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  • 201.
    Daley, Allison
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Budd, Graham
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    A morphometric analysis of Hurdia, a dinocaridid from the Burgess Shale, Canada2007Ingår i: Lundadagarna i historisk geologi och paleontologi X: 12-13 March 2007 Abstracts with programme, 2007, s. 44-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 202.
    Daley, Allison
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Budd, Graham
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    Hurdia, a new anomalocaridid from the Burgess Shale and the origin of biramous limbs in arthropods2007Ingår i: 51st Palaeontological Association Annual Meeting: Programme with Abstracts, 2007, s. 29-30Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 203.
    Daley, Allison C.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    The morphology and evolutionary significance of the anomalocaridids2010Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 600 to 500 million years ago, a major evolutionary radiation called the “Cambrian Explosion” gave rise to nearly all of the major animal phyla known today. This radiation is recorded by various fossil lagerstätten, such as the Burgess Shale in Canada, where soft-bodied animals are preserved in exquisite detail. Many Cambrian fossils are enigmatic forms that are morphologically dissimilar to their modern descendants, but which still provide valuable information when interpreted as stem-group taxa because they record the actual progression of evolution and give insight into the order of character acquisitions and homologies between living taxa. One such group of fossils is the anomalocaridids, large presumed predators that have had a complicated history of description. Their body has a trunk with a series of lateral lobes and associated gills, and a cephalic region with a pair of large frontal appendages, a circular mouth apparatus, stalked eyes and a cephalic carapace. Originally, two taxa were described from the Burgess Shale, Anomalocaris and Laggania, however data presented herein suggests that the diversity of the anomalocaridids was much higher. Newly collected fossil material revealed that a third Burgess Shale anomalocaridid, Hurdia, is known from whole-body specimens and study of its morphology has helped to clarify the morphology and systematics of the whole group. Hurdia is distinguished by having mouthparts with extra rows of teeth, a unique frontal appendage, and a large frontal carapace. Two species, Hurdia victoria and Hurdia triangulata were distinguished based on morphometric shape analysis of the frontal carapace. A phylogenetic analysis placed the anomalocaridids in the stem lineage to the euarthropods, and examination of Hurdia’s well-preserved gills confirm the homology of this structure with the outer branches of limbs in upper stem-group arthropods. This homology supports the theory that the Cambrian biramous limb formed by the fusion of a uniramous walking limb with a lateral lobe structure bearing gill blades. In this context, new evidence is present on the closely allied taxon Opabinia, suggesting that it had lobopod walking limbs and a lateral lobe structure with attached Hurdia-like gills. The diversity of the anomalocaridids at the Burgess Shale is further increased by two additional taxa known from isolated frontal appendages. Amplectobelua stephenensis is the first occurrence of this genus outside of the Chengjiang fauna in China, but Caryosyntrips serratus is an appendage unique to the Burgess Shale. To gain a better understanding of global distribution, a possible anomalocaridid is also described from the Sirius Passet biota in North Greenland. Tamisiocaris borealis is known from a single appendage, which is similar to Anomalocaris but unsegmented, suggesting this taxon belongs to the arthropod stem-lineage, perhaps in the anomalocaridid clade. Thus, the anomalocaridids are a widely distributed and highly diverse group of large Cambrian presumed predators, which provide important information relevant to the evolution of the arthropods.

    Delarbeten
    1. The Burgess Shale Anomalocaridid Hurdia and Its Significance for Early Euarthropod Evolution
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>The Burgess Shale Anomalocaridid Hurdia and Its Significance for Early Euarthropod Evolution
    Visa övriga...
    2009 (Engelska)Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 323, nr 5921, s. 1597-1600Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    As the largest predators of the Cambrian seas, the anomalocaridids had an important impact in structuring the first complex marine animal communities, but many aspects of anomalocaridid morphology, diversity, ecology, and affinity remain unclear owing to a paucity of specimens. Here we describe the anomalocaridid Hurdia, based on several hundred specimens from the Burgess Shale in Canada. Hurdia possesses a general body architecture similar to Anomalocaris and Laggania, including the presence of exceptionally well-preserved gills, but differs from those anomalocaridids by possessing a prominent anterior carapace structure. These features amplify and clarify the diversity of known anomalocaridid morphology and provide insight into the origins of important arthropod features, such as the head shield and respiratory exites.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2009
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
    Forskningsämne
    Historisk geologi och paleontologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-114185 (URN)10.1126/science.1169514 (DOI)000264342300036 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2010-02-11 Skapad: 2010-02-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-12Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. New anomalocaridid appendages from the Burgess Shale, Canada
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>New anomalocaridid appendages from the Burgess Shale, Canada
    2010 (Engelska)Ingår i: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 53, nr 4, s. 721-738Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The complex history of description of the anomalocaridids has partly been caused by the fragmentary nature of these fossils. Frontal appendages and mouth parts are more readily preserved than whole-body assemblages, so the earliest work on these animals examined these structures in isolation. After several decades of research, these disarticulated elements were assembled together to reconstruct the anomalocaridid body plan, and a total of three Burgess Shale genera, Anomalocaris, Laggania, and Hurdia, were described in full.  Here we present new frontal appendage material of additional anomalocaridid taxa from the ‘Middle’ Cambrian (Series 3) Burgess Shale Formation in Canada, showing that the diversity of anomalocaridids in this locality is even higher than previously thought. Material includes Amplectobelua stephenensis sp. nov., the first known occurrence of this genus outside of China; Caryosyntrips serratus gen. et sp. nov., which is similar to the Anomalocaris appendage but has a straighter outline and a different arrangement of spines; and an appendage that may be either the Laggania appendage or a third morph of the Hurdia appendage. The new anomalocaridid material is contemporaneous with the previously described taxa Anomalocaris, Laggania, and Hurdia, and the differences in morphology between the frontal appendages may reflect different feeding strategies. The stratigraphically lowest locality, S7 on Mount Stephen, yields material from all anomalocaridid taxa, but the assemblages in the younger quarries on Fossil Ridge are dominated by Anomalocaris and Hurdia only.

