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  • 251. Alizadehheidari, M.
    et al.
    Frykholm, K.
    Fritzsche, J.
    Wigenius, J.
    Modesti, M.
    Persson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Westerlund, F.
    Probing the Physical Properties of a DNA-Protein Complex Using Nanofluidic Channels2013In: European Biophysics Journal, ISSN 0175-7571, E-ISSN 1432-1017, Vol. 42, p. S134-S134Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 252. Alizadehheidari, Mohammadreza
    et al.
    Werner, Erik
    Noble, Charleston
    Nyberg, Lena
    Fritzsche, Joachim
    Mehlig, Bernhard
    Tegenfeldt, Jonas
    Ambjoernsson, Tobias
    Persson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Westerlund, Fredrik
    Nanoconfined Circular DNA2014In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 274A-274AArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanofluidic channels have become a versatile tool to manipulate single DNA molecules. They allow investigation of confined single DNA molecules from a fundamental polymer physics perspective as well as for example in DNA barcoding techniques.

  • 253.
    Alizadehheidari, Mohammadreza
    et al.
    Chalmers, Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Werner, Erik
    Gothenburg Univ, Phys, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Noble, Charleston
    Lund Univ, Phys, Lund, Sweden..
    Nyberg, Lena
    Chalmers, Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fritzsche, Joachim
    Chalmers, Appl Phys, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Persson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Mehlig, Bernhard
    Gothenburg Univ, Phys, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Tegenfeldt, Jonas
    Lund Univ, Solid State Phys, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ambjornsson, Tobias
    Lund Univ, Phys, Lund, Sweden..
    Westerlund, Fredrik
    Chalmers, Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Unfolding of Nanoconfined Circular DNA2015In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 231A-231AArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 254. Alizadehheidari, Mohammadreza
    et al.
    Werner, Erik
    Noble, Charleston
    Reiter-Schad, Michaela
    Nyberg, Lena K.
    Fritzsche, Joachim
    Mehlig, Bernhard
    Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.
    Ambjornsson, Tobias
    Persson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Westerlund, Fredrik
    Nanoconfined Circular and Linear DNA: Equilibrium Conformations and Unfolding Kinetics2015In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 871-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of circular DNA confined to nanofluidic channels are relevant both from a fundamental polymer-physics perspective and due to the importance of circular DNA molecules in vivo. We here observe the unfolding of confined DNA from the circular to linear configuration as a light-induced double-strand break occurs, characterize the dynamics, and compare the equilibrium conformational statistics of linear and circular configurations. This is important because it allows us to determine to what extent existing statistical theories describe the extension of confined circular DNA. We find that the ratio of the extensions of confined linear and circular DNA configurations increases as the buffer concentration decreases. The experimental results fall between theoretical predictions for the extended de Gennes regime at weaker confinement and the Odijk regime at stronger confinement. We show that it is possible to directly distinguish between circular and linear DNA molecules by measuring the emission intensity from the DNA. Finally, we determine the rate of unfolding and show that this rate is larger for more confined DNA, possibly reflecting the corresponding larger difference in entropy between the circular and linear configurations.

  • 255.
    Allander, K., Sundberg, J.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Temporal changes and reliability of blood parasite levels in captive yellowhammers (Emberiza citrinella).1997In: Journal of Avian Biology, no 28, p. 325-330.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Allander, K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Schmid-Hempel, P
    Immune defence reaction in bumble-bee workers after a previous challenge and parasitic coinfection2000In: FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, ISSN 0269-8463, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 711-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. A successful immune response requires the functioning of a range of physiological mechanisms and is therefore supposed to be costly in terms of limited resources that could be used otherwise, such as energy or nutrients. Because immunity is costly, imm

  • 257.
    Allander, Klas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Sundberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology.
    Temporal variation and reliability of blood parasite levels in captive Yellowhammer males Emberiza citrinella1997In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 325-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temporal variation of blood parasites in captive Yellowhammer males was studied in order to investigate possible costs of parasites. Birds were caught in the wild in early April and kept in aviaries during the study period. Blood samples were taken, body mass measured, and moult was scored twelve times for the same individuals from April to October. Blood parasites were detectable in smears during the whole study period with an intensity peak coinciding with breeding in the wild. Young birds had more parasites and a consistently higher body mass than older birds. There was no relationship between parasite intensity and mass in older birds but possibly one in young birds. Parasites did not seem to affect moult in either age class. Repeatability of parasite counts of smears from the same individual was very high and smears are therefore a reliable method for estimating parasite intensity. We conclude that blood parasites are probably most severe during, but occur in their hosts long after, the breeding season. Possible costs of parasites outside the breeding season require further study.

  • 258.
    Allbrand, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Naturorienterande ämnen i skolanstidigare år: En kvalitativ studie som belyser fyra NO-lärares uppfattningar om elevers tidigare erfarenheter och kunskaper i NO.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 259. Allen, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics.
    Kaysser-Pyzalla, Anke R.
    Beyond the International Year of Crystallography2015In: Journal of applied crystallography, ISSN 0021-8898, E-ISSN 1600-5767, Vol. 48, no P1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Allen, Andrew J.
    et al.
    NIST, Mat Measurement Sci Div Gaithersburg, MD USA.
    Hajdu, Janos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular biophysics. AS CR, European Extreme Light Infrastruct, Inst Phys, Prague, Czech Republic..
    McIntyre, Garry J.
    Australian Nucl Sci & Technol Org, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW, Australia.
    Journal of Applied Crystallography: the first 50 years and beyond2018In: Journal of applied crystallography, ISSN 0021-8898, E-ISSN 1600-5767, Vol. 51, no Part: 2, p. 233-234Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Editors of Journal of Applied Crystallography mark the journal's 50th anniversary.

