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  • 246801.
    Yu, Qian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Shuai, Hongyan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Ahooghalandari, Parvin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gylfe, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Glucose controls glucagon secretion by directly modulating cAMP in α‑cellsIn: Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246802.
    Yu, Qian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Shuai, Hongyan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Ahooghalandari, Parvin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gylfe, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Glucose lowers cAMP to inhibit glucagon secretion by a direct effect on alpha cells2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, p. S266-S267Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246803. Yu, S. W.
    et al.
    Stolte, W. C.
    Guillemin, R.
    Öhrwall, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Physics. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Physics V.
    Tran, I. C,
    Piancastelli, Maria-Novella
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Physics. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Physics V.
    Lindle, D. W.
    Photofragmentation study of core-excited NO2004In: Journal of Physics B, Vol. 37, p. 3583-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246804. Yu, S.-G.
    et al.
    Björn, L. O.
    Mamedov, Fikret
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Albertsson, Per-Åke
    Chloroplasts largely devoid of grana stacks have full photosynthetic capability1998In: Photosynthesis: Mechanisms and Effects / [ed] Garab, G., Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1998, , p. 1847-1850p. 1847-1850Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 246805.
    Yu, Sheng-Xiang
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100093, China.
    Janssens, Steven B.
    Botanic Garden Meise, Nieuwelaan 38, Meise, BE-1860, Belgium.
    Zhu, Xiang-Yun
    State Key Laboratory of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100093, China.
    Lidén, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Gao, Tian-Gang
    State Key Laboratory of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100093, China.
    Wang, Wei
    State Key Laboratory of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100093, China.
    Phylogeny of Impatiens (Balsaminaceae): integrating molecular and morphological evidence into a new classification2016In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 179-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impatiens L. is one of the largest angiosperm genera, containing over 1000 species, and is notorious for its taxonomic difficulty. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the genus to date based on a total evidence approach. Forty-six morphological characters, mainly obtained from our own investigations, are combined with sequence data from three genetic regions, including nuclear ribosomal ITS and plastid atpB-rbcL and trnL-F. We include 150 Impatiens species representing all clades recovered by previous phylogenetic analyses as well as three outgroups. Maximum-parsimony and Bayesian inference methods were used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Our analyses concur with previous studies, but in most cases provide stronger support. Impatiens splits into two major clades. For the first time, we report that species with three-colpate pollen and four carpels form a monophyletic group (clade I). Within clade II, seven well-supported subclades are recognized. Within this phylogenetic framework, character evolution is reconstructed, and diagnostic morphological characters for different clades and subclades are identified and discussed. Based on both morphological and molecular evidence, a new classification outline is presented, in which Impatiens is divided into two subgenera, subgen. Clavicarpa and subgen. Impatiens; the latter is further subdivided into seven sections.

  • 246806. Yu, Sheng-Xiang
    et al.
    Lidén, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Han, Bao-Cai
    Zhang, Xiao-Xia
    Impatiens lixianensis, a new species of Balsaminaceae from Sichuan, China2013In: Phytotaxa, ISSN 1179-3155, E-ISSN 1179-3163, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impatiens lixianensis, a new species of Balsaminaceae from Zhegushan, Lixian, Sichuan province, China, is described and illustrated. This species is closely related to I. apsotis in having small white to greenish-white flowers, 2 lateral sepals, and 1-2-flowered short racemes, but differs by its non-crested dorsal petals, a short 2-lobed swollen spur, long-clawed lower petals, and small scale-shaped upper petals. Regarding palynological characters, the lumina of the reticulum in I. lixianensis are smaller and much more granulate than those in I. apsotis.

  • 246807. Yu, Shihui
    et al.
    Graf, Wilhelm
    Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
    Shprintzen, Robert J
    Genomic disorders on chromosome 222012In: Current opinion in pediatrics, ISSN 1040-8703, E-ISSN 1531-698X, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 665-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

    Chromosome 22, the first human chromosome to be completely sequenced, is prone to genomic alterations. Copy-number variants (CNVs) are common because of an enrichment of low-copy repeat sequences that precipitate a high frequency of nonallelic homologous misalignments and unequal recombination during meiosis. Among these is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans and the most common microdeletion syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and DiGeorge syndrome. This review will focus on the recent literature dealing with both the molecular and clinical aspects of chromosome 22 genomic variations. Although the literature covering this area is expansive, the majority is descriptive or analytical of the problems presented by these genomic disorders, and there is little evidence of translational research including treatment outcomes.

    RECENT FINDINGS:

    With the increased use of microarray analysis in both research and clinical practice, variations in CNVs are becoming elucidated. Genomic analysis continues to characterize genes and gene effect. Research on the COMT gene continues to yield interesting findings, including a possible sex-mediated effect because of its regulatory role with estrogen. There is a small amount of treatment outcome data relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders in VCFS, but based on small samples and short-term follow-up.

    SUMMARY:

    Although hundreds of studies in the past year have focused on genomic disorders of chromosome 22, little progress has been made in the implementation of translational research, even for more common disorders including VCFS.

  • 246808.
    Yu, Shi-Yong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. PALAEOBIOLOGY.
    Andrén, Elinor
    Barnekow, Lena
    Berglund, Björn, E.
    Sandgren, Per
    Holocene palaeoecology and shoreline displacement on the Biskopsmåla Peninsula, southeastern Sweden2003In: BOREAS, ISSN 0300-9483, Vol. 32, p. 578-589Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246809. Yu, Shi-Yong
    et al.
    Berglund, Björn
    Andren, Elinor
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Sandgren, Per
    Mid-Holocene Baltic Sea transgression along the coast of Blekinge, SE Sweden - ancient lagoons correlated with beach ridges2004In: GFF, Vol. 126, no 3, p. 257-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246810.
    Yu, Shukun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology.
    Enzymes of floridean starch and floridoside degradation in red alge: purification, characterization and physiological studies1992Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 246811. Yu, Shun
    et al.
    Ahmadi, Sarch
    Palmgren, Pål
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Materials Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Hennies, Franz
    Zuleta, Marcelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Materials Science.
    Gothelid, Mats
    Modification of charge transfer and energy level alignment at organic/TiO2 interfaces2009In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 113, no 31, p. 13765-13771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adsorption of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) on rutile TiO2(110) modified by a set of pyridine derivatives (2,2'-bipyridine, 4,4'-bipyridine, and 4-tert-butyl pyridine) has been investigated using synchrotron radiation based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the unmodified TiOPc/TiO2 system, a strong charge transfer is observed from the first layer TiOPc into the substrate, which leads to a molecular layer at the interface with a depleted highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). However, precovering the TiO2 surface with a saturated pyridine monolayer effectively reduce this process and leave the TiOPc in a less perturbed molecular state. Furthermore, the TiOPc HOMO and core levels are observed at different binding energies ranging by 0.3 eV on the three pyridine monolayers, which is ascribed to differences in surface potentials set up by the different pyridine/TiO2 systems.