    Nyckelord
    anomalocaridids, appendages, Burgess Shale, Canada, Cambrian
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
    Forskningsämne
    Historisk geologi och paleontologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-114188 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-4983.2010.00955.x (DOI)000280127500004 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2010-02-11 Skapad: 2010-02-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-12Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Morphology and systematics of the anomalocaridid arthropod Hurdia from the Middle Cambrian of British Columbia and Utah
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Morphology and systematics of the anomalocaridid arthropod Hurdia from the Middle Cambrian of British Columbia and Utah
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 11, nr 7, s. 743-787Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In Cambrian fossil Lagerstätten like the Burgess Shale, exceptionally preserved arthropods constitute a large part of the taxonomic diversity, providing opportunities to study the early evolution of this phylum in detail. The anomalocaridids, large presumed pelagic predators, are particularly relevant owing to their unique combination of morphological characters and basal position in the arthropod stem lineage. Although isolated elements and fragmented specimens were first discovered over 100 years ago, subsequent findings of more complete bodies ofAnomalocaris and Peytoia, especially in the 1980s, allowed for a better understanding of these enigmatic forms. Their evolutionary significance as stem group arthropods was further clarified by the recent discovery of a third anomalocaridid taxon, Hurdia. Here, examination of hundreds ofHurdia specimens from different stratigraphical layers within the Burgess Shale and Stephen Formation, combined with statistical analyses, provides a detailed description of the taphonomy, morphology and diversity of the genus and further elucidates anomalocaridid systematics. Hurdiais distinguished from other anomalocaridids in having mouthparts with extra rows of teeth, a large frontal carapace complex and diminutive swimming flaps with prominent setal structures. The two original species, H. victoria Walcott, 1912 and H. triangulata Walcott, 1912, are confirmed based on morphometric outline analyses of the frontal carapace components combined with stratigraphical evidence; a third species, Hurdia dentata Simonetta & Delle Cave, 1975, is synonymized with H. victoria. Morphology, preservation and stratigraphical distribution suggest that H. victoria and H. triangulata share the same type of frontal appendage; a second type of appendage, previously assigned to Hurdia (Morph A), belongs to Peytoia nathorsti. These and other morphological differences between the anomalocaridids may reflect different feeding strategies. Appendages and mouthparts of Hurdia indet. sp. are also identified from the Spence Shale Member of Utah, making Hurdia and Anomalocaris the most common and globally distributed anomalocaridid taxa.

    Nyckelord
    Cambrian, Burgess Shale, Radiodonta, arthropods, multivariate statistics, taxonomy
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Geologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-114195 (URN)10.1080/14772019.2012.732723 (DOI)000326860800001 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2010-02-11 Skapad: 2010-02-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-12Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. A possible anomalocaridid from the Cambrian Sirius Passet lagerstätte, North Greenland
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>A possible anomalocaridid from the Cambrian Sirius Passet lagerstätte, North Greenland
    2010 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 84, nr 2, s. 352-355Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Sirius Passet biota of North Greenland is one of the oldest Cambrian lagerstätten, and although it is dominated by non-mineralized arthropods and lobopods, anomalocaridids have never been identified. Based on a single specimen, we herein describe for the first time an appendage with possible anomalocaridid affinities as suggested by an overall gross morphology similar to that of the frontal appendage of Anomalocaris from other localitites. Tamisiocaris borealis n. gen. and n. sp. has an elongated appendage with paired spines along one margin, and differs from the frontal appendage of Anomalocaris in that segment boundaries are absent and ventral spines are relatively long and spineless. These differences may be taphonomic, but the entire surface of the appendage is covered in a fine fabric, making it unlikely that this appendage was originally segmented or sclerotized. The taxon is tentatively placed within Radiodonta, but this systematic placement cannot be confirmed while complete body specimens are lacking.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Geologi
    Forskningsämne
    Geovetenskap med inriktning mot historisk geologi och paleontologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-114191 (URN)10.1666/09-136R1.1 (DOI)000275689000014 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2010-02-11 Skapad: 2010-02-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-12Bibliografiskt granskad
    5. The lobes and lobopods of Opabinia regalis from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>The lobes and lobopods of Opabinia regalis from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale
    2012 (Engelska)Ingår i: Lethaia: an international journal of palaeontology and stratigraphy, ISSN 0024-1164, E-ISSN 1502-3931, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 83-95Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Despite many papers devoted to it, the morphology of the Burgess Shale animal Opabinia regalis continues to excite controversy. In particular, the trunk region remains incompletely understood, leading to several recent attempts to interpret the fossil in radically different ways. New material of Opabinia from the Royal Ontario Museum and the Smithsonian collection, together with the recent description of comparative material of the Burgess Shale anomalocaridid Hurdia, help clarify details of its morphology, in particular with regards to the lateral lobes and setal blades. A recent reconstruction of the trunk lobes is rejected, and further evidence for the presence of trunk limbs is presented. Despite disagreements over its morphology, the phylogenetic placement of Opabinia is now relatively uncontroversial, although various derived aspects of its morphology complicate placing it precisely.

    Nyckelord
    Biramous limb, Burgess Shale, exceptional preservation, Opabinia regalis
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Biologiska vetenskaper
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-114193 (URN)10.1111/j.1502-3931.2011.00264.x (DOI)000298301900009 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2010-02-11 Skapad: 2010-02-11 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-12Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 204.
    Daley, Allison C.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    New anomalocaridid appendages from the Burgess Shale, Canada2010Ingår i: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 53, nr 4, s. 721-738Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex history of description of the anomalocaridids has partly been caused by the fragmentary nature of these fossils. Frontal appendages and mouth parts are more readily preserved than whole-body assemblages, so the earliest work on these animals examined these structures in isolation. After several decades of research, these disarticulated elements were assembled together to reconstruct the anomalocaridid body plan, and a total of three Burgess Shale genera, Anomalocaris, Laggania, and Hurdia, were described in full.  Here we present new frontal appendage material of additional anomalocaridid taxa from the ‘Middle’ Cambrian (Series 3) Burgess Shale Formation in Canada, showing that the diversity of anomalocaridids in this locality is even higher than previously thought. Material includes Amplectobelua stephenensis sp. nov., the first known occurrence of this genus outside of China; Caryosyntrips serratus gen. et sp. nov., which is similar to the Anomalocaris appendage but has a straighter outline and a different arrangement of spines; and an appendage that may be either the Laggania appendage or a third morph of the Hurdia appendage. The new anomalocaridid material is contemporaneous with the previously described taxa Anomalocaris, Laggania, and Hurdia, and the differences in morphology between the frontal appendages may reflect different feeding strategies. The stratigraphically lowest locality, S7 on Mount Stephen, yields material from all anomalocaridid taxa, but the assemblages in the younger quarries on Fossil Ridge are dominated by Anomalocaris and Hurdia only.

