressive lymphoma was more frequent in the oldest cohort 49% for age 40 to 54 versus 57% for age 55 to 64 versus 67% for age >= 65; P = .0008). Fewer patients aged >= 65 had previous autografting (26% versus 24% versus 9%; P = .002). Rates of relapse, acute and chronic GVHD, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year post-HCT were similar in the 3 age cohorts (22% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19% to 26%] for age 40 to 54, 27% [95% CI, 23% to 31%] for age 55 to 64, and 34% [95% CI, 24% to 44%] for age >= 65. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years was slightly lower in the older cohorts (OS: 54% [95% CI, 50% to 58%] for age 40 to 54; 40% [95% CI, 36% to 44%] for age 55 to 64, and 39% [95% CI, 28% to 50%] for age >= 65; P < .0001). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant effect of age on the incidence of acute or chronic GVHD or relapse. Age >= 55 years, Karnofsky Performance Status <80, and HLA mismatch adversely affected NRM, PFS, and OS. Disease status at HCT, but not histological subtype, was associated with worse NRM, relapse, PFS, and OS. Even for patients age >= 55 years, OS still approached 40% at 3 years, suggesting that HCT affects long-term remission and remains underused in qualified older patients with NHL.

  • 227. Medina, Doris M Rivera
    et al.
    Valencia, Alejandra
    de Velasquez, Alet
    Huang, Li-Min
    Prymula, Roman
    García-Sicilia, Jose
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    David, Marie Pierre P
    Descamps, Dominique
    Hardt, Karin
    Dubin, Gary
    Safety and immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine: a randomized, controlled trial in adolescent girls2010In: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    Immunization of girls against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types before sexual debut is important for cervical cancer prevention. This phase III blinded, randomized, controlled trial in adolescent girls assessed safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine.

    METHODS:

    Girls (mean age 12 years) in 12 countries received the HPV-16/18 L1 virus-like particle AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (N = 1,035) or hepatitis A virus vaccine as control (N = 1,032) at 0, 1, and 6 months. The primary objective was to compare the occurrence of serious adverse events (SAEs) between groups. HPV-16 and HPV-18 antibody titers were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay post-vaccination.

    RESULTS:

    Up to study month 7, 11 girls in the HPV-16/18 vaccine group reported 14 SAEs and 13 girls in the control group reported 15 SAEs. The difference in SAE incidence between groups was .20% (95% CI, -.78, 1.20). No SAE in the HPV-16/18 vaccine group was considered related to vaccination or led to withdrawal. The incidence of solicited local and general symptoms up to 7 days post-vaccination was moderately higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine than with control. The incidence of unsolicited symptoms, new onset of chronic diseases, and medically significant conditions was similar between groups. All girls seroconverted for both antigens after three doses of the HPV-16/18 vaccine; geometric mean titers were 19,882.0 and 8,262.0 EU/mL for anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies, respectively, in initially seronegative girls.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine was generally well tolerated and immunogenic when administered to young adolescent females, the primary target of organized vaccination programs.

  • 228.
    Mehta, Rohtesh S.
    et al.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Div Canc Med, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Holtan, Shernan G.
    Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Wang, Tao
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA;Med Coll Wisconsin, Div Biostat, Inst Hlth & Equ, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Hemmer, Michael T.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Spellman, Stephen R.
    Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Be Match Natl Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Arora, Mukta
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Med, Med Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, Box 736 UMHC, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Couriel, Daniel R.
    Utah Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Alousi, Amin M.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Div Canc Med, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Pidala, Joseph
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA.
    Abdel-Azim, Hisham
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Ahmed, Ibrahim
    Childrens Mercy Hosp & Clin, Dept Hematol Oncol & Bone Marrow Transplantat, Kansas City, MO USA.
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Dept Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Askar, Medhat
    Baylor Univ, Med Ctr, Dallas, TX USA.
    Auletta, Jeffery J.
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Div Hematol Oncol Bone Marrow Transplantat, Columbus, OH USA;Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Columbus, OH USA;Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Host Def Program, Columbus, OH USA.
    Bhatt, Vijaya
    Nebraska Med Ctr, Omaha, NE USA.
    Bredeson, Christopher
    Ottawa Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Ottawa, ON, Canada;Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Chhabra, Saurabh
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Gadalla, Shahinaz
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Clin Genet Branch, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Gajewski, James
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA.
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Hematol Res Ctr, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, London, England.
    Gergis, Usama
    New York Presbyterian Hosp, Dept Med Oncol, Hematol Malignancies & Bone Marrow Transplant, Weill Cornell Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Hematti, Peiman
    Univ Wisconsin Hosp & Clin, Div Hematol Oncol Bone Marrow Transplantat, Dept Med, Madison, WI 53792 USA.
    Hildebrandt, Gerhard C.
    Univ Kentucky, Markey Canc Ctr, Lexington, KY USA.
    Inamoto, Yoshihiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Hematopoiet Stem Cell Transplantat, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kitko, Carrie
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA.
    Khandelwal, Pooja
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA.
    MacMillan, Margaret L.
    Univ Minnesota, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Majhail, Navneet
    Cleveland Clin, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Taussig Canc Inst, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Marks, David, I
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England.
    Mehta, Parinda
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA.
    Nishihori, Taiga
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA.
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pawarode, Attaphol
    Univ Michigan, Sch Med, Dept Internal Med, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program,Div Hematol O, Ann Arbor, MI USA.
    Diaz, Miguel Angel
    Hosp Infantil Univ Nino Jesus, Dept Hematol Oncol, Madrid, Spain.
    Prestidge, Tim
    Starship Childrens Hosp, Blood & Canc Ctr, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Qayed, Muna
    Emory Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Rangarajan, Hemalatha
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Columbus, OH USA.
    Ringden, Olle
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saad, Ayman
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA.
    Seo, Sachiko
    Natl Canc Res Ctr East, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Chiba, Japan.
    Shah, Ami
    Lucille Packard Childrens Hosp, Stanford Sch Med, Div Stem Cell Transplantat & Regenerat Med, Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA.
    Shah, Niketa
    Yale New Haven Med Ctr, 20 York St, New Haven, CT 06504 USA.
    Schultz, Kirk R.
    Univ British Columbia, British Columbias Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol & Bone Marrow Transplan, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Solh, Melhem
    Northside Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Grp Georgia, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Spitzer, Thomas
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Szer, Jeffrey
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Dept Clin Haematol & Bone Marrow Transplantat, Parkville, Vic, Australia.
    Teshima, Takanori
    Kyushu Univ Hosp, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.
    Verdonck, Leo F.
    Isala Clin, Dept Hematol Oncol, Zwolle, Netherlands.
    Williams, Kirsten M.
    Childrens Natl Hlth Syst, Childrens Res Inst, Washington, DC USA.
    Wirk, Baldeep
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA.
    Wagner, John
    Thomas Jefferson Univ, Dept Med Oncol, Philadelphia, PA 19107 USA.
    Yared, Jean A.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Med, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, Div Hematol Oncol, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.
    Weisdorf, Daniel J.
    Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    GRFS and CRFS in alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for pediatric patients with acute leukemia2019In: BLOOD ADVANCES, ISSN 2473-9529, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1441-1449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-free relapse-free survival (GRFS) (a composite end point of survival without grade III-IV acute GVHD [aGVHD], systemic therapy-requiring chronic GVHD [cGVHD], or relapse) and cGVHD-free relapse-free survival (CRFS) among pediatric patients with acute leukemia (n = 1613) who underwent transplantation with 1 antigen-mismatched (7/8) bone marrow (BM; n = 172) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 1441). Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards models. To account for multiple testing, P < .01 for the donor/graft variable was considered statistically significant. Clinical characteristics were similar between UCB and 7/8 BM recipients, because most had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (62%), 64% received total body irradiation-based conditioning, and 60% received anti-thymocyte globulin or alemtuzumab. Methotrexate-based GVHD prophylaxis was more common with 7/8 BM (79%) than with UCB (15%), in which mycophenolate mofetil was commonly used. The univariate estimates of GRFS and CRFS were 22% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16-29) and 27% (95% CI, 20-34), respectively, with 7/8 BM and 33% (95% CI, 31-36) and 38% (95% CI, 35-40), respectively, with UCB (P < .001). In multivariate analysis, 7/8 BM vs UCB had similar GRFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% CI, 0.87-1.45; P = .39), CRFS (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.82-1.38; P = .66), overall survival (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.80-1.44; P = .66), and relapse (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.03-2.02; P = .03). However, the 7/8 BM group had a significantly higher risk for grade III-IV aGVHD (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.16-2.48; P = .006) compared with the UCB group. UCB and 7/8 BM groups had similar outcomes, as measured by GRFS and CRFS. However, given the higher risk for grade III-IV aGVHD, UCB might be preferred for patients lacking matched donors.