  • 246812. Yu, Shun
    et al.
    Ahmadi, Sareh
    Sun, Chenghua
    Palmgren, Pål
    Hennies, Franz
    Zuleta, Marcelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Göthelid, Mats
    4-tert-Butyl Pyridine Bond Site and Band Bending on TiO2(110)2010In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 114, no 5, p. 2315-2320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    In the present work, we study the bonding of 4-tert-butyl pyridine (4TBP) to the TiO2(110) surface using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that at low coverage, 4TBP adsorbs preferentially on oxygen vacancies. The calculated adsorption energy at the vacancies is 120 kJ/mol larger than that oil the five-fold-coordinated Ti4+ sites located in the rows on the TiO2 surface. The vacancy is "healed" by 4TBP, and the related gap state is strongly reduced through charge transfer into empty pi* orbitals on the pyridine ring. This leads to a change in surface band bending by 0.2 eV toward lower binding energies. The band bending does not change with further 4TBP deposition when saturating the surface to monolayer coverage, where the TiO2 surface is effectively protected against further adsorption by the dense 4TBP layer.
  • 246813. Yu, Shun
    et al.
    Ahmadi, Sareh
    Sun, Chenghua
    Schulte, Karina
    Pietzsch, Annette
    Hennies, Franz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Soft X-Ray Physics.
    Zuleta, Marcelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Göthelid, Mats
    Crystallization-Induced Charge-Transfer Change in TiOPc Thin Films Revealed by Resonant Photoemission Spectroscopy2011In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 115, no 30, p. 14969-14977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic semiconductors usually demonstrate crystal structure dependent electronic properties, and through precise control of film structure, the performance of novel organic electronic devices can be greatly improved. Understanding the crystal structure dependent charge-transfer mechanism thus becomes critical. In this work, we have prepared amorphous titanyl phthalocyanine films by vacuum molecular beam evaporation and have further crystallized them through vacuum annealing. In the crystalline phase, an excited electron is rapidly transferred into neighboring molecules; while in the amorphous phase, it is mainly localized and recombines with the core hole as revealed by resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES). The fast electron transfer time is determined to be around 16 fs in the crystalline film, which is in good agreement with the charge-transfer hopping time estimated from the best device performance reported. The crystallized film shows more p-type characteristics than the amorphous with all the energy levels shifting toward the vacuum level. However, the greatly improved charge transfer is assigned to the molecular orbital coupling rather than this shift. From density functional theory and RPES, we specify the contribution of two differently coordinated nitrogen atoms (N2c and N3c) to the experimental results and illustrate that the N3c related orbital has experienced a dramatic change, which is keenly related to the improved charge transfer.

  • 246814. Yu, Shun
    et al.
    Ahmadi, Sareh
    Zuleta, Marcelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Tian, Haining
    Schulte, Karina
    Pietzsch, Annette
    Hennies, Franz
    Weissenrieder, Jonas
    Yang, Xichuan
    Göthelid, Mats
    Adsorption geometry, molecular interaction, and charge transfer of triphenylamine-based dye on rutile TiO2(110)2010In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 133, no 22, p. 224704-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fast development of new organic sensitizers leads to the need for a better understanding of the complexity and significance of their adsorption processes on TiO2 surfaces. We have investigated a prototype of the triphenylamine-cyanoacrylic acid (donor-acceptor) on rutile TiO2 (110) surface with special attention on the monolayer region. This molecule belongs to the type of dye, some of which so far has delivered the record efficiency of 10%-10.3% for pure organic sensitizers [W. Zeng, Y. Cao, Y. Bai, Y. Wang, Y. Shi, M. Zhang, F. Wang, C. Pan, and P. Wang, Chem. Mater. 22, 1915 (2010)]. The molecular configuration of this dye on the TiO2 surface was found to vary with coverage and adopt gradually an upright geometry, as determined from near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Due to the molecular interaction within the increasingly dense packed layer, the molecular electronic structure changes systematically: all energy levels shift to higher binding energies, as shown by photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, the investigation of charge delocalization within the molecule was carried out by means of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy. A fast delocalization (similar to 1.8 fs) occurs at the donor part while a competing process between delocalization and localization takes place at the acceptor part. This depicts the "push-pull" concept in donor-acceptor molecular system in time scale.

  • 246815.
    YU, SK
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    AHMAD, T
    Uppsala University.
    KENNE, L
    Uppsala University.
    PEDERSEN, M
    Uppsala University.
    ALPHA-1,4-GLUCAN LYASE, A NEW CLASS OF STARCH GLYCOGEN DEGRADING ENZYME .3. SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY, MODE OF ACTION, AND CLEAVAGE MECHANISM1995In: BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA-GENERAL SUBJECTS, ISSN 0304-4165, Vol. 1244, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The alpha-1,4-glucan lyase (EC 4.2.2.-), purified from the red alga Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, is a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 116654 Da as determined by matrix-assisted laser-desorption mass spectrometry. It degraded maltose, maltosac

  • 246816. Yu, Sung W.
    et al.
    Stolte, W. C.
    Öhrwall, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Physics. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Physics V.
    Guillemin, R.
    Dominguez-Lopez, I.
    Piancastelli, M. N. P.
    Lindle, D. W.
    Anionic and cationic photofragmentation of core-excited N2O2003In: J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys, ISSN ISSN 0953-4075, Vol. 36, p. 1255-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have measured all detectable cationic and anionic fragments in singlechannel mode from N2O as a function of photon energy in the vicinity of the nitrogen 1s core-level threshold. Due to the high degree of localization of the core electrons, the two excitations Nt1s → 3π∗ and Nc1s → 3π∗ show high levels of site-selective behaviour. The observed partial ion yield for the sole anionic fragment,O−, in conjunctionwith the partial cation yields,confirms our previous demonstration of anion-yield spectroscopy as a unique tool to identify core-level shape resonances.

