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  • 251.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Hu, Qinghong
    Centre of Biopathways and Biomaterials, Dept of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China .
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Jonsson, Kenneth B
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Åberg, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap.
    Tang, Ruikang
    Centre of Biopathways and Biomaterials, Dept of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China .
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Calcium phosphates compounds in conjunction with hydrogel as carrier for BMP-2: A study on ectopic bone formation in rats2011Ingår i: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 7, nr 8, s. 3042-3049Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Current treatment of fractures often involves the use of bone graft or bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) to induce fracture healing, especially in patients with a compromised healing capacity. BMP has to be delivered in conjunction with a carrier. Unfortunately, there are drawbacks and limitations with current carriers, including their bovine origin which carries the risk of an immunological response. The physical properties also limit the use to open surgical procedures, as it cannot be injected. New carriers with improved properties are therefore needed. The aim of this study was to assess the ectopic bone forming capability of various calcium phosphate compounds when used in conjunction with a hydrogel as the carrier for BMP-2. Five different ceramic additives were tested, including beta-tricalcium phosphate and four types of hydroxyapatite (HAP) (nanoHAP, HAP, clods of HAP >100 mu m, and the biomimetic HAP Ostim35 (R)). The compounds were injected into the thigh muscle of rats, where it formed a gel in situ. After 4 weeks bone formation was evaluated by peripheral quantitative computed tomography and histology. The major finding was that the 20 nm nanoHAP yielded a higher bone density than the other additives (P = 0.0008, ANOVA with Tukey's multiple comparison test). We hypothesize that the higher bone density induced by nanoHAP might be due to nanocrystals of calcium phosphate acting as direct building blocks for biomineralization.

  • 252.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Jonsson, Kenneth B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    The use of a Large but not Critically Sized Fermoral Bone Defect in a Rat Model for Assesment of the Bone Forming Capacity of Various Bioactive Scaffolds2011Ingår i: TERMIS-EU 2011 Abstracts, 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 253.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Piskounova, Sonya
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Polymerkemi.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för radiologi, onkologi och strålningsvetenskap, Enheten för biomedicinsk strålningsvetenskap.
    Andersson, Britt-Marie
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Polymerkemi.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Polymerkemi.
    Morphological differences in BMP-2-induced ectopic bone between solid and crushed hyaluronan hydrogel templates2013Ingår i: Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, ISSN 0957-4530, E-ISSN 1573-4838, Vol. 24, nr 5, s. 1201-1209Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to affect bone formation by using crushed versus solid hydrogels as carriers for bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) was studied. Hydrogels, based on chemical crosslinking between hyaluronic acid and poly(vinyl alcohol) derivatives, were loaded with BMP-2 and hydroxyapatite. Crushed and solid forms of the gels were analyzed both in vitro via a release study using I-125 radioactive labeling of BMP-2, and in vivo in a subcutaneous ectopic bone model in rats. Dramatically different morphologies were observed for the ectopic bone formed in vivo in the two types of gels, even though virtually identical release profiles were observed in vitro. Solid hydrogels induced formation of a dense bone shell around non-degraded hydrogel, while crushed hydrogels demonstrated a uniform bone formation throughout the entire sample. These results suggest that by crushing the hydrogel, the construct's three-dimensional network becomes disrupted. This could expose unreacted functional groups, making the fragment's surfaces reactive and enable limited chemical fusion between the crushed hydrogel fragments, leading to similar in vitro release profiles. However, in vivo these interactions could be broken by enzymatic activity, creating a macroporous structure that allows easier cell infiltration, thus, facilitating bone formation.