  • 229. Menditto, Enrica
    et al.
    Costa, Elisio
    Midão, Luis
    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia
    Novellino, Ettore
    Bialek, Slawomir
    Briedis, Vitalis
    Mair, Alpana
    Rajabian-Soderlund, Rojin
    Arnavielhe, Sylvie
    Bedbrook, Anna
    Czarlewski, Wienczyslawa
    Annesi-Maesano, Isabella
    Anto, Josep M.
    Devillier, Philippe
    De Vries, Govert
    Keil, Thomas
    Sheikh, Aziz
    Orlando, Valentina
    Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée
    Cecchi, Lorenzo
    De Feo, Giulia
    Illario, M.
    Stellato, Christiana
    Fonseca, Joao
    Malva, Joao
    Morais-Almeida, Mario
    Pereira, Ana Maria
    Todo-Bom, Ana Maria
    Kvedariene, Violeta
    Valiulis, Arunas
    Bergmann, Karl Christian
    Klimek, Ludger
    Mösges, Ralph
    Pfaar, Oliver
    Zuberbier, Torsten
    Cardona, Vicky
    Mullol, Joaquim
    Papadopoulos, Nikos G.
    Prokopakis, Emmanuel P.
    Bewick, Mike
    Ryan, Dermot
    Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina E.
    Tomazic, Peter Valentin
    Cruz, Alvaro A.
    Kuna, Piotr
    Samolinski, Boleslaw
    Fokkens, Wytske J.
    Reitsma, Sietze
    Bosse, Isabelle
    Fontaine, Jean-François
    Laune, Daniel
    Haahtela, Tari
    Toppila-Salmi, Sanna
    Bachert, Claus
    Hellings, Peter W.
    Melén, Erik
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten
    Eller, Esben
    O'Hehir, Robyn E.
    Cingi, Cemal
    Gemicioğlu, Bilun
    Kalayci, Omer
    Ivancevich, Juan Carlos
    Bousquet, Jean
    Adherence to treatment in allergic rhinitis using mobile technology: the MASK Study2019In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 442-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mobile technology may help to better understand the adherence to treatment MASK-rhinitis (Mobile Airways Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) is a patient-centered ICT system. A mobile phone app (the Allergy Diary) central to MASK is available in 22 countries.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the adherence to treatment in allergic rhinitis patients using the Allergy Diary App.

    METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study was carried out on all users who filled in the Allergy Diary from January 1, 2016 to August 1, 2017. Secondary adherence was assessed by using the modified Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) and the Proportion of days covered (PDC) approach.

    RESULTS: 12,143 users were registered. 6,949 users reported at least one VAS data recording. Among them, 1,887 users reported ≥ 7 VAS data. 1,195 subjects were included in the analysis of adherence. 136 (11.28%) users were adherent (MPR ≥70% and PDC ≤ 1.25), 51 (4.23%) were partly adherent (MPR ≥70% and PDC =1.50) and 176 (14.60%) were switchers. On the other hand, 832 (69.05%) users were non-adherent to medications (MPR<70%). Of those, the largest group was non-adherent to medications and the time interval was increased in 442 (36.68%) users.

    CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Adherence to treatment is low. The relative efficacy of continuous versus on-demand treatment for AR symptoms is still a matter of debate.This study shows an approach for measuring retrospective adherence based on a mobile app. This represent a novel approach also for analyzing medication taking behavior in a real-world setting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 230. Merisson, Edyta
    et al.
    Mattsson, Niklas
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Blennow, Kaj
    Pikwer, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Mehmedagic, Irma
    Acosta, Stefan
    Åkeson, Jonas
    Total-tau and neurofilament light in CSF reflect spinal cord ischaemia after endovascular aortic repair2016In: Neurochemistry International, ISSN 0197-0186, E-ISSN 1872-9754, Vol. 93, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Repair of extensive aortic disease may be associated with spinal cord ischaemia (SCI). Here we test if levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for neuronal injury are altered in patients with SCI after advanced endovascular repair of extensive aortic disease.

    METHODS: CSF was sampled for up to 48 hours in ten patients undergoing endovascular aortic repair and analyzed for the axonal damage markers total-tau (T-tau) and neurofilament light (NFL).

