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  • 238801.
    Wu, Jinming
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity. School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, Heilongjiang, China.
    Yao, Yingxue
    Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong, China.
    Zhou, Liang
    School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, Heilongjiang, China.
    Chen, Ni
    School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, Heilongjiang, China.
    Yu, Huifeng
    State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
    Li, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Göteman, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Performance analysis of solo Duck wave energy converter arrays under motion constraints2017In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 139, p. 155-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the power capture performance of solo Duck wave energy converter (WEC) arrays. The barrier function method combined with a quasi-Newton BFGS optimization algorithm is applied to find the maximum captured power of the array when the Ducks are under motion constraints. Based on this optimized maximum captured power, the effects of separation distance, wave period, incident wave direction and Duck width on the array performance are investigated. For the two Ducks array, results show that the alternative constructive and destructive interaction stripes in the contour plot of the q-factor variation with non-dimensional separation distance are resulted from the diffracted wave pattern from each Duck, and the hydrodynamic interaction strength is reduced when constraints affect the performance. For the three Ducks array, the middle Duck shows larger variability of captured power than the side Ducks due to experiencing double in phase diffracted wave from the side ones. The captured power of the solo Duck WEC array is sensitive to incident wave direction, and arrays with Ducks of smaller width are found to have better performance in power capture efficiency.

  • 238802.
    Wu, Jinming
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity. Harbin Inst Technol, Sch Mechatron Engn, Harbin.
    Yao, Yingxue
    Harbin Inst Technol, Shenzhen Grad Sch, Shenzhen.
    Zhou, Liang
    Harbin Inst Technol, Sch Mechatron Engn, Harbin.
    Göteman, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Latching and Declutching Control of the Solo Duck Wave-Energy Converter with Different Load Types2017In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 2070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solo duck wave-energy converter (WEC) captures power in a point absorber manner, hence it exhibits high power-capture efficiency within only a narrow bandwidth. Passive control is characterized by a unidirectional power flow, and thus its engineering implementation can be simplified. In this paper, two typical passive control strategies, latching and declutching control, are applied to the solo duck WEC to improve its power-capture performance at wave periods larger and smaller than the natural period of the WEC, respectively. Special attention is paid to the peak value of instantaneous WEC performance parameters, including the peak motion excursion, the peak power take-off (PTO) moment, and the peak-to-average power ratio, when the captured power is maximized. Performance differences between the linear and coulomb loads are also investigated. Results show that both latching and declutching control can effectively improve captured power, but also incidentally increase the peak motion excursion and peak-to-average power ratio. When under latching and declutching control, the coulomb load leads to the same maximum relative capture width and peak motion excursion as the linear load, but presents smaller peak PTO moment and peak-to-average power ratio than the linear load, hence making the coulomb load the better choice for the solo duck WEC.

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  • 238803.
    Wu, Jinming
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity. School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang, China.
    Zhao, Yingxue
    Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong, China.
    Zhou, Liang
    School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, Heilongjiang, China.
    Göteman, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Real-time latching control strategies for the solo Duck wave energy converter in irregular waves2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 222, p. 717-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a point absorber, the solo Duck wave energy converter (WEC) shows high power capture efficiency within a narrow bandwidth around the natural period. In this paper, real-time latching control is applied to the solo Duck WEC in irregular waves to improve its performance in sea states away from the natural period. Two predictive latching control strategies, in which one is close-to-optimal and the other is sub-optimal, and one non-predictive strategy are considered. The improvement of the WEC performance due to latching control is studied. Compared to the performance under simple resistive control, the three latching control strategies show almost equivalent control effect, leading to an average increase of the maximum relative capture width by around 70% and an average decrease of the optimal power take-off (PTO) damping coefficient by around 60%. Since the non-predictive strategy requires no prediction of future excitation force and WEC motion, it can be identified as the best choice for the solo Duck WEC under latching control. Although latching control leads to significant increase of fatigue load on the WEC hull like other advanced controls, it does not cause additional fatigue damage to the PTO.

  • 238804.
    Wu, Jiyue
    et al.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Engn & Mat Sci, Mile End Rd, London E1 4NS, England.
    Mahajan, Amit
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Engn & Mat Sci, Mile End Rd, London E1 4NS, England.
    Riekehr, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Zhang, Hangfeng
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, Mile End Rd, London E1 4NS, England.
    Yang, Bin
    Univ Chester, Fac Sci & Engn, Dept Elect & Elect Engn, Thornton Sci Pk, Chester CH2 4NU, Cheshire, England.
    Meng, Nan
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Engn & Mat Sci, Mile End Rd, London E1 4NS, England.
    Zhang, Zhen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Yan, Haixue
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Engn & Mat Sci, Mile End Rd, London E1 4NS, England.
    Perovskite Sr-x(Bi1-xNa0.97-xLi0.03)(0.5)TiO3 ceramics with polar nano regions for high power energy storage2018In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 50, p. 723-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dielectric capacitors are very attractive for high power energy storage. However, the low energy density of these capacitors, which is mainly limited by the dielectric materials, is still the bottleneck for their applications. In this work, lead-free single-phase perovskite Srx(Bi1-xNa0.97-xLi0.03)(0.5)TiO3 (x = 0.30 and 0.38) bulk ceramics, prepared using solid-state reaction method, were carefully studied for the dielectric capacitor application. Polar nano regions (PNRs) were created in this material using co-substitution at A-site to enable relaxor behaviour with low remnant polarization (P-r) and high maximum polarization (P-max). Moreover, P-max was further increased due to the electric field induced reversible phase transitions in nano regions. Comprehensive structural and electrical studies were performed to confirm the PNRs and reversible phase transitions. And finally a high energy density (1.70 J/cm(3)) with an excellent efficiency (87.2%) was achieved using the contribution of field-induced rotations of PNRs and PNR-related reversible transitions in this material, making it among the best performing lead-free dielectric ceramic bulk material for high energy storage.