  • 246817.
    Yu, Tsung
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA.;Univ Zurich, Epidemiol Biostat & Prevent Inst, CH-8006 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Holbrook, Janet T.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Thorne, Jennifer E.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Wilmer Eye Inst, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Flynn, Terry N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Van Natta, Mark L.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Puhan, Milo A.
    Univ Zurich, Epidemiol Biostat & Prevent Inst, CH-8006 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Outcome Preferences in Patients With Noninfectious Uveitis: Results of a Best-Worst Scaling Study2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 11, p. 6864-6872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To estimate patient preferences regarding potential adverse outcomes of local versus systemic corticosteroid therapies for noninfectious uveitis by using a best-worst scaling (BWS) approach. METHODS. Local and systemic therapies are alternatives for noninfectious uveitis that have different potential adverse outcomes. Patients participating in the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment Trial Follow-up Study (MUST FS) and additional patients with a history of noninfectious uveitis treated at two academic medical centers (Johns Hopkins University and University of Pennsylvania) were surveyed about their preferences regarding six adverse outcomes deemed important to patients. Using "case 1'' BWS, patients were asked to repeatedly select the most and least worrying from a list of outcomes (in the survey three outcomes per task). RESULTS. Eighty-two patients in the MUST FS and 100 patients treated at the academic medical centers completed the survey. According to BWS, patients were more likely to select vision not meeting the requirement for driving (individual BWS score: median = 3, interquartile range, 0-5), development of glaucoma (2, 1-4), and needing eye surgery (1, 0-3) as the most worrying outcomes as compared to needing medicine for high blood pressure/cholesterol (2, 4 to 0), development of cataracts (2, 3 to 1), or infection (sinusitis) (3, 5 to 0). Larger BWS scores indicated the outcomes were more worrying to patients. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with noninfectious uveitis considered impaired vision, development of glaucoma, and need for eye surgery worrying adverse outcomes, which suggests that it is especially desirable to avoid these outcomes if possible. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00132691.)

  • 246818.
    Yu, Wan-ying
    et al.
    Cent S Univ, Xiangya Hosp, Dept Pharm, Changsha, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Xue
    Cent S Univ, Xiangya Hosp 3, Ctr Clin Pharmacol, Changsha 410013, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Huang, Lihua
    Cent S Univ, Xiangya Hosp 3, Ctr Med Expt, Changsha, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Peng, Chen
    Univ South China, Inst Pharm & Pharmacol, Hengyang, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Ma, Wan-le
    Cent S Univ, Xiangya Hosp 3, Ctr Clin Pharmacol, Changsha 410013, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Guo-Ping
    Cent S Univ, Xiangya Hosp 3, Ctr Clin Pharmacol, Changsha 410013, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Influence of APOE Gene Polymorphism on Interindividual and Interethnic Warfarin Dosage Requirement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2016In: Cardiovascular Therapeutics, ISSN 1755-5914, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 297-307Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWarfarin is the most extensively used coumarin anticoagulant. It has been shown that the anticoagulant effect of warfarin is associated with genetic variation. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is a possible candidate to influence the maintenance dose of warfarin. ApoE affects the vitamin K cycle by mediating the uptake of vitamin K into the liver. The vitamin K cycle is the drug target of warfarin. However, the association between genetic variants of the APOE gene and warfarin dose requirement is still controversial. MethodsRevman 5.3 software was used to analyze the relationship between APOE genotypes and warfarin dose requirements. ResultsIn our meta-analysis, the E2/E2 genotype was significantly associated with warfarin dose. E2/E2 patients required 12% (P=0.0002) lower mean daily warfarin dose than E3/E3 carriers. In addition, subgroup analysis showed that Asians with the E4/E4 genotype tended to need lower warfarin maintenance doses, while the African American E4/E4 carriers needed slightly higher doses than E3/E3 carriers; however, these subgroups were very small. ConclusionThis is the first meta-analysis of the association between APOE genotypes and warfarin dose. APOE E2/E2 might be one of thefactors affecting warfarin dose requirements. The effect of APOE may vary between ethnicities.

  • 246819. Yu, Wei
    et al.
    Andersson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Worley, Kim
    Muzny, Donna
    Ding, Y
    Liu, Wen
    Ricafrente, Jennifer
    Wentland, Meredith
    Lennon, Greg
    Gibbs, Richard
    Large scale concatenation cDNA sequencing1997In: Genome Research, Vol. 7, p. 353-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246820.
    Yu, Wenqiang
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Ginjala, Vasudeva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Pant, Vinod
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Chernukhin, Igor
    Whitehead, Joanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Docquier, France
    Farrar, Dawn
    Tavoosidana, Gholamreza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Kanduri, Chandrasekhar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Oshimura, Mitsuo
    Feinberg, Andrew P
    Lobanenkov, Victor
    Klenova, Elena
    Rolf Ohlsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation regulates CTCF-dependent chromatin insulation2004In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1105-1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromatin insulators demarcate expression domains by blocking the cis effects of enhancers or silencers in a position-dependent manner1, 2. We show that the chromatin insulator protein CTCF carries a post-translational modification: poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that a poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation mark, which exclusively segregates with the maternal allele of the insulator domain in the H19 imprinting control region, requires the bases that are essential for interaction with CTCF3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation−on−chip analysis documented that the link between CTCF and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation extended to more than 140 mouse CTCF target sites. An insulator trap assay showed that the insulator function of most of these CTCF target sites is sensitive to 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. We suggest that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation imparts chromatin insulator properties to CTCF at both imprinted and nonimprinted loci, which has implications for the regulation of expression domains and their demise in pathological lesions.