    RESULTS: Six of ten patients developed SCI (clinically present within 3-6 hours). CSF levels of NFL increased up to 37-fold in patients with, but were stable in patients without, SCI. CSF levels of T-tau also increased in patients with SCI, but with some overlap with patients without SCI. Levels of NFL and T-tau did not increase until after the appearance of neurological symptoms (12-48 h after aortic repair).

    CONCLUSIONS: The CSF biomarkers NFL and T-tau both reflect development of SCI after endovascular aortic repair, but do not rise until after clinical signs of SCI appear. Future studies are desirable to identify earlier biomarkers of SCI.

  • 231.
    Mero, Sointu
    et al.
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Div Clin Microbiol, HUSLAB, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kirveskari, Juha
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Div Clin Microbiol, HUSLAB, Helsinki, Finland..
    Antikainen, Jenni
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Div Clin Microbiol, HUSLAB, Helsinki, Finland..
    Ursing, Johan
    Danderyd Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.;Indepth Network, Bandim Hlth Project, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.;Sormland Cty Council, Ctr Clin Res, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Kofoed, Poul-Erik
    Indepth Network, Bandim Hlth Project, Bissau, Guinea Bissau.;Kolding Hosp IRS Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Paediat, Kolding, Denmark..
    Kantele, Anu
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Helsinki, Clin Infect Dis, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Multiplex PCR detection of Cryptosporidium sp, Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica directly from dried stool samples from Guinea-Bissauan children with diarrhoea2017In: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 655-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In developing countries, diarrhoea is the most common cause of death for children under five years of age, with Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium and Entamoeba histolytica as the most frequent pathogenic parasites. Traditional microscopy for stool parasites has poor sensitivity and specificity, while new molecular methods may provide more accurate diagnostics. In poor regions with sample storage hampered by uncertain electricity supply, research would benefit from a method capable of analysing dried stools. Methods: A real-time multiplex PCR method with internal inhibition control was developed for detecting Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium hominis/parvum and Entamoeba histolytica directly from stool specimens. Applicability to dried samples was checked by comparing with fresh ones in a small test material. Finally, the assay was applied to dried specimens collected from Guinea-Bissauan children with diarrhoea. Results: The PCR's analytical sensitivity limit was 0.1 ng/ml for G. lamblia DNA, 0.01 ng/ml for E. histolytica DNA and 0.1 ng/ml for Cryptosporidium sp. In the test material, the assay performed similarly with fresh and dried stools. Of the 52 Guinea-Bissauan samples, local microscopy revealed a parasite in 15%, while PCR detected 62% positive for at least one parasite: 44% of the dried samples had Giardia, 23% Cryptosporidium and 0% E. histolytica. Conclusions: Our new multiplex real-time PCR for protozoa presents a sensitive method applicable to dried samples. As proof of concept, it worked well on stools collected from Guinea-Bissauan children with diarrhoea. It provides an epidemiological tool for analysing dried specimens from regions poor in resources.

  • 232.
    Michelis, Fotios V.
    et al.
    Princes Margaret Canc Ctr, Allogene Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Gupta, Vikas
    Princes Margaret Canc Ctr, Allogene Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Wang, Hai-Lin
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Bacher, Ulrike
    Univ Med Gottingen, Dept Hematol Oncol, Gottingen, Germany.;Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg, Interdisciplinary Clin Stem Cell Transplantat, Hamburg, Germany..
    Beitinjaneh, Amer
    Univ Miami, Miami, FL USA..
    Chen, Yi-Bin
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    DeFilipp, Zachariah
    Emory Univ Hosp, 1364 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Kebriaei, Partow
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Div Canc Med, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Univ Hosp, Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oran, Betul
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England.;Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Div Canc Med, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Rashidi, Armin
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Oncol, St Louis, MO USA..
    Rizzieri, David A.
    Duke Univ, Div Hematol Malignancies & Cellular Therapy, Durham, NC USA..
    Tallman, Martin S.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Leukemia Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA..
    de Lima, Marcos
    Univ Hosp, Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Khoury, H. Jean
    Emory Univ Hosp, 1364 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Sandmaier, Brenda M.
    Univ Washington, Div Med Oncol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Weisdorf, Daniel
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Cytogenetic Risk Determines Outcomes After Allogeneic Transplantation in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Their Second Complete Remission: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Cohort Analysis2017In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 123, no 11, p. 2035-2042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers curative potential to a number of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in their first complete remission. However, there are limited data in the literature concerning post-HCT outcomes for older patients in their second complete remission (CR2).

    METHODS The purpose of the current study was to retrospectively investigate within the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database parameters influencing post-transplant outcomes for patients 60 years of age or older undergoing HCT for AML in CR2.

    RESULTS In total, 196 patients from 78 centers were identified; the median age was 64 years (range, 60-78 years). Seventy-one percent had a Karnofsky performance status >= 90 at the time of HCT. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens were used in 159 patients (81%). A univariate analysis demonstrated a 3-year overall survival (OS) rate of 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 35%-49%), a leukemia-free survival rate of 37% (95% CI, 30%-44%), a cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality of 25% (95% CI, 19%-32%), and a cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) of 38% (95% CI, 31%-45%). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that cytogenetic risk was the only independent risk factor for OS (P=.023) with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.14 (95% CI, 0.59-2.19) for intermediate-risk cytogenetics and an HR of 2.32 (95% CI, 1.05-5.14) for unfavorable-risk cytogenetics. For CIR, cytogenetic risk was also the only independent prognostic factor (P=.01) with an HR of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.47-2.56) for intermediate-risk cytogenetics and an HR of 2.98 (95% CI, 1.11-8.00) for unfavorable-risk cytogenetics.

    CONCLUSIONS Allogeneic HCT is a curative treatment option for older patients with AML in CR2, particularly for those with favorable or intermediate cytogenetic risk.

  • 233.
    Mideo, Nicole
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Bailey, Jeffrey A
    Division of Transfusion Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA, USA.
    Hathaway, Nicholas J
    Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA, USA.
    Ngasala, Billy
    Department of Parasitology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Saunders, David L
    Division of Immunology and Medicine, USAMC Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok, Thailand.
    Lon, Chanthap
    US Army Medical Component, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
    Kharabora, Oksana
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Jamnik, Andrew
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Balasubramanian, Sujata
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Björkman, Anders
    Malaria Research, Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Meshnick, Steven R
    Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Read, Andrew F
    Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Department of Biology and Entomology, the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
    Juliano, Jonathan J
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    A deep sequencing tool for partitioning clearance rates following antimalarial treatment in polyclonal infections2016In: Evolution, medicine, and public health, ISSN 2050-6201, Vol. 2016, no 1, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

    Current tools struggle to detect drug-resistant malaria parasites when infections contain multiple parasite clones, which is the norm in high transmission settings in Africa. Our aim was to develop and apply an approach for detecting resistance that overcomes the challenges of polyclonal infections without requiring a genetic marker for resistance.

