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  • 246651.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
    Wu, Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
    Song, Mei
    PCN CAD Center, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, China.
    Song, Junde
    PCN CAD Center, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Yong
    Cross-layer optimisation for uplink transmission in OFDMA cellular networks with fixed relays2011In: European transactions on telecommunications, ISSN 1124-318X, E-ISSN 2161-3915, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 296-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we consider a cross-layer design aimed to enhance performance for uplink transmission in an orthogonal frequency division multiple-access (OFDMA)-based cellular network with fixed relay stations. Because mobile stations (MSs) spend most of the power on the uplink transmission, power efficiency resource allocation becomes very important to MSs. We develop a cross-layer optimisation framework for two types of uplink flows (inelastic and elastic flows) that have different quality-of-service requirements. For inelastic flows with fixed-rate requirement, we formulate the cross-layer optimisation problem as the minimisation of the sum transmission power of MSs under the constraints of flow conservation law, subcarrier assignment, relaying path selection and power allocation. For elastic flows with flexible-service-rate requirement, we consider the cross-layer trade-off between uplink service rate and power consumption of MSs and pose the optimisation problem as the maximisation of a linear combination of utility (of service rates) and power consumption (of MSs). Different trade-offs can be achieved by varying the weighting parameters. Dual decomposition and subgradient methods are used to solve the problems optimally with reduced computational complexity. The simulation results show that, through the proposed cross-layer resource optimisation framework and algorithms, significant benefits of deployment of multiple fixed relays in an OFDMA cellular network can be fully obtained such as reduction in power consumption, increase in service rate and energy savings in the uplink transmission of MSs.

  • 246652.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
    Wu, Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
    Song, Mei
    Song, Junde
    Zhang, Yong
    Dynamic Control and Resource Allocation in Wireless-Infrastructured Distributed Cellular Networks with OFDMA2009In: 2009 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PARALLEL PROCESSING WORKSHOPS (ICPPW 2009) / [ed] Barolli L, Feng WC, 2009, p. 337-343Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we consider joint optimization of end-to-end data transmission and resource allocation for Wireless-Infrastructured Distributed Cellular Networks (WIDCNs), where each base station (BS) in a cell is connected with its neighboring BSs via wireless links, and a mobile station (MS) can access one or multiple adjacent BSs simultaneously through time-varying OFDMA channels. The communications between a source MS and a destination MS are carried out with the help of BSs in the multi-hop, distributed manner. To achieve the joint optimization for such WIDCNs, a Stochastic Network Utility Maximization (SNUM) problem is formulated under the constraints of OFDMA sub-channel allocation on time-varying access links (both uplink and downlink), as well as routing and scheduling on forwarding links among BSs. By decomposing the corresponding dual problem, transforming it into a stochastic convex optimization problem and solving it by quasi-gradient method, we obtain distributed dynamic control algorithms for end-to-end data transmission. The algorithm can adapt to the OFMDA channel variation and converges asymptotically to the optimal solution. We also develop a distributed algorithm for OFDMA sub-channel allocation and link coordination between BSs. The simulation results show that the data rates of the flows can converge to optimal solution approximately, queues of the network is stable under the proposed distributed dynamic algorithm, and the multi-receiver scheme outperforms the single-receiver scheme due to diversity.

  • 246653.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
    Wu, Ping
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
    Song, Mei
    PCN&CAD Center, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, PR China.
    Song, Junde
    PCN&CAD Center, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, PR China.
    Zhang, Yong
    PCN&CAD Center, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, PR China.
    Dynamic control and resource allocation in wireless-infrastructured distributed cellular networks with OFDMA2009In: 2nd International Workshop on Next Generation of Wireless and Mobile Networks (NGWMN), Vienna, Österrike, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246654.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    Yuan, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    A Note on Decoding Order in Optimizing Multi-cell NOMAManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 246655.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    Yuan, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    Joint CoMP-Cell Selection and Resource Allocation in Fronthaul-Constrained C-RAN2017In: Proc. 15th International Symposium on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc, and Wireless Networks, IEEE, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246656.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    Yuan, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    User-centric Performance Optimization with Remote Radio Head Cooperation in C-RAN2017Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 246657.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    Yuan, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science.
    Lei, Lei
    Sun, Sumei
    Chatzinotas, Symeon
    Ottersten, Björn
    Resource optimization with load coupling in multi-cell NOMA2018In: IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, ISSN 1536-1276, E-ISSN 1558-2248, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 4735-4749Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246658.
    You, Lei
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, S-60174 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Yuan, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Science. Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, S-60174 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Pappas, Nikolaos
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, S-60174 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Varbrand, Peter
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, S-60174 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Energy-Aware Wireless Relay Selection in Load-Coupled OFDMA Cellular Networks2017In: IEEE Communications Letters, ISSN 1089-7798, E-ISSN 1558-2558, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 144-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate transmission energy minimization via optimizing wireless relay selection in orthogonal-frequency-division multiple access networks. We take into account the impact of the load of cells on transmission energy. We prove the NP-hardness of the energy-aware wireless relay selection problem. To tackle computational complexity, a partial optimality condition is derived for providing insights in respect of designing an effective and efficient algorithm. Numerical results show the resulting algorithm achieves high energy performance.

  • 246659. You, Liwen
    et al.
    Garwicz, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Klinisk kemi och farmakologi.
    Rögnvaldsson, Thorsteinn
    Comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of the specificity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.2005In: J Virol, ISSN 0022-538X, Vol. 79, no 19, p. 12477-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapidly developing viral resistance to licensed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors is an increasing problem in the treatment of HIV-infected individuals and AIDS patients. A rational design of more effective protease inhibitors and discovery of potential biological substrates for the HIV-1 protease require accurate models for protease cleavage specificity. In this study, several popular bioinformatic machine learning methods, including support vector machines and artificial neural networks, were used to analyze the specificity of the HIV-1 protease. A new, extensive data set (746 peptides that have been experimentally tested for cleavage by the HIV-1 protease) was compiled, and the data were used to construct different classifiers that predicted whether the protease would cleave a given peptide substrate or not. The best predictor was a nonlinear predictor using two physicochemical parameters (hydrophobicity, or alternatively polarity, and size) for the amino acids, indicating that these properties are the key features recognized by the HIV-1 protease. The present in silico study provides new and important insights into the workings of the HIV-1 protease at the molecular level, supporting the recent hypothesis that the protease primarily recognizes a conformation rather than a specific amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the presence of 1 to 2 lysine residues near the cleavage site of octameric peptide substrates seems to prevent cleavage efficiently, suggesting that this positively charged amino acid plays an important role in hindering the activity of the HIV-1 protease.

  • 246660.
    You, Wenjing
    et al.
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Tengdin, Phoebe
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Chen, Cong
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Shi, Xun
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Zusin, Dmitriy
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Zhang, Yingchao
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Gentry, Christian
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Blonsky, Adam
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Keller, Mark
    NIST, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 USA.
    Oppeneer, Peter M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Kapteyn, Henry
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Tao, Zhensheng
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Fudan Univ, Dept Phys, State Key Lab Surface Phys, Shanghai 200438, Peoples R China;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Murnane, Margaret
    Univ Colorado, Dept Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;Univ Colorado, JILA, Boulder, CO 80309 USA;NIST, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Revealing the Nature of the Ultrafast Magnetic Phase Transition in Ni by Correlating Extreme Ultraviolet Magneto-Optic and Photoemission Spectroscopies2018In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 121, no 7, article id 077204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By correlating time-and angle-resolved photoemission and time-resolved transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements, both at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, we uncover the universal nature of the ultrafast photoinduced magnetic phase transition in Ni. This allows us to explain the ultrafast magnetic response of Ni at all laser fluences-from a small reduction of the magnetization at low laser fluences, to complete quenching at high laser fluences. Both probe methods exhibit the same demagnetization and recovery timescales. The spin system absorbs the energy required to proceed through a magnetic phase transition within 20 fs after the peak of the pump pulse. However, the spectroscopic signatures of demagnetization of the material appear only after approximate to 200 fs and the subsequent recovery of magnetization on timescales ranging from 500 fs to >70 ps. We also provide evidence of two competing channels with two distinct timescales in the recovery process that suggest the presence of coexisting phases in the material.