  • 246821.
    Yu, Wen-Ru
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Olsson, Yngve
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Accumulation of immunoreactivity to ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase PGP 9.5 in axons of human cases with spinal cord lesions1998In: APMIS, Vol. 106, p. 1081-Article, book review (Other scientific)
  • 246822.
    Yu, WR
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westergren, H
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Farooque, M
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Holtz, A
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Olsson, Y
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Systemic hypothermia following compression injury of rat spinal cord:reduction of plasma protein extravasation demonstrated byimmunohistochemistry.1999In: Acta Neuropathol (Berl), Vol. 98, p. 15-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246823.
    Yu, WR
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westergren, H
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Farooque, M
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Holtz, A
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Olsson, Y
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Systemic hypothermia following spinal cord compression injury in the rat: An immunohistochemical study on the expression of vimentin and GFAP1999In: Neuropathology, Vol. 19, p. 172-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246824. Yu, X
    et al.
    Johanson, G
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ichihara, G
    Shibata, E
    Kamijima, M
    Ono, Y
    Takeuchi, Y
    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of metabolic interactions between n-hexane and toluene in humans.1997In: J Occup Health, Vol. 40, p. 293-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246825. Yu, X.
    et al.
    Wieczorek, S.
    Franke, A.
    Yin, Hong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Pierer, M.
    Sina, C.
    Karlsen, T. H.
    Boberg, K. M.
    Bergquist, A.
    Kunz, M.
    Witte, T.
    Gross, W. L.
    Epplen, J. T.
    Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Schreiber, S.
    Ibrahim, S. M.
    Association of UCP2 - 866 G/A polymorphism with chronic inflammatory diseases2009In: Genes and Immunity, ISSN 1466-4879, E-ISSN 1476-5470, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 601-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reported earlier that two mitochondrial gene polymorphisms, UCP2 -866 G/A (rs659366) and mtDNA nt13708 G/A (rs28359178), are associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we aim to investigate whether these functional polymorphisms contribute to other eight chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Wegener' granulomatosis (WG), Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and psoriasis. Compared with individual control panels, the UCP2 -866 G/A polymorphism was associated with RA and SLE, and the mtDNA nt13708 G/A polymorphism with RA. Compared with combined controls, the UCP2 -866 G/A polymorphism was associated with SLE, WG, CD and UC. When all eight disease panels and the original MS panel were combined in a meta-analysis, the UCP2 was associated with chronic inflammatory diseases in terms of either alleles (odds ratio (OR)=0.91, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.86-0.96), P=0.0003) or genotypes (OR=0.88, (95% CI: 0.82-0.95), P=0.0008), with the -866A allele associated with a decreased risk to diseases. As the -866A allele increases gene expression, our findings suggest a protective role of the UCP2 protein in chronic inflammatory diseases.

  • 246826. Yu, X. Z.
    et al.
    Arima, T.
    Kaneko, Y.
    He, J. P.
    Mathieu, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Asaka, T.
    Hara, T.
    Kimoto, K.
    Matsui, Y.
    Tokura, Y.
    Direct observation of the bandwidth-disorder induced variation of charge/orbital ordering structure in RE0.5(Ca1-ySry)1.5MnO42007In: Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, Fast Track Communication, Vol. 19, no 17, p. 172203-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246827. Yu, X. Z.
    et al.
    Mathieu, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Arima, T.
    Kaneko, Y.
    He, J. P.
    Uchida, M.
    Asaka, T.
    Nagai, T.
    Kimoto, K.
    Asamitsu, A.
    Matsui, Y.
    Tokura, Y.
    Variation of charge/orbital ordering in layered manganites Pr1-xCa1+xMnO4 as investigated by transmission-electron-microscopy2007In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 75, no 17, p. 174441-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246828.
    YU, Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    LUNDSTROM, T
    Uppsala University.
    CRYSTAL-GROWTH AND STRUCTURAL INVESTIGATION OF THE NEW QUATERNARY COMPOUND MO1-XCRXALB WITH X=0.391995In: JOURNAL OF ALLOYS AND COMPOUNDS, Vol. 226, no 1-2, p. 5-9Other (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Single crystals of Mo(1-x)Cr(x)AIB (quaternary representative of UBC) were synthesized by the high-temperature metal-solution method using aluminium flux, chromium, molybdenum metals and boron powder as starting materials. The mixture, with atomic ratio

  • 246829.
    YU, Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    LUNDSTROM, T
    Uppsala University.
    SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE NEW TERNARY BORIDE (V1-XNBX)(2)B-31995In: JOURNAL OF ALLOYS AND COMPOUNDS, Vol. 229, no 2, p. 243-247Other (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The new ternary compound (V1-xNbx)(2)B-3 was synthesized by both single crystal and polycrystalline methods. It belongs to the V2B3-type structure, which crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm (No. 63), with Z = 4. The unit cell parameters of

  • 246830.
    YU, Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    LUNDSTROM, T
    Uppsala University.
    SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURE INVESTIGATION OF THE NEW TERNARY BORIDE (CR0.80W0.20)(3)B-4 AND ITS ANALOGS (CR(1-X)TM(X))(3)B-4 WITH TM=MO OR TA1995In: JOURNAL OF ALLOYS AND COMPOUNDS, Vol. 228, no 2, p. 122-126Other (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Single crystals of (Cr(1-x)M(3))(3)B-4 (TM = W, Mo or Ta) have been synthesized by the high temperature metal-solution method using aluminium flux. They all crystallize in the Ta3B4-type structure, with the space group Immm (No. 71) and unit-cell dimensi

  • 246831.
    YU, Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    TERGENIUS, LE
    Uppsala University.
    LUNDSTROM, T
    Uppsala University.
    OKADA, S
    Uppsala University.
    A STRUCTURAL INVESTIGATION OF V2B3 BY SINGLE-CRYSTAL DIFFRACTOMETRY1995In: JOURNAL OF ALLOYS AND COMPOUNDS, Vol. 221, p. 86-90Other (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The crystal structure of V2B3 was reinvestigated using single-crystal X-ray diffractometry. V2B3 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm with a = 3.0599(4) Angstrom, b = 18.429(2) Angstrom, c = 2.9839(4) Angstrom, Z = 4. The crystal was grown f