  • 254.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Piskounova, Sonya
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för radiologi, onkologi och strålningsvetenskap.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Andersson, Britt-Marie
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för materialkemi, Polymerkemi.
    Improved bone formation through increased surface area of hyaluronan-based hydrogels when used as carriers for BMP-2Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract
  • 255.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap.
    Pankotai, Eszter
    Department of Orthopedics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Ungern.
    Weszl, Miklos
    Department of Orthopedics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Ungern.
    Carlsson, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap.
    Lacza, Zsombor
    Department of Orthopedics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Ungern.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Bone forming potential of Sr doped hydroxyapatite hollow spheres in a rat vertebral bone defect model2012Ingår i: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 50, nr supplement 1, s. S114-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 256.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap.
    Pankotai, Eszter
    Department of Orthopedics, Semmelweis University.
    Weszl, Miklós
    Department of Orthopedics, Semmelweis University.
    Forster-Horváth, Csaba
    Department of Orthopedics, Semmelweis University.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap.
    Lacza, Zsombor
    Department of Orthopedics, Semmelweis University.
    Osteogenic potential of Sr-doped calcium phosphate hollow spheres in vitro and in vivo2013Ingår i: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 101, nr 8, s. 2322-2331Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment of osteoporotic fractures with conventional surgical methods is associated with a high rate of complications. Intense search for new treatment options includes development of specific biomaterials aimed to be part of the surgical armamentarium. Strontium doped calcium phosphate spheres (SrCPS) is a new material that might be of interest due to the influence on osteoclast and osteoblast activity. In the present study, we successfully constructed hollow spherical SrCPS particles with a diameter of ∼700 nm and shell thickness of ∼150 nm. The Sr content was about 20 wt %. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were investigated in vitro with concentrations from 0 to 1000 μg/mL of SrCPS in medium extract in a day chase study. The in vivo biocompatibility was tested in a delayed bone-healing model in a rat vertebral defect by histology, μCT, and nanoSPECT. The SrCPS showed no toxicity in vitro with comparable cell number in all concentrations. Increased metabolism was seen in the cell viability study in cells exposed to 400 and 600 μg/mL. SPECT showed good biocompatibility with no local adverse effects and an increased osteoblast activity as compared to adjacent vertebra. SrCPS implantation induced bone formation and resulted in complete resorption and defect consolidation.

  • 257.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Yuen, Pik Kwan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Marsell, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Polymerkemi.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ossipov, Dmitri
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Polymerkemi.
    Bisphosphonate-Linked Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Sequesters and Enzymatically Releases Active Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 for Induction of Osteogenic Differentiation2013Ingår i: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 14, nr 9, s. 3055-3063Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Regeneration of bone by delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from implantable scaffolds is a promising alternative to the existing autologous bone grafting procedures. Hydrogels are used extensively in biomaterials as delivery systems for different growth factors. However, a controlled release of the growth factors is necessary to induce bone formation, which can be accomplished by various chemical functionalities. Herein we demonstrate that functionalization of a hyaluronan (HA) hydrogel with covalently linked bisphosphonate (BP) ligands provides efficient sequestering of BMP-2 in the resulting HA-BP hydrogel. The HA-BP hydrogel was investigated in comparison with its analogue lacking BP groups (HA hydrogel). While HA hydrogel released 100% of BMP-2 over two weeks, less than 10% of BMP-2 was released from the HA-BP hydrogel for the same time. We demonstrate that the sequestered growth factor can still be released by enzymatic degradation of the HA-BP hydrogel. Most importantly, entrapment of BMP-2 in HA-BP hydrogel preserves the growth factor bioactivity, which was confirmed by induction of osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after the cells incubation with the enzymatic digest of the hydrogel. At the same time, the hydrogels degradation products were not toxic to MSCs and osteoblasts. Furthermore, BP-functionalization of HA hydrogels promotes adhesion of the cells to the surface of HA hydrogel. Altogether, the present findings indicate that covalent grafting of HA hydrogel with BP groups can alter the clinical effects of BMPs in bone tissue regeneration.