    METHODOLOGY

    Clinical samples from patients treated with artemisinin combination therapy were collected from Tanzania and Cambodia. By deeply sequencing a hypervariable locus, we quantified the relative abundance of parasite subpopulations (defined by haplotypes of that locus) within infections and revealed evolutionary dynamics during treatment. Slow clearance is a phenotypic, clinical marker of artemisinin resistance; we analyzed variation in clearance rates within infections by fitting parasite clearance curves to subpopulation data.

    RESULTS

    In Tanzania, we found substantial variation in clearance rates within individual patients. Some parasite subpopulations cleared as slowly as resistant parasites observed in Cambodia. We evaluated possible explanations for these data, including resistance to drugs. Assuming slow clearance was a stable phenotype of subpopulations, simulations predicted that modest increases in their frequency could substantially increase time to cure.

    CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

    By characterizing parasite subpopulations within patients, our method can detect rare, slow clearing parasites in vivo whose phenotypic effects would otherwise be masked. Since our approach can be applied to polyclonal infections even when the genetics underlying resistance are unknown, it could aid in monitoring the emergence of artemisinin resistance. Our application to Tanzanian samples uncovers rare subpopulations with worrying phenotypes for closer examination.

  • 234.
    Milberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Adv Home Care, Norrkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Norrkoping, Sweden.
    Liljeroos, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden;Malarsjukhuset Hosp, Med Dept, S-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Can a single question about family members' sense of security during palliative care predict their well-being during bereavement?: A longitudinal study during ongoing care and one year after the patient's death2019In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 18, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIt has been recognised that more evidence about important aspects of family members' sense of security during palliative care is needed. The objectives of the study was: i) to discover what variables are associated with family members feeling secure during palliative care; ii) to develop a model of family members' sense of security during palliative care, and iii) to evaluate if family members' sense of security during ongoing palliative care predicts well-being during bereavement.MethodsBetween September 2009 and October 2010, 227 family members (of patients admitted to six Swedish palliative home care units) participated in the study (participation rate 75%) during ongoing care and 158 participated also 1 year after the patient's death (70%). They answered a single question regarding the family members' sense of security during the palliative care period. The question was constructed and validated by the researchers. Data were also collected using other questions and validated instruments and analysed stepwise with Generalized Linear Models (ordinal multinomial distribution and logit link).ResultsSixteen variables were positively related to family members' sense of security during ongoing palliative care. The five variables with the highest importance were selected into the model (listed in decreasing importance): Family members' mastery; nervousness and stress; self-efficacy; patient having gynaecological cancer; family members' perceived quality of life. Moreover, the family members' sense of security during ongoing palliative care predicted ten variables indicating their well-being 1 year after the patient's death, e.g. psychological well-being, complicated grief symptoms, health related quality of life.ConclusionsThe findings reveal possibilities to identify family members at risk of negative adjustment to bereavement in clinical practice and may help to develop interventions to support family members during ongoing palliative care.

  • 235.
    Molarius, Anu
    et al.
    Vastmanland Cty Council, Competence Ctr Hlth, S-72189 Vasteras, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Linden-Bostrom, Margareta
    Reg Orebro Cty, Dept Sustainable Dev, Orebro, Sweden.;Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden..
    Granström, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Karlsson, Jan
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Obesity continues to increase in the majority of the population in mid-Sweden-a 12-year follow-up2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 622-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to investigate trends in the prevalence of obesity by age and level of education in the general population in mid-Sweden from year 2000 to 2012. Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to a random population sample aged 25-74 years in years 2000, 2004, 2008 and 2012. The overall response rates were 67%, 65%, 60% and 53%, respectively, and the study included 29 017, 27 385, 25 910 and 24 152 respondents, respectively. Obesity (BMI a parts per thousand yen 30 kg/m(2)) was based on self-reported weight and height. Results: The age-standardized prevalence of obesity increased from 13% to 17% in women and from 12% to 17% in men between 2000 and 2012. Obesity increased in all age groups from 2000 to 2008 and continued to increase among the middle aged (45-64 years) between 2008 and 2012. The socioeconomic gradient in obesity changed during the study period since the absolute increase in obesity was steepest at the middle educational level. In 2012, the prevalence of obesity was almost twice as high at both middle and low educational levels compared with high educational level. The 'true' prevalence of adult obesity, corrected for self-reported weight and height, was around 20% in 2012 for both men and women. Conclusion: In the majority, among the middle-aged and those with secondary education, the prevalence of obesity continued to increase even between 2008 and 2012.

  • 236.
    Molarius, Anu
    et al.
    Competence Centre for Health, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden .
    Simonsson, Bo
    Competence Centre for Health, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden .
    Lindén-Boström, Margareta
    Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    Kalander-Blomqvist, Marina
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Värmland County Council, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Eriksson, Hans G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Social inequalities in self-reported refraining from health care due to financial reasons in Sweden: health care on equal terms?2014In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 14, p. 605-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The main goal of the health care system in Sweden is good health and health care on equal terms for the entire population. This study investigated the existence of social inequalities in refraining from health care due to financial reasons in Sweden.

    METHODS: The study is based on 38,536 persons who responded to a survey questionnaire sent to a random sample of men and women aged 18-84 years in 2008 (response rate 59%). The proportion of persons who during the past three months due to financial reasons limited or refrained from seeking health care, purchasing medicine or seeking dental care is reported. The groups were defined by gender, age, country of origin, educational level and employment status. The prevalence of longstanding illness was used to describe morbidity in these groups. Differences between groups were tested with chi-squared statistics and multivariate logistic regression models.

    RESULTS: In total, 3% reported that they had limited or refrained from seeking health care, 4% from purchasing medicine and 10% from seeking dental care. To refrain from seeking health care was much more common among the unemployed (12%) and those on disability pension (10%) than among employees (2%). It was also more common among young adults and persons born outside the Nordic countries. Similar differences also apply to purchasing medicine and dental care. The odds for refraining from seeking health care, purchasing medicine or seeking dental care due to financial reasons were 2-3 times higher among persons with longstanding illness than among persons with no longstanding illness.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are social inequalities in self-reported refraining from health care due to financial reasons in Sweden even though the absolute levels vary between different types of care. Often those in most need refrain from seeking health care which contradicts the national goal of the health care system. The results suggest that the fare systems of health care and dental care should be revised because they contribute to inequalities in health care.