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  • 238805. Wu, Lang
    et al.
    Shi, Wei
    Long, Jirong
    Guo, Xingyi
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    Beesley, Jonathan
    Bolla, Manjeet K
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Lu, Yingchang
    Cai, Qiuyin
    Al-Ejeh, Fares
    Rozali, Esdy
    Wang, Qin
    Dennis, Joe
    Li, Bingshan
    Zeng, Chenjie
    Feng, Helian
    Gusev, Alexander
    Barfield, Richard T
    Andrulis, Irene L
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Arndt, Volker
    Aronson, Kristan J
    Auer, Paul L
    Barrdahl, Myrto
    Baynes, Caroline
    Beckmann, Matthias W
    Benitez, Javier
    Bermisheva, Marina
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Bogdanova, Natalia V
    Bojesen, Stig E
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Brenner, Hermann
    Brinton, Louise
    Broberg, Per
    Brucker, Sara Y
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    Caldés, Trinidad
    Canzian, Federico
    Carter, Brian D
    Castelao, J Esteban
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    Chen, Xiaoqing
    Cheng, Ting-Yuan David
    Christiansen, Hans
    Clarke, Christine L
    Collée, Margriet
    Cornelissen, Sten
    Couch, Fergus J
    Cox, David
    Cox, Angela
    Cross, Simon S
    Cunningham, Julie M
    Czene, Kamila
    Daly, Mary B
    Devilee, Peter
    Doheny, Kimberly F
    Dörk, Thilo
    Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel
    Dumont, Martine
    Dwek, Miriam
    Eccles, Diana M
    Eilber, Ursula
    Eliassen, A Heather
    Engel, Christoph
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Fachal, Laura
    Fasching, Peter A
    Figueroa, Jonine
    Flesch-Janys, Dieter
    Fletcher, Olivia
    Flyger, Henrik
    Fritschi, Lin
    Gabrielson, Marike
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Gapstur, Susan M
    García-Closas, Montserrat
    Gaudet, Mia M
    Ghoussaini, Maya
    Giles, Graham G
    Goldberg, Mark S
    Goldgar, David E
    González-Neira, Anna
    Guénel, Pascal
    Hahnen, Eric
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Håkansson, Niclas
    Hall, Per
    Hallberg, Emily
    Hamann, Ute
    Harrington, Patricia
    Hein, Alexander
    Hicks, Belynda
    Hillemanns, Peter
    Hollestelle, Antoinette
    Hoover, Robert N
    Hopper, John L
    Huang, Guanmengqian
    Humphreys, Keith
    Hunter, David J
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Janni, Wolfgang
    John, Esther M
    Johnson, Nichola
    Jones, Kristine
    Jones, Michael E
    Jung, Audrey
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kerin, Michael J
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Kosma, Veli-Matti
    Kristensen, Vessela N
    Lambrechts, Diether
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Li, Jingmei
    Lindström, Sara
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Lo, Wing-Yee
    Loibl, Sibylle
    Lubinski, Jan
    Luccarini, Craig
    Lux, Michael P
    MacInnis, Robert J
    Maishman, Tom
    Kostovska, Ivana Maleva
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Manson, JoAnn E
    Margolin, Sara
    Mavroudis, Dimitrios
    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne
    Meindl, Alfons
    Menon, Usha
    Meyer, Jeffery
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Neven, Patrick
    Nielsen, Sune F
    Nordestgaard, Børge G
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I
    Olson, Janet E
    Olsson, Håkan
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Peto, Julian
    Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana
    Prentice, Ross
    Presneau, Nadege
    Pylkäs, Katri
    Rack, Brigitte
    Radice, Paolo
    Rahman, Nazneen
    Rennert, Gad
    Rennert, Hedy S
    Rhenius, Valerie
    Romero, Atocha
    Romm, Jane
    Rudolph, Anja
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Sandler, Dale P
    Sawyer, Elinor J
    Schmidt, Marjanka K
    Schmutzler, Rita K
    Schneeweiss, Andreas
    Scott, Rodney J
    Scott, Christopher G
    Seal, Sheila
    Shah, Mitul
    Shrubsole, Martha J
    Smeets, Ann
    Southey, Melissa C
    Spinelli, John J
    Stone, Jennifer
    Surowy, Harald
    Swerdlow, Anthony J
    Tamimi, Rulla M
    Tapper, William
    Taylor, Jack A
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Tessier, Daniel C
    Thomas, Abigail
    Thöne, Kathrin
    Tollenaar, Rob A E M
    Torres, Diana
    Truong, Thérèse
    Untch, Michael
    Vachon, Celine
    Van Den Berg, David
    Vincent, Daniel
    Waisfisz, Quinten
    Weinberg, Clarice R
    Wendt, Camilla
    Whittemore, Alice S
    Wildiers, Hans
    Willett, Walter C
    Winqvist, Robert
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Xia, Lucy
    Yang, Xiaohong R
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    Ziv, Elad
    Dunning, Alison M
    Pharoah, Paul D P
    Simard, Jacques
    Milne, Roger L
    Edwards, Stacey L
    Kraft, Peter
    Easton, Douglas F
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    Zheng, Wei
    A transcriptome-wide association study of 229,000 women identifies new candidate susceptibility genes for breast cancer.2018In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 968-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    , including 14 genes at loci not yet reported for breast cancer. We silenced 13 genes and showed an effect for 11 on cell proliferation and/or colony-forming efficiency. Our study provides new insights into breast cancer genetics and biology.