  • 261. Allen, Gregory S
    et al.
    Zavialov, Andrey
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Molekylärbiologi.
    Gursky, Richard
    Ehrenberg, Måns
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Molekylärbiologi.
    Frank, Joachim
    The cryo-EM structure of a translation initiation complex from Escherichia coli.2005In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 703-12Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 262. Allen, James E.
    et al.
    Whelan, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Assessing the State of Substitution Models Describing Noncoding RNA Evolution2014In: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 65-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic inference is widely used to investigate the relationships between homologous sequences. RNA molecules have played a key role in these studies because they are present throughout life and tend to evolve slowly. Phylogenetic inference has been shown to be dependent on the substitution model used. A wide range of models have been developed to describe RNA evolution, either with 16 states describing all possible canonical base pairs or with 7 states where the 10 mismatched nucleotides are reduced to a single state. Formal model selection has become a standard practice for choosing an inferential model and works well for comparing models of a specific type, such as comparisons within nucleotide models or within amino acid models. Model selection cannot function across different sized state spaces because the likelihoods are conditioned on different data. Here, we introduce statistical state-space projection methods that allow the direct comparison of likelihoods between nucleotide models and 7-state and 16-state RNA models. To demonstrate the general applicability of our new methods, we extract 287 RNA families from genomic alignments and perform model selection. We find that in 281/287 families, RNA models are selected in preference to nucleotide models, with simple 7-state RNA models selected for more conserved families with shorter stems and more complex 16-state RNA models selected for more divergent families with longer stems. Other factors, such as the function of the RNA molecule or the GC-content, have limited impact on model selection. Our models and model selection methods are freely available in the open-source software.

  • 263.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bjerke, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Edlund, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Origin of the U87MG glioma cell line: Good news and bad news2016In: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 8, no 354, article id 354re3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human tumor-derived cell lines are indispensable tools for basic and translational oncology. They have an infinite life span and are easy to handle and scalable, and results can be obtained with high reproducibility. However, a tumor-derived cell line may not be authentic to the tumor of origin. Two major questions emerge: Have the identity of the donor and the actual tumor origin of the cell line been accurately determined? To what extent does the cell line reflect the phenotype of the tumor type of origin? The importance of these questions is greatest in translational research. We have examined these questions using genetic profiling and transcriptome analysis in human glioma cell lines. We find that the DNA profile of the widely used glioma cell line U87MG is different from that of the original cells and that it is likely to be a bona fide human glioblastoma cell line of unknown origin.

  • 264.
    Allen, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Divne, Anna-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Universal tag arrays in forensic SNP analysis.2005In: Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 297, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microarray-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping enables simultaneous and rapid detection of a large number of markers and is thus an attractive method for forensic individual acid identification. This assay relies on a one-color detection system and minisequencing in solution before hybridization to universal tag arrays. The minisequencing reaction is based on incorporation of a fluorescent dideoxynucleotide to a primer containing a tag-sequence flanking the position to be interrogated. This one-color system detects C and T polymorphisms in separate reactions on multiple polymerase chain reaction targets with the fluorophore TAMRA coupled to the respective dideoxynucleotide. After incorporation, tagged primer sequences are hybridized through their complementary sequence on the array, and positive signals are detected by a confocal laser-scanner.

  • 265.
    Alm, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Scholz, Birger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Fischer, Celia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Dencker, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Stigson, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Proteomic evaluation of neonatal exposure to 2,2,4,4,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether2006In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 254-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to the brominated flame retardant 2,2 ,4,4 ,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE-99) during the brain growth spurt disrupts normal brain development in mice and results in disturbed spontaneous behavior in adulthood. The neurodevelopmental toxicity of PBDE-99 has been reported to affect the cholinergic and catecholaminergic systems. In this study we use a proteomics approach to study the early effect of PBDE-99 in two distinct regions of the neonatal mouse brain, the striatum and the hippocampus. A single oral dose of PBDE-99 (12 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle was administered to male NMRI mice on neonatal day 10, and the striatum and the hippocampus were isolated. Using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we found 40 and 56 protein spots with significantly (p < 0.01) altered levels in the striatum and the hippocampus, respectively. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS) to determine the protein identity of 11 spots from the striatum and 10 from the hippocampus. We found that the levels of proteins involved in neurodegeneration and neuroplasticity (e.g., Gap-43/neuromodulin, stathmin) were typically altered in the striatum, and proteins involved in metabolism and energy production [e.g., alpha-enolase; gamma-enolase; ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex, beta subunit (Atp5b); and alpha-synuclein] were typically altered in the hippocampus. Interestingly, many of the identified proteins have been linked to protein kinase C signaling. In conclusion, we identify responses to early exposure to PBDE-99 that could contribute to persistent neurotoxic effects. This study also shows the usefulness of proteomics to identify potential biomarkers of developmental neurotoxicity of organohalogen compounds.

  • 266.
    Alm, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Scholz, Birger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Nilsson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Andrén, Per E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Savitski, Mikhail M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stigson, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Fex-Svenningsen, Åsa
    Institute of Medical Biology, Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Dencker, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    In Vitro Neurotoxicity of PBDE-99: Immediate and Concentration-Dependent Effects on Protein Expression in Cerebral Cortex Cells2010In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 1226-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are commonly used flame retardants in various consumer products. Pre- and postnatal exposure to congeners of PBDEs disrupts normal brain development in rodents. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was used to analyze concentration-dependent differences in protein expression in cultured cortical cells isolated from rat fetuses (GD 21) after 24 h exposure to PBDE-99 (3, 10, or 30 muM). Changes on a post-translational level were studied using a 1 h exposure to 30 muM PBDE-99. The effects of 24 h exposure to 3 and 30 muM PBDE-99 on mRNA levels were measured using oligonucleotide microarrays. A total of 62, 46, and 443 proteins were differentially expressed compared to controls after 24 h of exposure to 3, 10, and 30 muM PDBE-99, respectively. Of these, 48, 43, and 238 proteins were successfully identified, respectively. We propose that the biological effects of low-concentration PBDE-99 exposure are fundamentally different than effects of high-concentration exposure. Low-dose PBDE-99 exposure induced marked effects on cytoskeletal proteins, which was not correlated to cytotoxicity or major morphological effects, suggesting that other more regulatory aspects of cytoskeletal functions may be affected. Interestingly, 0.3 and 3 muM, but not 10 or 30 muM increased the expression of phosphorylated (active) Gap43, perhaps reflecting effects on neurite extension processes.