  • 237. Moller, Clara
    et al.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Larsson, Mattias Holmqvist
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Mentalizing in Young Offenders2014In: Psychoanalytic psychology, ISSN 0736-9735, E-ISSN 1939-1331, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 84-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to prevent relapse into criminality, it is important to understand what precedes criminal behavior. Two earlier studies found deficits in mentalizing ability to be related to violent and criminal actions. Mentalizing refers to the ability to make human behavior predictable and meaningful by inferring mental states (thoughts, feelings, etc.) as explaining behavior. In this study, mentalizing ability was assessed by rating 42 Adult Attachment Interviews with young male offenders with the Reflective Functioning (RF) scale. In addition, specific mentalizing ability about their crimes was assessed, as well as psychopathy traits (Psychopathy Checklist, Screening Version [PCL: SV]) and alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale [TAS]). Results suggest impaired mentalizing in criminal offenders. Examples of anti- and prementalizing reasoning about crimes are presented. RF scores were not correlated with the PCL:SV or TAS.

  • 238.
    Montgomery, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Strand Brodd, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Persson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    The Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants has convergent and discriminant validity in preterm and term infants2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 5, p. 740-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Methods are needed to evaluate the level of early motor development and quality of motor performance in infants. We examined the convergent and discriminant validity of the Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants (SOMP-I) for evaluating the level of motor development and quality of motor performance in preterm and term infants.

    METHODS: A regional cohort of 111 preterm infants with a gestational age of <32 weeks and 72 healthy term born infants were assessed with the SOMP-I, at two, four, six and 10 months of corrected age. Convergent validity was analysed with a mixed model analysis of the motor performance over time. Discriminant validity was analysed with the Mann-Whitney U-test in groups with different neonatal characteristics.

    RESULTS: Convergent validity was supported, as the level of motor development increased with age and the quality of motor performance improved over time. The method discriminated for both level and quality between the preterm and the term infants. The preterm infants demonstrated different quality deficits regardless of the level of motor development.

    CONCLUSION: Convergent validity and discriminant validity of the SOMP-I were supported in preterm and term infants and facilitates early identification of infants with atypical motor development.

  • 239. Morris, Ulrika
    et al.
    Khamis, Mwinyi
    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit
    Abass, Ali K
    Msellem, Mwinyi I
    Nassor, Majda H
    González, Iveth J
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Ali, Abdullah S
    Björkman, Anders
    Cook, Jackie
    Field deployment of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for centralized mass-screening of asymptomatic malaria in Zanzibar: a pre-elimination setting2015In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 14, article id 205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Molecular tools for detection of low-density asymptomatic Plasmodium infections are needed in malaria elimination efforts. This study reports results from the hitherto largest implementation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for centralized mass screening of asymptomatic malaria in Zanzibar.

    METHODS: Healthy individuals present and willing to participate in randomly selected households in 60 villages throughout Zanzibar were screened for malaria by rapid diagnostic tests (RDT). In 50 % of the study households, participants were asked to provide 60 μL of finger-prick blood for additional LAMP screening. LAMP was conducted in two centralized laboratories in Zanzibar, by trained technicians with limited or no previous experience of molecular methods. The LAMP assay was performed with Loopamp(TM) MALARIA Pan/Pf Detection Kit (Eiken Chemical Company, Japan). Samples positive for Plasmodium genus (Pan)-LAMP were re-tested using Plasmodium falciparum-specific LAMP kits.

    RESULTS: Paired RDT and LAMP samples were available from 3983 individuals. The prevalence of asymptomatic malaria was 0.5 % (CI 95 % 0.1-0.8) and 1.6 % (CI 95 % 1.1-2.2) by RDT and Pan-LAMP, respectively. LAMP detected 3.4 (CI 95 % 2.2-5.2) times more Plasmodium positive samples than RDT. DNA contamination was experienced, but solved by repetitive decontamination of all equipment and reagents.

    CONCLUSIONS: LAMP is a simple and sensitive molecular tool, and has potential in active surveillance and mass-screening programmes for detection of low-density asymptomatic malaria in pre-elimination settings. However, in order to deploy LAMP more effectively in field settings, protocols may need to be adapted for processing larger numbers of samples. A higher throughput, affordable closed system would be ideal to avoid contamination.

  • 240. Morris, Ulrika
    et al.
    Xu, Weiping
    Msellem, Mwinyi I
    Schwartz, Alanna
    Abass, Ali
    Shakely, Delér
    Cook, Jackie
    Bhattarai, Achuyt
    Petzold, Max
    Greenhouse, Bryan
    Ali, Abdullah S
    Björkman, Anders
    Fröberg, Gabrielle
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Characterising temporal trends in asymptomatic Plasmodium infections and transporter polymorphisms during transition from high to low transmission in Zanzibar, 2005-2013.2015In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 33, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Improved understanding of the asymptomatic malaria parasite reservoir is a prerequisite to pursue malaria elimination efforts. We therefore characterised temporal trends and transporter polymorphisms in asymptomatic Plasmodium infections during the transition from high to low transmission in Zanzibar.

    METHODS: Healthy individuals participating in cross-sectional surveys conducted 2005-2013 were screened for asymptomatic malaria by PCR. Complexity/diversity of infection and transporter polymorphisms were assessed in Plasmodium falciparum positive samples. Symptomatic samples were included for comparison of polymorphisms in 2013.

    RESULTS: PCR-determined parasite prevalence declined from 21.1% (CI95% 17.4-24.9) to 2.3% (CI95% 1.7-2.9) from 2005 to 2013. P. falciparum remained the predominant species; prevalence was highest in children and young adults aged 5-25years. Parasite densities and complexity of infection, but not population genetic diversity of P. falciparum, decreased from 2005-2009. pfcrt 76T (99.2-64.7%, p<0.001) and pfmdr1 86Y frequencies (89.4-66.7%, p=0.03) decreased over time. Pfmdr1 (a.a.86,184,1246) YYY and YYD haplotypes were more frequent in asymptomatic than symptomatic infections in 2013 (p<0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: There is a declining, albeit persistent, reservoir of parasites present at low-densities in asymptomatic individuals in Zanzibar. This study revealed important characteristics of the remaining parasite population, including intriguing temporal trends in molecular markers associated with antimalarial resistance, which need to be further investigated.