  • 246661. You, Z-B
    et al.
    Herrera-Marschitz, M
    Pettersson, E
    Nylander, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Goiny, M
    Shou, H.-Z
    Kehr, J
    Godukhin, O
    Hokfelt, T
    Terenius, L
    Ungerstedt, U
    Modulation of neurotransmitter release by cholecystokinin in neostriatum and substantia nigra of the rat: regional and receptor specificity1996In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 793-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of cholecystokinin peptides on the release of dynorphin B, aspartate, glutamate, dopamine and GABA in the neostriatum and substantia nigra of the rat was investigated using in vivo microdialysis. Sulphated cholecystokinin-8S in the dialysis perfusate (1-100 microM) induced a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular dynorphin B and aspartate levels, both in the neostriatum and substantia nigra. Striatal dopamine levels were only increased by 100 microM of cholecystokinin-8S, while in the substantia nigra they were increased by 10-100 microM of cholecystokinin-8S. Extracellular GABA and glutamate levels were increased following 100 microM of cholecystokinin-8S only. Striatal cholecystokinin-8S administration also produced a significant increase in nigral dynorphin B levels. Local cholecystokinin-4 (100 microM) produced a moderate, but significant, increase of extracellular dynorphin B and aspartate levels in the neostriatum and substantia nigra. No effect was observed on the other neurotransmitters investigated. A 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway did not affect the increases in dynorphin B and aspartate levels produced by local administration of cholecystokinin-8S. Basal extracellular GABA levels were increased significantly in both the neostriatum and substantia nigra ipsilateral to the lesion. Nigral glutamate and aspartate levels were also increased in the lesioned substantia nigra, but in the lesioned neostriatum aspartate levels were decreased. The cholecystokinin-B antagonist L-365,260 (20 mg/kg, s.c.), but not the cholecystokinin-A antagonist L-364,718 (devazepide; 20 mg/kg, s.c.), significantly inhibited the effect of cholecystokinin-8S on striatal dynorphin B and aspartate levels. In the substantia nigra, however, the effect of cholecystokinin-8S on dynorphin B and aspartate levels was inhibited to a similar extent by both L-365,260 and L-364,718. Pretreatment with L-364,718, but not with L-365.260, prevented the increase in nigral dopamine levels produced by nigral cholecystokinin-8S administration. Taken together, these results suggest that cholecystokinin-8S modulates dynorphin B and aspartate release in the neostriatum and substantia nigra of the rat via different receptor mechanisms. In the neostriatum, the effect of cholecystokinin-8S on dynorphin B and aspartate release is mediated via the cholecystokinin-B receptor subtype, while in the substantia nigra, cholecystokinin-8S modulates dynorphin B and aspartate release via both cholecystokinin-A and cholecystokinin-B receptor subtypes. Cholecystokinin-8S modulates dopamine release mainly in the substantia nigra, via the cholecystokinin-A receptor subtype.

  • 246662. You, Zhi-Bing
    et al.
    Herrera-Marschitz, Mario
    Nylander, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute.
    Goiny, Michel
    Kehr, Jan
    Ungerstedt, Urban
    Terenius, Lars
    Effect of morphine on dynorphin B and GABA release in the basal ganglia of rat1996In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 710, no 1-2, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vivo microdialysis was used to study the effects of systemic, as well as intracerebral administration of morphine and naloxone on dynorphin B release in neostriatum and substantia nigra of rats. The release of dopamine (DA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu) and aspartate (Asp) was also investigated. Systemic injection of morphine (1 mg/kg s.c.) induced long-lasting increases in extracellular dynorphin B and GABA levels in the substantia nigra, whereas DA, Glu and Asp levels, measured in the same region, were not significantly affected. No effect on striatal neurotransmitter levels was observed following systemic morphine administration. Local perfusion of the substantia nigra with morphine (100 microM) through the microdialysis probe also increased nigral dynorphin B and GABA levels. Perfusion of the neostriatum with morphine (100 microM) significantly increased GABA and dynorphin B levels in the ipsilateral substantia nigra, but no effect was observed locally. Naloxone blocked the effect of systemic morphine administration on nigral dynorphin B and GABA release, already at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg s.c. Naloxone alone, given either systemically (0.2-4 mg/kg s.c.) or intracerebrally (1-100 microM), did not affect dynorphin B or amino acid levels, either in neostriatum or in substantia nigra. However, naloxone produced a concentration-dependent increase in DA levels. The present results indicate that systemic morphine administration stimulates the release of dynorphin B in the substantia nigra, probably by activating the mu-subtype of opioid receptor, since the effect of morphine on nigral dynorphin B and GABA was antagonized by a low dose of naloxone. The increase in extracellular DA levels produced by high concentrations of naloxone, both in neostriatum and substantia nigra, indicates a disinhibitory effect of this drug on DA release, probably via a non-mu subtype of opioid receptors located on nigro-striatal DA neurones.

  • 246663.
    Youhanan, Liza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    The Digitalization of Omvärlden: a qualitative content analysis of a magazine2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The journalistic field is facing a paradigm shift with the digitalization of offline publications. This research aims to study the Swedish magazine Omvärlden, who since January 2015 has completely converted to an online magazine. The research aims to understand how this digitalization process has affected the content of Omvärlden and if it still upholds classic journalistic quality. Thus the research question is ”how has the digitalization of the magazine Omvärlden affected the journalistic content published on their digital platforms? ”. A qualitative content analysis was performed and the data was anchored in the concept of news form. The analysis was conducted in three steps; 1) comparing the offline magazine with the online magazine, 2) comparing collected data from one single day, June 5th 2017, from all of Omvärlden’s digital platforms; Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Omvarlden.se and Omvarldenberattar.se and finally 3) following an article and comparing how the story is shaped in each digital platform. The results pointed in several directions indicating that the content is indeed adapted to the various digital channels but to different extent. Classic journalistic logics intertwine with digital logics as the content is shaped and re-shaped depending on the platform of publication. The content is both fragmented and adjusted to social and digital media logics. On the other hand, it is also coherent and in accordance with classic journalistic content and news form . Due to the ever changing media environment the research shows journalistic content will have to adapt to several media logics when shaping the content. 

  • 246664. Younan, George
    et al.
    Suber, Freeman
    Xing, Wei
    Shi, Tong
    Kunori, Yuichi
    Åbrink, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Schlenner, Susan M.
    Rodewald, Hans-Reimer
    Moore, Francis D.
    Stevens, Richard L.
    Adachi, Roberto
    Austen, K. Frank
    Gurish, Michael F.
    The inflammatory response after an epidermal burn depends on the activities of mouse mast cell proteases 4 and 52010In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 185, no 12, p. 7681-7690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A second-degree epidermal scald burn in mice elicits an inflammatory response mediated by natural IgM directed to nonmuscle myosin with complement activation that results in ulceration and scarring. We find that such burn injury is associated with early mast cell (MC) degranulation and is absent in WBB6F1-Kit(W)/Kit(Wv) mice, which lack MCs in a context of other defects due to a mutation of the Kit receptor. To address further an MC role, we used transgenic strains with normal lineage development and a deficiency in a specific secretory granule component. Mouse strains lacking the MC-restricted chymase, mouse MC protease (mMCP)-4, or elastase, mMCP-5, show decreased injury after a second-degree scald burn, whereas mice lacking the MC-restricted tryptases, mMCP-6 and mMCP-7, or MC-specific carboxypeptidase A3 activity are not protected. Histologic sections showed some disruption of the epidermis at the scald site in the protected strains suggesting the possibility of topical reconstitution of full injury. Topical application of recombinant mMCP-5 or human neutrophil elastase to the scalded area increases epidermal injury with subsequent ulceration and scarring, both clinically and morphologically, in mMCP-5-deficient mice. Restoration of injury requires that topical administration of recombinant mMCP-5 occurs within the first hour postburn. Importantly, topical application of human MC chymase restores burn injury to scalded mMCP-4-deficient mice but not to mMCP-5-deficient mice revealing nonredundant actions for these two MC proteases in a model of innate inflammatory injury with remodeling.