  • 246832.
    Yu, Yang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Abnormal Placentation in the Mouse2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Placental development can be disturbed by various factors, such as mutation of specific genes or maternal diabetes. Our previous work on interspecies hybrid placental dysplasia (IHPD) and two additional models of placental hyperplasia, cloned mice and Esx1 mutants, showed that many genes are deregulated in placental dysplasia. Two of these candidate placentation genes, Cpe and Lhx3, were further studied. We performed in situ hybridization to determine their spatio-temporal expression in the placentas and placental phenotypes were analyzed in mutant mice. Our results showed that the placental phenotype in Cpe mutant mice mimics some IHPD phenotypes. Deregulated expression of Cpe and Cpd, a functionally equivalent gene, prior to the manifestation of the IHPD phenotype, indicated that Cpe and Cpd are potentially causative genes in IHPD. Lhx3 mutants lacked any placental phenotype. Deletion of Lhx3 and Lhx4 together caused an inconsistent placental phenotype which did not affect placental lipid transport function or expression of Lhx3/Lhx4 target genes. Down regulation of Lhx3/Lhx4 did not rescue the placental phenotype of AT24 mice and hence could be excluded as causative genes in IHPD. Analysis of placental development in diabetic mice showed that severe maternal diabetes resulted in fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) without any change in placental weight and lipid transport function. The diabetic placentas however exhibited abnormal morphology. Gene expression profiling identified some genes that might contribute to diabetic pathology. In another study, it was found that the heterochromatin protein CBX1 is required for normal placentation, as deletion of the gene caused consistent spongiotrophoblast and labyrinthine phenotypes. Gene expression profiling and spatio-temporal expression analysis showed that several genes with known function in placental development were deregulated in the Cbx1 null placenta.

    List of papers
    1. Carboxypeptidase E in the mouse placenta
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carboxypeptidase E in the mouse placenta
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Differentiation, ISSN 0301-4681, E-ISSN 1432-0436, Vol. 74, no 9-10, p. 648-660Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Carboxypeptidase E (CPE) has important functions in processing of endocrine pro-peptides, such as pro-insulin, pro-opiomelanocortin, or pro-gonadotropin-releasing hormone, as evidenced by the hyperpro-insulinemia, obesity, and sterility of Cpe mutant mice. Down-regulation of Cpe in enlarged placentas of interspecific hybrid (interspecies hybrid placental dysplasia (IHPD)) and cloned mice suggested that reduced CPE enzyme and receptor activity could underlie abnormal placental phenotypes. In this study, we have explored the role of Cpe in murine placentation by determining its expression at various stages of gestation, and by phenotypic analysis of Cpe mutant placentas. Our results show that Cpe and Carboxypeptidase D (Cpd), another carboxypeptidase with a very similar function, are strictly co-localized in the mouse placenta from late mid-gestation to term. We also show that absence of CPE causes a sporadic but striking placental phenotype characterized by an increase in giant and glycogen cell numbers and giant cell hypertrophy. Microarray-based transcriptional pro. ling of Cpe mutant placentas identified only a very small number of genes with altered expression, including Dtprp, which belongs to the prolactin gene family. Concordant deregulation of Cpe and Cpd in abnormal placentas of interspecies hybrids before the onset of IHPD phenotype and recapitulation of some phenotypes of IHPD hyperplastic placentas in Cpe mutant placentas suggests that these two genes are causally involved in IHPD and may function as speciation genes in the genus Mus.

    Keywords
    interspecies hybrid placental dysplasia, Cpe, Cpd, fat mutation, trophoblast giant cells
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94491 (URN)10.1111/j.1432-0436.2006.00093.x (DOI)000242657200016 ()17177860 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-05-08 Created: 2006-05-08 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Expression and function of the LIM homeobox containing genes Lhx3 and Lhx4 in the mouse placenta
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression and function of the LIM homeobox containing genes Lhx3 and Lhx4 in the mouse placenta
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Developmental Dynamics, ISSN 1058-8388, E-ISSN 1097-0177, Vol. 237, no 5, p. 1517-1525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The LIM homeobox containing genes of the LIM-3 group, Lhx3 and Lhx4, are critical for normal development. Both genes are involved in the formation of the pituitary and the motoneuron system and loss of either gene causes perinatal lethality. Previous studies had shown that Lhx3 is overexpressed in hyperplastic placentas of mouse interspecies hybrids. To determine the role of LHX3 in the mouse placenta, we performed expression and function analyses. Our results show that Lhx3 exhibits specific spatial and temporal expression in the mouse placenta. However, deletion of Lhx3 does not produce a placental phenotype. To test whether this is due to functional substitution by Lhx4, we performed a phenotype analysis of Lhx3-/-; Lhx4-/- double-mutant placentas. A subset of Lhx3-/-; Lhx4-/- placentas exhibited abnormal structure of the labyrinth. However, absence of both LIM-3 genes did not interfere with placental transport nor consistently with expression of target genes such as Gnrhr. Thus, LHX3 and LHX4 appear to be dispensable for placental development and function.

    Keywords
    LIM-homeobox gene, Lhx3, Lhx4, mouse placenta
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96495 (URN)10.1002/dvdy.21546 (DOI)000255842900027 ()
    Available from: 2007-11-21 Created: 2007-11-21 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Influence of murine maternal diabetes on placental morphology, gene expression, and function
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of murine maternal diabetes on placental morphology, gene expression, and function
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Archives of Physiology and Biochemistry, ISSN 1381-3455, E-ISSN 1744-4160, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 99-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Developmental Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96496 (URN)10.1080/13813450802033776 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-21 Created: 2007-11-21 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Loss of the heterochromatin protein-1β encoding gene Cbx1 leads to defective placental development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loss of the heterochromatin protein-1β encoding gene Cbx1 leads to defective placental development
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-96497 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-11-21 Created: 2007-11-21 Last updated: 2010-02-03Bibliographically approved
  • 246833.
    Yu, Yang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology.
    Synthesis, phase analysis and crystal structures of some borides 1995Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 246834.
    Yu, Yang
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Shi, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Bullwinkel, Jörn
    Billur, Mustafa
    Geyer, Rudolf
    Singh, Prim B.
    Fundele, Reinald H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Loss of the heterochromatin protein-1β encoding gene Cbx1 leads to defective placental developmentManuscript (Other academic)
  • 246835.
    Yu, Yang
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Shi, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Konno, Toshihiro
    Soares, Michael J.
    Geyer, Rudolf
    Fundele, Reinald H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Influence of murine maternal diabetes on placental morphology, gene expression, and function2008In: Archives of Physiology and Biochemistry, ISSN 1381-3455, E-ISSN 1744-4160, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 99-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246836.
    Yu, Young-Sang
    et al.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.;Univ Illinois, Dept Chem, Chicago, IL 60607 USA..
    Farmand, Maryam
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Kim, Chunjoong
    Univ Illinois, Dept Chem, Chicago, IL 60607 USA.;Chungnam Natl Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Taejon 305764, Chungnam, South Korea..
    Liu, Yijin
    SLAC Natl Accelerator Lab, Stanford Synchrotron Radiat Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025 USA..
    Grey, Clare P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England.;SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Chem, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA..
    Strobridge, Fiona C.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England..
    Tyliszczak, Tolek
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Celestre, Rich
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Denes, Peter
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Joseph, John
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Div Engn, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Krishnan, Harinarayan
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Computat Res Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Maia, Filipe R.N.C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Kilcoyne, A. L. David
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Marchesini, Stefano
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Leite, Talita Perciano Costa
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Computat Res Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Warwick, Tony
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Padmore, Howard
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Cabana, Jordi
    Univ Illinois, Dept Chem, Chicago, IL 60607 USA..
    Shapiro, David A.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Adv Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Three-dimensional localization of nanoscale battery reactions using soft X-ray tomography2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Battery function is determined by the efficiency and reversibility of the electrochemical phase transformations at solid electrodes. The microscopic tools available to study the chemical states of matter with the required spatial resolution and chemical specificity are intrinsically limited when studying complex architectures by their reliance on two-dimensional projections of thick material. Here, we report the development of soft X-ray ptychographic tomography, which resolves chemical states in three dimensions at 11 nm spatial resolution. We study an ensemble of nano-plates of lithium iron phosphate extracted from a battery electrode at 50% state of charge. Using a set of nanoscale tomograms, we quantify the electrochemical state and resolve phase boundaries throughout the volume of individual nanoparticles. These observations reveal multiple reaction points, intra-particle heterogeneity, and size effects that highlight the importance of multi-dimensional analytical tools in providing novel insight to the design of the next generation of high-performance devices.