  • 205.
    Daley, Allison C
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    Morphology and systematics of the anomalocaridid arthropod Hurdia from the Middle Cambrian of British Columbia and Utah2013Ingår i: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 11, nr 7, s. 743-787Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In Cambrian fossil Lagerstätten like the Burgess Shale, exceptionally preserved arthropods constitute a large part of the taxonomic diversity, providing opportunities to study the early evolution of this phylum in detail. The anomalocaridids, large presumed pelagic predators, are particularly relevant owing to their unique combination of morphological characters and basal position in the arthropod stem lineage. Although isolated elements and fragmented specimens were first discovered over 100 years ago, subsequent findings of more complete bodies ofAnomalocaris and Peytoia, especially in the 1980s, allowed for a better understanding of these enigmatic forms. Their evolutionary significance as stem group arthropods was further clarified by the recent discovery of a third anomalocaridid taxon, Hurdia. Here, examination of hundreds ofHurdia specimens from different stratigraphical layers within the Burgess Shale and Stephen Formation, combined with statistical analyses, provides a detailed description of the taphonomy, morphology and diversity of the genus and further elucidates anomalocaridid systematics. Hurdiais distinguished from other anomalocaridids in having mouthparts with extra rows of teeth, a large frontal carapace complex and diminutive swimming flaps with prominent setal structures. The two original species, H. victoria Walcott, 1912 and H. triangulata Walcott, 1912, are confirmed based on morphometric outline analyses of the frontal carapace components combined with stratigraphical evidence; a third species, Hurdia dentata Simonetta & Delle Cave, 1975, is synonymized with H. victoria. Morphology, preservation and stratigraphical distribution suggest that H. victoria and H. triangulata share the same type of frontal appendage; a second type of appendage, previously assigned to Hurdia (Morph A), belongs to Peytoia nathorsti. These and other morphological differences between the anomalocaridids may reflect different feeding strategies. Appendages and mouthparts of Hurdia indet. sp. are also identified from the Spence Shale Member of Utah, making Hurdia and Anomalocaris the most common and globally distributed anomalocaridid taxa.

  • 206.
    Daley, Allison C.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    Royal Ontario Museum.
    Edgecombe, Gregory D.
    Natural History Museum, London.
    Collins, Desmond
    The Burgess Shale Anomalocaridid Hurdia and Its Significance for Early Euarthropod Evolution2009Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 323, nr 5921, s. 1597-1600Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As the largest predators of the Cambrian seas, the anomalocaridids had an important impact in structuring the first complex marine animal communities, but many aspects of anomalocaridid morphology, diversity, ecology, and affinity remain unclear owing to a paucity of specimens. Here we describe the anomalocaridid Hurdia, based on several hundred specimens from the Burgess Shale in Canada. Hurdia possesses a general body architecture similar to Anomalocaris and Laggania, including the presence of exceptionally well-preserved gills, but differs from those anomalocaridids by possessing a prominent anterior carapace structure. These features amplify and clarify the diversity of known anomalocaridid morphology and provide insight into the origins of important arthropod features, such as the head shield and respiratory exites.

  • 207.
    Daley, Allison C.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    A possible anomalocaridid from the Cambrian Sirius Passet lagerstätte, North Greenland2010Ingår i: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 84, nr 2, s. 352-355Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sirius Passet biota of North Greenland is one of the oldest Cambrian lagerstätten, and although it is dominated by non-mineralized arthropods and lobopods, anomalocaridids have never been identified. Based on a single specimen, we herein describe for the first time an appendage with possible anomalocaridid affinities as suggested by an overall gross morphology similar to that of the frontal appendage of Anomalocaris from other localitites. Tamisiocaris borealis n. gen. and n. sp. has an elongated appendage with paired spines along one margin, and differs from the frontal appendage of Anomalocaris in that segment boundaries are absent and ventral spines are relatively long and spineless. These differences may be taphonomic, but the entire surface of the appendage is covered in a fine fabric, making it unlikely that this appendage was originally segmented or sclerotized. The taxon is tentatively placed within Radiodonta, but this systematic placement cannot be confirmed while complete body specimens are lacking.

  • 208.
    Damen, Wim
    et al.
    Universität zu Köln.
    Janssen, Ralf
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Prpic, Nikola-Michael
    Universität zu Köln.
    Pair rule gene orthologs in spider segmentation2005Ingår i: Evolution & Development, ISSN 1520-541X, E-ISSN 1525-142X, Vol. 7, nr 6, s. 618-628Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The activation of pair rule genes is the first indication of the metameric organization of the Drosophila embryo and thus forms a key step in the segmentation process. There are two classes of pair rule genes in Drosophila: the primary pair rule genes that are directly activated by the maternal and gap genes and the secondary pair rule genes that rely on input from the primary pair rule genes. Here we analyze orthologs of Drosophila primary and secondary pair rule orthologs in the spider Cupiennius salei. The expression patterns of the spider pair rule gene orthologs can be subdivided in three groups: even-skipped and runt-1 expression is in stripes that start at the posterior end of the growth zone and their expression ends before the stripes reach the anterior end of the growth zone, while hairy and pairberry-3 stripes also start at the posterior end, but do not cease in the anterior growth zone. Stripes of odd-paired, odd-skipped-related-1, and sloppy paired are only found in the anterior portion of the growth zone. The various genes thus seem to be active during different phases of segment specification. It is notable that the spider orthologs of the Drosophila primary pair rule genes are active more posterior in the growth zone and thus during earlier phases of segment specification than most orthologs of Drosophila secondary pair rule genes, indicating that parts of the hierarchy might be conserved between flies and spiders. The spider ortholog of the Drosophila pair rule gene fushi tarazu is not expressed in the growth zone, but is expressed in a Hox-like fashion. The segmentation function of fushi tarazu thus appears to be a newly acquired role of the gene in the lineage of the mandibulate arthropods.