  • 246665.
    Younan, Merna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Patienternas följsamhet till non-vitamin K orala antikoagulantia2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstract Bakgrund: Orala antikoagulantia används för behandling av tromboembolism. Warfarin har länge varit den mest använda substansen i gruppen vitamin K-antagonister (VKA), men har också varit associerad med en del problem såsom interaktioner, blödningar och att den kräver regelbundna provtagningar. När de nya non-vitamin K orala antikoagulantia (NOAK) introducerades på marknaden gjordes flera studier där dessa jämfördes med warfarin. Fördelarna med NOAK-preparaten jämfört med warfarin är bland annat att NOAK har snabbare tillslag av den antikoagulerande effekten, kortare halveringstid, färre interaktioner och en mindre risk för intrakraniell blödning.  Syfte: Huvudsyftet var att kartlägga patienters följsamhet till behandling med NOAK och att undersöka vilka faktorer som patienterna identifierat kan påverka följsamheten samt var patienterna inhämtar information om sitt läkemedel och vilken information som ges på apoteken.  Metod: En enkätstudie innehållande 11 frågor användes för att besvara syftet med studien. Studieenkäterna delades ut på fyra apotek, två apotek i Västerås och två apotek i Jönköping. Patienterna som tillfrågades om att delta i studien var de som hämtade ut ett NOAK-preparat på de deltagande apoteken under studieperioden. Patienten fick fylla i enkäten i samband med expediering av sitt läkemedel.  Resultat: 27 patienter besvarade enkäten. Av dessa bedömde 78 procent att de hade en god följsamhet till sin NOAK-behandling, medan resterande 22 procent uppgav en dålig följsamhet då de inte tagit sin dagliga dos vid ett eller flera tillfällen. Bland de patienterna med dålig följsamhet hade alla behandlats med NOAK i över sex månader. Av den totala studiepopulationen svarade 70 procent att de kontaktade sina läkare eller annan sjukvårdspersonal vid frågor om sina NOAK-läkemedel.  Slutsats: Patienternas följsamhet till behandling med NOAK var god både i Västerås och Jönköping, men det finns fortfarande utrymme för förbättring. Behandlingslängden var av betydelse för följsamheten men påverkan av faktorer som ålder, kön och var patienterna inhämtar sin läkemedelsinformation kunde inte påvisas.   

  • 246666.
    Younesi, Reza
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Batteries: An Important Piece in the Puzzle of Renewable Energies for a Better World2014In: Frontiers in Energy Research, ISSN 2296-598X, Vol. 2, no 14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246667.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Challenges in the Development of an Electrolyte Solution for the Li/air Battery2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246668.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    Characterization of Reaction Products in the Li-O2 Battery Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The rechargeable Li-O2 battery has attracted interest due to its high theoretical energy density (about 10 times better than today’s Li-ion batteries). In this PhD thesis the cycling instability of the Li-O2 battery has been studied. Degradation of the battery has been followed by studying the interface between the electrodes and electrolyte and determining the chemical composition and quantity of degradation products formed after varied cycling conditions. For this in-house and synchrotron based Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) were used as a powerful surface sensitive technique. Using these methods quantitative and qualitative information was obtained of both amorphous and crystalline compounds. To make the most realistic studies the carbon cathode pore structure was optimised by varying the binder to carbon ratio. This was shown to have an effect on improving the discharge capacity. For Li-O2 batteries electrolyte decomposition is a major challenge. The stability of different electrolyte solvents and salts were investigated. Aprotic carbonate and ether based solvents such as PC, EC/DEC, TEGDME, and PEGDME were found to decompose during electrochemical cycling of the cells. The carbonate based electrolytes decompose to form a 5-10 nm thick surface layer on the carbon cathode during discharge which was then removed during battery charging. The degradation products of the ether based electrolytes consisted mainly of ether and carbonate based surface species. It is also shown that Li2O2 as the final discharge product of the cell is chemically reactive and decomposes carbonate and ether based solvents. The stability of lithium electrolyte salts (such as LiPF6, LiBF4, LiB(CN)4, LiBOB, and LiClO4) was also studied. The PES results revealed that all salts are unstable during the cell cycling and in contact with Li2O2. Decomposition layers thinner than 5 nm were observed on Li2O2. Furthermore, it is shown that the stability of the interface on the lithium anode is a chief issue. When compared to Li batteries (where oxygen levels are below 10 ppm) working in the presence of excess oxygen leads to the decomposition of carbonate based electrolytes to a larger degree.

    List of papers
    1. Influence of the Cathode Porosity on the Discharge Performance of the Lithium-Oxygen Battery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of the Cathode Porosity on the Discharge Performance of the Lithium-Oxygen Battery
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 196, no 22, p. 9835-9838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    By varying the ratio between the amount of carbon and Kynar binder in the cathode of a lithium-oxygen battery, it could be shown that an increasing amount of binder resulted in a decrease in the discharge capacity, mainly as a result of the decrease in the cathode porosity. It was shown that the Kynar binder blocked the majority of the pores with a width below 300 angstrom as determined by studying the pore volume and pore size distribution by nitrogen adsorption. Three carbonate based electrolytes (PC, PC:DEC (1:1), and EC:DEC (2:1) with 1 M LiPF(6)) were tested with the various cathode film compositions. Generally, the PC:DEC and EC:DEC based electrolytes provided higher capacities than PC. The results indicated that the air electrode composition and its effect on the porosity of the cathode, as well as electrolyte properties, are important when optimizing the discharge capacity.

    Keywords
    Lithium-oxygen, Air electrode, Porosity, Cathode formulation
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences Inorganic Chemistry Materials Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-160711 (URN)10.1016/j.jpowsour.2011.07.062 (DOI)000295602400099 ()
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2011-11-02 Created: 2011-10-31 Last updated: 2017-12-30
    2. Ether Based Electrolyte, LiB(CN)4 Salt and Binder Degradation in the Li-€“O2 Battery Studied by Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ether Based Electrolyte, LiB(CN)4 Salt and Binder Degradation in the Li-€“O2 Battery Studied by Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES)
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 35, p. 18597-18604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Li-O2 cells composed of a carbon cathode containing an α-MnO2 nanowire catalyst and a Kynar (PVDF-HFP) binder were cycled with different electrolytes containing 0.5 M LiB(CN)4 salt in polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether (PEGDME) or tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (Tetraglyme) solvents. All cells exhibited fast capacity fading. To explain this, the surface chemistry of the carbon electrodes were investigated by synchrotron based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using two photon energies of 2300 and 6900 eV. It is shown that the LiB(CN)4 salt and Kynar binder were degraded during cycling, forming a layer composed of salt and binder residues on the cathode surface. The degradation mechanism of the salt differed in the two tested solvents and, consequently, different types of boron compounds were formed during cycling. Larger amounts of the degraded salt was observed using Tetraglyme as the solvent. With a nonfluorined Li-salt, the observed formation of LiF, which might be a reason for the observed blockage of pores in the cathode and for the observed capacity fading, must be due to Kynar binder decomposition. The amount of LiF formed in the PEGDME cell was larger than that formed in the Tetraglyme cell. The results indicate that not only the electrolyte solvent, but also electrolyte salt as well as the binder used for the porous cathode must be carefully considered when building a successful rechargeable Li-O2 battery.

    Keywords
    Lithium-air, Li-O2, battery, metal/air, Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS, LiB(CN)4, Ether electrolyte, Kynar, binder decomposition
    National Category
    Physical Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-182045 (URN)10.1021/jp303691m (DOI)000308339600004 ()
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2012-10-02 Created: 2012-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-30
    3. Li-O2 Battery Degradation by Lithium Peroxide (Li2O2): A Model Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Li-O2 Battery Degradation by Lithium Peroxide (Li2O2): A Model Study
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical stability of the Li-O2 battery components (cathode and electrolyte) in contact with lithiumperoxide (Li2O2) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS is a versatile method to detect amorphous as well as crystalline decomposition products of both salts and solvents. Two strategies were employed. First, cathodes including carbon, α‑MnO2 catalyst, and Kynar binder (PVdF-HFP) were exposed to Li2O2 and LiClO4 in propylenecarbonate (PC) or (tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether) TEGDME electrolytes. The results indicated that Li2O2 degrades TEGDME to carboxylate containing species and that the decomposition products in turn degraded the Kynar binder. The α‑MnO2 catalyst was unaffected. Second, Li2O2 model surfaces were kept in contact with different electrolytes to investigate the chemical stability, and also the resulting surface layer on Li2O2. Further, the XPS experiments revealed that the Li salts LiPF6, LiBF4, and LiClO4 decomposed to form LiF or LiCl together with P-O or B-O bond containing compounds when exposed to Li2O2. PC decomposed to carbonate and ether based species. The degradation of the electrolytes increased from short to long exposure time indicating that the surface layer on Li2O2 became thicker by increasing time. Overall, it was shown that a mixture of ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate (EC/DEC) is more robust in contact with Li2O2 compared to PC.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2013
    Keywords
    Lithium-air, Li2O2, oxygen battery, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Lithium-Oxygen, XPS
    National Category
    Physical Chemistry Materials Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Polymer Chemistry; Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183884 (URN)10.1021/cm303226g (DOI)000313303400013 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research CouncilStandUp
    Available from: 2012-11-05 Created: 2012-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-30
    4. The Cathode Surface Composition of a Cycled Li–O2 Battery: A Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Cathode Surface Composition of a Cycled Li–O2 Battery: A Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study
    2012 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 39, p. 20673-20680Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A layer of reaction products, dominantly built up of C and O in the form of ethers and lithium alkyl carbonates, is formed on the surface of the carbon cathode during discharge of a Li–O2 battery in an electrolyte of 1 M LiPF6 in PC. The results are based on a detailed surface analysis combining the use of in house X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and synchrotron based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The Li–O2 batteries were investigated at uncycled state (stored), after the first discharge, after the first charge, and at the end of life (discharge state). The results showed little to no Li2O2 and/or Li2O among the discharge products. The surface layers on the cathode were dominantly removed during charging of the battery. At the end of battery life, no complete discharge product layer is formed. The cathodes showed a strong indication of binder decomposition during cycling of the Li–O2 cell. Overall, the results obtained in this investigation show that the whole cathode formulation as well as the electrolyte composition need a completely new approach for the realization of a recyclable Li–O2 battery.