  • 246837. Yu, Z
    et al.
    Segel, R.E
    Chen, F-J
    Heimberg, P
    Bent, R.D
    Blomgren, Jan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Neutron Research.
    Nann, H
    Sun, C
    Rehm, K.E
    Hardie, G
    Brown, J.D
    Jacobsen, E
    Homolka, J
    Schneider, R
    A Read-Out System for Microstrip Silicon Detectors1994In: Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Rev. A, Vol. 351, p. 460-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246838. Yu, Z W
    et al.
    Burén, J
    Enerbäck, S
    Nilsson, E
    Samuelsson, L
    Eriksson, Jan W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Insulin can enhance GLUT4 gene expression in 3T3-F442A cells and this effect is mimicked by vanadate but counteracted by cAMP and high glucose--potential implications for insulin resistance.2001In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1535, no 2, p. 174-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well-established that high levels of cAMP or glucose can produce insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction between these agents and insulin with respect to adipose tissue/muscle glucose transporter isoform (glucose transporter 4, GLUT4) gene regulation in cultured 3T3-F442A adipocytes and to further elucidate the GLUT4-related mechanisms in insulin resistance. Insulin (10(4) microU/ml) treatment for 16 h clearly increased GLUT4 mRNA level in cells cultured in medium containing 5.6 mM glucose but not in cells cultured in medium with high glucose (25 mM). 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 or 4 mM) or N(6)-monobutyryl cAMP, a hydrolyzable and a non-hydrolyzable cAMP analog, respectively, markedly decreased the GLUT4 mRNA level irrespective of glucose concentrations. In addition, these cAMP analogs also inhibited the upregulating effect of insulin on GLUT4 mRNA level. Interestingly, the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate (1-50 microM) clearly increased GLUT4 mRNA level in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, cAMP-induced inhibition of the insulin effect was also prevented by vanadate. In parallel to the effects on GLUT4 gene expression, both insulin, vanadate and cAMP produced similar changes in cellular GLUT4 protein content and cAMP impaired the effect of insulin to stimulate (14)C-deoxyglucose uptake. In contrast, insulin, vanadate or cAMP did not alter insulin receptor (IR) mRNA or the cellular content of IR protein. In conclusion: (1) Both insulin and vanadate elicit a stimulating effect on GLUT4 gene expression in 3T3-F442A cells, but a prerequisite is that the surrounding glucose concentration is low. (2) Cyclic AMP impairs the insulin effect on GLUT4 gene expression, but this is prevented by vanadate, probably by enhancing the tyrosine phosphorylation of signalling peptides and/or transcription factors. (3) IR gene and protein expression is not altered by insulin, vanadate or cAMP in this cell type. (4) The changes in GLUT4 gene expression produced by cAMP or vanadate are accompanied by similar alterations in GLUT4 protein expression and glucose uptake, suggesting a role of GLUT4 gene expression for the long-term regulation of cellular insulin action on glucose transport.

  • 246839. Yu, Z W
    et al.
    Eriksson, Jan W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    The upregulating effect of insulin and vanadate on cell surface insulin receptors in rat adipocytes is modulated by glucose and energy availability.2000In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 310-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to further characterize the rapid effects of insulin and the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate to amplify cell surface insulin binding capacity in isolated rat adipocytes. The effect of 20 min insulin treatment (1000 microU/ml) was 2- to 3-fold (p < 0.01) when cells were treated in medium containing 5.6 mM D-glucose, but it was totally absent in glucose-free medium. Other carbon energy sources, such as fructose and pyruvate, could only partly substitute for D-glucose, with an approximately 1.5-fold insulin effect. Moreover, inhibiting transmembrane glucose transport with cytochalasin B completely blocked the effect of insulin to enhance cell surface binding. The effect of vanadate was only partly glucose-dependent, since a submaximal effect (1.5- to 2-fold, p<0.05) was seen also in the absence of glucose. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein markedly blunted the effect of vanadate (from 3- to 4-fold to approximately 2-fold, p < 0.05) also indicating the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation-related mechanisms in the upregulation of cell surface insulin binding. Glycosylation of insulin receptors as a mechanism for this effect appears unlikely since neither the effect of insulin nor that of vanadate was altered by the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin. The time course for the insulin effect displayed a long duration (at least 6 h), suggesting a maintenance role of insulin keeping its receptors accessible for ligand binding at the cell surface. In conclusion, the effect of insulin and vanadate to upregulate cell-surface insulin receptors is energy-dependent and to some extent specifically glucose-dependent.