  • 258.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Öhman, Caroline
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap.
    Österberg, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ossipov, Dmitri
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Polymerkemi.
    Marsell, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    In vivo performance of a BP-linked hyaluronan-based hydrogel as carrier of bone morphogenetic protein-22013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 259.
    Hultin, Hella
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Endokrinkirurgi.
    Ribom, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Gastrointestinalkirurgi.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Endokrinkirurgi.
    Persisting disturbances in calcium homeostasis after gastric bypass surgeryManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 260.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    et al.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Harrison, Tabitha A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Kang, Hyun Min
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Chen, Sai
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Schmit, Stephanie L.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Tampa, FL USA.
    Conti, David V.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Qu, Conghui
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Jeon, Jihyoun
    Univ Michigan, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Edlund, Christopher K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Greenside, Peyton
    Stanford Univ, Biomed Informat Program, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Wainberg, Michael
    Stanford Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Schumacher, Fredrick R.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Populat & Quantitat Hlth Sci, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Smith, Joshua D.
    Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Levine, David M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Nelson, Sarah C.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Sinnott-Armstrong, Nasa A.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Alonso, M. Henar
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Prevent & Control Program, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Dept Clin Sci, Fac Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Anderson, Kristin
    Univ Minnesota, Div Epidemiol & Community Hlth, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Arnau-Collell, Coral
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Clin, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS,Ctr, Barcelona, Spain.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bamia, Christina
    Hellen Hlth Fdn, Athens, Greece;Univ Athens, WHO Collaborating Ctr Nutr & Hlth, Unit Nutr Epidemiol & Nutr Publ Hlth, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat,Sch Med, Athens, Greece.
    Banbury, Barbara L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Baron, John A.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Med, Sch Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Bezieau, Stephane
    Ctr Hosp Univ CHU Nantes, Serv Genet Med, Nantes, France.
    Bishop, D. Timothy
    St Jamess Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Med Res, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.
    Boehm, Juergen
    Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA;Univ Utah, Dept Populat Hlth Sci, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Boeing, Heiner
    German Inst Human Nutr Potsdam Rehbrucke, Dept Epidemiol, Potsdam, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brezina, Stefanie
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Canc Res, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.
    Buch, Stephan
    Tech Univ Dresden, Dept Med 1, Univ Hosp Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Buchanan, Daniel D.
    Univ Melbourne, Colorectal Oncogen Grp, Dept Clin Pathol, Parkville, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Canc Res, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Parkville, Vic, Australia;Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genom Med & Family Canc Clin, Parkville, Vic, Australia.
    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea
    Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Inst Hlth Res, Denver, CO USA.
    Butterbach, Katja
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Caan, Bette J.
    Kaiser Permanente Med Care Program, Div Res, Oakland, CA 94611 USA.
    Campbell, Peter T.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Carlson, Christopher S.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Castellvi-Bel, Sergi
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Clin, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS,Ctr, Barcelona, Spain.
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Broad Inst Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, MA USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Immunol & Infect Dis, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Murcia Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Reg Hlth Council, IMIB Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Cho, Sang Hee
    Chonnam Natl Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, Hwasun, South Korea.
    Connolly, Charles M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England;Imperial Coll London, Dept Surg & Canc, London, England.
    Cuk, Katarina
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Curtis, Keith R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    de la Chapelle, Albert
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Doheny, Kimberly F.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Duggan, David
    City Hope Natl Med Ctr, Translat Genom Res Inst, Phoenix, AZ USA.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Elias, Sjoerd G.
    Univ Utrecht, Julius Ctr Hlth Sci & Primary Care, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Elliott, Faye
    St Jamess Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Med Res, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.
    English, Dallas R.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Feskens, Edith J. M.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr & Hlth, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Figueiredo, Jane C.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Med, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Keck Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Fischer, Rocky
    Univ Michigan, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    FitzGerald, Liesel M.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Tasmania, Menzies Inst Med Res, Hobart, Tas, Australia.
    Forman, David
    WHO, Int Agcy Res Canc, Lyon, France.
    Gala, Manish
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Gallinger, Steven
    Univ Toronto, Mt Sinai Hosp, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Gauderman, W. James
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Gillanders, Elizabeth
    NCI, Div Canc Control & Populat Sci, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Gong, Jian
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Goodman, Phyllis J.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Grady, William M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Grove, John S.
    Univ Hawaii, Canc Res Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA.
    Gsur, Andrea
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Canc Res, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    WHO, Nutr & Metab Sect, Int Agcy Res Canc, Lyon, France.
    Haile, Robert W.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Div Oncol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Hampe, Jochen
    Tech Univ Dresden, Dept Med 1, Univ Hosp Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Hampel, Heather
    Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Div Human Genet, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Oncol Unit, Umea, Sweden.
    Hayes, Richard B.
    NYU, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Dept Populat Hlth, New York, NY USA.
    Hofer, Philipp
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Canc Res, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.
    Hoffmeister, Michael
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Sch Publ Hlth, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Inst Hlth & Environm, Seoul, South Korea.
    Hsu, Wan-Ling
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Huang, Wen-Yi
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Hudson, Thomas J.
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Ibanez-Sanz, Gemma
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Prevent & Control Program, Barcelona, Spain;Bellvitge Univ Hosp, Gastroenterol Dept, Barcelona, Spain;Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Colorectal Canc Grp, ONCOBELL Program, Barcelona, Spain.
    Idos, Gregory E.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Ingersoll, Roxann
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Jackson, Rebecca D.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Metab, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Jacobs, Eric J.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Jenkins, Mark A.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Joshi, Amit D.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Joshu, Corinne E.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Keku, Temitope O.
    Univ N Carolina, Ctr Gastrointestinal Biol & Dis, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Univ Oxford, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Kim, Hyeong Rok
    Chonnam Natl Univ, Dept Surg, Hwasun Hosp & Med Sch, Hwasun, South Korea.
    Kobayashi, Emiko
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Kolonel, Laurence N.
    Univ Hawaii Manoa, Off Publ Hlth Studies, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Kuehn, Tilman
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kury, Sebastien
    Ctr Hosp Univ CHU Nantes, Serv Genet Med, Nantes, France.
    Kweon, Sun-Seog