    Keywords
    Litihum-air, Li-O2, battery, Metal-air, XPS, PES, Photoelectron Spectroscopy
    National Category
    Physical Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-182604 (URN)10.1021/jp302168h (DOI)000309375700003 ()
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2012-10-11 Created: 2012-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-30
    5. Surface Characterization of the Carbon Cathode and the Lithium Anode of Li-O2 Batteries using LiClO4 or LiBOB salts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface Characterization of the Carbon Cathode and the Lithium Anode of Li-O2 Batteries using LiClO4 or LiBOB salts
    2013 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1333-1341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The surface compositions of a MnO2 catalyst containing carbon cathode and a Li anode in a Li–O2 battery were investigated using synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Electrolytes comprising LiClO4 or LiBOB salts in PC or EC:DEC (1:1) solvents were used for this study. Decomposition products from LiClO4 or LiBOB were observed on the cathode surface when using PC. However, no degradation of LiClO4 was detected when using EC/DEC. We have demonstrated that both PC and EC/DEC solvents decompose during the cell cycling to form carbonate and ether containing compounds on the surface of the carbon cathode. However, EC/DEC decomposed to a lesser degree compared to PC. PES revealed that a surface layer with a thickness of at least 1–2 nm remained on the MnO2 catalyst at the end of the charged state. It was shown that the detachment of Kynar binder influences the surface composition of both the carbon cathode and the Li anode of Li–O2 cells. The PES results indicated that in the charged state the SEI on the Li anode is composed of PEO, carboxylates, carbonates, and LiClO4 salt.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2013
    Keywords
    Li-O2 battery, XPS, Carbon Cathode, Lithium Anode, Perchlorate, Lithium/Air, Photoelectron Spectroscopy, lithium bis(oxalato)borate
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry Physical Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183885 (URN)10.1021/am3026129 (DOI)000315619100022 ()
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2012-11-05 Created: 2012-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-30
    6. The SEI Layer Formed on Lithium Metal in the Presence of Oxygen: A Seldom Considered Component in the Development of the Li-O2 battery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The SEI Layer Formed on Lithium Metal in the Presence of Oxygen: A Seldom Considered Component in the Development of the Li-O2 battery
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 225, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The SEI layer formed on metallic Li which has been used as an anode in a Li-O2 battery is studied for the first time. We have used XPS to monitor the surface composition of the lithium electrode and have identified the various chemical species present. The XPS results indicated that the composition of the SEI layer is affected by the presence of oxygen and is unstable during cycling. We also observed decomposition products from the binder material used in the cathode on the surface of the lithium anode. This new SEI layer has an increased resistance affecting the lithium deposition which is essential for battery operation.

    Keywords
    Litihum-air, SEI, solid electrolyte interphase, Li-O2, Battery, Lithium anode, XPS, Photoelectron Spectroscopy
    National Category
    Physical Chemistry Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183344 (URN)10.1016/j.jpowsour.2012.10.011 (DOI)000313923400007 ()
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2012-10-24 Created: 2012-10-24 Last updated: 2017-12-30
  • 246669.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Bardé, Fanny
    Toyota Motor Europe, Zaventem, Belgium.
    Electrochemical performance and interfacial properties of Li-metal in lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide based electrolytes2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 15925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful usage of lithium metal as the negative electrode or anode in rechargeable batteries can be an important step to increase the energy density of lithium batteries. Performance of lithium metal in a relatively promising electrolyte solution composed of lithium bis( uorosulfonyl)imide (LiN(SO2F)2; LiFSI) salt dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) is here studied. The in uence of the concentration of the electrolyte salt −1 M or 4 M LiFSI- is investigated by varying important electrochemical parameters such as applied current density and plating capacity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis as a surface sensitive technique is here used to analyze that how the composition of the solid electrolyte interphase varies with the salt concentration and with the number of cycles.

  • 246670.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brant, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Mogensen, Ronnie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Larsson, Paul
    ALTRIS AB.
    A Cheap and Sustainable Cathode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 246671.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Christiansen, Ane Sælland
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Scipioni, Roberto
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Ngo, Duc-The
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hjelm, Johan
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Norby, Poul
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Analysis of the Interphase on Carbon Black Formed in High Voltage Batteries2015In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 162, no 7, p. A1289-A1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon black (CB) additives commonly used to increase the electrical conductivity of electrodes in Li-ion batteries are generally believed to be electrochemically inert additives in cathodes. Decomposition of electrolyte in the surface region of CB in Li-ion cells at high voltages up to 4.9 V is here studied using electrochemical measurements as well as structural and surface characterizations. LiPF6 and LiClO4 dissolved in ethylene carbonate:diethylene carbonate (1:1) were used as the electrolyte to study irreversible charge capacity of CB cathodes when cycled between 4.9 V and 2.5 V. Synchrotron-based soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SOXPES) results revealed spontaneous partial decomposition of the electrolytes on the CB electrode, without applying external current or voltage. Depth profile analysis of the electrolyte/cathode interphase indicated that the concentration of decomposed species is highest at the outermost surface of the CB. It is concluded that carboxylate and carbonate bonds (originating from solvent decomposition) and LiF (when LiPF6 was used) take part in the formation of the decomposed species. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and transmission electron microscopy results, however, did not show formation of a dense surface layer on CB particles.

  • 246672.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Li-O2 Battery Degradation by Lithium Peroxide (Li2O2): A Model Study2013In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical stability of the Li-O2 battery components (cathode and electrolyte) in contact with lithiumperoxide (Li2O2) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS is a versatile method to detect amorphous as well as crystalline decomposition products of both salts and solvents. Two strategies were employed. First, cathodes including carbon, α‑MnO2 catalyst, and Kynar binder (PVdF-HFP) were exposed to Li2O2 and LiClO4 in propylenecarbonate (PC) or (tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether) TEGDME electrolytes. The results indicated that Li2O2 degrades TEGDME to carboxylate containing species and that the decomposition products in turn degraded the Kynar binder. The α‑MnO2 catalyst was unaffected. Second, Li2O2 model surfaces were kept in contact with different electrolytes to investigate the chemical stability, and also the resulting surface layer on Li2O2. Further, the XPS experiments revealed that the Li salts LiPF6, LiBF4, and LiClO4 decomposed to form LiF or LiCl together with P-O or B-O bond containing compounds when exposed to Li2O2. PC decomposed to carbonate and ether based species. The degradation of the electrolytes increased from short to long exposure time indicating that the surface layer on Li2O2 became thicker by increasing time. Overall, it was shown that a mixture of ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate (EC/DEC) is more robust in contact with Li2O2 compared to PC.

  • 246673.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Degradation Products on Li-Negative Electrode and the Carbon Cathode in Li-O2 Batteries2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246674.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Surface Characterization of the Carbon Cathode and the Lithium Anode of Li-O2 Batteries using LiClO4 or LiBOB salts2013In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1333-1341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface compositions of a MnO2 catalyst containing carbon cathode and a Li anode in a Li–O2 battery were investigated using synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Electrolytes comprising LiClO4 or LiBOB salts in PC or EC:DEC (1:1) solvents were used for this study. Decomposition products from LiClO4 or LiBOB were observed on the cathode surface when using PC. However, no degradation of LiClO4 was detected when using EC/DEC. We have demonstrated that both PC and EC/DEC solvents decompose during the cell cycling to form carbonate and ether containing compounds on the surface of the carbon cathode. However, EC/DEC decomposed to a lesser degree compared to PC. PES revealed that a surface layer with a thickness of at least 1–2 nm remained on the MnO2 catalyst at the end of the charged state. It was shown that the detachment of Kynar binder influences the surface composition of both the carbon cathode and the Li anode of Li–O2 cells. The PES results indicated that in the charged state the SEI on the Li anode is composed of PEO, carboxylates, carbonates, and LiClO4 salt.