  • 267. Almeida, Erika
    et al.
    Nunes, Ana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Andrade, Pedro
    Alves, Susana
    Guerreiro, Catia
    Rebelo, Rui
    Antipredator responses of two anurans towards native and exotic predators2011In: Amphibia-Reptilia, ISSN 0173-5373, E-ISSN 1568-5381, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When faced with the risk of predation, tadpoles of many amphibian species are known to modify their phenotype. In this work we studied the effect of an exotic species, the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), on the phenotype of two species of amphibians with different reproduction habitats: the Iberian painted frog, Discoglossus galganoi, that normally reproduces in temporary water bodies and the common toad, Bufo bufo, that reproduces in permanent water bodies. The responses were compared with the ones shown in the presence of a native predator, dragonfly (Aeshnidae) larvae. Behaviour, growth and morphology of tadpoles were monitored in a factorial experiment with five treatments. Our results showed that only the permanent habitat species altered its behaviour and life-history traits in the presence of P. clarkii; however, this was mediated by chemical cues from consumed conspecifics. Antipredator responses of B. bufo towards the exotic crayfish were similar to the ones towards the native predator, while D. galganoi responded to the dragonfly larvae but not to P. clarkii. This may be the result of infrequent colonization events of temporary habitats by the crayfish. Therefore, the consequences of the introduction of P. clarkii might be more serious for D. galganoi and other species living in temporary habitats. Species breeding in permanent habitats, more prone to having generalized antipredator responses, may be relatively protected against this exotic crayfish although the effectiveness of these responses still needs to be tested.

  • 268. Almeida, Rafael M.
    et al.
    Barros, Nathan
    Cole, Jonathan J.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Roland, Fabio
    Correspondence: Emissions from Amazonian dams2013In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 1005-1005Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 269. Almeida, Rafael M.
    et al.
    Barros, Nathan
    Cole, Jonathan J.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Roland, Fábio
    Emissions from Amazonian dams2013In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 1005-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 270.
    Almeida, Rafael M.
    et al.
    Univ Fed Juiz de Fora, Inst Ciencias Biol, Dept Biol, Aquat Ecol Lab, Juiz De Fora, Brazil..
    Nobrega, Gabriel N.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Escola Super Agr Luiz de Queiroz, Dept Ciencia Solo, Piracicaba, Brazil..
    Junger, Pedro C.
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Lab Limnol, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Figueiredo, Aline V.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Water Resources & Environm Sanitat, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Andrade, Anizio S.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Limnol, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    de Moura, Caroline G. B.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Limnol, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Tonetta, Denise
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Lab Freshwater Ecol, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Oliveira, Ernandes S., Jr.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Inst Water & Wetland Res, NL-6525 ED Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Araujo, Fabiana
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Water Resources & Environm Sanitat, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Rust, Felipe
    Univ Fed Juiz de Fora, Inst Ciencias Biol, Dept Biol, Aquat Ecol Lab, Juiz De Fora, Brazil..
    Pineiro-Guerra, Juan M.
    Univ Republica, Dept Ecol Teor & Aplicada, Ctr Univ Reg Este, Montevideo, Uruguay.;Univ Republica, Fac Ciencias, Montevideo, Uruguay..
    Mendonca, Jurandir R., Jr.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Water Resources & Environm Sanitat, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Medeiros, Leonardo R.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Limnol, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Pinheiro, Lorena
    Univ Fed Estado Rio de Janeiro, Dept Ciencias Nat, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Miranda, Marcela
    Univ Fed Juiz de Fora, Inst Ciencias Biol, Dept Biol, Aquat Ecol Lab, Juiz De Fora, Brazil..
    Costa, Mariana R. A.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Water Resources & Environm Sanitat, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Melo, Michaela L.
    Univ Fed Sao Carlos, Lab Microbial Proc & Biodivers, BR-13560 Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil..
    Nobre, Regina L. G.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Limnol, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Benevides, Thiago
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Lab Limnol, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Roland, Fabio
    Univ Fed Juiz de Fora, Inst Ciencias Biol, Dept Biol, Aquat Ecol Lab, Juiz De Fora, Brazil..
    de Klein, Jeroen
    Wageningen Univ, Aquat Ecol & Environm Sci, NL-6700 AP Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Barros, Nathan O.
    Univ Fed Juiz de Fora, Inst Ciencias Biol, Dept Biol, Aquat Ecol Lab, Juiz De Fora, Brazil..
    Mendonca, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Univ Fed Juiz de Fora, Inst Ciencias Biol, Dept Biol, Aquat Ecol Lab, Juiz De Fora, Brazil.
    Becker, Vanessa
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Lab Water Resources & Environm Sanitat, BR-59072970 Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Huszar, Veral. M.
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Museu Nacl, Lab Ficol, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Kosten, Sarian
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Inst Water & Wetland Res, NL-6525 ED Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    High Primary Production Contrasts with Intense Carbon Emission in a Eutrophic Tropical Reservoir2016In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 7, article id 717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies from temperate lakes indicate that eutrophic systems tend to emit less carbon dioxide (Co-2) and bury more organic carbon (OC) than oligotrophic ones, rendering them CO2 sinks in some cases. However, the scarcity of data from tropical systems is critical for a complete understanding of the interplay between eutrophication and aquatic carbon (C) fluxes in warm waters. We test the hypothesis that a warm eutrophic system is a source of both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere, and that atmospheric emissions are larger than the burial of OC in sediments. This hypothesis was based on the following assumptions: (i) OC mineralization rates are high in warm water systems, so that water column CO2 production overrides the high C uptake by primary producers, and (ii) increasing trophic status creates favorable conditions for CH4 production. We measured water-air and sediment-water CO2 fluxes, CH4 diffusion, ebullition and oxidation, net ecosystem production (NEP) and sediment OC burial during the dry season in a eutrophic reservoir in the semiarid northeastern Brazil. The reservoir was stratified during daytime and mixed during nighttime. In spite of the high rates of primary production (4858 +/- 934 mg C m(-2) d(-1)), net heterotrophy was prevalent due to high ecosystem respiration (5209 +/- 992 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). Consequently, the reservoir was a source of atmospheric CO2 (518 +/- 182 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). In addition, the reservoir was a source of ebullitive (17 +/- 10 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) and diffusive CH4 (11 +/- 6 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). OC sedimentation was high (1162 mg C m(-2) d(-1)), but our results suggest that the majority of it is mineralized to CO2 (722 +/- 182 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) rather than buried as OC (440 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). Although temporally resolved data would render our findings more conclusive, our results suggest that despite being a primary production and OC burial hotspot, the tropical eutrophic system studied here was a stronger CO2 and CH4 source than a C sink, mainly because of high rates of OC mineralization in the water column and sediments.