    PMID:16336415

  • 209.
    Damen, Wim
    et al.
    Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Dep. of genetics .
    Prpic, Nikola-Michael
    Johann-Friedrich-Blumenbach-Institut für Zoologie und Anthropologie.
    Janssen, Ralf
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Embryonic development and the understanding of the adult body plan in myriapods2009Ingår i: Soil Organisms, ISSN 1864 - 6417, Vol. 81, nr 3, s. 337-346Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The adult body plan is laid down during embryonic and post-embryonic development of an organism. Here we review two examples for how data on gene expression during embryonic development have changed our understanding of the adult body plan of myriapods. Gene expression studies in the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima (Leach, 1817) have demonstrated that a developmental constraint underlies the always-odd number of leg bearing segments in geophilomorph centipedes. Similarly, data on gene expression in the millipede Glomeris marginata (Villers, 1789) have demonstrated a decoupling of dorsal and ventral segmentation, which provided an explanation for the discrepancy in dorsal and ventral structures in the body of millipedes. Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying embryonic development therefore significantly contributes to understanding morphological features of the adult myriapod body.

  • 210. Davies, Neil
    et al.
    Gibling, Martin R.
    McMahon, William J.
    Slater, Ben
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Long, Darrel G. F.
    Bashforth, Arden R.
    Berry, Christopher M.
    Falcon-Lang, Howard J.
    Gupta, Sanjeev
    Rygel, Michael C.
    Wellman, Charles H.
    Discussion on ‘Tectonic and environmental controls on Palaeozoic fluvial environments: reassessing the impacts of early land plants on sedimentation’2017Ingår i: Journal of the Geological Society, ISSN 0016-7649, E-ISSN 2041-479X, Vol. 174, s. 947-950Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The first-order importance of tectonic and environmental controlsfor terrigenous sediment supply has rarely been questioned, but the role of vegetation in the modification of ancient alluvial signatures has been observed since the mid-20th century (Vogt 1941). Studies of sparsely vegetated rivers (Schumm 1968) and alluvial stratigraphic variation (Cotter 1978; Davies & Gibling 2010) led to observations of (1) plant modulation of alluvial signatures and (2) Palaeozoic facies shifts (PFS): unidirectional changes to facies diversity and frequency, in stratigraphic alliance with the plant fossil record. One PFS is the Siluro-Devonian appearance of mud rich, architecturally complex alluvium, traditionally ascribed to meandering rivers, and sedimentologically distinct from pre vegetation strata (Davies & Gibling 2010; Long 2011). Using selected secondary data, Santos et al. (2017) dispute the correlation of these observations using three key points, as follows. (1) The mid-Palaeozoic was typified by orogenic assembly of low-gradient equatorial continents and elevated sea level, which led to tropical weathering (abundant fine sediment) and extensive alluvial plains. This drove the PFS by promoting river meandering independently of vegetation. (2) Meandering does not require vegetation; this is shown by examples in Precambrian deposits, on other planets, and in ‘non-vegetated’ deserts. Meandering rivers were more abundant than the pre vegetation rock record suggests, owing to selective bypass and deflation of fine material. (3) Early Siluro-Devonian (meaning Ludlow–Early Devonian) land plants were too small, their biomass and cover too limited, and their wetland habitat too narrow to have stabilized meandering channels, influencing landscape little more than earlier microbial communities. We contest the conclusions and method of the paper, and deal with each point in turn.

  • 211. de Boer, Erik J.
    et al.
    Hooghiemstra, Henry
    Florens, F. B. Vincent
    Baider, Claudia
    Engels, Stefan
    Dakos, Vasilis
    Blaauw, Maarten
    Bennett, Keith D.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Rapid succession of plant associations on the small ocean island of Mauritius at the onset of the Holocene2013Ingår i: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 68, s. 114-125Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The island of Mauritius offers the opportunity to study the poorly understood vegetation response to climate change on a small tropical oceanic island. A high-resolution pollen record from a 10 m long peat core from Kanaka Crater (560 m elevation, Mauritius, Indian Ocean) shows that vegetation shifted from a stable open wet forest Last Glacial state to a stable closed-stratified-tall-forest Holocene state. An ecological threshold was crossed at similar to 11.5 cal ka BP, propelling the forest ecosystem into an unstable period lasting similar to 4000 years. The shift between the two steady states involves a cascade of four abrupt (<150 years) forest transitions in which different tree species dominated the vegetation for a quasi-stable period of respectively similar to 1900, similar to 1100 and similar to 900 years. We interpret the first forest transition as climate-driven, reflecting the response of a small low topography oceanic island where significant spatial biome migration is impossible. The three subsequent forest transitions are not evidently linked to climate events, and are suggested to be driven by internal forest dynamics. The cascade of four consecutive events of species turnover occurred at a remarkably fast rate compared to changes during the preceding and following periods, and might therefore be considered as a composite tipping point in the ecosystem. We hypothesize that wet gallery forest, spatially and temporally stabilized by the drainage system, served as a long lasting reservoir of biodiversity and facilitated a rapid exchange of species with the montane forests to allow for a rapid cascade of plant associations.