  • 238806.
    Wu, Lang
    et al.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA;Univ Hawaii Manoa, Canc Epidemiol Div, Populat Sci Pacific Program, Univ Hawaii Canc Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Wang, Jifeng
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA;Fifth Peoples Hosp Shanghai, Dept Urol, Shanghai, Peoples R China.
    Cai, Qiuyin
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Cavazos, Taylor B.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Emami, Nima C.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Program Biol & Med Informat, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA;Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Long, Jirong
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Lu, Yingchang
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Guo, Xingyi
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Bauer, Joshua A.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Biochem, Sch Med, Nashville, TN 37203 USA;Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Inst Chem Biol, High Throughput Screening Facil, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Pasaniuc, Bogdan
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA;Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Penney, Kathryn L.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Freedman, Matthew L.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England;Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, London, England;Inst Canc Res, London, England.
    Witte, John S.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Program Biol & Med Informat, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA;Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA;Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Keck Sch Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Eeles, Rosalind A.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England;Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, London, England;Inst Canc Res, London, England.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Ingr, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Benlloch, Sara
    Inst Canc Res, London, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Strangeways Res Lab, Cambridge, England.
    Henderson, Brian E.
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Keck Sch Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Conti, David, V
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Keck Sch Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Schumacher, Fredrick R.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Populat & Quantitat Hlth Sci, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Hosp Cleveland, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Easton, Douglas
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Strangeways Res Lab, Cambridge, England.
    Al Olama, Ali Amin
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Strangeways Res Lab, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Clin Neurosci, Cambridge, England.
    Muir, Kenneth
    Univ Manchester, Div Populat Hlth Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Oxford Rd, Manchester, Lancs, England;Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry, W Midlands, England.
    Berndt, Sonja, I
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Chanock, Stephen
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Weinstein, Stephanie
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Koutros, Stella
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Wildund, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Stevens, Victoria L.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Tangen, Catherine M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, Brisbane, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Qld, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Clements, Judith
    Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr BioResource APCB, Translat Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Pashayan, Nora
    UCL, Dept Appl Hlth Res, London, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Strangeways Lab, Cambridge, England.
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Univ Turku, Inst Biomed, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FI-20014 Turku, Finland;Turku Univ Hosp, Tyks Microbiol & Genet, Dept Med Genet, Turku, Finland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    West, Catharine
    Univ Manchester, Christie Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci,Div Canc Sci, Radiotherapy Related Res,Manchester NIHR Biomed R, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Mucci, Lorelei
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Tenon Hosp, CeRePP, Paris, France;UPMC Sorbonne Univ, GRC ONCOTYPE URO 5, Tenon Hosp, 4 Rue Chine, Paris, France.
    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, Aarhus, Denmark;Aarhus Univ, Dept Clin Med, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Grindedal, Eli Marie
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Oslo, Norway.
    Neal, David E.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Addenbrookes Hosp, Cambridge, England;Canc Res UK Cambridge Res Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Cambridge, England.
    Hamdy, Freddie C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Fac Med Sci, John Radcliffe Hosp, Oxford, England.
    Donovan, Jenny L.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol, Avon, England.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Univ Oxford, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Hamilton, Robert J.
    Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Rosenstein, Bany S.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Radiat Oncol, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Genet & Genom Sci, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Lu, Yong-Jie
    Queen Mary Univ London, Ctr Mol Oncol, Barts Canc Inst, John Vane Sci Ctr, London, England.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Kibel, Adam S.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Urol Surg, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Vega, Ana
    IDIS, Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom SERGAS, Grp Med Xenom, CIBERER, Santiago De Compostela, Spain.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Barcelona Inst Global Hlth ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain;CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;IMIM Hosp del Mar Res Inst, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.
    Park, Jong Y.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Tampa, FL USA.
    Stanford, Janet L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Newcomb, Lisa F.
    Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Sch Publ Hlth, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Urol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Herlev, Denmark.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTZ, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Maier, Christian
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Human Genet, Ulm, Germany.
    Kim, Jeri
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Genitourinary Med Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med Oncol, Sch Med, Stanford, CA USA;Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncol Inst Porto, Dept Genet, Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Biomed Sci Inst ICBAS, Porto, Portugal.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    City Hope Natl Med Ctr, Beckman Res Inst, Dept Populat Sci, Duarte, CA USA.
    De Ruyck, Kim
    Univ Ghent, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Basic Med Sci, Ghent, Belgium.
    Razack, Azad
    Univ Malaya, Dept Surg, Fac Med, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Gamulin, Marija
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Inst Human Genet, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kaneva, Radka
    Med Univ, Mol Med Ctr, Dept Med Chem & Biochem, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Univ Alberta, Dept Oncol, Cross Canc Inst, Edmonton, AB, Canada;Cross Canc Inst, Div Radiat Oncol, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
    Claessens, Frank
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Mol Endocrinol Lab, Dept Cellular & Mol Med, Leuven, Belgium.
    Townsend, Paul A.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Canc Res Ctr, Hlth Innovat Manchester,Fac Biol Med & Hlth,Div C, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr,NIHR Manchester Biom, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Gago Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hosp Univ Santiago, Genom Med Grp, Serv Galego Saude,Galician Fdn Genom Med,SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Santiago De Compostela, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA.
    Roobol, Monique J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Urol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Menegaux, Florence
    Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris Sud, Canc & Environm Grp, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP,INSERM, Villejuif, France.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Clin Gerontol Unit, Cambridge, England.
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa
    Univ Utah, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Genet Epidemiol, Salt Lake City, UT USA;Vet Affairs Med Ctr, George E Wahlen Dept, Salt Lake City, UT 84148 USA.
    Thibodeau, Stephen N.
    Univ Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, England;Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Blot, William J.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med, Nashville, TN 37203 USA;Int Epidemiol Inst, Rockville, MD USA.
    Riboli, Elio
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England.
    Identification of Novel Susceptibility Loci and Genes for Prostate Cancer Risk: A Transcriptome-Wide Association Study in over 140,000 European Descendants2019In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 79, no 13, p. 3192-3204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association study-identified prostate cancer risk variants explain only a relatively small fraction of its familial relative risk, and the genes responsible for many of these identified associations remain unknown. To discover novel prostate cancer genetic loci and possible causal genes at previously identified risk loci, we performed a transcriptome-wide association study in 79,194 cases and 61,112 controls of European ancestry. Using data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project, we established genetic models to predict gene expression across the transcriptome for both prostate models and cross-tissue models and evaluated model performance using two independent datasets. We identified significant associations for 137 genes at P < 2.61 x 10(-6), a Bonferroni-corrected threshold, including nine genes that remained significant at P < 2.61 x 10(-6) after adjusting for all known prostate cancer risk variants in nearby regions. Of the 128 remaining associated genes, 94 have not yet been reported as potential target genes at known loci. We silenced 14 genes and many showed a consistent effect on viability and colony-forming efficiency in three cell lines. Our study provides substantial new information to advance our understanding of prostate cancer genetics and biology. Significance: This study identifies novel prostate cancer genetic loci and possible causal genes, advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive prostate cancer.

  • 238807.
    Wu, Lanping
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Li, Guowei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Understanding ChineseConsumer's Intention toPurchase Smartwatches: A case of Apple Watch2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 238808.
    Wu, Lichuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Impact of surface gravity waves on air-sea fluxes and upper-ocean mixing2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface gravity waves play a vital role in the air-sea interaction. They can alter the turbulence ofthe bottom atmospheric layer as well as the upper-ocean layer. Accordingly, they can affect themomentum flux, heat fluxes, as well as the upper-ocean mixing. In most numerical models, waveinfluences are not considered or not fully considered. The wave influences on the atmosphereand the ocean are important for weather forecasts and climate studies. Here, different aspects ofwave impact on the atmosphere and the ocean are introduced into numerical models.In the first study, a wave-state-dependent sea spray generation function and Charnock co-efficient were applied to a wind stress parameterization under high wind speeds. The newlyproposed wind stress parameterization and a sea spray influenced heat flux parameterizationwere applied to an atmosphere-wave coupled model to study their influence on the simulationof mid-latitude storms. The new wind stress parameterization reduces wind speed simulationerror during high wind speed ranges and intensifies the storms. Adding the sea spray impacton heat fluxes improves the model performance concerning the air temperature. Adding the seaspray impact both on the wind stress and heat fluxes results in best model performance in allexperiments for wind speed, and air temperature.In the second study, the influence of surface waves on upper-ocean mixing was parameter-ized into a 1D k − ε ocean turbulence model though four processes (wave breaking, Stokes driftinteraction with the Coriolis force, Langmuir circulation, and stirring by non-breaking waves)based mainly on existing investigations. Considering all the effects of surface gravity waves,rather than just one effect, significantly improves model performance. The non-breaking-wave-induced mixing and Langmuir turbulence are the most important terms when considering theimpact of waves on upper-ocean mixing. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that vertical pro-files of the Stokes drift calculated from 2D wave spectrum improve the model performancesignificantly compared with other methods of calculating the vertical profiles of the Stokes drift.Introducing the wave influences in modelling systems, the results verified against measure-ments. Concluding from these studies for the further model development, the wave influencesshould be taken into account to improve the model performance.