  • 271.
    Almeida, Rafael M.
    et al.
    Cornell University, USA.
    Paranaíba, José R.
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Barbosa, Ícaro
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Sobek, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Kosten, Sarian
    University Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Linkhorst, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Mendonça, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Quadra, Gabrielle
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Roland, Fábio
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Barros, Nathan
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Carbon dioxide emission from drawdown areas of a Brazilian reservoir is linked to surrounding land cover2019In: Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 1015-1621, E-ISSN 1420-9055, Vol. 81, article id 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reservoir sediments exposed to air due to water level fluctuations are strong sources of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The spatial variability of CO2 fluxes from these drawdown areas are still poorly understood. In a reservoir in southeastern Brazil, we investigated whether CO2 emissions from drawdown areas vary as a function of neighboring land cover types and assessed the magnitude of CO2 fluxes from drawdown areas in relation to nearby water surface. Exposed sediments near forestland (average = 2733 mg C m−2 day−1) emitted more CO2 than exposed sediments near grassland (average = 1261 mg C m−2 day−1), congruent with a difference in organic matter content between areas adjacent to forestland (average = 12.2%) and grassland (average = 10.9%). Moisture also had a significant effect on CO2 emission, with dry exposed sediments (average water content: 13.7%) emitting on average 2.5 times more CO2 than wet exposed sediments (average water content: 23.5%). We carried out a systematic comparison with data from the literature, which indicates that CO2 efflux from drawdown areas globally is about an order of magnitude higher than CO2 efflux from adjacent water surfaces, and within the range of CO2 efflux from terrestrial soils. Our findings suggest that emissions from exposed sediments may vary substantially in space, possibly related to organic matter supply from uphill vegetation, and that drawdown areas play a disproportionately important role in total reservoir CO2 emissions with respect to the area they cover.

  • 272. Almeida, Rafael M.
    et al.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Huszar, Vera L. M.
    Sobek, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Mendonca, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Barros, Nathan
    Boemer, Gina
    Arantes, Joao Durval, Jr.
    Roland, Fabio
    Phosphorus transport by the largest Amazon tributary (Madeira River, Brazil) and its sensitivity to precipitation and damming2015In: INLAND WATERS, ISSN 2044-2041, E-ISSN 2044-205X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Originating in the Bolivian and Peruvian Andes, the Madeira River is the largest tributary of the Amazon River in terms of discharge. Andean rivers transport large quantities of nutrient-rich suspended sediments and are the main source of phosphorus (P) to the Amazon basin. Here, we show the seasonal variability in concentrations and loads of different P forms (total, particulate, dissolved, and soluble reactive P) in the Madeira River through 8 field campaigns between 2009 and 2011. At our sampling reach in Porto Velho, Brazil, the Madeira River transports similar to 177-247 Gg yr(-1) of P, mostly linked to particles (similar to 85%). Concentrations and loads of all P forms have a maximum at rising waters and a minimum at low waters. Total P concentrations were substantially higher at a given discharge at rising water than at a similar discharge at falling water. The peak of P concentrations matched the peak of rainfall in the upper basin, suggesting an influence of precipitation-driven erosion. Projected precipitation increase in the eastern slopes of the Andes could enhance sediment yield and hence the P transport in the Madeira River. Because most of the P is particulate, however, we hypothesize that the planned proliferation of hydropower dams in the Madeira basin has the potential to reduce P loads substantially, possibly counteracting any precipitation-related increases. In the long term, this could be detrimental to highly productive downstream floodplain forests that are seasonally fertilized with P-rich deposits.

  • 273.
    Almlöf, Martin
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Computational Methods for Calculation of Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinities Involving Protein and Nucleic Acid Complexes2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to accurately predict binding free energies from computer simulations is an invaluable resource in understanding biochemical processes and drug action. Several methods based on microscopic molecular dynamics simulations exist, and in this thesis the validation, application, and development of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method is presented.

    For a test case of several hydrophobic ligands binding to P450cam it is found that the LIE parameters do not change when simulations are performed with three different force fields. The nonpolar contribution to binding of these ligands is best reproduced with a constant offset and a previously determined scaling of the van der Waals interactions.

    A new methodology for prediction of binding free energies of protein-protein complexes is investigated and found to give excellent agreement with experimental results. In order to reproduce the nonpolar contribution to binding, a different scaling of the van der Waals interactions is neccesary (compared to small ligand binding) and found to be, in part, due to an electrostatic preorganization effect not present when binding small ligands.