  • 246675.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Roberts, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The SEI Layer Formed on Lithium Metal in the Presence of Oxygen: A Seldom Considered Component in the Development of the Li-O2 battery2013In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 225, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SEI layer formed on metallic Li which has been used as an anode in a Li-O2 battery is studied for the first time. We have used XPS to monitor the surface composition of the lithium electrode and have identified the various chemical species present. The XPS results indicated that the composition of the SEI layer is affected by the presence of oxygen and is unstable during cycling. We also observed decomposition products from the binder material used in the cathode on the surface of the lithium anode. This new SEI layer has an increased resistance affecting the lithium deposition which is essential for battery operation.

  • 246676.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Treskow, Marcel
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Scheers, Johan
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Ether Based Electrolyte, LiB(CN)4 Salt and Binder Degradation in the Li-€“O2 Battery Studied by Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES)2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 35, p. 18597-18604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Li-O2 cells composed of a carbon cathode containing an α-MnO2 nanowire catalyst and a Kynar (PVDF-HFP) binder were cycled with different electrolytes containing 0.5 M LiB(CN)4 salt in polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether (PEGDME) or tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (Tetraglyme) solvents. All cells exhibited fast capacity fading. To explain this, the surface chemistry of the carbon electrodes were investigated by synchrotron based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using two photon energies of 2300 and 6900 eV. It is shown that the LiB(CN)4 salt and Kynar binder were degraded during cycling, forming a layer composed of salt and binder residues on the cathode surface. The degradation mechanism of the salt differed in the two tested solvents and, consequently, different types of boron compounds were formed during cycling. Larger amounts of the degraded salt was observed using Tetraglyme as the solvent. With a nonfluorined Li-salt, the observed formation of LiF, which might be a reason for the observed blockage of pores in the cathode and for the observed capacity fading, must be due to Kynar binder decomposition. The amount of LiF formed in the PEGDME cell was larger than that formed in the Tetraglyme cell. The results indicate that not only the electrolyte solvent, but also electrolyte salt as well as the binder used for the porous cathode must be carefully considered when building a successful rechargeable Li-O2 battery.

  • 246677.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Malmgren, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tan, Serdar
    Akdeniz University.
    Influence of annealing temperature on the electrochemical and surface properties of the 5-V spinel cathode material LiCr0.2Ni0.4Mn1.4O4 synthesized by a sol–gel technique2014In: Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry, ISSN 1432-8488, E-ISSN 1433-0768, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 2157-2166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LiCr0.2Ni0.4Mn1.4O4 was synthesized by a sol-gel technique in which tartaric acid was used as oxide precursor. The synthesized powder was annealed at five different temperatures from 600 to 1,000 A degrees C and tested as a 5-V cathode material in Li-ion batteries. The study shows that annealing at higher temperatures resulted in improved electrochemical performance, increased particle size, and a differentiated surface composition. Spinel powders synthesized at 900 A degrees C had initial discharge capacities close to 130 mAh g(-1) at C and C/2 discharge rates. Powders synthesized at 1,000 A degrees C showed capacity retention values higher than 85 % at C/2, C, and 2C rates at 25 A degrees C after 50 cycles. Annealing at 600-800 A degrees C resulted in formation of spinel particles smaller than 200 nm, while almost micron-sized particles were obtained at 900-1,000 A degrees C. Chromium deficiency was detected at the surface of the active materials annealed at low temperatures. The XPS results indicate presence of Cr6+ impurity when the annealing temperature was not high enough. The study revealed that increased annealing temperature is beneficial for both improved electrochemical performance of LiCr0.2Ni0.4Mn1.4O4 and for avoiding formation of Cr6+ impurity on its surface.

  • 246678.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Norby, Poul
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Vegge, Tejs
    Technical University of Denmark.
    A New Look at the Stability of Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Acetonitrile in Li-O2 Batteries2014In: ECS Electrochemistry Letters, Vol. 3, no 3, p. A15-A18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and acetonitrile (MeCN) have recently been highlighted as promising electrolyte solvents for Li-O2 batteries. Possible reactions between these two solvents and Li2O2 are here discussed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to analyze surface of the Li2O2 powder after direct contact with the solvents for different times of exposure. The results indicated that Li2O2 decomposes DMSO solvents, whereas no indication of degradation of MeCN by Li2O2 was observed.

  • 246679.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Singh, Neelam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Urbonaite, Sigita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Effect of Pore Size on the Performance of the Li-O2 Battery2010In: ECS Transactions, ISSN 1938-5862, E-ISSN 1938-6737, Vol. 25, no 35, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium-airbatteries are complex electrochemical systems. This study deals with thecomposite cathode, where oxygen is reduced and different lithium-oxygen speciesare formed as reaction products. The amount of stored reactionproduct and thus the battery capacity is known to dependon surface area and pore-volume in the cathode. Here therole of pore size is studied for three different carbonsand their corresponding composite cathode films. Gas adsorption studies showthat film-forming Kynar polymer is blocking micropores and mesopores below~300 Å. This influences battery performance of the high surfacearea carbon, containing micropores only, where the capacity is shownto be negligible. The two other carbons, with wider pore-sizedistributions, show a battery capacity in the order of 1300-1500mAh/g carbon. This shows that it is vital to consideralso the pore size in the cathode film for agood battery performance.

  • 246680.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Singh, Neelam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Urbonaite, Sigita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Primary Nonaqueous Lithium-Air Battery2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 246681.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Urbonaite, Sigita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Role of Carbon in the Cathode of a Li-O2 Battery2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246682.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Urbonaite, Sigita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Hahlin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Cathode Surface Composition of a Cycled Li–O2 Battery: A Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 39, p. 20673-20680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A layer of reaction products, dominantly built up of C and O in the form of ethers and lithium alkyl carbonates, is formed on the surface of the carbon cathode during discharge of a Li–O2 battery in an electrolyte of 1 M LiPF6 in PC. The results are based on a detailed surface analysis combining the use of in house X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and synchrotron based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The Li–O2 batteries were investigated at uncycled state (stored), after the first discharge, after the first charge, and at the end of life (discharge state). The results showed little to no Li2O2 and/or Li2O among the discharge products. The surface layers on the cathode were dominantly removed during charging of the battery. At the end of battery life, no complete discharge product layer is formed. The cathodes showed a strong indication of binder decomposition during cycling of the Li–O2 cell. Overall, the results obtained in this investigation show that the whole cathode formulation as well as the electrolyte composition need a completely new approach for the realization of a recyclable Li–O2 battery.

  • 246683.
    Younesi, Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Veith, Gabriel M.
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Vegge, Tejs
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Lithium salts for advanced lithium batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S2015In: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, E-ISSN 1754-5706, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 1905-1922Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium-sulfur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions and conditions within such cells. This review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.

  • 246684.
    Younesi, S. R.
    et al.
    Amirkabir University of Technology.
    Alimadadi, H.
    Amirkabir University of Technology.
    Alamdari, E. Keshavarz
    Amirkabir University of Technology.
    Marashi, S. P. H.
    Amirkabir University of Technology.
    Kinetic mechanisms of cementation of cadmium ions by zinc powder from sulphate solutions2006In: Hydrometallurgy, ISSN 0304-386X, E-ISSN 1879-1158, Vol. 84, no 3–4, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cementation of cadmium ions by zinc powder was studied in a batch reactor at low and high concentrations at pH 5.2–5.4 and it is shown that the reaction is first-order. XRD and SEM analysis confirm that the deposited layer is metallic with no evidence of basic zinc sulphate or re-dissolution of cadmium. Dependence of the reaction constant on initial cadmium concentration proves the reaction mechanism. Different possible kinetic controlling models of cadmium ion (Cd2+) cementation from aqueous solution by zinc powder were studied with respect to initial cadmium concentration, temperature, zinc powder size and stoichiometric ratio. The experiments demonstrate that at initial cadmium concentrations > 1000 ppm, the ash diffusion control model prevails, while at concentrations < 500 ppm, the data has good agreement with the film diffusion model. For concentrations between 500 ppm and 1000 ppm, a combination of ash diffusion and film diffusion models controls the reaction rate. Based on numerical analysis, the calculated activation energies at high and low concentrations are 9.6 and 7.2 kJ/mol, respectively. Statistical data analysis was performed and different reaction rate constants were estimated from the equations for high and low initial cadmium concentrations.