    List of papers
    1. The impact of waves and sea spray on modelling storm track and development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of waves and sea spray on modelling storm track and development
    2015 (English)In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 67, article id 27967Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In high wind speed conditions, sea spray generated by intensely breaking waves greatly influences the wind stress and heat fluxes. Measurements indicate that the drag coefficient decreases at high wind speeds. The sea spray generation function (SSGF), an important term of wind stress parameterisation at high wind speeds, is usually treated as a function of wind speed/friction velocity. In this study, we introduce a wave-state-dependent SSGF and wave-age-dependent Charnock number into a high wind speed–wind stress parameterisation. The newly proposed wind stress parameterisation and sea spray heat flux parameterisation were applied to an atmosphere–wave coupled model to study the mid-latitude storm development of six storm cases. Compared with measurements from the FINO1 platform in the North Sea, the new wind stress parameterisation can reduce wind speed simulation errors in the high wind speed range. Considering only sea spray impact on wind stress (and not on heat fluxes) will intensify the storms (in terms of minimum sea level pressure and maximum wind speed), but has little effect on the storm tracks. Considering the impact of sea spray on heat fluxes only (not on wind stress) can improve the model performance regarding air temperature, but it has little effect on the storm intensity and storm track performance. If the impact of sea spray on both the wind stress and heat fluxes is taken into account, the model performs best in all experiments for minimum sea level pressure, maximum wind speed and air temperature.

    Keywords
    sea spray, wind stress, heat fluxes, storms
    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-263091 (URN)10.3402/tellusa.v67.27967 (DOI)000361746300001 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2015-09-25 Created: 2015-09-25 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
    2. Upper-ocean mixing due to surface gravity waves
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upper-ocean mixing due to surface gravity waves
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, ISSN 2169-9275, E-ISSN 2169-9291, Vol. 120, no 12, p. 8210-8228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Surface gravity waves play an important role in the lower layer of the atmosphere and the upper layer of the ocean. Surface waves effect upper-ocean mixing mainly through four processes: wave breaking, Stokes drift interaction with the Coriolis force, Langmuir circulation, and stirring by nonbreaking waves. We introduce the impact of these four processes into a 1-D  ocean turbulence model. The parameterizations used are based mainly on existing investigations. Comparison of simulation results and measurements demonstrates that considering all the effects of waves, rather than just one effect, significantly improves model performance. The nonbreaking-wave-induced mixing and Langmuir turbulence are the most important terms when considering the impact of waves on upper-ocean mixing. Under high-wave conditions, the turbulent mixing induced by nonbreaking waves can be of the same order of magnitude as the viscosity induced by other terms at the surface. Nonbreaking waves contribute very little to shear production and their impact is negligible in the models. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that the vertical profile of the Stokes drift calculated from the 2-D wave spectrum improves model performance significantly compared with other methods of introducing wave effects.

    Keywords
    ocean mixing; nonbreaking waves; Langmuir circulation; Coriolis-Stokes forcing; breaking waves
    National Category
    Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270913 (URN)10.1002/2015JC011329 (DOI)000369153200027 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-3902
    Available from: 2016-01-05 Created: 2016-01-05 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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  • 238809.
    Wu, Lichuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Introducing Surface Gravity Waves into Earth System Models2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface gravity waves alter the turbulence of the bottom atmosphere and the upper ocean. Accordingly, they can affect momentum flux, heat fluxes, gas exchange and atmospheric mixing. However, in most state-of-the-art Earth System Models (ESMs), surface wave influences are not fully considered or even included. Here, applying surface wave influences into ESMs is investigated from different aspects.

    Tuning parameterisations for including instantaneous wave influences has difficulties to capture wave influences. Increasing the horizontal resolution of models intensifies storm simulations for both atmosphere-wave coupled (considering the influence of instantaneous wave-induced stress) and stand-alone atmospheric models. However, coupled models are more sensitive to the horizontal resolution than stand-alone atmospheric models.

    Under high winds, wave states have a big impact on the sea spray generation. Introducing a wave-state-dependent sea spray generation function and Charnock coefficient into a wind stress parameterisation improves the model performance concerning wind speed (intensifies storms). Adding sea spray impact on heat fluxes improves the simulation results of air temperature. Adding sea spray impact both on the wind stress and heat fluxes results in better model performance on wind speed and air temperature while compared to adding only one wave influence.

    Swell impact on atmospheric turbulence closure schemes should be taken into account through three terms: the atmospheric mixing length scale, the swell-induced momentum flux at the surface, and the profile of swell-induced momentum flux. Introducing the swell impact on the three terms into turbulence closure schemes shows a better performance than introducing only one of the influences.

    Considering all surface wave impacts on the upper-ocean turbulence (wave breaking, Stokes drift interaction with the Coriolis force, Langmuir circulation, and stirring by non-breaking waves), rather than just one effect, significantly improves model performance. The non-breaking-wave-induced mixing and Langmuir circulation are the most important terms when considering the impact of waves on upper-ocean mixing.

    Accurate climate simulations from ESMs are very important references for social and biological systems to adapt the climate change. Comparing simulation results with measurements shows that adding surface wave influences improves model performance. Thus, an accurate description of all important wave impact processes should be correctly represented in ESMs, which are important tools to describe climate and weather. Reducing the uncertainties of simulation results from ESMs through introducing surface gravity wave influences is necessary.

    List of papers
    1. Surface Wave Impact When Simulating Midlatitude Storm Development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface Wave Impact When Simulating Midlatitude Storm Development
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, ISSN 0739-0572, E-ISSN 1520-0426, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 233-248Article in journal, News item (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Surface gravity waves, present at the air–sea interface, can affect the momentum flux and heat fluxes by modifying turbulence in the lower layers of the atmosphere. How to incorporate wave impacts into model parameterizations is still an open issue. In this study, the influence of a dynamic roughness length (considering instantaneous wave-induced stress), horizontal resolution, and the coupling time resolution between waves and the atmosphere on storm simulations are investigated using sensitivity experiments. Based on the sim- ulations of six midlatitude storms using both an atmosphere–wave coupled model and an atmospheric stand- alone model, the impacts are investigated. Adding the wave-induced stress weakens the storm intensity. Applying a roughness length tuned to an average friction velocity is not enough to capture the simulation results from ‘‘true’’ wave-related roughness length. High-horizontal-resolution models intensify the simula- tion of storms, which is valid for both coupled and uncoupled models. Compared with the atmospheric stand- alone model, the coupled model (considering the influence of dynamic roughness length) is more sensitive to the model horizontal resolution. During reasonable ranges, the coupling time resolution does not have a significant impact on the storm intensity based on the limited experiments used in this study. It is concluded that the dynamic wave influence (instantaneous wave influence) and the model resolution should be taken into account during the development of forecast and climate models.

    National Category
    Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313154 (URN)10.1175/JTECH-D-16-0070.1 (DOI)000391826300016 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-3902
    Available from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2017-01-17 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
    2. The impact of waves and sea spray on modelling storm track and development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of waves and sea spray on modelling storm track and development
    2015 (English)In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 67, article id 27967Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In high wind speed conditions, sea spray generated by intensely breaking waves greatly influences the wind stress and heat fluxes. Measurements indicate that the drag coefficient decreases at high wind speeds. The sea spray generation function (SSGF), an important term of wind stress parameterisation at high wind speeds, is usually treated as a function of wind speed/friction velocity. In this study, we introduce a wave-state-dependent SSGF and wave-age-dependent Charnock number into a high wind speed–wind stress parameterisation. The newly proposed wind stress parameterisation and sea spray heat flux parameterisation were applied to an atmosphere–wave coupled model to study the mid-latitude storm development of six storm cases. Compared with measurements from the FINO1 platform in the North Sea, the new wind stress parameterisation can reduce wind speed simulation errors in the high wind speed range. Considering only sea spray impact on wind stress (and not on heat fluxes) will intensify the storms (in terms of minimum sea level pressure and maximum wind speed), but has little effect on the storm tracks. Considering the impact of sea spray on heat fluxes only (not on wind stress) can improve the model performance regarding air temperature, but it has little effect on the storm intensity and storm track performance. If the impact of sea spray on both the wind stress and heat fluxes is taken into account, the model performs best in all experiments for minimum sea level pressure, maximum wind speed and air temperature.