  • 241.
    Morth, Charlott
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Malarsjukhuset, Dept Oncol, S-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Hagberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Successful intraperitoneal rituximab treatment in a patient with therapy-resistant malignant ascites due to mantle cell lymphoma2015In: Annals of Hematology, ISSN 0939-5555, E-ISSN 1432-0584, Vol. 94, no 10, p. 1757-1758Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 242.
    Muffly, Lori
    et al.
    Stanford Univ, Div Blood & Marrow Transplantat, 300 Pasteur Dr,H0144B, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Pasquini, Marcelo C.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Martens, Michael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Brazauskas, Ruta
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Zhu, Xiaochun
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Adekola, Kehinde
    Northwestern Mem Hosp, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Ballen, Karen K.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Bajel, Ashish
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Victoria, Vic, Australia..
    Baron, Frederic
    Ctr Hosp Univ Liege, Domaine Univ Sart Tilman, Liege, Belgium..
    Battiwalla, Minoo
    NHLBI, Hematol Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Beitinjaneh, Amer
    Univ Miami, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Miami, FL USA..
    Cahn, Jean-Yves
    Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Grenoble, France..
    Carabasi, Mathew
    Thomas Jefferson Univ Hosp, Dept Med Oncol, Philadelphia, PA 19107 USA..
    Chen, Yi-Bin
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Chhabra, Saurabh
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Ciurea, Stefan
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat & Cellular Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA.;Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Transplant Myeloid Study Grp, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Copelan, Edward
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA..
    D'Souza, Anita
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Edwards, John
    Indiana Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Foran, James
    Mayo Clin, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Freytes, Cesar O.
    Texas Transplant Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Fung, Henry C.
    Temple Hlth, Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, Philadelphia, PA USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Div Expt Med, Dept Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Giralt, Sergio
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA..
    Hashmi, Shahrukh K.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Internal Med, Minneapolis, MN USA.;King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Ctr Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Hildebrandt, Gerhard C.
    Univ Kentucky, Chandler Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Lexington, KY USA..
    Ho, Vincent
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Jakubowski, Ann
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA..
    Lazarus, Hillard
    Univ Hosp Cleveland, Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Luskin, Marlise R.
    Univ Penn, Med Ctr, Abramson Canc Ctr, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Martino, Rodrigo
    Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Div Clin Hematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Maziarz, Richard
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, Adult Blood & Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    McCarthy, Philip
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Dept Med, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Olin, Rebecca
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Med Ctr, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pawarode, Attaphol
    Univ Michigan, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Internal Med,Med Sch, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Peres, Edward
    Henry Ford Hosp, Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Rezvani, Andrew R.
    Stanford Univ, Div Blood & Marrow Transplantat, 300 Pasteur Dr,H0144B, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Rizzieri, David
    Duke Univ, Blood & Marrow Transplant Clin, Div Hematol Malignancies & Cellular Therapy, Durham, NC USA..
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Schouten, Harry C.
    Acad Ziekenhuis, Dept Hematol, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Sabloff, Mitchell
    Univ Ottawa, Dept ofMedicine, Div Hematol, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Seftel, Matthew
    CancerCare Manitoba, Dept Med Oncol & Hematol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Seo, Sachiko
    East Hosp, Natl Canc Res Ctr, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan..
    Sorror, Mohamed L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Med Oncol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Szer, Jeff
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Dept Clin Haematol & Bone Marrow Transplantat, Victoria, Vic, Australia..
    Wirk, Baldeep M.
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Wood, William A.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Med, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Artz, Andrew
    Univ Chicago, Hematol Oncol Sect, Sch Med, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Increasing use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients aged 70 years and older in the United States2017In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 130, no 9, p. 1156-1164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we evaluated trends and outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in adults >= 70 years with hematologic malignancies across the United States. Adults >= 70 years with a hematologic malignancy undergoing first allogeneic HCT in the United States between 2000 and 2013 and reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research were eligible. Transplant utilization and transplant outcomes, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and transplant-related mortality (TRM) were studied. One thousand one hundred and six patients >= 70 years underwent HCT across 103 transplant centers. The number and proportion of allografts performed in this population rose markedly over the past decade, accounting for 0.1% of transplants in 2000 to 3.85% (N = 298) in 2013. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes represented the most common disease indications. Two-year OS and PFS significantly improved over time (OS: 26% [95% confidence interval (CI), 21% to 33%] in 2000-2007 to 39% [95% CI, 35% to 42%] in 2008-2013, P < .001; PFS: 22% [16% to 28%] in 2000-2007 to 32% [95% CI, 29% to 36%] in 2008-2013, P = .003). Two-year TRM ranged from 33% to 35% and was unchanged over time (P = .54). Multivariable analysis of OS in the modern era of 2008-2013 revealed higher comorbidity by HCT comorbidity index >= 3 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; P = .006), umbilical cord blood graft (HR, 1.97; P = .0002), and myeloablative conditioning (HR, 1.61; P = .0002) as adverse factors. Over the past decade, utilization and survival after allogeneic transplant have increased in patients >= 70 years. Select adults >= 70 years with hematologic malignancies should be considered for transplant.

  • 243.
    Myers, Regina M.
    et al.
    Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Div Hematol & Oncol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Hill, Brian T.
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Shaw, Bronwen E.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Kim, Soyoung
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Div Biostat, Inst Hlth & Soc, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Millard, Heather R.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Battiwalla, Minoo
    NHLBI, Hematol Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Majhail, Navneet S.
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Buchbinder, David
    Childrens Hosp Orange Cty, Div Pediat Hematol, Orange, CA 92668 USA..
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Univ Hosp Cleveland, Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Flowers, Mary E. D.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    D'Souza, Anita
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Ehrhardt, Matthew J.
    St Jude Childrens Res Hosp, 332 N Lauderdale St, Memphis, TN 38105 USA..
    Langston, Amelia
    Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Yared, Jean A.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Greenebaum Comprehens Canc Ctr,Blood & Marrow Tra, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Hayashi, Robert J.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Daly, Andrew
    Tom Baker Canc Clin, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Inamoto, Yoshihiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Hematopoiet Stem Cell Transplantat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Malone, Adriana K.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Tisch Canc Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    DeFilipp, Zachariah
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Margossian, Steven P.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat Oncol, Boston, MA USA.;Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Warwick, Anne B.
    Uniformed Serv Ind Hlth Sci, Dept Pediat, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Jaglowski, Samantha
    Ohio State Univ, Med Ctr, Div Hematol, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Beitinjaneh, Amer
    Univ Miami, Miami, FL USA..
    Fung, Henry
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, 7701 Burholme Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA..
    Kasow, Kimberly A.
    Univ N Carolina, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Pediat, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Marks, David I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Reynolds, Jana
    Baylor Univ, Med Ctr, Dallas, TX USA..
    Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Oncol, St Louis, MO USA..
    Wirk, Baldeep
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Wood, William A.
    Univ N Carolina, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Med, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Satwani, Prakash
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplantat, New York, NY USA..
    Long-Term Outcomes Among 2-Year Survivors of Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hodgkin and Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma2018In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 816-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT) is a standard therapy for relapsed classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL); however, long-term outcomes are not well described.