    Chonnam Natl Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Gwangju, South Korea;Chonnam Natl Univ, Jeonnam Reg Canc Ctr, Hwasun Hosp, Hwasun, South Korea.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurie, Cecelia A.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Canc Res Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA.
    Leal, Suzanne M.
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Stat Genet, Dept Mol & Human Genet, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Lee, Soo Chin
    Natl Univ, Inst Canc, Dept Haematol Oncol, Singapore, Singapore;Natl Univ Singapore, Canc Sci Inst Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Carmel, Clalit Hlth Serv, Personalized Genom Serv, Haifa, Israel;Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel;Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel.
    Lemire, Mathieu
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Li, Christopher I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Li, Li
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Ctr Community Hlth Integrat, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Case Western Reserve Univ, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Lieb, Wolfgang
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Inst Epidemiol, PopGen Biobank, Kiel, Germany.
    Lin, Yi
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Scottsdale, AZ USA.
    Ling, Hua
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Louie, Tin L.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Mannisto, Satu
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Publ Hlth Solut, Helsinki, Finland.
    Markowitz, Sanford D.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Med, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Genet, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Hosp Cleveland, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Martin, Vicente
    CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Leon, Biomed Inst IBIOMED, Leon, Spain.
    Masala, Giovanna
    Inst Canc Res Prevent & Clin Network ISPRO, Canc Risk Factors & Life Style Epidemiol Unit, Florence, Italy.
    McNeil, Caroline E.
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Melas, Marilena
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Moreno, Lorena
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Clin, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS,Ctr, Barcelona, Spain.
    Murphy, Neil
    WHO, Nutr & Metab Sect, Int Agcy Res Canc, Lyon, France.
    Myte, Robin
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Oncol Unit, Umea, Sweden.
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;IIGM, Turin, Italy.
    Newcomb, Polly A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA;Weill Cornell Med Coll, Dept Med, New York, NY USA.
    Ogino, Shuji
    Broad Inst Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, MA USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Program MPE Mol Pathol Epidemiol, Dept Pathol, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA USA;Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Univ Utrecht, Julius Ctr Hlth Sci & Primary Care, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Pardini, Barbara
    IIGM, Turin, Italy;Univ Turin, Dept Med Sci, Turin, Italy.
    Parfrey, Patrick S.
    Mem Univ, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Sch Med, St John, NF, Canada.
    Pearlman, Rachel
    Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Div Human Genet, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Perduca, Vittorio
    Univ Paris 05, Lab Math Appl MAP5, CNRS, UMR 8145, Paris, France;Univ Paris Saclay, CESP, INSERM, U1018,Fac Med,Univ Paris Sud,UVSQ,Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Pinchev, Mila
    Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel.
    Platz, Elizabeth A.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Prentice, Ross L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Pugh, Elizabeth
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Raskin, Leon
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Rennert, Gad
    Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel;Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Israel Inst Technol, Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel;Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Israel Inst Technol, Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Riboli, Elio
    Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England.
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Granada, Escuela Andaluza Salud Publ, Inst Invest Biosanitaria Ibs GRANADA, Hosp Univ Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Romm, Jane
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Sakoda, Lori C.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Kaiser Permanente Northern Calif, Div Res, Oakland, CA USA.
    Schafmayer, Clemens
    Univ Hosp Schleswig Holstein, Dept Gen & Thorac Surg, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Schoen, Robert E.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Med Ctr, Dept Med & Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Seminara, Daniela
    NCI, Div Canc Control & Populat Sci, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Shah, Mitul
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Shelford, Tameka
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Shin, Min-Ho
    Chonnam Natl Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Gwangju, South Korea.
    Shulman, Katerina
    Hillel Yaffe Med Ctr, Oncol Unit, Hadera, Israel.
    Sieri, Sabina
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Milan, Italy.
    Slattery, Martha L.
    Univ Utah, Dept Internal Med, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Univ Melbourne, Genet Epidemiol Lab, Dept Pathol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Stadler, Zsofia K.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Stegmaier, Christa
    Saarland Canc Registry, Saarbrucken, Germany.
    Su, Yu-Ru
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Tangen, Catherine M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Thibodeau, Stephen N.
    Mayo Clin, Div Lab Genet, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Thomas, Duncan C.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Thomas, Sushma S.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Hellen Hlth Fdn, Athens, Greece;Univ Athens, WHO Collaborating Ctr Nutr & Hlth, Unit Nutr Epidemiol & Nutr Publ Hlth, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat,Sch Med, Athens, Greece.
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA;Univ Utah, Dept Populat Hlth Sci, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Van den Berg, David J.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr & Hlth, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Oncol Unit, Umea, Sweden.
    van Kranen, Henk
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm RIVM, Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Visvanathan, Kala
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Vodicka, Pavel
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Inst Biol & Med Genet, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med, Plzen, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Biomed Ctr Pilsen, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Vodickova, Ludmila
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Inst Biol & Med Genet, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med, Plzen, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Biomed Ctr Pilsen, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Vymetalkova, Veronika
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Inst Biol & Med Genet, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med, Plzen, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Biomed Ctr Pilsen, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Weigl, Korbinian
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Weinstein, Stephanie J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    White, Emily
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Win, Aung Ko
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genom Med & Family Canc Clin, Parkville, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Wolf, C. Roland
    Univ Dundee, Sch Med, Dundee, Scotland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Woods, Michael O.
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Discipline Genet, St John, NF, Canada.
    Wu, Anna H.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Zaidi, Syed H.
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Zanke, Brent W.
    Univ Toronto, Div Hematol, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Zhang, Qing
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Genom Shared Resource, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr,Vanderbilt Ep, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Scacheri, Peter C.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet & Genome Sci, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA.
    Potter, John D.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Bassik, Michael C.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Kundaje, Anshul
    Stanford Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Casey, Graham
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Charlottesville, VA USA.
    Moreno, Victor
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Prevent & Control Program, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Dept Clin Sci, Fac Med, Barcelona, Spain;Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Colorectal Canc Grp, ONCOBELL Program, Barcelona, Spain.
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Nickerson, Deborah A.
    Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Gruber, Stephen B.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Hsu, Li
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Peters, Ulrike
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer2019Ingår i: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, nr 1, s. 76-87Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P < 5 x 10(-8), bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to similar to 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Kruppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.