  • 246685.
    Younesi, S Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Urbonaite, Sigita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Influence of the Cathode Porosity on the Discharge Performance of the Lithium-Oxygen Battery2011In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 196, no 22, p. 9835-9838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By varying the ratio between the amount of carbon and Kynar binder in the cathode of a lithium-oxygen battery, it could be shown that an increasing amount of binder resulted in a decrease in the discharge capacity, mainly as a result of the decrease in the cathode porosity. It was shown that the Kynar binder blocked the majority of the pores with a width below 300 angstrom as determined by studying the pore volume and pore size distribution by nitrogen adsorption. Three carbonate based electrolytes (PC, PC:DEC (1:1), and EC:DEC (2:1) with 1 M LiPF(6)) were tested with the various cathode film compositions. Generally, the PC:DEC and EC:DEC based electrolytes provided higher capacities than PC. The results indicated that the air electrode composition and its effect on the porosity of the cathode, as well as electrolyte properties, are important when optimizing the discharge capacity.

  • 246686.
    Younesi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    YKI, Ytkemiska Institutet AB .
    Andersson, Martin
    YKI, Ytkemiska Institutet AB .
    Rapid activation of surfactant precursor2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246687.
    Younesi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Ciosek, Katarzyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Lithium oxygen batteries: challenges and possibilities2008In: 214th ECS Meeting, Abstract #465 Meet. Abstr. - Electrochem. Soc. / MA2008-02 / B1 - Battery and Energy Technology Joint General Session: MA2008-02, October 12 - October 17, 2008 , Honolulu, HI, The Electrochemical Society , 2008, p. 465-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246688.
    Younesi, Simin
    et al.
    Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
    Mehregan, Iraj
    Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
    Assadi, Mostafa
    AREEO, Res Inst Forests & Rangelands, POB 13185-116, Tehran, Iran.
    Nejadsattari, Taher
    Islamic Azad Univ, Dept Biol, Sci & Res Branch, Tehran, Iran.
    Lidén, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Dionysia robusta (Primulaceae), a new species from W Iran2016In: Willdenowia, ISSN 0511-9618, E-ISSN 1868-6397, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species from the W part of the Iranian Zagros Mountains in Ilam province, Dionysia robusta (Primulaceae), is described, illustrated and compared with similar and related species. It differs from these relatives in leaf shape, length and density of glandular hairs, and shape of the calyx. The DNA sequence of the nuclear ribosomal ITS region of D. robusta is most similar to that of D. gaubae.

  • 246689. Young, Donovan
    et al.
    Zarembo, Konstantin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Holographic dual of the Eguchi-Kawai mechanism2014In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 6, p. 030-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The holographic dual of N = 2*, D = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory has many features common to 5d CFT. We interpret this as a manifestation of Eguchi-Kawai mechanism.

  • 246690.
    Young, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Recurrent Genetic Mutations in Lymphoid Malignancies2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the genetic landscape of B-cell derived lymphoid malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), has been rapidly unraveled, identifying recurrent genetic mutations with potential clinical impact. Interestingly, ~30% of all CLL patients can be assigned to more homogeneous subsets based on the expression of a similar or “stereotyped” B-cell receptor (BcR). Considering that biased distribution of genetic mutations was recently indicated in specific stereotyped subsets, in paper I, we screened 565 subset cases, preferentially assigned to clinically aggressive subsets, and confirm the SF3B1 mutational bias in subset #2 (45%), but also report on similarly marked enrichment in subset #3 (46%). In contrast, NOTCH1 mutations were predominantly detected in subsets #1, #8, #59 and #99 (22-34%). This data further highlights a subset-biased acquisition of genetic mutations in the pathogenesis of at least certain subsets. Aberrant NF-κB signaling due to a deletion within the NFKBIE gene previously reported in CLL warranted extended investigation in other lymphoid malignancies. Therefore, in paper II, we screened 1460 patients with various lymphoid malignancies for NFKBIE deletions and reported enrichment in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (27%) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) (23%). NFKBIE-deleted PMBL cases had higher rates of chemorefractoriness and inferior overall survival (OS). NFKBIE-deletion status remained an independent prognostic marker in multivariate analysis. EGR2 mutations were recently reported in advanced stage CLL patients; thus, in paper III we screened 2403 CLL patients for mutations in EGR2. An overall mutational frequency of 3.8% was reported and EGR2 mutations were associated with younger age, advanced stage and del(11q). EGR2 mutational status remained an independent marker of poor outcome in multivariate analysis, both in the screening and validation cohorts. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 70 CLL cases, assigned to poor-prognostic subsets #1 and #2 and indolent subset #4, were investigated in Paper IV and revealed a similar skewing of SF3B1 mutations in subset #2 and NOTCH1 mutations in subset #1 to that reported in Paper I. Additionally, an increased frequency of the recently proposed CLL driver gene RPS15 was observed in subset #1. Finally, novel non-coding mutational biases were detected in both subset #1 and #2 that warrant further investigation.

    List of papers
    1. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, no 8, p. 959-967Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22-34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets# 2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s).

    National Category
    Hematology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-304419 (URN)10.3324/haematol.2016.141812 (DOI)000381941900019 ()27198719 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-10-05 Created: 2016-10-05 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    2. Frequent NFKBIE deletions are associated with poor outcome in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequent NFKBIE deletions are associated with poor outcome in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 128, no 23, p. 2666-2670Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported a truncating deletion in the NFKBIE gene, which encodes IκBϵ, a negative feedback regulator of NF-κB, in clinically aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Preliminary data indicate enrichment of NFKBIE aberrations in other lymphoid malignancies, hence we screened a large patient cohort (n=1460) diagnosed with different lymphoid neoplasms. While NFKBIE deletions were infrequent in follicular lymphoma, splenic marginal-zone lymphoma, and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (<2%), slightly higher frequencies were seen in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and primary CNS lymphoma (3-4%). In contrast, a remarkably high frequency of NFKBIE aberrations (46/203 cases, 22.7%) was observed in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (3/11 cases, 27.3%). NFKBIE-deleted PMBL patients were more often therapy-refractory (P=.022) and displayed inferior outcome compared to wildtype patients (5-year survival: 59% vs. 78%; P=.034); however they appeared to benefit from radiotherapy (P=.022) and rituximab-containing regimens (P=.074). NFKBIEaberrations remained an independent factor in multivariate analysis (P=.003), also when restricting to immunochemotherapy-treated patients (P=.008). Whole-exome sequencing and gene expression-profiling verified the importance of NF-κB deregulation in PMBL. In summary, we identify NFKBIE aberrations as a common genetic event across B-cell malignancies and highlight NFKBIE deletions as a novel poor-prognostic marker in PMBL.

    National Category
    Hematology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
    Research subject
    Molecular Genetics; Pathology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314939 (URN)10.1182/blood-201603-704528 (DOI)000392652300015 ()27670424 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    German Research Foundation (DFG), DA1787/1-1Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research Council
    Note

    L.M., D.N., and E.Y. contributed equally to this study as joint first authors.

    R.R. and F.D. contributed equally as joint senior authors.

    Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-07 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
    3. EGR2 mutations define a new clinically aggressive subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>EGR2 mutations define a new clinically aggressive subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 1547-1554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recurrent mutations within EGR2 were recently reported in advanced-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and associated with a worse outcome. To study their prognostic impact, 2403 CLL patients were examined for mutations in the EGR2 hotspot region including a screening (n = 1283) and two validation cohorts (UK CLL4 trial patients, n = 366; CLL Research Consortium (CRC) patients, n = 490). Targeted deep-sequencing of 27 known/postulated CLL driver genes was also performed in 38 EGR2-mutated patients to assess concurrent mutations. EGR2 mutations were detected in 91/2403 (3.8%) investigated cases, and associated with younger age at diagnosis, advanced clinical stage, high CD38 expression and unmutated IGHV genes. EGR2- mutated patients frequently carried ATM lesions (42%), TP53 aberrations (18%) and NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations (16%). EGR2 mutations independently predicted shorter time-to-first-treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS) in the screening cohort; they were confirmed associated with reduced TTFT and OS in the CRC cohort and independently predicted short OS from randomization in the UK CLL4 cohort. A particularly dismal outcome was observed among EGR2-mutated patients who also carried TP53 aberrations. In summary, EGR2 mutations were independently associated with an unfavorable prognosis, comparable to CLL patients carrying TP53 aberrations, suggesting that EGR2-mutated patients represent a new patient subgroup with very poor outcome.