    METHODS: This study analyzed survival, nonrelapse mortality, late effects, and subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs) in 1617 patients who survived progression-free for >= 2 years after auto-HCT for cHL or DLBCL between 1990 and 2008. The median age at auto-HCT was 40 years; the median follow-up was 10.6 years.

    RESULTS: The 5-year overall survival rate was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87%-92%) for patients with cHL and 89% (95% CI, 87%-91%) for patients with DLBCL. The risk of late mortality in comparison with the general population was 9.6-fold higher for patients with cHL (standardized mortality ratio [SMR], 9.6) and 3.4-fold higher for patients with DLBCL (SMR, 3.4). Relapse accounted for 44% of late deaths. At least 1 late effect was reported for 9% of the patients. A total of 105 SMNs were confirmed: 44 in the cHL group and 61 in the DLBCL group. According to a multivariate analysis, older age, male sex, a Karnofsky score < 90, total body irradiation (TBI) exposure, and a higher number of lines of chemotherapy before auto-HCT were risk factors for overall mortality in cHL. Risk factors in DLBCL were older age and TBI exposure. A subanalysis of 798 adolescent and young adult patients mirrored the outcomes of the overall study population.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite generally favorable outcomes, 2-year survivors of auto-HCT for cHL or DLBCL have an excess late-mortality risk in comparison with the general population and experience an assortment of late complications.

  • 244. Myrnäs, Anna
    et al.
    Castegren, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Fatal hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with day care surgery and anaesthesia: a case report2013In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 242-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Thrombotic angiopathies, i.e. haemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, are thought to occur in patients with a combination of risk factors (e.g., an infection with shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) or low activity of the metalloproteinase Adamts-13) and a pathophysiological trigger (e.g., anti-endothelial antibodies, cytokines or activation of chemokine receptor 4). To our knowledge, this is the first report describing an association between haemolytic uremic syndrome and routine surgery and anaesthesia.

    CASE PRESENTATION:

    We present a case in which a 67-year-old Caucasian female developed fatal haemolytic uremic syndrome in the immediate postoperative period of uncomplicated day care surgery. The patient had suffered gastrointestinal symptoms followed by confusion approximately two weeks before surgery, but had been without any symptoms in the week before surgery. Haemolytic uremic syndrome with cerebral symptoms ranging from initial anxiety to subsequent seizures and coma developed within a few hours after the end of surgery. In addition, acute kidney failure and severe thrombocytopenia occurred about the same time. During intensive care, the patient was found to be positive for enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) in faeces.

    CONCLUSION:

    Anaesthesiologists should be notified that haemolytic uremic syndrome is an uncommon differential diagnosis in patients with postoperative seizures and coma. Patients with a recent enterohemmoragic E.Coli infection should be followed postoperatively for signs of haemolytic uremic syndrome.

  • 245.
    Möller, Clara
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Karlgren, Linda
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sandell, Anton
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, SwedenLinkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Philips, Björn
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden; Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Dependency Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mentalization-based therapy adherence and competence stimulates in-session mentalization in psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder with co-morbid substance dependence2017In: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 749-765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To test whether adherence to mentalization-based treatment (MBT) principles predict better patient in-session mentalizing.

    METHODS: Two sessions for each of 15 patients with borderline personality disorder and comorbid substance abuse disorder were rated for MBT adherence and competence. Individual patient statements were rated for Reflective Functioning (RF), therapist statements were rated as demanding RF or not. Data were analysed using multilevel modelling.

    RESULTS: MBT adherence and competence predicted higher session RF (β = .58-.75), even while controlling for pre-treatment RF. In addition, therapist interventions directed toward exploring mental states predicted higher RF of subsequent patient responses (β = .11-.12).

    CONCLUSIONS: MBT adherence and competence were significantly related to patient in-session mentalizing, supporting the validity of MBT principles. Results point to the importance of supervision for therapists to become adherent to MBT principles. The small number of patients and sessions limits generalizability of results.

  • 246.
    Möller, Marika C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Rehabilitation, Stockholm.
    Bartfai, Aniko B
    Rådestad, Angelique Flöter
    Effects of testosterone and estrogen replacement on memory function2010In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 983-989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Testosterone insufficiency has been associated with psychosexual problems, reduced psychological well-being, and negative metabolic consequences, whereas less is known about the effects on cognition. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding testosterone to estrogen therapy on memory functions in oophorectomized women.

    METHODS:

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, women with surgically induced menopause (n = 50; mean [SD] age, 54.0 [2.9] y) received estradiol valerate in combination with testosterone undecanoate or placebo. The women were assessed with a self-report questionnaire regarding memory and neuropsychological tests for verbal and spatial episodic memory and incidental learning at baseline, at the time of crossover, and after completion of treatment.

    RESULTS:

    Testosterone undecanoate 40 mg added to estrogen therapy had a negative effect on immediate but not delayed verbal memory at 24 weeks. Subjective and objective memory showed some correspondence as the women in the estrogen + placebo treatment group rated decreased everyday memory problems at 24 weeks compared with baseline. This was not observed in the women in the estrogen + testosterone treatment. Verbal attention span deteriorated from baseline with estrogen + placebo treatment but not with the estrogen + testosterone treatment. However, there was no significant treatment effect between the two groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Adding testosterone to estrogen treatment deteriorated immediate verbal memory compared with estrogen + placebo, while other memory functions were unaffected.