  • 261.
    Hållmarker, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Endokrinkirurgi.
    Cancer incidence in participants in a long-distance ski race (Vasaloppet, Sweden) compared to the background population.2015Ingår i: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 51, nr 4, s. 558-568Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied the association between taking part in a long distance ski race and cancer incidence to address the hypothesis that a lifestyle involving a high degree of physical activity (PA) lowers cancer incidence with a pattern that is different by cancer site.

    METHODS: Cancer incidence was estimated in a large cohort of skiers (n=185,412) participating in the Vasaloppet long distance ski race in Sweden 1989-2010 and non-participants in the ski race, randomly selected from the Swedish general population (n=184,617). Data include race finishing times as a measurement of physical fitness. Hazard ratios (HRs) and net probability of cancer over twenty years of follow-up were estimated for all invasive cancer, and separately for prostate, breast, colo-rectal and lung cancer, and groups of cancers with presumed relation to lifestyle.

    FINDINGS: Participating in Vasaloppet was associated with a relative risk reduction for all invasive cancer of 6% (95% confidence interval 2-9%) and a relative risk reduction of 32% (95% confidence interval 28-37%) of cancer sites where there is epidemiological evidence that smoking, bodyweight, regular PA and consumption of fruit and vegetables are aetiological factors. For skin cancer the risk was increased, as for prostate cancer. Skiers with shorter finishing times had lower incidence of cancer.

    INTERPRETATION: This study indicates that it is unrealistic to reduce overall population cancer incidence drastically with life style. However, cancers that are epidemiologically associated with life style factors were significantly reduced by what presumably is a blend of non-smoking, normal body weight, sound dietary habits and PA. Our data thus provide additional support for present days' recommendations about life style prevention. Higher health awareness is associated with attendance to screening, which may explain our results for prostate cancer.

    FUNDING: University fund, independent funds from an insurance company and a private foundation.