  • 212.
    De Vleeschouwer, David
    et al.
    Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine & Environm Sci, Klagenfurterstr 2-4, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Auer, Gerald
    Japan Agcy Marine Earth Sci & Technol JAMSTEC, Dept Biochem, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 2370061, Japan.
    Smith, Rebecca
    Univ Massachusetts, Dept Geosci, Amherst, MA 01003 USA.
    Bogus, Kara
    Texas A&M Univ, Int Ocean Discovery Program, College Stn, TX 77845 USA.
    Christensen, Beth
    Adelphi Univ, Environm Studies Program, Garden City, NY 11530 USA.
    Groeneveld, Jeroen
    Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine & Environm Sci, Klagenfurterstr 2-4, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Petrick, Benjamin
    Max Planck Inst Chem, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Henderiks, Jorijntje
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Castaneda, Isla S.
    Univ Massachusetts, Dept Geosci, Amherst, MA 01003 USA.
    O'Brien, Evan
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Geol & Geophys, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.
    Ellinghausen, Maret
    Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine & Environm Sci, Klagenfurterstr 2-4, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Gallagher, Stephen J.
    Univ Melbourne, Sch Earth Sci, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Fulthorpe, Craig S.
    Univ Texas Austin, Jackson Sch Geosci, Inst Geophys, Austin, TX 78758 USA.
    Paelike, Heiko
    Univ Bremen, MARUM Ctr Marine & Environm Sci, Klagenfurterstr 2-4, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    The amplifying effect of Indonesian Throughflow heat transport on Late Pliocene Southern Hemisphere climate cooling2018Ingår i: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, ISSN 0012-821X, E-ISSN 1385-013X, Vol. 500, s. 15-27Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An unusually short glaciation interrupted the warm Pliocene around 3.3 Ma (Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2). Different hypotheses exist to explain why this glaciation event was so pronounced, and why the global climate system returned to warm Pliocene conditions relatively quickly afterwards. One of these proposed mechanisms is a reduced equator-to-pole heat transfer, in response to a tectonically reduced Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). The ITF is a critical part of the global thermohaline ocean circulation, transporting heat from the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool to the Indian Ocean. When ITF connectivity is reduced, the water and heat supply for the Leeuwin Current, flowing poleward along Australia's west coast, is also diminished. To assess the possible relationship between mid-Pliocene glaciations and latitudinal heat transport through the Indonesian Throughflow, we constructed a multi-proxy orbital scale record for the 3.7-2.8 Ma interval from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site U1463, off northwest Australia. The comparison of the Site U1463 record with paleoclimate records from nearby Site 763 and West Pacific Warm Pool Site 806 allows for a detailed regional reconstruction of Pliocene paleoceanography and thus for testing the proposed hypothesis. An astronomically-paced decrease in potassium content characterizes the late Pliocene interval of U1463. This record documents the increasing aridity of northwest Australia, periodically alleviated by reinforced summer monsoon precipitation under summer insolation maxima. The 3180 record of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer correlates exceptionally well with the sea surface temperature (SST) record from Site 806 in the West Pacific Warm Pool, even during MIS M2. Hence, Site U1463 preserves an uninterrupted ITF signal even during Pliocene glaciations. However, the U1463 delta O-18(G.sacculifer) record exhibits a 0.5 parts per thousand offset with the nearby Site 763A record around MIS M2. This implies that Site 763A, about 500 km west of U1463, more closely tracks Indian Ocean SST records across MIS M2. The U1463 data reveal that heat-transport through the Indonesian Throughflow did not shut down completely during MIS M2, but rather its intensity decreased prior to and during MIS M2, causing Site 763A to temporarily reflect an Indian Ocean, rather than an ITF signal. We conclude that ITF variability significantly influenced latitudinal heat transport by means of the Leeuwin Current and hence contributed to the relative intensity of MIS M2. We propose the ITF valve between the Pacific and Indian Ocean as a positive feedback mechanism, in which an initial sea level lowering reduces ITF heat transport, in turn amplifying global cooling by advancing the thermal isolation of Antarctica.

  • 213. Degtyarev, D.D:
    et al.
    Tolmacheva, T.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Oblique slides and their position in lateral row of the Early Paleozoic structures of the Chingiz Mountain Range (East Kazakhstan)2005Ingår i: Notes on Regional Tectonic. 2. Kazakhstan, Tian-hanâ, Polar Ural, Vol. 2, s. 44-68Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 214.
    den Boer, Wendy
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Evolutionary Progression of the Iconic Australasian Kangaroos, Rat-Kangaroos, and their Fossil Relatives (Marsupialia: Macropodiformes)2018Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The exceptionally diverse macropodiform’s (kangaroos, rat-kangaroos and their fossil allies) currently have a fossil record that spans from the late Oligocene to the Holocene with an Australasian widespread fossil occurence. The origins of the macropodiforms are believed to have been during the Eocene possibly having split from the Phalangeridae. This is largely based on molecular data as there is a complete lack of macropodiform fossil material prior to the late Oligocene leaving the origins of the macropodiforms to be largely speculative. Thus, late Oligocene rat-kangaroo dental fossil elements associated with Palaeopotorous priscus (which shares characteristics observed in both phalangerid and macropodiforms) were examined to get a better insight into the potential origins of the macropodiforms. The results obtained suggested that P. priscus is currently the most basal macropodiform known. Furthermore, due to the absence of adequate macropodiform post-cranial material, the functional eco-morphological interpretation of various macropodiform fossil taxa has been based largely on cranial and dental characteristics. Consequently, the examination of Miocene Balbaridae kangaroo’s (Balbaroo nalima and an untaxonomised balbarid) post-cranial elements was undertaken, suggesting an array of locomotion types (similar to living macropodiforms) and a likely persistent arboreal and quadrupedal lifestyle. In addition, the Pleistocene Protemnodon anak’s post-cranial material are examined, proposing a probable combination of quadrupedal bounding and a slow walking gait alternative to the eminent fast bipedal saltation seen in almost all extant macropodiforms.

    Delarbeten
    1. A New Species of the Basal "Kangaroo'' Balbaroo and a Re-Evaluation of Stem Macropodiform Interrelationships
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>A New Species of the Basal "Kangaroo'' Balbaroo and a Re-Evaluation of Stem Macropodiform Interrelationships
    Visa övriga...
    2014 (Engelska)Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, nr 11, s. e112705-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Exceptionally well-preserved skulls and postcranial elements of a new species of the plesiomorphic stem macropodiform Balbaroo have been recovered from middle Miocene freshwater limestone deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of northwestern Queensland, Australia. This constitutes the richest intraspecific sample for any currently known basal "kangaroo'', and, along with additional material referred to Balbaroo fangaroo, provides new insights into structural variability within the most prolific archaic macropodiform clade - Balbaridae. Qualitative and metric evaluations of taxonomic boundaries demonstrate that the previously distinct species Nambaroo bullockensis is a junior synonym of B. camfieldensis. Furthermore, coupled Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses reveal that our new Balbaroo remains represent the most derived member of the Balbaroo lineage, and are closely related to the middle Miocene B. camfieldensis, which like most named balbarid species is identifiable only from isolated jaws. The postcranial elements of Balbaroo concur with earlier finds of the stratigraphically oldest balbarid skeleton, Nambaroo gillespieae, and suggest that quadrupedal progression was a primary gait mode as opposed to bipedal saltation. All Balbaroo spp. have low-crowned bilophodont molars, which are typical for browsing herbivores inhabiting the densely forested environments envisaged for middle Miocene northeastern Australia.