  • 246840. Yu, Z W
    et al.
    Jansson, P A
    Posner, B I
    Smith, U
    Eriksson, Jan W
    The Lundberg Laboratory for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Peroxovanadate and insulin action in adipocytes from NIDDM patients. Evidence against a primary defect in tyrosine phosphorylation1997In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1197-1203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the effects of insulin and the stable peroxovanadate compound potassium bisperoxopicolinatooxovanadate (bpV(pic)), a potent inhibitor of phosphotyrosine phosphatases, on lipolysis and glucose uptake in subcutaneous adipocytes from 10 male patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and 10 matched non-diabetic control subjects. Lipolysis stimulated by isoprenaline or the cAMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (8-br-cAMP), was reduced by approximately 40 % in NIDDM compared to control subjects. In both groups bpV(pic) exerted an antilipolytic effect that was similar to insulin (∼ 50 % inhibition). 14C-U-glucose uptake was dose-dependently increased by bpV(pic) treatment, but this effect and also that of insulin were impaired in NIDDM compared to control (bpV(pic) 1.6-fold vs 2.4-fold and insulin 2.2-fold vs 3.4-fold). Furthermore, low concentrations of bpV(pic) did not affect insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, although tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor β-subunit was clearly increased by bpV(pic). In conclusion, 1) β-adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis in vitro is attenuated in NIDDM adipocytes due to post-receptor mechanisms. 2) Both insulin and bpV(pic) decrease lipolysis and enhance glucose uptake in control as well as NIDDM adipocytes. The effect on glucose uptake, but not that on lipolysis, is impaired in NIDDM cells. 3) Peroxovanadate does not improve sensitivity and responsiveness to insulin in NIDDM adipocytes, showing that insulin-resistant glucose uptake in NIDDM is not overcome by phosphotyrosine-phosphatase inhibition and, thus, probably is not caused by impaired tyrosine phosphorylation events alone.

  • 246841. Yu, Z W
    et al.
    Posner, B I
    Smith, U
    Eriksson, Jan W
    The Lundberg Laboratory for Diabetes Research, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Effects of peroxovanadate and vanadate on insulin binding, degradation and sensitivity in rat adipocytes1996In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1310, no 1, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of vanadate and the stable peroxovanadate compound bpV(pic) on insulin binding and degradation were investigated in rat adipocytes under conditions of ongoing receptor cycling. Both bpV(pic) and vanadate increased 125I-insulin binding to intact cells through an increase in apparent receptor affinity. The maximal effect of bpV(pic) was to increase binding approximately 4-fold (EC50 0.06 +/- 0.01 mM), whereas vanadate increased binding approximately 2-fold (EC50 1.4 +/- 0.2 mM). Removal of cell surface insulin-receptor complexes with trypsin showed that the effects on binding exerted by bpV(pic) and vanadate were due to a similar increase in both cell surface binding and intracellular accumulation of radioactivity. Both bpV(pic) and vanadate inhibited the degradation of 125I-insulin in medium containing 1% bovine serum albumin. The ratio of degraded/intact intracellular 125I-insulin was also markedly reduced by these agents, suggesting that they inhibit intracellular insulin-degrading proteases. Similar to previous findings with vanadate, bpV(pic) stimulated glucose transport and, at low concentrations, enhanced insulin sensitivity. Taken together, these data demonstrate that both bpV(pic) and vanadate inhibit insulin degradation. In addition, they significantly enhance cell surface insulin binding in rat fat cells and this is associated with an improved insulin sensitivity.

  • 246842. Yu, Z W
    et al.
    Wickman, A
    Eriksson, Jan W
    Lundberg Laboratory for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Göteborg University, Sahigrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Cryptic receptors for insulin-like growth factor II in the plasma membrane of rat adipocytes: a possible link to cellular insulin resistance1996In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1282, no 1, p. 57-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To further elucidate the mechanisms for short-term regulation of the receptor for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), we investigated effects of insulin, cAMP and phosphatase inhibitors on cell surface 125I-IGF-II binding in rat adipocytes. Preincubation with the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA, 1 microM) or the non-hydrolysable cAMP analogue N6-mbcAMP (4 mM) markedly impaired insulin-stimulated 125I-IGF-II binding. Furthermore, addition of OA enhanced the inhibitory effect exerted by N6-mbcAMP. N6-mbcAMP also induced an insensitivity to insulin which was normalized by concomitant addition of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate (0.5 mM). In contrast, vanadate did not affect the impairment in maximal insulin-stimulated 125I-IGF-II binding produced by either OA or N6-mbcAMP. Phospholipase C (PLC), which cleaves phospholipids at the cell surface, markedly enhanced cell surface 125I-IGF-II binding in a concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis demonstrated that the effect of PLC was due to an increased number of binding sites suggesting that "cryptic' IGF-II receptors are associated with the plasma membrane (PM). PLC (5 U/ml) also reversed the N6-mbcAMP-induced decrease of 125I-IGF-II binding at a low insulin concentration (10 microU/ml). Taken together, these data indicate that cAMP, similar to its effects on the glucose transporter GLUT 4 and the insulin receptor, may increase the proportion of functionally cryptic IGF-II receptors in the PM through mechanisms involving serine phosphorylation, possibly of a docking or coupling protein. Tyrosine phosphorylation appears to exert an opposite effect promoting the full cell surface expression of receptors.

  • 246843.
    Yu, Z
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Westerlund, D
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Characterization of the precolumn BioTrap 500 C-18 for direct injection of plasma samples in a column-switching system1998In: Chromatographia, Vol. 47, p. 299-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246844.
    Yu, Z
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Westerlund, D
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Influence of mobile phase conditions on the clean-up effect of restricted-access media precolumns for plasma samples injected in a column-switching system1997In: CHROMATOGRAPHIA, Vol. 44, p. 589-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246845. Yu, Ze
    et al.
    Gorlov, Mikhail
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    Synergistic Effect of N-Methylbenzimidazole and Guanidinium Thiocyanate on the Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Ionic Liquid Electrolytes2010In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 114, no 50, p. 22330-22337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of additives guanidinium thiocyanate (GSCN) and N-methylbenzimidazole (MBI) on the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on low-viscous, binary ionic liquid and organic liquid electrolytes were investigated. Addition of only GSCN to the electrolyte has a pronounced influence on the short-circuit current, owing largely to the positive shift of the conduction band edge potential, probably increasing the injection efficiency of the excited dye. When only MBI was added to the electrolyte, a significant improvement of the open-circuit voltage was found, which could be attributed to a negative shift of the TiO2 conduction band edge potential and a longer electron lifetime under open-circuit conditions. Synergistic effects were observed when GSCN and MBI were used together in the ionic liquid-based electrolyte. In this case, optimal open-circuit voltage and total conversion efficiency were obtained among the ionic liquid electrolytes studied mainly due to the more efficient retardation of the recombination loss reaction at the TiO2/electrolyte interface.