    Keywords
    sea spray, wind stress, heat fluxes, storms
    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-263091 (URN)10.3402/tellusa.v67.27967 (DOI)000361746300001 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2015-09-25 Created: 2015-09-25 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
    3. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, ISSN 2169-9275, E-ISSN 2169-9291, Vol. 121, no 7, p. 4633-4648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress reduces the near-surface wind speed. Introducing the wave influence roughness length has a larger influence than does adding the swell influence on mixing. Compared with measurements, adding the swell influence on both atmospheric mixing and wind stress gives the best model performance for the wind speed. The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered when developing climate models.

    Keywords
    air-sea interaction; swell waves; wind stress; atmospheric mixing
    National Category
    Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302007 (URN)10.1002/2015JC011576 (DOI)000383468500013 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-3902
    Available from: 2016-08-27 Created: 2016-08-27 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    4. Atmospheric boundary layer turbulence closure scheme for wind-following swell conditions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atmospheric boundary layer turbulence closure scheme for wind-following swell conditions
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, ISSN 0022-4928, E-ISSN 1520-0469, Vol. 74, no 7, p. 2363-2382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Over the ocean, atmospheric boundary layer turbulence can be altered by underlying waves. Under swell conditions, the impact of waves on the atmosphere is more complicated compared to that under wind-wave conditions. Based on large-eddy simulation (LES), the wind-following swell impact on the atmospheric boundary layer is investigated through three terms: swell-induced surface momentum flux, the vertical profile of swell-induced momentum flux, and the swell impact on atmospheric mixing. The swell-induced surface momentum flux displays a decreasing trend with increasing atmospheric convection. The swell-induced momentum flux decays approximately exponentially with height. Compared with atmospheric convection, the decay coefficient is more sensitive to wave age. Atmospheric mixing is enhanced under swell conditions relative to a flat stationary surface. The swell impact on the atmospheric boundary layer is incorporated into a turbulence closure parameterization through the three terms. The modified turbulence closure parameterization is introduced into a single-column atmospheric model to simulate LES cases. Adding only the swell impact on the atmospheric mixing has a limited influence on wind profiles. Adding both the impact of swell on the atmospheric mixing and the profile of swell-induced momentum flux significantly improves the agreement between the 1D atmospheric simulation results and the LES results, to some extent simulating the wave-induced low-level wind jet. It is concluded that the swell impact should be included in atmospheric numerical models.

    National Category
    Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314757 (URN)10.1175/JAS-D-16-0308.1 (DOI)000405556700015 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-3902
    Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2017-10-24Bibliographically approved
    5. Upper-ocean mixing due to surface gravity waves
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upper-ocean mixing due to surface gravity waves
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, ISSN 2169-9275, E-ISSN 2169-9291, Vol. 120, no 12, p. 8210-8228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Surface gravity waves play an important role in the lower layer of the atmosphere and the upper layer of the ocean. Surface waves effect upper-ocean mixing mainly through four processes: wave breaking, Stokes drift interaction with the Coriolis force, Langmuir circulation, and stirring by nonbreaking waves. We introduce the impact of these four processes into a 1-D  ocean turbulence model. The parameterizations used are based mainly on existing investigations. Comparison of simulation results and measurements demonstrates that considering all the effects of waves, rather than just one effect, significantly improves model performance. The nonbreaking-wave-induced mixing and Langmuir turbulence are the most important terms when considering the impact of waves on upper-ocean mixing. Under high-wave conditions, the turbulent mixing induced by nonbreaking waves can be of the same order of magnitude as the viscosity induced by other terms at the surface. Nonbreaking waves contribute very little to shear production and their impact is negligible in the models. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that the vertical profile of the Stokes drift calculated from the 2-D wave spectrum improves model performance significantly compared with other methods of introducing wave effects.

    Keywords
    ocean mixing; nonbreaking waves; Langmuir circulation; Coriolis-Stokes forcing; breaking waves
    National Category
    Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270913 (URN)10.1002/2015JC011329 (DOI)000369153200027 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-3902
    Available from: 2016-01-05 Created: 2016-01-05 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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  • 238810.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Breivik, Øyvind
    Norwegian Meteorological Institute; Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Ocean‐Wave‐Atmosphere Interaction Processes in a Fully Coupled Modeling System2019In: Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, ISSN 1942-2466, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 3852-3874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high‐resolution coupled ocean‐wave‐atmosphere model (Uppsala University Coupled model, UU‐CM) of the Baltic Sea and the North Sea with improved representation of ocean‐wave‐atmosphere interaction processes is presented. In the UU‐CM model, the stress on the air‐sea interface is estimated as a balance of four stress terms, that is, the air‐side stress, ocean‐side stress, wave‐supported stress (absorption of momentum by the wave field), and the momentum flux from waves to currents (breaking waves). The vector differences between these four stress terms are considered in the coupled system. The turbulent kinetic energy flux induced by wave breaking, the Stokes‐Coriolis force and the Stokes drift material advection terms are added to the ocean circulation model component. Based on two‐month‐long (January and July) simulations, we find that the ocean‐wave‐atmosphere coupling has a significant influence on coastal areas. The coupled system captures the influence of surface currents and local systems such as coastal upwelling and their impact on the atmosphere. The wave‐current interaction enhances the upper ocean mixing and reduces the sea surface temperature in July significantly. However, the pattern of the wave‐current processes influences on the ocean current and waves are complex due to the stress differences in both magnitude and direction.

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  • 238811.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Hristov, Tihomir
    The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Maryland.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Vertical Profiles of Wave-Coherent Momentum Flux and Velocity Variances in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Laye2018In: Journal of Physical Oceanography, ISSN 0022-3670, E-ISSN 1520-0485, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 625-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wave-coherent momentum flux and velocity variances are investigated using a theoretical model and open-ocean measurements. The spectrum-integrated wave-coherent (SIWC) momentum flux and velocity variances decay roughly exponentially with height. The exponential decay coefficients of the SIWC momentum flux and velocity variances decrease with increasing peak wavenumber. The phases of the wave-coherent horizontal (vertical) velocity fluctuations are approximately 180° (90°) under waves with wind-wave angle |α1| < 90°. In general, the ratio of the SIWC momentum flux to the total momentum flux under swell conditions is higher than that under wind-wave conditions at the same height. At a height of 9.9 m, the SIWC vertical (horizontal) velocity variances can exceed 30% (10%) of the total vertical (horizontal) velocity variances at high wave ages. The impact of SIWC momentum flux on wind profiles is determined mainly by the surface SIWC momentum flux ratio, the decay coefficient of the SIWC momentum flux, and the sea surface roughness length, with the first two factors being dominant. The results of this study suggest a methodology for parameterizing the SIWC momentum flux and the total momentum flux over the ocean. These results are important for simulating the marine atmospheric boundary layer and should be used in model development.