    Nationell ämneskategori
    Geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240097 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0112705 (DOI)000345533200034 ()25409233 (PubMedID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2015-01-05 Skapad: 2015-01-05 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-22Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Is the Fossil Rat-Kangaroo Palaeopotorous pricus the Most Basally Branching Macropodiform?
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Is the Fossil Rat-Kangaroo Palaeopotorous pricus the Most Basally Branching Macropodiform?
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Annan geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
    Forskningsämne
    Geovetenskap med inriktning mot historisk geologi och paleontologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339580 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2018-01-21 Skapad: 2018-01-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-31Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Autopodial Anatomy Elucidate Climbing Ability in Miocene Balbarid 'kangaroos' (Marsupialia, Macropodifromes)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Autopodial Anatomy Elucidate Climbing Ability in Miocene Balbarid 'kangaroos' (Marsupialia, Macropodifromes)
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Annan geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
    Forskningsämne
    Geovetenskap med inriktning mot historisk geologi och paleontologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339581 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2018-01-21 Skapad: 2018-01-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-31Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. Functional Eco-Morphology of the 'Giant Extinct Wallaby' Protemnodon anak from Morwell Local Fauna, Victoria, Australia
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Functional Eco-Morphology of the 'Giant Extinct Wallaby' Protemnodon anak from Morwell Local Fauna, Victoria, Australia
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Annan geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
    Forskningsämne
    Geovetenskap med inriktning mot historisk geologi och paleontologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339582 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2018-01-21 Skapad: 2018-01-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-31Bibliografiskt granskad
    5. Systematic Review of the Fossil Macropodiformes (Kangaroo, Rat-Kangaroos, and their Allies)
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Systematic Review of the Fossil Macropodiformes (Kangaroo, Rat-Kangaroos, and their Allies)
    (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Annan geovetenskap och miljövetenskap
    Forskningsämne
    Geovetenskap med inriktning mot historisk geologi och paleontologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339583 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2018-01-21 Skapad: 2018-01-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-31Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 215.
    den Boer, Wendy
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Locomotory Evolution in Macropodiforms (Kangaroos and Rat-kangaroos)2016Licentiatavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 216.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Campione, Nicolas E.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Autopodial Anatomy Elucidate Climbing Ability in Miocene Balbarid 'kangaroos' (Marsupialia, Macropodifromes)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 217.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Swedish Nat Hist Museum, Dept Palaeobiol, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Campione, Nicolás E.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Evolution och utvecklingsbiologi. Univ New England, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Sch Environm & Rural Sci, Armidale, NSW 2531, Australia.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Climbing adaptations, locomotory disparity and ecological convergence in ancient stem 'kangaroos'2019Ingår i: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 6, nr 2, artikel-id 181617Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Living kangaroos, wallabies and rat-kangaroos (Macropodoidea) constitute the most ecologically diverse radiation of Australasian marsupials. Indeed, even their hallmark bipedal hopping gait has been variously modified for bounding, walking and climbing. However, the origins of this locomotory adaptability are uncertain because skeletons of the most ancient macropodoids are exceptionally rare. Some of the stratigraphically oldest fossils have been attributed to Balbaridae-a clade of potentially quadrupedal stem macropodoids that became extinct during the late Miocene. Here we undertake the first assessment of balbarid locomotion using two-dimensional geometric morphometrics and a correlative multivariate analysis of linear measurements. We selected the astragalus and pedal digit IV ungual as proxies for primary gait because these elements are preserved in the only articulated balbarid skeleton, as well as some unusual early Miocene balbarid-like remains that resemble the bones of modern tree-kangaroos. Our results show that these fossils manifest character states indicative of contrasting locomotory capabilities. Furthermore, predictive modelling reveals similarities with extant macropodoids that employ either bipedal saltation and/or climbing. We interpret this as evidence for archetypal gait versatility, which probably integrated higher-speed hopping with slower-speed quadrupedal progression and varying degrees of scansoriality as independent specializations for life in forest and woodland settings.

  • 218.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Functional Eco-Morphology of the 'Giant Extinct Wallaby' Protemnodon anak from Morwell Local Fauna, Victoria, AustraliaManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 219.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Is the Fossil Rat-Kangaroo Palaeopotorous pricus the Most Basally Branching Macropodiform?Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 220.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Is the fossil rat-kangaroo Palaeopotorous priscus the most basally branching stem macropodiform?2018Ingår i: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 38, nr 2, artikel-id e1428196Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 221. Devaere, Lea
    et al.
    Clausen, Sebastien
    Javier Alvaro, J.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Vachard, Daniel
    Terreneuvian Orthothecid (Hyolitha) Digestive Tracts from Northern Montagne Noire, France; Taphonomic, Ontogenetic and Phylogenetic Implications2014Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. e88583-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 285 specimens of Conotheca subcurvata with three-dimensionally preserved digestive tracts were recovered from the Terreneuvian (early Cambrian) Heraultia Limestone of the northern Montagne Noire, southern France. They represent one of the oldest occurrences of such preserved guts. The newly discovered operculum of some complete specimens provides additional data allowing emendation of the species diagnosis. Infestation of the U-shaped digestive tracts by smooth uniseriate, branching to anastomosing filaments along with isolated botryoidal coccoids attests to their early, microbially mediated phosphatisation. Apart from taphonomic deformation, C. subcurvata exhibits three different configurations of the digestive tract: (1) anal tube and gut parallel, straight to slightly undulating; (2) anal tube straight and loosely folded gut; and (3) anal tube straight and gut straight with local zigzag folds. The arrangement of the digestive tracts and its correlation with the mean apertural diameter of the specimens are interpreted as ontogenetically dependent. The simple U-shaped gut, usually considered as characteristic of the Hyolithida, developed in earlier stages of C. subcurvata, whereas the more complex orthothecid type-3 only appears in largest specimens. This growth pattern suggests a distinct phylogenetic relationship between these two hyolith orders through heterochronic processes.

  • 222. Devaere, Lea
    et al.
    Holmer, Lars Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Clausen, Sebastien
    Vachard, Daniel
    Oldest mickwitziid brachiopod from the Terreneuvian of southern France2015Ingår i: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 60, nr 3, s. 755-768Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Kerberellus marcouensis Devaere, Holmer, and Clausen gen. et sp. nov., originally described as Dictyonina? sp., from the Terreneuvian of northern Montagne Noire (France) is reinterpreted as the oldest relative to or member of mickwitziid-like stem-group brachiopods. Were extracted 170 partial to complete phosphatic internal moulds of two types of adult and one type of juvenile disarticulated valves, rarely externally coated with phosphates, from the calcareous Heraultia Member of the Marcou Formation. They correspond to microbially infested, ventribiconvex, inequivalved, bivalved shells. The ventral interarea is bisected by a triangular sinus. The shell, most probably dominantly organic in origin, is orthogonally pierced throughout its entire thickness by radially-aligned, smooth-walled, cylindrical to hourglass shaped canals except for the sub-apical planar field (interarea). The through-going canals of K. marcouensis are compared with brachiopods endopunctae and with canals of mickwitziid brachiopods. The absence of striations on K. marcouensis canal walls, typical of mickwitziids, implies that (i) the tubes could have been depleted of setae or; (ii) traces of the microvilli were not preserved on the tube wall (taphonomic bias) or, (iii) the tubes could have been associated with an outer epithelial follicle.