    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Research subject
    Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314928 (URN)10.1038/leu.2016.359 (DOI)000404745300009 ()27890934 (PubMedID)
    Note

    E.Y. and D.N. contributed equally to this study as joint first authors.

    R.R. and F.D. contributed equally as joint senior authors.

    Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-07 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Whole-genome sequencing in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whole-genome sequencing in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Medical Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302024 (URN)
    External cooperation:
    Funder
    Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research Council
    Available from: 2016-08-28 Created: 2016-08-28 Last updated: 2018-01-10
  • 246691.
    Young, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Noerenberg, Daniel
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Tumor Immunology, Charité, University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ljungström, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Frick, Mareike
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Tumor Immunology, Charité, University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany.
    Sutton, Lesley Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blakemore, Stuart James
    Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Galan-Sousa, Joel
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Tumor Immunology, Charité, University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany.
    Plevova, Karla
    Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University and University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rossi, Davide
    Division of Hematology, Department of Translational Medicine, Amedeo Avogadro University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy and Hematology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and Institute of Oncology Research, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
    Ruth, Clifford
    Oxford National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre and Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Roos-Weil, Damien
    INSERM, U1170, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Navrklova, Veronika
    European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University and University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Dörken, Bernd
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Tumor Immunology, Charité, University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany.
    Schmitt, Clemens A
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Tumor Immunology, Charité, University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany.
    Ekström Smedby, Karin
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, and Hematology Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Giacopelli, Brian
    Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
    Blachly, James
    Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Hematology Department, General Hospital of Nikea, Piraeus, Greece.
    Panayiotidis, Panayiotis
    First Department of Propaedeutic Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Karches Center for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Davi, Frédéric
    Laboratory of Hematology and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, France.
    Langerak, Anton W
    Department of Immunology, Laboratory for Medical Immunology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Oscier, David
    Department of Molecular Pathology, Royal Bournemouth Hospital, Bournemouth, UK.
    Schuh, Anna
    Oxford National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre and Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Gaidano, Gianluca
    Division of Hematology, Department of Translational Medicine, Amedeo Avogadro University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and Division of Experimental Oncology and Department of Onco-Hematology, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
    Xu, Wei
    Department of Hematology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Collaborative Innovation Center For Cancer Personalized Medicine, Nanjing, China.
    Fan, Lei
    Department of Hematology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Collaborative Innovation Center For Cancer Personalized Medicine, Nanjing, China.
    Bernard, Olivier A
    INSERM, U1170, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Nguyen-Khac, Florence
    Laboratory of Hematology and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, France.
    Rassenti, Laura Z
    Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego/Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Li, Jianyonglm
    Department of Hematology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Collaborative Innovation Center For Cancer Personalized Medicine, Nanjing, China.
    Kipps, Thomas J
    Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Immunology, Genetics, and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden and Institute of Applied Biosciences, Center for Research and Technology Hellas, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University and University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Zenz, Thorsten
    Department of Molecular Therapy in Haematology and Oncology (G250) and Department of Translational Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Medicine V, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany.
    Strefford, Jonathan
    Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Damm, Frederik
    Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Tumor Immunology, Charité, University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany; German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany and Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Berlin, Germany .
    EGR2 mutations define a new clinically aggressive subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia2017In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 1547-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurrent mutations within EGR2 were recently reported in advanced-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and associated with a worse outcome. To study their prognostic impact, 2403 CLL patients were examined for mutations in the EGR2 hotspot region including a screening (n = 1283) and two validation cohorts (UK CLL4 trial patients, n = 366; CLL Research Consortium (CRC) patients, n = 490). Targeted deep-sequencing of 27 known/postulated CLL driver genes was also performed in 38 EGR2-mutated patients to assess concurrent mutations. EGR2 mutations were detected in 91/2403 (3.8%) investigated cases, and associated with younger age at diagnosis, advanced clinical stage, high CD38 expression and unmutated IGHV genes. EGR2- mutated patients frequently carried ATM lesions (42%), TP53 aberrations (18%) and NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations (16%). EGR2 mutations independently predicted shorter time-to-first-treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS) in the screening cohort; they were confirmed associated with reduced TTFT and OS in the CRC cohort and independently predicted short OS from randomization in the UK CLL4 cohort. A particularly dismal outcome was observed among EGR2-mutated patients who also carried TP53 aberrations. In summary, EGR2 mutations were independently associated with an unfavorable prognosis, comparable to CLL patients carrying TP53 aberrations, suggesting that EGR2-mutated patients represent a new patient subgroup with very poor outcome.

  • 246692.
    Young, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Norenberg, Daniel
    Charite, Dept Hematol Oncol & Tumor Immunol, D-13353 Berlin, Germany..
    Ljungstrom, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Plevova, Karla
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Rossi, Davide
    Amedeo Avogadro Univ Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy..
    Navrkalova, Veronika
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Smedby, Karin Ekstrom
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Stem Cell Ctr Hematol & Transplantat, Lund, Sweden..
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Gen Hosp Nikea, Dept Hematol, Piraeus, Greece..
    Panagiotidis, Panagiotis
    Univ Athens, Sch Med, Dept Propaedeut Med 1, GR-11527 Athens, Greece..
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Feinstein Inst Med Res, North Shore Long Isl Jewish Hlth Syst, Manhasset, NY USA..
    Davi, Frederic
    Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Hematol Lab, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 06, 12 Rue Cuvier, Paris, France..
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Immunol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Gaidano, Gianluca
    Ghia, Paolo
    IRCCS, San Raffaele Sci Inst, Div Expt Oncol, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS, San Raffaele Sci Inst, Dept Oncohematol, Milan, Italy..
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    CERTH, Inst Appl Biosci, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Masaryk Univ, Cent European Inst Technol, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Zenz, Thorsten
    Univ Heidelberg Hosp, Dept Med 5, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Damm, Frederik
    Charite, Dept Hematol Oncol & Tumor Immunol, D-13353 Berlin, Germany..
    EGR2 mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemiam - a new bad player?2015In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 56, no S1, p. 83-85Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 246693. Young, Gavin
    et al.
    Hundt, Nikolas
    Cole, Daniel
    Fineberg, Adam
    Andrecka, Joanna
    Tyler, Andrew
    Olerinyova, Anna
    Ansari, Ayla
    Marklund, Erik G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Collier, Miranda P.
    Chandler, Shane A.
    Tkachenko, Olga
    Allen, Joel
    Crispin, Max
    Billington, Neil
    Takagi, Yasuharu
    Sellers, James R.
    Eichmann, Cédric
    Selenko, Philipp
    Frey, Lukas
    Riek, Roland
    Galpin, Martin R.
    Struwe, Weston B.
    Benesch, Justin L. P.
    Kukura, Philipp
    Quantitative mass imaging of single biological macromolecules2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 360, no 6387, p. 423-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Careful measurements of light scattering can provide information on individual macromolecules and complexes. Young et al. used a light-scattering approach for accurate mass determination of proteins as small as 20 kDa (see the Perspective by Lee and Klenerman). Movies of protein complex association and dissociation were analyzed to extract biophysical parameters from single molecules and assemblies without labeling. Using this approach, the authors determined in vitro kinetics of fibril and aggregate growth and association constants for a complex protein-glycoprotein assembly.Science, this issue p. 423; see also p. 378The cellular processes underpinning life are orchestrated by proteins and their interactions. The associated structural and dynamic heterogeneity, despite being key to function, poses a fundamental challenge to existing analytical and structural methodologies. We used interferometric scattering microscopy to quantify the mass of single biomolecules in solution with 2% sequence mass accuracy, up to 19-kilodalton resolution, and 1-kilodalton precision. We resolved oligomeric distributions at high dynamic range, detected small-molecule binding, and mass-imaged proteins with associated lipids and sugars. These capabilities enabled us to characterize the molecular dynamics of processes as diverse as glycoprotein cross-linking, amyloidogenic protein aggregation, and actin polymerization. Interferometric scattering mass spectrometry allows spatiotemporally resolved measurement of a broad range of biomolecular interactions, one molecule at a time.