    A new treatment of the electrostatic contribution to binding is also proposed. In this new scheme, the chemical makeup of the ligand determines the scaling of the electrostatic ligand interaction energies. These scaling factors are calibrated using the electrostatic contribution to hydration free energies and proposed to be applicable to ligand binding.

    The issue of codon-anticodon recognition on the ribosome is adressed using LIE. The calculated binding free energies are in excellent agreement with experimental results, and further predict that the Leu2 anticodon stem loop is about 10 times more stable than the Ser stem loop in complex with a ribosome loaded with the Phe UUU codon. The simulations also support the previously suggested roles of A1492, A1493, and G530 in the codon-anticodon recognition process.

    List of papers
    1. Binding Affinity Prediction with Different Force Fields: Examination of the Linear Interaction Energy Method
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Binding Affinity Prediction with Different Force Fields: Examination of the Linear Interaction Energy Method
    2004 In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1242-1254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95285 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-12-22 Created: 2006-12-22Bibliographically approved
    2. Probing the Effect of Point Mutations at Protein-Protein Interfaces with Free Energy Calculations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probing the Effect of Point Mutations at Protein-Protein Interfaces with Free Energy Calculations
    2006 In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 433-442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95286 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-12-22 Created: 2006-12-22Bibliographically approved
    3. Energetics of codon-anticodon recognition on the small ribosomal subunit
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energetics of codon-anticodon recognition on the small ribosomal subunit
    2007 (English)In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 200-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent crystal structures of the small ribosomal subunit have made it possible to examine the detailed energetics of codon recognition on the ribosome by computational methods. The binding of cognate and near-cognate anticodon stem loops to the ribosome decoding center, with mRNA containing the Phe UUU and UUC codons, are analyzed here using explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations together with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method. The calculated binding free energies are in excellent agreement with experimental binding constants and reproduce the relative effects of mismatches in the first and second codon position versus a mismatch at the wobble position. The simulations further predict that the Leu2 anticodon stem loop is about 10 times more stable than the Ser stem loop in complex with the Phe UUU codon. It is also found that the ribosome significantly enhances the intrinsic stability differences of codon-anticodon complexes in aqueous solution. Structural analysis of the simulations confirms the previously suggested importance of the universally conserved nucleotides A1492, A1493, and G530 in the decoding process.

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95287 (URN)10.1021/bi061713i (DOI)000243157300021 ()17198390 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-12-22 Created: 2006-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Investigation of the Linear Response Approximation for Predicting Hydration Free Energies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of the Linear Response Approximation for Predicting Hydration Free Energies
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95288 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-12-22 Created: 2006-12-22 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 274.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Andér, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Energetics of codon-anticodon recognition on the small ribosomal subunit2007In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 200-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent crystal structures of the small ribosomal subunit have made it possible to examine the detailed energetics of codon recognition on the ribosome by computational methods. The binding of cognate and near-cognate anticodon stem loops to the ribosome decoding center, with mRNA containing the Phe UUU and UUC codons, are analyzed here using explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations together with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method. The calculated binding free energies are in excellent agreement with experimental binding constants and reproduce the relative effects of mismatches in the first and second codon position versus a mismatch at the wobble position. The simulations further predict that the Leu2 anticodon stem loop is about 10 times more stable than the Ser stem loop in complex with the Phe UUU codon. It is also found that the ribosome significantly enhances the intrinsic stability differences of codon-anticodon complexes in aqueous solution. Structural analysis of the simulations confirms the previously suggested importance of the universally conserved nucleotides A1492, A1493, and G530 in the decoding process.

  • 275.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Aqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Smalås, Arne O
    Brandsdal, Björn O
    Probing the effect of point mutations at protein-protein interfaces with free energy calculations.2006In: Biophys J, ISSN 0006-3495, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 433-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 276.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Brandsdal, Bjørn O
    Aqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Molecular Biology.
    Binding affinity prediction with different force fields: examination of the2004In: J Comput Chem, ISSN 0192-8651, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1242-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 277.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Brandsdal, Bjørn
    Åqvist, Johan
    Binding Affinity Prediction with Different Force Fields: Examination of the Linear Interaction Energy Method2004In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1242-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 278.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Carlsson, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Improving the accuracy of the linear interaction energy method for solvation free energies2007In: Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, ISSN 1549-9618, E-ISSN 1549-9626, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 2162-2175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A linear response method for estimating the free energy of solvation is presented and validated using explicit solvent molecular dynamics, thermodynamic perturbation calculations, and experimental data. The electrostatic contribution to the solvation free energy is calculated using a linear response estimate, which is obtained by comparison to the free energy calculated using thermodynamic perturbation. Systematic deviations from the value of 1/2 in the potential energy scaling factor are observed for some types of compounds, and these are taken into account by introducing specific coefficients for different chemical groups. The derived model reduces the rms error of the linear response estimate significantly from 1.6 to 0.3 kcal/mol on a training set of 221 molecules used to parametrize the model and from 3.7 to 1.3 kcal/mol on a test set of 355 molecules that were not used in the derivation of the model. The total solvation free energy is estimated by combining the derived model with an empirical size dependent term for predicting the nonpolar contribution. Using this model, the experimental hydration free energies for 192 molecules are reproduced with an rms error of 1.1 kcal/mol. The use of LIE in simplified binding free energy calculations to predict protein−ligand binding free energies is also discussed.