  • 223. Dronov, A. V.
    et al.
    Holmer, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Palaeobiology.
    Ordovician Eustacy2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 224.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    The tergomyan Mollusc Carcassonnella from the Upper Ordovician of Girvan, Scotland2008Ingår i: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 51, nr Part 3, s. 663-675Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The tergomyan genus Carcassonnella Horny´ and Peel, 1996 is common in and characteristic of the Mediterranean Province in peri-Gondwanan terranes during the late Tremadoc and Arenig. It is united with other small, slitbearingcyrtonellids in the Carcassonnellidae Horny´ , 1997b, of which Baltiscanella Horny´ , 1997b from the Arenig of the Oslo Region, Norway, and Sarkanella from the Caradoc of the Siljan District, Sweden has been recognized outside the Mediterranean Province. The most inclusive view of the Carcassonnellidae unites Peelerophon Yochelson, 1982, Carcassonnella Horny´ and Peel, 1996, Sarkanella Horny´ , 1997a, Baltiscanella Horny´ , 1997b, and Tachillanella Horny´ , 1997b. Patterns of distribution of genera in the family are obscured, however, by widely different phylogenetic relationships presented in the literature. Here, Carcassonnella multilineata (Reed, 1920) is documented in the upper Whitehouse and Drummuck subgroups of the Girvan district, Midland Valley of Scotland, being the first record of the genus outside peri-Gondwana. Its enigmatic occurrence on the edge of Laurentia is opposed to the occurrence of low latitude benthic faunas in higher latitudes during this time interval (the Boda Event). It is likely, therefore, that the genus spread from the ancient stock found on the Perunican microcontinent as this drifted away from Gondwana in the mid-Caradoc.

  • 225.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Isakar, Mare
    Microgastropods in the Ordovician of Baltoscandia: potentials and prospects2004Ingår i: WOGOGOB-2004 Conference materials, 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 226.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Eight meeting on the Working Group on Ordovician Geology of Baltoscandia (WOGOGOB 2004)2004Rapport (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 227.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Gastropods of the Pentland Hills2007Ingår i: Silurian fossils of the Pentland Hills, Scotland, The Palaeontological Association, London , 2007, s. 109-122Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 228.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Magne, Høyberget
    Redescription of Holmia inusitata (Trilobita) from the Lower Cambrian of Scandinavia2003Ingår i: Palaeontology, Vol. 46, nr 5, s. 1039-1054Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 229.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Current oriented nautiloids from the O/S boundary at Osmundsberget, Siljan District, Dalarna, Sweden2007Ingår i: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi & Paleontologi X, Abstracts with Programme, 19, 2007, s. 44-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 230.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Mass concentration of nautiloids and associated fauna in the Late Ordovician at Osmundsberget, Siljan District, Dalarna, Sweden2007Ingår i: WOGOGOB 2007, 9th meeting of the WOrking Group on Ordovician Geology Of Baltoscandia: Fieldguide and Abstracts, 2007, s. 110-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 231.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Frýda, Jiri
    Czech Geological Survey.
    Wagner, Peter
    Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution.
    Horný, Radvan
    Department of Palaeontology, National Museum, Czech Republic.
    Isakar, Mare
    The Museum of Geology of the University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Stewart, Sarah
    National Museum of Scotland.
    Bertero, Verònica
    CICTERRA-CONICET, Centro de Investigaciones Paleobiológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
    Rohr, David M.
    Department of Earth and Physical Sciences, Sul Ross State University, Alpine, TX 79832, USA.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Blodgett, Robert B.
    2821 Kingfisher Drive, Anchorage, AK 99502, USA.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Biogeography of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids2013Ingår i: Memoir Geological Society of London, Vol. 38, s. 199-220Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographical distribution of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids has beenanalysed on a generic level. The dataset contains 334 genera and 2769 species, yielding 1231 records of genera with 2274 occurrencesworldwide. There is a bias towards eastern Laurentia, Baltica and Perunica records. Some 53.1% of the records are Ordovician. The study demonstrates that these molluscs are well suited to being used to improve understanding of Ordovician and Silurian biogeographicalprovinciality. Specific points are that: a Lower Ordovician assemblage is evident in Laurentia; the fauna of the Argentinean Precordillera is Laurentian until the Darriwilian, when taxa are shared with North China; Late Silurian gastropods from the Alexander terrane (SE Alaska) are unknown in Laurentia, but support a rift origin of this terrane from NE Siberia; Perunica, Ibero-Armorica and Morocco cluster together throughout the Ordovician but Perunica and Morocco are closer; Darriwilian–Sandbian deep-water Bohemian taxaoccur in Baltica; a Laurentian–Baltica proximity is unsupported until the Silurian; Siberia clusters with North China and eastern Laurentia during the Tremadocian–Darriwilian; during the Gorstian–Pridoli Siberia clusters with the Farewell and Alexander terranes; North China may have been close to Laurentia and the Argentinean margin of Gondwana; and the affinity of Tarim taxa is problematic.