  • 238812.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Nilsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Atmospheric boundary layer turbulence closure scheme for wind-following swell conditions2017In: Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, ISSN 0022-4928, E-ISSN 1520-0469, Vol. 74, no 7, p. 2363-2382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the ocean, atmospheric boundary layer turbulence can be altered by underlying waves. Under swell conditions, the impact of waves on the atmosphere is more complicated compared to that under wind-wave conditions. Based on large-eddy simulation (LES), the wind-following swell impact on the atmospheric boundary layer is investigated through three terms: swell-induced surface momentum flux, the vertical profile of swell-induced momentum flux, and the swell impact on atmospheric mixing. The swell-induced surface momentum flux displays a decreasing trend with increasing atmospheric convection. The swell-induced momentum flux decays approximately exponentially with height. Compared with atmospheric convection, the decay coefficient is more sensitive to wave age. Atmospheric mixing is enhanced under swell conditions relative to a flat stationary surface. The swell impact on the atmospheric boundary layer is incorporated into a turbulence closure parameterization through the three terms. The modified turbulence closure parameterization is introduced into a single-column atmospheric model to simulate LES cases. Adding only the swell impact on the atmospheric mixing has a limited influence on wind profiles. Adding both the impact of swell on the atmospheric mixing and the profile of swell-induced momentum flux significantly improves the agreement between the 1D atmospheric simulation results and the LES results, to some extent simulating the wave-induced low-level wind jet. It is concluded that the swell impact should be included in atmospheric numerical models.

  • 238813.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Sahlee, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Larsen, Xiaoli
    Danish Tech Univ, Wind Energy Dept, Resource Assessment Modeling Sect, Riso Campus, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, ISSN 2169-9275, E-ISSN 2169-9291, Vol. 121, no 7, p. 4633-4648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress reduces the near-surface wind speed. Introducing the wave influence roughness length has a larger influence than does adding the swell influence on mixing. Compared with measurements, adding the swell influence on both atmospheric mixing and wind stress gives the best model performance for the wind speed. The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered when developing climate models.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 238814.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Sahlée, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Upper-ocean mixing due to surface gravity waves2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, ISSN 2169-9275, E-ISSN 2169-9291, Vol. 120, no 12, p. 8210-8228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface gravity waves play an important role in the lower layer of the atmosphere and the upper layer of the ocean. Surface waves effect upper-ocean mixing mainly through four processes: wave breaking, Stokes drift interaction with the Coriolis force, Langmuir circulation, and stirring by nonbreaking waves. We introduce the impact of these four processes into a 1-D  ocean turbulence model. The parameterizations used are based mainly on existing investigations. Comparison of simulation results and measurements demonstrates that considering all the effects of waves, rather than just one effect, significantly improves model performance. The nonbreaking-wave-induced mixing and Langmuir turbulence are the most important terms when considering the impact of waves on upper-ocean mixing. Under high-wave conditions, the turbulent mixing induced by nonbreaking waves can be of the same order of magnitude as the viscosity induced by other terms at the surface. Nonbreaking waves contribute very little to shear production and their impact is negligible in the models. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that the vertical profile of the Stokes drift calculated from the 2-D wave spectrum improves model performance significantly compared with other methods of introducing wave effects.

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  • 238815.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Sahlée, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo
    The impact of waves and sea spray on modelling storm track and development2015In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 67, article id 27967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In high wind speed conditions, sea spray generated by intensely breaking waves greatly influences the wind stress and heat fluxes. Measurements indicate that the drag coefficient decreases at high wind speeds. The sea spray generation function (SSGF), an important term of wind stress parameterisation at high wind speeds, is usually treated as a function of wind speed/friction velocity. In this study, we introduce a wave-state-dependent SSGF and wave-age-dependent Charnock number into a high wind speed–wind stress parameterisation. The newly proposed wind stress parameterisation and sea spray heat flux parameterisation were applied to an atmosphere–wave coupled model to study the mid-latitude storm development of six storm cases. Compared with measurements from the FINO1 platform in the North Sea, the new wind stress parameterisation can reduce wind speed simulation errors in the high wind speed range. Considering only sea spray impact on wind stress (and not on heat fluxes) will intensify the storms (in terms of minimum sea level pressure and maximum wind speed), but has little effect on the storm tracks. Considering the impact of sea spray on heat fluxes only (not on wind stress) can improve the model performance regarding air temperature, but it has little effect on the storm intensity and storm track performance. If the impact of sea spray on both the wind stress and heat fluxes is taken into account, the model performs best in all experiments for minimum sea level pressure, maximum wind speed and air temperature.

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  • 238816.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Sproson, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Sahleé, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Surface Wave Impact When Simulating Midlatitude Storm Development2017In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, ISSN 0739-0572, E-ISSN 1520-0426, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 233-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface gravity waves, present at the air–sea interface, can affect the momentum flux and heat fluxes by modifying turbulence in the lower layers of the atmosphere. How to incorporate wave impacts into model parameterizations is still an open issue. In this study, the influence of a dynamic roughness length (considering instantaneous wave-induced stress), horizontal resolution, and the coupling time resolution between waves and the atmosphere on storm simulations are investigated using sensitivity experiments. Based on the sim- ulations of six midlatitude storms using both an atmosphere–wave coupled model and an atmospheric stand- alone model, the impacts are investigated. Adding the wave-induced stress weakens the storm intensity. Applying a roughness length tuned to an average friction velocity is not enough to capture the simulation results from ‘‘true’’ wave-related roughness length. High-horizontal-resolution models intensify the simula- tion of storms, which is valid for both coupled and uncoupled models. Compared with the atmospheric stand- alone model, the coupled model (considering the influence of dynamic roughness length) is more sensitive to the model horizontal resolution. During reasonable ranges, the coupling time resolution does not have a significant impact on the storm intensity based on the limited experiments used in this study. It is concluded that the dynamic wave influence (instantaneous wave influence) and the model resolution should be taken into account during the development of forecast and climate models.