  • 279.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Carlsson, Jens
    Åqvist, Johan
    Investigation of the Linear Response Approximation for Predicting Hydration Free EnergiesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 280.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Kristensen, Emma M. E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Molecular dynamics study of heparin based coatings2008In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 29, no 33, p. 4463-4469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heparin based surface coatings can be used to improve the biocompatibility of metallic surfaces such as vascular stents. Here, we report molecular dynamics simulations of a macromolecular conjugate of heparin used to prepare such surfaces. The structural properties of the heparin conjugate are investigated for different degrees of hydration, to allow comparison with spectroscopic results. The simulations show that the polymer becomes more compact with an increasing degree of inter-chain interactions as the hydration increases. This is also accompanied by changes in the interaction patterns among the heparin chains, where counter ions become looser associated with the disaccharide units and their strong interactions can be partly replaced by water molecules and heparin hydroxyl groups. The structural information that can be obtained from computer simulations of this type of coatings can be very valuable for understanding and further development of functional interfaces, since very little is known experimentally regarding their detailed structural properties. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 281.
    Almlöf, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Åqvist, Johan
    Smalås, Arne
    Brandsdal, Bjørn
    Probing the Effect of Point Mutations at Protein-Protein Interfaces with Free Energy Calculations2006In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 433-442Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 282.
    Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Christofer M. G.
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Divne, Anna-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergin, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Homa, Felix
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindh, Markus V.
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden;Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Lund, Sweden.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Translat Microbiome Res, Dept Mol Tumour & Cell Biol, Sci Life Lab, Solna, Sweden.
    Ettema, Thijs J. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, EEMiS, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Genomes from uncultivated prokaryotes: a comparison of metagenome-assembled and single-amplified genomes2018In: Microbiome, ISSN 0026-2633, E-ISSN 2049-2618, Vol. 6, article id 173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prokaryotes dominate the biosphere and regulate biogeochemical processes essential to all life. Yet, our knowledge about their biology is for the most part limited to the minority that has been successfully cultured. Molecular techniques now allow for obtaining genome sequences of uncultivated prokaryotic taxa, facilitating in-depth analyses that may ultimately improve our understanding of these key organisms.

    Results: We compared results from two culture-independent strategies for recovering bacterial genomes: single-amplified genomes and metagenome-assembled genomes. Single-amplified genomes were obtained from samples collected at an offshore station in the Baltic Sea Proper and compared to previously obtained metagenome-assembled genomes from a time series at the same station. Among 16 single-amplified genomes analyzed, seven were found to match metagenome-assembled genomes, affiliated with a diverse set of taxa. Notably, genome pairs between the two approaches were nearly identical (average 99.51% sequence identity; range 98.77-99.84%) across overlapping regions (30-80% of each genome). Within matching pairs, the single-amplified genomes were consistently smaller and less complete, whereas the genetic functional profiles were maintained. For the metagenome-assembled genomes, only on average 3.6% of the bases were estimated to be missing from the genomes due to wrongly binned contigs.

    Conclusions: The strong agreement between the single-amplified and metagenome-assembled genomes emphasizes that both methods generate accurate genome information from uncultivated bacteria. Importantly, this implies that the research questions and the available resources are allowed to determine the selection of genomics approach for microbiome studies.

  • 283.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Galand, Pierre E.
    Casamayor, Emilio O.
    Pedros-Alio, Carlos
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    High bicarbonate assimilation in the dark by Arctic bacteria2010In: ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1581-1590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although both autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms incorporate CO2 in the dark through different metabolic pathways, this process has usually been disregarded in oxic marine environments. We studied the significance and mediators of dark bicarbonate assimilation in dilution cultures inoculated with winter Arctic seawater. At stationary phase, bicarbonate incorporation rates were high (0.5-2.5 mu gC L-1 d(-1)) and correlated with rates of bacterial heterotrophic production, suggesting that most of the incorporation was due to heterotrophs. Accordingly, very few typically chemoautotrophic bacteria were detected by 16S rRNA gene cloning. The genetic analysis of the biotin carboxylase gene accC putatively involved in archaeal CO2 fixation did not yield any archaeal sequence, but amplified a variety of bacterial carboxylases involved in fatty acids biosynthesis, anaplerotic pathways and leucine catabolism. Gammaproteobacteria dominated the seawater cultures (40-70% of cell counts), followed by Betaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria as shown by catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARDFISH). Both Beta-and Gammaproteobacteria were active in leucine and bicarbonate uptake, while Flavobacteria did not take up bicarbonate, as measured by microautoradiography combined with CARDFISH. Within Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas-Colwellia and Oleispira were very active in bicarbonate uptake (ca. 30 and 70% of active cells, respectively), while the group Arctic96B-16 did not take up bicarbonate. Our results suggest that, potentially, the incorporation of CO2 can be relevant for the metabolism of specific Arctic heterotrophic phylotypes, promoting the maintenance of their cell activity and/or longer survival under resource depleted conditions.

  • 284.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Unanue, Marian
    Latatu, Ainhoa
    Azua, Inigo
    Ayo, Begona
    Artolozaga, Itxaso
    Iriberri, Juan
    Changes in marine prokaryotic community induced by varying types of dissolved organic matter and subsequent grazing pressure2009In: Journal of Plankton Research, ISSN 0142-7873, E-ISSN 1464-3774, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 1373-1383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analysed changes in the abundance, biomass, activity and composition of coastal marine prokaryotic communities after the addition of organic substrates, such as glucose, leucine and yeast extract, and the effect of grazing pressure exerted by nanoflagellates. The addition of a carbon source (i.e. glucose) promoted the growth of Gammaproteobacteria, while a combined source of C and N (i.e. leucine) favoured the development of Alphaproteobacteria. The addition of yeast extract, a complex substrate rich in N and growth factors, promoted the proliferation of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Grazing pressure exerted by nanoflagellates produced marked differences on the size structure of the prokaryotic biomass. A pronounced tendency to filamentation and aggregation was observed in the glucose treatment, while in the case of yeast extract, small and mainly freely dispersed prokaryotes were maintained throughout the incubations. Thus, the final community in the yeast extract treatment showed a high percentage of edible biomass, while an important fraction of potentially grazing-resistant prokaryotes (more than 50% of total prokaryotic biomass) was detected in the microcosms enriched with glucose. These results suggest a marked effect of DOM sources on the development of grazing-resistant prokaryotes.