  • 232.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet.
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Martma, Tonu
    Kaljo, Dimitri
    Kroger, Bjorn
    Parnaste, Helje
    Terminal Ordovician stratigraphy of the Siljan district, Sweden2015Ingår i: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 137, nr 1, s. 36-56Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of new isotopic data and earlier biostratigraphic information from eight sections through the terminal Ordovician (Pirgu and Porkuni stages) of the Siljan district, Sweden, allows a more precise correlation of sections in terms of biostratigraphy and carbon isotope dating. Four levels with positive delta C-13 excursions are identified (from bottom) - the Moe, an unnamed excursion, Paroveja and Hirnantian Carbon Isotope Excursion (HICE). The delta C-13 values through the Boda Limestone are 1-2 parts per thousand higher than usual in Baltica, only the values for the HICE remains within what is expected. Background values increase from 1.5 parts per thousand in the bottom of the core of the Boda Limestone up to 3 parts per thousand in the top of it. The HICE is identified in five of eight sections and the main peak falls according to inferred correlation within the Metabolograptus persculptus Biozone, at or close to the Hindella beds in the Upper Boda Member. The late Katian (Pirgu) age of Holorhynchus in the Siljan district is clear and its co-occurrence with the chitinozoan Belonechitina gamachiana in Estonia supports a Katian age for this zone. The base of the Ozarkodina hassi Biozone may occur within units B-C of the Upper Boda Member and in the upper part of the Loka Formation and most likely is correlated with the M. persculptus Biozone. The Hirnantia-Dalmanitina faunas reported from the lowermost part of the Loka Formation and units B-D of the Upper Boda Member seem to range through all the Hirnantian, but detailed morphological studies allow to distinguish an older (=extraordinarius) and a younger (=persculptus) fauna.

  • 233.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E. S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Shell repair following failed predation in two Upper Ordovician brachiopods from central Sweden2000Ingår i: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, Vol. 122, s. 307-312Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Shell repair is reported in two dorsal valves of the brachiopod Strophomena? arachnoidea Lindstrom, 1880 from the lower Ashgill Fjacka Formation of the Siljan district, Dalarna. The most severe case displays a large wedge-shaped injury that cuts back abou

  • 234.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Gastropods and macheridians of the Baltic late Ordovician1999Ingår i: Acta Universitatis Carolinae Geologica: Quo vadis Ordovician? Short papers of the 8th International Symposium on the Ordovician System (Prague, June 20-25,1999), 1999, s. 401-404Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 235.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Locality descriptions, the Siljan District: WOGOGOB 2007. 9th meeting of the Working Group on Ordovician Geology of Baltoscandia. Field guide and Abstracts2007Ingår i: Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning, Rapporter och Meddelanden, ISSN 0349-2176, Vol. 128, s. 52-58Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 236.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Ordovician of the Siljan District, Sweden2007Ingår i: Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning, Rapporter och Meddelanden, ISSN 0349-2176, nr 128, s. 7-26Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 237.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi. Paleobiologi.
    Trilobittens nye klær2002Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 238.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Gastropods and tergomyans from the Upper Ordovician (Viru–Harju) of the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden2013Ingår i: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 11, nr 3, s. 295-336Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse tergomyan and gastropod assemblage is described from the Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP)section of the Sandbian Stage, Upper Ordovician, in the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden. Deep water graptolitic mudstone and shale comprise the succession, and previously only one gastropod species was known. The new material spans the Sularp Formation through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilisDicellograptus complanatus biozones). Fourteen species are described: two tergomyan, five bellerophontoid gastropods, and seven anisostrophically coiled gastropods.Three species are new: Peelerophon hodites, Tetranota scanica and Lophospira sandbiana. Three taxa (Tritonophon subtrilobatus,Tetranota scanica and Holopea mobergi) are found high in the Lindegård Mudstone (Vormsi–Pirgu stages). Cyrtodiscus, Peelerophon and Tritonophon are recorded for the first time in Baltoscandia. Some taxa may have been transportedfrom shallower water settings, whereas species of Peelerophon, Joleaudella, Mestoronema and Sinuites may have been partof the local benthos. Except for Bucania erratica, no species are shared with the fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in Sweden. Deaechospira elliptica, common in the Dalby Limestone, is not recorded at Fågelsång, although two closely relatedspecies are found (Deaechospira rotunda and Deaechospira? sp.). The Fågelsång assemblage has more in common with the older to coeval fauna of the Elnes and Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region, Norway (e.g. sharing Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mestoronema and Pararaphistoma). The Sandbian fauna of Fågelsång includes peri-Gondwanan taxa, e.g. Cyrtodiscus,Peelerophon and Deaechospira. Nevertheless, cluster analysis reveals that the faunas of Baltica and Laurentia were most similar, whereas faunas from Perunica and Baltica remained distinct and separated during the Darriwilian–Sandbian. The few similarities may result from spread of a temperate fauna supplementing rather than replacing taxa in deep water assemblages.The main Fåagelsång assemblage coincides both with the Baltoscandian Middle Caradoc Faunal Turnover and the Gutenberg Carbon Isotope Excursion.

  • 239.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Enheten för musik och museer, Evolutionsmuseet. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Geovetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för geovetenskaper, Paleobiologi.
    Tergomyans, gastropods, and biogeography in the Upper Ordovician of the Fågelsång district, southern Sweden2009Ingår i: Absolutely final meeting of IGCP 503: Ordovician palaeogeography and palaeoclimate - Copenhagen 2009 - August 31 – September 4, Copenhagen: Geological Museum, Natural History Museums , 2009, s. 24-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Ordovician, deep-water graptolitic mudstone and shale formed in what is now the classical succession at Fågelsång, southern Sweden. Previously, only one gastropod species was described from the succession, but during this study diverse tergomyan and gastropod assemblages have been recognized both from outcrop and drill-core collections. The material spans the Sularp Shale through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilis − Dicellograptus complanatus Zones; Sandbian − Katian, Viru − Harju regional stages). Altogether 14 species are described; two tergomyan, five bellerophontoid gastropods, and six anisostrophically coiled gastropods. Three taxa (Tritonophon, Tetranota and Holopea) are found in the Lindegård mudstone. The first record of Tritonophon in the Ordovician of Baltoscandia occurs in the Fågelsång and nearby Röstånga area. The remaining taxa are from the Sularp, Skagen, and Mossen formations. Specimens may have been transported into the area from shallower settings, while species of Peelerophon, Cyrtodiscus, Joleaudella, and Sinuites, are interpreted as having been part of the local benthos. With the exception of Bucania and Deaechospira, no other taxa are common to the hitherto described gastropod fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in other parts of Sweden. The Fågelsång assemblages have more in common with the slightly older or coeval fauna of the Elnes to Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region (e.g. Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mestoronema, Pararaphistoma). The Sandbian taxa show similarities with peri-Gondwanan faunas (e.g. Peelerophon, Cyrtodiscus). Both Peelerophon and Cyrtodiscus are for the first time recorded from Baltoscandia. The hitherto endemic Baltoscandian taxon Deaechospira may also be recognized in Bohemia and Morocco.

  • 240.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Museer m.m., Evolutionsmuseet.