  • 247.
    Möller, Marika C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Univ Dept Rehabil Med, Danderyd Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Div Rehabil Med, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordin, Love Engström
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Diagnost Med Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Div Clin Geriatr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bartfai, Aniko
    Univ Dept Rehabil Med, Danderyd Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Div Rehabil Med, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Julin, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Div Clin Geriatr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Li, Tie-Qiang
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Diagnost Med Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Div Med Imaging & Technol, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fatigue and Cognitive Fatigability in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury are Correlated with Altered Neural Activity during Vigilance Test Performance.2017In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 8, article id 496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Fatigue is the most frequently reported persistent symptom following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), but the explanations for the persisting fatigue symptoms in mTBI remain controversial. In this study, we investigated the change of cerebral blood flow during the performance of a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) by using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) MRI technique to better understand the relationship between fatigability and brain activity in mTBI.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients (mean age: 37.5 ± 11.2 years) with persistent complaints of fatigue after mTBI and 10 healthy controls (mean age 36.9 ± 11.0 years) were studied. Both groups completed a 20-min long PVT inside a clinical MRI scanner during simultaneous measurements of reaction time and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with PCASL technique. Cognitive fatigability and neural activity during PVT were analyzed by dividing the performance and rCBF data into quintiles in addition to the assessment of self-rated fatigue before and after the PVT.

    RESULTS: The patients showed significant fatigability during the PVT while the controls had a stable performance. The variability in performance was also significantly higher among the patients, indicating monitoring difficulty. A three-way ANOVA, modeling of the rCBF data demonstrated that there was a significant interaction effect between the subject group and performance time during PVT in a mainly frontal/thalamic network, indicating that the pattern of rCBF change for the mTBI patients differed significantly from that of healthy controls. In the mTBI patients, fatigability at the end of the PVT was related to increased rCBF in the right middle frontal gyrus, while self-rated fatigue was related to increased rCBF in left medial frontal and anterior cingulate gyri and decreases of rCBF in a frontal/thalamic network during this period.

    DISCUSSION: This study demonstrates that PCASL is a useful technique to investigate neural correlates of fatigability and fatigue in mTBI patients. Patients suffering from fatigue after mTBI used different brain networks compared to healthy controls during a vigilance task and in mTBI, there was a distinction between rCBF changes related to fatigability vs. perceived fatigue. Whether networks for fatigability and self-rated fatigue are different, needs to be investigated in future studies.

  • 248.
    Möller, Marika Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Nygren de Boussard, Catharina
    Oldenburg, Christian
    Bartfai, Aniko
    An investigation of attention, executive, and psychomotor aspects of cognitive fatigability2014In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, ISSN 1380-3395, E-ISSN 1744-411X, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 716-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    Self-perceived mental fatigue is a common presenting symptom in many neurological diseases. Discriminating objective fatigability from self-perceived mental fatigue might facilitate neuropsychological diagnosis and treatment programs. However clinically valid neuropsychological instruments suitable for assessment of fatigability are still lacking. The prime aim of the study was to investigate aspects of cognitive fatigability and to identify properties of neuropsychological tests suitable to assess fatigability in patients with persistent cognitive complaints after mild brain injury. Another aim was to investigate whether cognitive fatigability captured by neuropsychological measures is influenced by depression or sleep disturbances.

    Method:

    Twenty-four patients with persistent cognitive symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), (aged 18-51 years) and 31 healthy controls (aged 20-49 years) underwent neuropsychological testing measuring three cognitive fatigability domains: Attention fatigability was assessed using the Ruff 2 & 7 Selective Attention Test, executive fatigability using the Color Word Test (Stroop), and psychomotor fatigability using the Digit Symbol Substitution Test from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). Subjective fatigue was measured using the Fatigue Severity Scale and a questionnaire of everyday consequences of fatigue. Depression was screened using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and sleep disturbances using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.

    Results:

    The patients reported significantly more mental fatigue and performed worse on tests of psychomotor and executive fatigability than the healthy controls. Furthermore, the cognitive fatigability measures were not influenced by depression or sleep disturbances, as was the case in self-reported fatigue.

    Conclusion:

    Tests demanding executive or simultaneous processing of several neuropsychological functions seem most sensitive in order to capture cognitive fatigability. Clinical tests that can capture fatigability enable a deeper understanding of how fatigability might contribute to cognitive complaints and problems in maintaining daily activities.

  • 249.
    Möller, Marika Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Rådestad, A. F.
    Von Schoultz, B.
    Bartfai, A.
    Effect of estrogen and testosterone replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue2013In: Gynecological Endocrinology, ISSN 0951-3590, E-ISSN 1473-0766, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 173-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both estrogen and testosterone insufficiency has been associated with reduced psychological well-being including fatigue. However, hormonal replacement studies on fatigue are rare. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of testosterone and estrogen replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue and the relation between sex hormone levels and cognitive fatigue in oophorectomized women. Fifty women with surgically induced menopause (mean age: 54.0±2.9 years) were randomly assigned to treatment with estradiol valerate in combination with testosterone undecanoate or placebo for 24 weeks in a double-blind cross-over study. Neuropsychological tests and questionnaires were used to assess cognitive fatigue and psychological well-being. Cognitive fatigue was significantly associated to poor self-rated health and higher body mass index but not to general psychological well-being or sex hormone levels. Treatment with testosterone + estrogen had no significant effect on cognitive fatigue but the results indicated a curvilinear relation for hormonal levels. The estrogen/testosterone ratio was more related to functions rather than high or low hormone levels per se. We found that cognitive fatigue is frequent in oophorectomized women and negatively associated to self-perceived health and positively associated to BMI. A well-balanced ratio between estrogen and testosterone levels may be important for cognitive fatigue.

  • 250.
    Mörth, Charlott
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Malarsjukhuset, Dept Oncol, 34 Kungsvagen, SE-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Kafantaris, Ioannis
    Malarsjukhuset, Dept Pulm Med, SE-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Castegren, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Anesthesia Surg Serv & Intens Care, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Valachis, Antonios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Malarsjukhuset, Dept Oncol, 34 Kungsvagen, SE-63188 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Validation and optimization of a predictive model for radiation pneumonitis in patients with lung cancer2016In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 1144-1148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current retrospective study was to validate a predictive model for radiation pneumonitis (STRIPE) in an independent dataset and to investigate whether the addition of other potential risk factors could strengthen the accuracy of the model. Consecutive patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC; n=71) treated with definitive concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy were retrospectively assessed for radiation pneumonitis (RP). The results identified that 16 (23%) patients developed grade >= 2 RP. Furthermore, STRIPE score (intermediate vs. low risk) was independently associated with the development of RP [odds ratio (OR), 3.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-13.89], whereas current smoking status was found to be protective against RP (OR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.01-0.78). Similar discriminatory power of the STRIPE score was observed as in the original study. The addition of smoking status strengthened the model's discriminatory ability to predict RP. Thus, the addition of smoking status as a risk factor may strengthen the accuracy of the model for predicting RP in patients with NSCLC.

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