  • 246846. Yu, Ze
    et al.
    Gorlov, Mikhail
    Nissfolk, Jarl
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    Investigation of Iodine Concentration Effects in Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells2010In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 114, no 23, p. 10612-10620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work describes the effects of different iodine concentrations and iodine-to-iodide ratios in electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells based on low-viscous, binary ionic liquid and organic liquid solvents. Current-voltage characteristics, photoelectrochemical measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used for characterization. Optimal short-circuit current and overall conversion efficiency were achieved using intermediate and low iodine concentration in ionic liquid-based and acetonitrile-based electrolytes, respectively. Results from photoelectrochemical and Raman-spectroscopic measurements reveal that both triiodide mobility and chemical availability affect the optimal iodine concentration required in these two types of electrolytes. The higher iodine concentrations required for the ionic liquid-based electrolytes partly compensate for these effects, although negative effects from higher recombination losses and light absorption of iodine-containing species start to become significant.

  • 246847. Yu, Ze
    et al.
    Tian, Haining
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Gorlov, Mikhail
    Sun, Licheng
    Kloo, Lars
    Tetrathiafulvalene as a one-electron iodine-free organic redox mediator in electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells2012In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1083-1087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) was investigated as an organic iodine-free redox mediator in electrolytes for dye-sensitized, nanocrystalline solar cells (DSCs) and was compared to the commonly used iodide/triiodide system. The TTF system studied was determined to be a one-electron transfer system, although potentially exhibiting three well-defined oxidation states. Despite the slightly positive redox potential of TTF, electrolytes with TTF displayed around 200 mV lower open-circuit voltage than the iodide/triiodide system. This can mainly be ascribed to a much shorter electron lifetime in the TiO(2) film. Mass transport limitations for redox species in TTF-based electrolytes were found to be serious. Electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS) show that the charge-transfer resistance at the counter electrode in the electrolyte with TTF is considerably larger than for the iodide/triiodide system. In addition, the light absorption of the TTF-based electrolyte is stronger than that for the iodide/triiodide system. Thus, DSCs with TTF-based electrolytes show worse photovoltaic performance than those with iodide/triiodide-based electrolytes. The differences in I-V characteristics and charge-recombination behavior have also been elucidated.

  • 246848. Yu, Ze
    et al.
    Vlachopoulos, Nick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Gorlov, Mikhail
    Kloo, Lars
    Liquid electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells2011In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 40, no 40, p. 10289-10303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present review offers a survey of liquid electrolytes used in dye-sensitized solar cells from the beginning of photoelectrochemical cell research. It handles both the solvents employed, and the prerequisites identified for an ideal liquid solvent, as well as the various effects of electrolyte solutes in terms of redox systems and additives. The conclusions of the present review call for more detailed molecular insight into the electrolyte-electrode interface reactions and structures.

  • 246849. Yu, Ze
    et al.
    Vlachopoulos, Nick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    Incompletely solvated ionic liquid mixtures as electrolyte solvents for highly stable dye-sensitized solar cells2013In: RSC ADV, ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 1896-1901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionic liquids have been intensively investigated as alternative stable electrolyte solvents for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A highest overall conversion efficiency of over 8% has been achieved using a ionic-liquid-based electrolyte in combination with an iodide/triiodide redox couple. However, the relatively high viscosities of ionic liquids require higher iodine concentration in the electrolyte due to mass-transport limitations of the triiodide ions. The higher iodine concentration significantly reduces the photovoltaic performance, which normally are lower than those using organic solvent-based electrolytes. Here, the concept of incompletely solvated ionic liquid mixtures (ISILMs) is introduced and represents a conceptually new type of electrolyte solvent for DSCs. It is found that the photovoltaic performance of ISILM-based electrolytes can rival that of organic solvent-based electrolytes. Furthermore, the vapor pressures of ISILMs are found to be considerably lower than that for pure organic solvents. Stability tests show that ISILM-based electrolytes provide highly stable DSCs under light soaking conditions. Thus, ISILM-based electrolytes offer a new platform to develop more efficient and stable DSC devices of relevance to future large-scale applications.

  • 246850.
    Yu, Zhang
    et al.
    Changchun Brother Biotech Co Ltd, Changchun 130062, Peoples R China..
    Jing, Huang
    Jilin Univ, Affiliated Hosp 1, Dept Lab, Changchun 130021, Peoples R China..
    Hongtao, Pan
    Furong, Jia
    Yuting, Jin
    Xu, Shengyuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Distinction between bacterial and viral infections by serum measurement of human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) and the impact of antibody selection2016In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 432, p. 82-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distinction between acute infections of bacterial or viral causes is clinically important, but often very difficult even for experienced doctors. Previous studies indicated that serum measurements of HNL (Human Neutrophil Lipocalin) might be a superior diagnostic means in this regard, but also indicated that the antibody conformation of the HNL assay might have an impact on the diagnostic performance. The aim of the present report was to examine this further. Methods: Several different (n = 24) HNL ELISA assays were developed using different combinations of monoclonal and polyclonal HNL antibodies. Sera were collected from healthy persons (n = 188) and from 155 patients with acute infections.before any antibiotics treatment. The patients were diagnosed as having bacterial (n = 69) or viral causes (n = 86) of their infections. Plasma and serum were also examined by Western blotting using HNL-specific polyclonal antibodies. Results: The optimal assay format for the distinction between bacterial and viral infection resulted in an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AuROC) for S-HNL of 0.98. (95% CI 0.94-1.00) as compared to 0.83 (0.76-0.88) for blood neutrophil counts and 0.69 (0.61-0.76) for S-CRP. Results also showed that different assay formats of HNL identified monomeric and dimeric HNL differently, the monomeric HNL being elevated in viral infections and the dimeric HNL being elevated in bacterial infections. Conclusion: We conclude that serum theasurement of HNL is a superior diagnostic means to distinguish between acute infections caused by bacteria or virus. For optimal clinical performance the immunoassay should address conformational epitopes in the dimeric HNL.

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