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  • 238817.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Staneva, Joanna
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Inst Coastal Res, Geesthacht, Germany.
    Breivik, Oyvind
    Norwegian Meteorol Inst, Oslo, Norway;Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Nurser, A. J. George
    Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Clementi, Emanuela
    EuroMediterranean Ctr Climate Change CMCC, Bologna, Italy.
    Madec, Gurvan
    CNRS, LOcean IPSL, Paris, France.
    Wave effects on coastal upwelling and water level2019In: Ocean Modelling, ISSN 1463-5003, E-ISSN 1463-5011, Vol. 140, article id UNSP 101405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional atmosphere, ocean and wave models are run independently of each other. This means that the energy and momentum fluxes do not fully account for the impact of the oceanic wave field at the air-sea interface. In this study, the Stokes drift impact on mass and tracer advection, the Stokes-Coriolis forcing, and the sea-state-dependent momentum and energy fluxes are introduced into an ocean circulation model and tested for a domain covering the Baltic Sea and the North Sea. Sensitivity experiments are designed to investigate the influence on the simulation of storms and Baltic Sea upwelling. Inclusion of wave effects improves the model performance compared with the stand-alone circulation model in terms of sea level height, temperature and circulation. The direct sea-state-dependent momentum and turbulent kinetic energy fluxes prove to be of higher importance than the Stokes drift related effects investigated in this study (i.e., Stokes-Coriolis forcing and Stokes drift advection on tracers and on mass). The latter affects the mass and tracer advection but largely balances the influence of the Stokes-Coriolis forcing. The upwelling frequency changes by > 10% along the Swedish coast when wave effects are included. In general, the strong (weak) upwelling probability is reduced (increased) when adding the wave effects. From the results, we conclude that inclusion of wave effects can be important for regional, high-resolution ocean models even on short time scales, suggesting that they should be introduced in operational ocean circulation models. However, care should be taken when introducing the Stokes-Coriolis forcing as it should be balanced by the Stokes drift in mass and tracer advection.

  • 238818.
    Wu, Lichuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Wen, Yuanqiao
    Zhou, Chunhui
    Xiao, Changshi
    Zhang, Jinfeng
    Modeling the Vulnerability of Waterway Networks2014In: Journal of waterway, port, coastal, and ocean engineering, ISSN 0733-950X, E-ISSN 1943-5460, Vol. 140, no 4, p. 04014012-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some areas, rivers and canals interweave into a network, making inland waterway transportation feasible. Significant losses will occur if a vulnerable waterway (where vulnerability is defined in terms of susceptibility to interference and difficulty in restoring the initial state) that is vital to a network is blocked. System vulnerabilities combined with hazard factors trigger disasters; therefore, reducing the vulnerability of a network system is a useful means of reducing major losses. In this paper, a model to calculate vulnerability based on inherent characteristics of waterways such as channel connectivity, transportation efficiency, and economic cost is developed. Three influence factors-importance, efficiency contribution, and loss-are used to build a vulnerability assessment model in which the relative vulnerabilities of various waterways can be assessed and the most vulnerable waterway can be found. Using this model, a simple waterway network is tested to identify vulnerable waterways. (C) 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  • 238819. Wu, Lin
    et al.
    Olverling, Anna
    Huang, Zhen
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Chao, Hongfen
    Gao, Xin
    Sjoeholm, Ake
    GLP-1, exendin-4 and C-peptide regulate pancreatic islet microcirculation, insulin secretion and glucose tolerance in rats2012In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, E-ISSN 1470-8736, Vol. 122, no 7-8, p. 375-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide I) and its mimetic exendin-4 are used against Type 2 diabetes. C-peptide has also proven promising to enhance insulin action. Since insulin secretion in vivo can be rapidly tuned by changes in islet microcirculation, we evaluated the influence of GLP-1, exendin-4 and C-peptide on pancreatic IBF (islet blood flow), and dynamic changes in insulin secretion and glycaemia in the rat. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups given intravenous saline, GLP-1, exendin-4 or C-peptide respectively and administered either saline or 30% glucose. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of intravenous infusion of different doses of exendin-4 into either the femoral vein or the portal vein on islet microcirculation. A non-radioactive microsphere technique was adopted to measure the regional blood flow. Both GLP-1 and exendin-4 prevented the glucose-induced PBF (pancreatic blood flow) redistribution into the islets. Infusion of exendin-4 into the portal vein did not alter pancreatic islet microcirculation, while infusion of exendin-4 into femoral vein significantly decreased basal IBF. C-peptide increased basal IBF and the proportion of IBF out of total PBF, but did not affect the islet microcirculation after glucose administration. GLP-1, exendin-4 and C-peptide stimulated insulin secretion and significantly decreased glycaemia. Blocking NO formation did not prevent the decreased IBF and post-load glycaemia evoked by exendin-4, but further decreased IBF and KBF (kidney blood flow) and increased basal glycaemia. Blocking the vagus nerve enhanced pancreatic IBF and further decreased post-load glycaemia and KBF and increased basal glycaemia. The vascular modulatory effect on pancreatic islet microcirculation described herein, with subsequent effects on in vivo insulin secretion and glycaemia, might be one of the mechanisms underlying the anti-diabetic actions of GLP-1 and its long acting mimetic exendin-4, as well as that of C-peptide.

  • 238820.
    Wu, Lulu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Manukyan, Levon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mantas, Athanasios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nanocellulose-Based Nanoporous Filter Paper for Virus Removal Filtration of Human Intravenous Immunoglobulin2019In: ACS APPLIED NANO MATERIALS, ISSN 2574-0970, Vol. 2, no 10, p. 6352-6359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a highly valuable plasma-derived biotherapeutic with several important clinical indications in primary and acquired immunodeficiencies as well as autoimmune diseases, especially neuropathies. Ensuring the viral safety of plasma-derived products, such as human WIG, is mandatory. Viral filtration is commonly used to affect viral removal in the manufacture of plasma products. Viral filtration of large volumes of a IVIG feed solution can take significant time, the required filter area can be large, and the resultant total cost of filtration is considerable. Therefore, there is a need for a high-capacity filter, which can process large volumes of plasma-derived biotherapeutic products within a short time at reduced cost. Here, we describe for the first time the performance of a nanocellulose-based virus removal filter paper in the processing of human IVIG, which has the potential to address the above- stated issues. The filter exhibited 5-6 log virus clearance of Phi X174 (28 nm; pI 6.6) or MS2 (27 nm; pI 3.9) phages during the filtration of spiked IVIG solutions (11 mg/mL, pH 4.9). To simulate real-life production conditions, filtration at 288 L/m(2), corresponding to 3 kg of protein/m(2), at 3 bar was undertaken. No substantial filter fouling was evident, with the flux remaining stable throughout filtration at 20-30 L/m(2).h. The predicted volumetric capacity V-max was >= 1700 L/m(2), which corresponds to the processing of >= 19 kg/m(2) of immunoglobulins. A number of characterization tests encompassing size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed immunoglobulin integrity before and after filtration. This study has shown that a mille-feuille filter paper manufacturing process offers the possibility of producing cost-efficient viral removal filters with the required performance capabilities suitable for the processing of plasma-derived immunoglobulins and recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

  • 238821.
    Wu, Lulu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Manukyan, Levon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mantas, Athanasios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials. Uppsala University.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Virus removal nanofiltration of intravenous immunoglobulin using nanocellulose-based filter paper2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Replacement therapy using plasma-derived Factor IX products is a life-saving treatment for patients with hemophilia B. Ensuring viral safety of plasma-derived Factor IX products is a critical issue during their bioprocessing. Although nanofiltration is an attractive method for clearing viruses from plasma-derived Factor IX products, it is not easy to implement in practice. Various large molecular weight protein impurities and/or soluble aggregates, which are not retained on sterilizing grade 0.2 μm filters, may cause filter fouling and thereby interrupt the manufacturing. Here, for the first time, the nanofiltration of coagulation factor IX-rich prothrombin complex concentrate is shown using a nanocellulose-based virus removal filter paper, aka the mille-feuille filter paper. Furthermore, a new method of soluble aggregate removal is developed. As a result, high product recovery and high virus clearance capacity are demonstrated. The mille-feuille filter paper has a tailored pore size in the nm-range in the region most suitable for targeted removal of soluble protein aggregates and small-size viruses from biologics solutions. The filter paper is produced according to traditional paper making technology and consists of 100% cellulose nanofibers. The mille-feuille filter paper offers new possibilities in developing cost-efficient and robust bioprocesses for manufacturing plasma-derived hemophilia products.