  • 285.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Vazquez-Dominguez, Evaristo
    Cardelus, Clara
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Sala, M. Montserrat
    Lekunberri, Itziar
    Balague, Vanessa
    Vila-Costa, Maria
    Unrein, Fernando
    Massana, Ramon
    Simo, Rafel
    Gasol, Josep M.
    Factors controlling the year-round variability in carbon flux through bacteria in a coastal marine system2008In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 397-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from several years of monthly samplings are combined with a 1-year detailed study of carbon flux through bacteria at a NW Mediterranean coastal site to delineate the bacterial role in carbon use and to assess whether environmental factors or bacterial assemblage composition affected the in situ rates of bacterial carbon processing. Leucine (Leu) uptake rates [as an estimate of bacterial heterotrophic production (BHP)] showed high interannual variability but, on average, lower values were found in winter (around 50 pM Leu(-1) h(-1)) as compared to summer (around 150 pM Leu(-1) h(-1)). Leu-to-carbon conversion factors ranged from 0.9 to 3.6 kgC mol Leu(-1), with generally higher values in winter. Leu uptake was only weakly correlated to temperature, and over a full-year cycle (in 2003), Leu uptake peaked concomitantly with winter chlorophyll a (Chl a) maxima, and in periods of high ectoenzyme activities in spring and summer. This suggests that both low molecular weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) released by phytoplankton, and high molecular weight DOM in periods of low Chl a, can enhance BHP. Bacterial respiration (BR, range 7-48 mu g C l(-1) d(-1)) was not correlated to BHP or temperature, but was significantly correlated to DOC concentration. Total bacterial carbon demand (BHP plus BR) was only met by dissolved organic carbon produced by phytoplankton during the winter period. We measured bacterial growth efficiencies by the short-term and the long-term methods and they ranged from 3 to 42%, increasing during the phytoplankton blooms in winter (during the Chl a peaks), and in spring. Changes in bacterioplankton assemblage structure (as depicted by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting) were not coupled to changes in ecosystem functioning, at least in bacterial carbon use.

  • 286.
    Alonso-Saez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zeder, Michael
    Harding, Tommy
    Pernthaler, Jakob
    Lovejoy, Connie
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pedros-Alio, Carlos
    Winter bloom of a rare betaproteobacteriurn in the Arctic Ocean2014In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 5, p. 425-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extremely low abundance microorganisms (members of the "rare biosphere") are believed to include dormant taxa, which can sporadically become abundant following environmental triggers. Yet, microbial transitions from rare to abundant have seldom been captured in situ, and it is uncertain how widespread these transitions are. A bloom of a single ribotype (>= 99% similarity in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene) of a widespread betaproteobacterium (Janthinobacterium sp.) occurred over 2 weeks in Arctic marine waters. The Janthinobactenum population was not detected microscopically in situ in January and early February, but suddenly appeared in the water column thereafter, eventually accounting for up to 20% of bacterial cells in mid February. During the bloom, this bacterium was detected at open water sites up to 50 km apart, being abundant down to more than 300 m. This event is one of the largest monospecific bacterial blooms reported in polar oceans. It is also remarkable because Betaproteobacteria are typically found only in low abundance in marine environments. In particular, Janthinobacterium were known from non-marine habitats and had previously been detected only in the rare biosphere of seawater samples, including the polar oceans. The Arctic Janthinobacterium formed mucilagenous monolayer aggregates after short (ca. 8 h) incubations, suggesting that biofilm formation may play a role in maintaining rare bacteria in pelagic marine environments. The spontaneous mass occurrence of this opportunistic rare taxon in polar waters during the energy-limited season extends current knowledge of how and when microbial transitions between rare and abundant occur in the ocean.

  • 287.
    Alonso-Sáez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Andersson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    High archaeal diversity in Antarctic circumpolar deep waters2011In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 689-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaea are abundant in polar oceans but important ecological aspects of this group remain enigmatic, such as patterns of diversity and biogeography. Here, we provide the first high-throughput sequencing population study of Antarctic archaea based on 198 bp fragments of the 16S rRNA gene, targeting different water masses across the Amundsen and Ross Seas. Our results suggest that archaeal community composition is strongly shaped by hydrography and significantly influenced by environmental parameters. Archaeal communities from cold continental shelf waters (SW) of the Ross Sea were similar over depth with a single thaumarchaeal phylotype dominating Antarctic surface waters (AASW) and deeper SW (contributing up to 80% of reads). However, this phylotype contributed less than 8% of reads in circumpolar deep waters (CDW). A related thaumarchaeon (98% identity) was almost absent in AASW, but contributed up to 30% of reads in CDW, suggesting ecological differentiation of closely related phylotypes. Significantly higher archaeal richness and evenness were observed in CDW, with Shannon indices (c. 2.5) twice as high as for AASW, and high contributions of Group II Euryarchaeota. Based on these results, we suggest that CDW is a hotspot of archaeal diversity and may play an important role in the dispersal of archaeal phylotypes to other oceanic water masses.