  • 246694.
    Young, Iris D.
    et al.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Ibrahim, Mohamed
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Biol, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Chatterjee, Ruchira
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Gul, Sheraz
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Fuller, Franklin D.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Koroidov, Sergey
    Umea Univ, Inst Kemi, Kemiskt Biol Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Brewster, Aaron S.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Tran, Rosalie
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Kroll, Thomas
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA.;SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, SSRL, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Michels-Clark, Tara
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA.;SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Stan, Claudiu A.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Hussein, Rana
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Biol, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Zhang, Miao
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Biol, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Douthit, Lacey
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Kubin, Markus
    Helmholtz Zentrum, Inst Methods & Instrumentat Synchrotron Radiat Re, D-14109 Berlin, Germany..
    de Lichtenberg, Casper
    Umea Univ, Inst Kemi, Kemiskt Biol Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Pham, Long Vo
    Nilsson, Hakan
    Umea Univ, Inst Kemi, Kemiskt Biol Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Cheah, Mun Hon
    Umea Univ, Inst Kemi, Kemiskt Biol Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Shevela, Dmitriy
    Umea Univ, Inst Kemi, Kemiskt Biol Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Saracini, Claudio
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Bean, Mackenzie A.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Seuffert, Ina
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Biol, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, SSRL, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, SSRL, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA.;Ctr High Pressure Sci & Technol Adv Res, Shanghai 201203, Peoples R China..
    Pastor, Ernest
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Weninger, Clemens
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Fransson, Thomas
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Lassalle, Louise
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Braeuer, Philipp
    Univ Oxford, Dept Biochem, S Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QU, England.;Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England..
    Aller, Pierre
    Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England..
    Docker, Peter T.
    Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England..
    Andi, Babak
    Brookhaven Natl Lab, Natl Synchrotron Light Source 2, Upton, NY 11973 USA..
    Orville, Allen M.
    Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England..
    Glownia, James M.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Nelson, Silke
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Sikorski, Marcin
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Zhu, Diling
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Hunter, Mark S.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Lane, Thomas J.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Aquila, Andy
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Koglin, Jason E.
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Robinson, Joseph
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Liang, Mengning
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Boutet, Sebastien
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Lyubimov, Artem Y.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mol & Cellular Physiol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mol & Cellular Physiol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Moriarty, Nigel W.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Liebschner, Dorothee
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Afonine, Pavel V.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Waterman, David G.
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab, Didcot OX11 0QX, Oxon, England.;Rutherford Appleton Lab, CCP4,Res Complex Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA, Oxon, England..
    Evans, Gwyndaf
    Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Sci & Innovat Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE, Oxon, England..
    Wernet, Philippe
    Helmholtz Zentrum, Inst Methods & Instrumentat Synchrotron Radiat Re, D-14109 Berlin, Germany..
    Dobbek, Holger
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Biol, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Weis, William I.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mol & Cellular Physiol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Dept Photon Sci, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Dept Struct Biol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Brunger, Axel T.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mol & Cellular Physiol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Dept Photon Sci, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.;Stanford Univ, Dept Struct Biol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Adams, Paul D.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Bioengn, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Zouni, Athina
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Biol, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Messinger, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics. Umea Univ, Inst Kemi, Kemiskt Biol Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Bergmann, Uwe
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford PULSE Inst, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Kern, Jan
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, LCLS, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Yano, Junko
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Mol Biophys & Integrated Bioimaging Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature2016In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 540, no 7633, p. 453-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S-0 to S-4)(1), in which S-1 is the dark-stable state and S-3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O-2 evolution(2,3). A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site(4-6). Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S-1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S-3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S-3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 angstrom resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL7 provided a damage-free view of the S-1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions(8,9), and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S-2 and S-3 states(10). Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site(10-13). This approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms.

  • 246695.
    Young, Joanna C.
    et al.
    Univ Alaska, Geophys Inst, Fairbanks, AK 99701 USA..
    Arendt, Anthony
    Univ Alaska, Geophys Inst, Fairbanks, AK 99701 USA.;Univ Washington, Polar Sci Ctr, Appl Phys Lab, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Hock, Regine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Univ Alaska, Geophys Inst, Fairbanks, AK 99701 USA..
    Pettit, Erin
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Geosci, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    The challenge of monitoring glaciers with extreme altitudinal range: mass-balance reconstruction for Kahiltna Glacier, Alaska2018In: Journal of Glaciology, ISSN 0022-1430, E-ISSN 1727-5652, Vol. 64, no 243, p. 75-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glaciers spanning large altitudinal ranges often experience different climatic regimes with elevation, creating challenges in acquiring mass-balance and climate observations that represent the entire glacier. We use mixed methods to reconstruct the 1991-2014 mass balance of the Kahiltna Glacier in Alaska, a large (503 km(2)) glacier with one of the greatest elevation ranges globally (264-6108m a. s.l.). We calibrate an enhanced temperature index model to glacier-wide mass balances from repeat laser altimetry and point observations, finding a mean net mass-balance rate of -0.74 mw.e. a(-1)(+/-sigma = 0.04, std dev. of the best-performing model simulations). Results are validated against mass changes from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, a novel approach at the individual glacier scale. Correlation is strong between the detrended model-and GRACE-derived mass change time series (R-2 = 0.58 and p << 0.001), and between summer (R-2 = 0.69 and p = 0.003) and annual (R-2 = 0.63 and p = 0.006) balances, lending greater confidence to our modeling results. We find poor correlation, however, between modeled glacier-wide balances and recent single-stake monitoring. Finally, we make recommendations for monitoring glaciers with extreme altitudinal ranges, including characterizing precipitation via snow radar profiling.

  • 246696.
    Young, Karl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Troha, Gregory
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Social Roles in Virtual World Games: A case study of the social role of rated battleground leader in World of Warcraft2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 246697. Young, L.A.
    et al.
    Pavlovska-Teglia, G
    Stodulski, G
    Hau, Jann
    Uppsala University, Department of Comparative Medicine.
    Effect of oral administration of corticosterone and group housing on body weight gain and locomotor development in the neonatal rat.1996In: ANIMAL WELFARE, Vol. 5, p. 167-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246698.
    Young, Maisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Climate change implications on transboundary water management in the Jordan River Basin: A Case Study of the Jordan River Basin and the transboundary agreements between riparians Israel, Palestine and Jordan2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore the relationship between the impacts of climate change and transboundary water management (TWM) mechanisms. The thesis does so through a case study of the transboundary water agreements between Israel, Palestine and Jordan – states that share the transboundary waters in the Jordan River Basin (JRB), a basin that lies in a region of high political tensions and decreasing precipitation. By using empirical climate data on precipitation, temperature and general climate change projections for the basin, the author seeks to understand how these environmental changes will challenge TWM in the JRB. By using qualitative methods to examine the water agreements through the method of process tracing, the thesis seeks to understand how the water agreements are constructed to handle changes in waterflow due to climate change. The results show that the transboundary mechanisms, the water agreements and Joint Water Committees (JWC), managing the transboundary waters in the JRB, possess weak mechanisms to manage changes in waterflow. As a consequence, the whole basin might experience increasing political pressures in the future over the fulfilment of water allocation provisions. The thesis further suggests that the TWM structures in the case lack awareness and mechanisms to handle climate change impacts. On the other hand, the JWCs have an institutional capacity, expertise, and mandate in managing these potential risks in the future. However, incidents in the past, manifest that decreased waterflow leads to increasing political tensions and conflicts between the states in the basin due to the lack of conflict resolution mechanisms in the TWM structures. In order to establish a sustainable TWM in the JRB, the suggested recommendation is that climate change impacts ought to be embedded into the water agreements by incorporating flexible mechanisms for water allocation. In addition, the conflict resolution mechanisms should be strengthened. 

  • 246699.
    Young, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kartan i fokus: En studie av namn- och kartkunskaper i geografiundervisningen vid grundskolans senare år2011Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med detta examensarbete var att undersöka geografilärares inställning till, och praktiska erfarenheter av, kartans användning som redskap inom geografiämnet vid grundskolans senare år (årskurser 7-9). Av specifikt intresse var att få reda på dessa lärares syn på kartkunskaper i allmänhet och namngeografins ställning inom ämnet i synnerhet, samt deras syn på den aktuella namngeografiska debatten. Metoden att försöka nå detta syfte har varit användandet av en kvalitativ fallstudie, där fem verksamma geografilärare vid grundskolans senare år har intervjuats.

    Resultaten pekar på att lärarna ser en tydlig skillnad där kartkunskaper värderas högre än namnkunskaper. Kartkunskaper – där kartan används som ett redskap i geografiundervisningen – ses som ett mer omfattande och väsentligt arbetsområde. Namnkunskapernas användning däremot är omtvistad och skapar en polarisering av åsikter, som sedan kan kännas igen i den aktuella namnkunskapsdebatten. En vidare slutsats är att namnkunskaper ingår till övervägande del i en traditionell värdebaserad didaktisk typologi, medan kartkunskaps-begreppet är svårare att placera.

  • 246700.
    Young, Shannen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Where Have All the Women Gone?: The Production of Knowledge and Media Representation of Women's Participation in the Gacaca Courts2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
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