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  • 238822. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Bai, Jin
    Wang, Yudi
    Wang, Anjie
    Lin, Xiao
    Wang, Liang
    Shen, Yihua
    Wang, Zeqing
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Ma, Tingli
    High-performance phosphide/carbon counter electrode for both iodide and organic redox couples in dye-sensitized solar cells2012In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 22, no 22, p. 11121-11127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, molybdenum phosphide (MoP), nickel phosphide (Ni5P4), and carbon-supported Ni5P4 (Ni5P4/C) were proposed for use as counter electrode (CE) catalysts in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) for the regeneration of both the conventional I-3(-)/I- redox couple and a new organic T-2/T- redox couple. For the I-3(-)/I- redox couple, the DSCs using MoP and Ni5P4 CE yielded a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.92 and 5.71%, and the DSC using Ni5P4/C showed a high PCE of 7.54%, which was close to that of the DSC using Pt CE (7.76%). For the T-2/T- redox couple, Ni5P4/C performed much better than Pt and the DSC using Ni5P4/C CE showed a PCE of 4.75%, much higher than the photovoltaic performance of the DSC using Pt CE (3.38%).

  • 238823. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Guo, Hongyue
    Lin, Ya-nan
    Wu, Kezhong
    Ma, Tingli
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Synthesis of Highly Effective Vanadium Nitride (VN) Peas as a Counter Electrode Catalyst in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells2014In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 118, no 24, p. 12625-12631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vanadium nitride (VN) peas and cubes were synthesized by regulating the molar ratio of the starting materials (urea/VOCl3) via the urea-metal chloride route. The as-prepared VN compounds were subsequently introduced into dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) as counter electrode (CE) catalysts for the regeneration of novel organic thiolate/disulfide (T-/T-2) and traditional iodide/triiodide (I-/I-3(-))redox couples. The cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization curve results proved that the catalytic activity of the prepared VN was significantly affected by particle shape and particle size. The VN peas showed the highest catalytic activity, followed by the small VN cubes and large VN cubes. The I-/I-3(-)-electrolyte-based DSCs yielded a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.29%. The Pt-free VN CE catalysts are more suitable for the new organic redox couples of T-/T-2. The DSCs based on VN peas CE showed a PCE of 5.57%, an enhancement of 40.7% relative to the Pt-CE-based DSCs (3.96%).

  • 238824. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Lin, Xiao
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Ma, Tingli
    A novel catalyst of WO2 nanorod for the counter electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells2011In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 47, no 15, p. 4535-4537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tungsten dioxide (WO2) nanorods were synthesized, which showed excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of triiodide to iodide. The dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) using WO2 as a counter electrode (CE) reached a high energy conversion efficiency of 7.25%, which can match the performance of the DSC based on a Pt CE.

  • 238825. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Lin, Xiao
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Ma, Tingli
    Low-Cost Molybdenum Carbide and Tungsten Carbide Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells2011In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 50, no 15, p. 3520-3524Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238826. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Lin, Xiao
    Wang, Liang
    Guo, Wei
    Wang, Yudi
    Xiao, Jinqiu
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Ma, Tingli
    In Situ Synthesized Economical Tungsten Dioxide Imbedded in Mesoporous Carbon for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells As Counter Electrode Catalyst2011In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 115, no 45, p. 22598-22602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tungsten dioxide imbedded in mesoporous carbon (WO(2)-MC) was obtained by in situ synthesis and then introduced into dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) as a counter electrode (CE) catalyst. Catalytic activity for redox couple regeneration was improved significantly through combining high electrical conductivity and catalytic activity into one material, WO(2)-MC, in which WO(2) served as a catalyst and MC served as an electrical conductor. This has been proved by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The triiodide/iodide-based DSC using WO(2)-MC as CE showed a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.76%, which surpassed the performance of the DSC using traditional Pt CE (7.55%). In addition, the WO(2)-MC and WO(2) nanorods exhibited higher catalytic activity than Pt for the regeneration of a new organic redox couple, di-5-(1-methyltetrazole) disulfide/5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole N-tetramethylammonium salt (T(2)/T(-)). The PCE of the T(2)/T(-)-based DSCs using WO(2)-MC, WO(2), and Pt were 5.22, 4.66, and 3.09%, respectively.

  • 238827. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Lin, Xiao
    Wang, Yudi
    Wang, Liang
    Guo, Wei
    Qu, Daidi
    Peng, Xiaojun
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Graetzel, Michael
    Ma, Tingli
    Economical Pt-Free Catalysts for Counter Electrodes of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 7, p. 3419-3428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three classes (carbides, nitrides and oxides) of nanoscaled early-transition-metal catalysts have been proposed to replace the expensive Pt catalyst as counter electrodes (CEs) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Of these catalysts, Cr3C2, CrN, VC(N), VN, TiC, TiC(N), TiN, and V2O3 all showed excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of I-3(-) to I- in the electrolyte. Further, VC embedded in mesoporous carbon (VC-MC) was prepared through in situ synthesis. The I-3(-)/I- DSC based on the VC-MC CE reached a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.63%, comparable to the photovoltaic performance of the DSC using a Pt CE (7.50%). In addition, the carbide catalysts demonstrated catalytic activity higher than that of Pt for the regeneration of a new organic redox couple of T-2/T-. The T-2/T- DSCs using TiC and VC-MC CEs showed PCEs of 4.96 and 5.15%, much higher than that of the DSC using a Pt CE (3.66%). This work expands the list of potential CE catalysts, which can help reduce the cost of DSCs and thereby encourage their fundamental research and commercial application.

  • 238828. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Lin, Ya-nan
    Guo, Hongyue
    Ma, Tingli
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Highly effective Pt/MoSi2 composite counter electrode catalyst for dye-sensitized solar cell2014In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 263, p. 154-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MoSi2 is introduced into dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) as counter electrode (CE) catalyst for the first time, and the DSC produces power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.87%. To improve the catalytic activity, Pt/MoSi2 composite catalyst is synthesized and it is found that 1.13 wt% of Pt loading is enough for achieving high catalytic activity. After optimization, the DSC using the Pt/MoSi2 composite CE shows high PCE of 7.68%, close to the Pt CE based DSC (7.94%).  

  • 238829. Wu, Mingxing
    et al.
    Wang, Yudi
    Lin, Xiao
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ång