  • 288.
    Alonso-Sáez, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Waller, A. S.
    Mende, D. R.
    Bakker, K.
    Farnelid, H.
    Yager, P. L.
    Lovejoy, C.
    Tremblay, J. -E
    Potvin, M.
    Heinrich, Friederike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Estrada, M.
    Riemann, L.
    Bork, P.
    Pedrós-Alió, C.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Role for urea in nitrification by polar marine Archaea2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 44, p. 17989-17994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the high abundance of Archaea in the global ocean, their metabolism and biogeochemical roles remain largely unresolved. We investigated the population dynamics and metabolic activity of Thaumarchaeota in polar environments, where these microorganisms are particularly abundant and exhibit seasonal growth. Thaumarchaeota were more abundant in deep Arctic and Antarctic waters and grew throughout the winter at surface and deeper Arctic halocline waters. However, in situ single-cell activity measurements revealed a low activity of this group in the uptake of both leucine and bicarbonate (<5% Thaumarchaeota cells active), which is inconsistent with known heterotrophic and autotrophic thaumarchaeal lifestyles. These results suggested the existence of alternative sources of carbon and energy. Our analysis of an environmental metagenome from the Arctic winter revealed that Thaumarchaeota had pathways for ammonia oxidation and, unexpectedly, an abundance of genes involved in urea transport and degradation. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that most polar Thaumarchaeota had the potential to oxidize ammonia, and a large fraction of them had urease genes, enabling the use of urea to fuel nitrification. Thaumarchaeota from Arctic deep waters had a higher abundance of urease genes than those near the surface suggesting genetic differences between closely related archaeal populations. In situ measurements of urea uptake and concentration in Arctic waters showed that small-sized prokaryotes incorporated the carbon from urea, and the availability of urea was often higher than that of ammonium. Therefore, the degradation of urea may be a relevant pathway for Thaumarchaeota and other microorganisms exposed to the low-energy conditions of dark polar waters.

  • 289.
    Alsmark, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Molecular Evolution.
    Comparative Genomics of Obligate and Facultative Intracellular Parasites2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The α-proteobacteria Rickettsia prowazekii and Bartonella henselae are the causative agents of epidemic typhus and cat scratch disease respectively. Whereas R. prowazekii is an obligate intracellular parasite, B. henselae can live and proliferate both outside and inside the eukaryotic host cell. Besides the obvious medical interest to identify the complete gene set of two human pathogens, their genome sequences are also important for the study of evolutionary processes. Both R. prowazekii and B. henselae have small genomes, but their last common ancestor of these two bacteria was most likely a free-living organism with a substantially larger genome.

    The aim of this thesis is to compare the complete genomes of R. prowazekii and B. henselae and to decipher the evolutionary processes leading to the adaptation to an intracellular lifestyle. The working hypothesis was that the facultative intracellular B. henselae is an intermediate between a free living bacteria and the obligate R. prowazekii, which is corroborated. B. henselae has a broader biosynthetic repertoire than R. prowazekii, including the presence of genes for glycolysis and de novo biosynthesis of purines and pyrimidines. However, both bacteria have reduced gene sets for biosynthesis of amino acids and cofactors compared to free-living bacteria.

    Comparisons of gene order in bacteria reveal that several operons are well conserved between distantly related species. The genome sequences of R. prowazekii and B. henselae show that many of the operons that are usually conserved, are broken and rearranged in these species. One of the mechanisms of reductive evolution include intra-chromosomal recombination between repeated loci. This process expels one of the repeats and cause rearrangements in the gene order of the flanking regions. While the R. prowazekii genome almost completely lack repeated sequences, the B. henselae genome is rich in repeats. These repeats are, however, most often located within regions associated with pathogenicity islands. The higher number of scrambled operons, and the lower number of repeats, in R. prowazekii compared to B. henselae imply that the reductive process has gone further in the former species.

  • 290.
    Alsmark, Cecilia M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Frank, A. Carolin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Karlberg, E. Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Legault, Boris-Antoine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Ardell, David H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Canbäck, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Eriksson, Ann-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Näslund, A. Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Handley, Scott A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Huvet, Maxime
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    La Scola, Bernard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    Holmberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Andersson, Siv G. E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Molecular Evolution.
    The louse-borne human pathogen Bartonella quintana is a genomic derivative of the zoonotic agent Bartonella henselae2004In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 101, no 26, p. 9716-9721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the complete genomes of two human pathogens, Bartonella quintana (1,581,384 bp) and Bartonella henselae (1,931,047 bp). The two pathogens maintain several similarities in being transmitted by insect vectors, using mammalian reservoirs, infecting similar cell types (endothelial cells and erythrocytes) and causing vasculoproliferative changes in immunocompromised hosts. A primary difference between the two pathogens is their reservoir ecology. Whereas B. quintana is a specialist, using only the human as a reservoir, B. henselae is more promiscuous and is frequently isolated from both cats and humans. Genome comparison elucidated a high degree of overall similarity with major differences being B. henselae specific genomic islands coding for filamentous hemagglutinin, and evidence of extensive genome reduction in B. quintana, reminiscent of that found in Rickettsia prowazekii. Both genomes are reduced versions of chromosome I from the highly related pathogen Brucella melitensis. Flanked by two rRNA operons is a segment with similarity to genes located on chromosome II of B. melitensis, suggesting that it was acquired by integration of megareplicon DNA in a common ancestor of the two Bartonella species. Comparisons of the vector-host ecology of these organisms suggest that the utilization of host-restricted vectors is associated with accelerated rates of genome degradation and may explain why human pathogens transmitted by specialist vectors are outnumbered by zoonotic agents, which use vectors of broad host ranges.

  • 291.
    Alstrom, P
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Olsson, U
    Golden-spectacled Warbler systematics2000In: IBIS, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 495-500Other (Other scientific)
  • 292. Alstrup, Vagn
    et al.
    Aptroot, Andre
    Divakar, Pradeep K.
    LaGreca, Scott
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Lichens from Tanzania and Kenya III: Macrolichens and calicioid lichens2010In: Cryptogamie Mycologie, ISSN 0181-1584, E-ISSN 1776-100X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 333-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    156 species of macrolichens and calicioid lichens are reported from Tanzania and Kenya. 28 species are new for Tanzania and 2 for Kenya. New for Africa are Hypotrachyna novella, H. physcioides, Melanelia panniformis, Physcidia squamulosa, and Xanthoparmelia microspora.

  • 293.
    Alström, P. & Mild, K
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. SYSTEMATIC ZOOLOGY.
    Pipits and Wagtails of Europe, Asia and North America: identification and systematics. London: . 496 pp.2003Book (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Alström, P. & Olsson, U.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.