  • 262.
    Hållmarker, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi. Mora Hosp, Dept Internal Med, S-79285 Mora, Sweden.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, S-79188 Falun, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Wester, Per
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Sci, S-90185 Umea, Sweden;Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, S-18288 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellberg, Dan
    Ctr Clin Res, S-79182 Falun, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi.
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Survival and incidence of cardiovascular diseases in participants in a long-distance ski race (Vasaloppet, Sweden) compared to the background population2018Ingår i: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, E-ISSN 2058-1742, Vol. 4, nr 2, s. 91-97Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the relationship between taking part in a long-distance ski race and incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) to address the hypothesis that lifestyle lowers the incidence. A cohort of 399 630 subjects in Sweden, half were skiers in the world's largest ski race, and half were non-skiers. Non-skiers were frequency matched for sex, age, and year of race. Individuals with severe diseases were excluded. The endpoints were death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The subjects were followed up for a maximum of 21.8 years and median of 9.8 years. We identified 9399 death, myocardial infarction, or stroke events among non-skiers and 4784 among the Vasaloppet skiers. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) comparing skiers and non-skiers were 0.52 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49-0.54] for all-cause mortality, 0.56 (95% CI 0.52-0.60) for myocardial infarction and 0.63 (95% CI 0.58-0.67) for stroke and for all three outcomes 0.56 (95% CI 0.54-0.58). The results were consistent across subgroups: age, sex, family status, education, and race year. For skiers, a doubling of race time was associated with a higher age-adjusted risk of 19%, and male skiers had a doubled risk than female skiers, with a HR 2.06 (95% CI 1.89-2.41). The outcome analyses revealed no differences in risk of atrial fibrillation between skiers and non-skiers. This large cohort study provides additional support for the hypothesis that individuals with high level of physical activity representing a healthy lifestyle, as evident by their participation in a long-distance ski race, have a lower risk of CVD or death.

  • 263.
    Hållmarker, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Cardiac Arrest in a Long-Distance Ski Race (Vasaloppet) in Sweden2012Ingår i: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 60, nr 15, s. 1431-1432Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 264.
    Hållmarker, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi. Medicinkliniken Mora Landstinget Dalarna.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi. Högskolan Dalarna, Falun.
    Hellberg, Dan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi. Centrum för klinisk forskning, Dalarna, Falun.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi.
    Risk of recurrent ischaemic events after myocardial infarction in long-distance ski race participants2016Ingår i: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, nr 3, s. 282-290Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To study whether a high level of physical activity prior to myocardial infarction (MI) also protects against recurrent MI (re-MI) or death.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A longitudinal study of a primary cohort consisting of 204,038 skiers with a proved substantially high level of physical activity in the world's largest long-distance ski race, Vasaloppet, and 499,543 non-skiers selected from the Swedish population. Individuals with severe diseases at baseline were excluded. In the nationwide clinical register, Swedeheart, we identified 7092 individuals with a first MI incident between 1989 and 2010. Of these, 1039 (0.5%) were skiers and 6053 (1.2%) were non-skiers. One hundred and sixty-three (15.7%) skiers and 1352 (22.3%) non-skiers suffered a re-MI or died during follow-up (median 4.44 years), corresponding to an incidence rate of 38.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 33.2-45.4)/1000 person-years and 55.6 (95% CI 52.7-58.7)/1000 person-years, respectively. Severity of MI in both groups was the same. For skiers compared to non-skiers the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for re-MI was 0.66 (95% CI 0.52-0.82). For death or re-MI, HR was 0.70 (95% CI 0.59-0.82) with consistent results in subgroups based on race year, age, gender, education level, marital status. After adjustment for also smoking, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular medication, HR was 0.80 (95% CI 0.67-0.97).

    CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study supports the hypothesis that patients with MI and with prior physical activity and healthy lifestyle, as evidenced by their participation in a long-distance ski race, have a lower risk of subsequent re-MI or death.

  • 265.
    Hållmarker, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Reply to" Airway Remodeling and Cardiac Arrest in Long-Distance Ski Races" Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Volume 61, Issue 3, 22 January 2013, Pages 388-3892013Ingår i: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 61, nr 3, s. 389-Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 266.
    Hållmarker, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Åsberg, Signild
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi. Högskolan Dalarna Falun.
    Hellberg, Dan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi. Centrum klinisk forskning Dalarna Falun.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Wester, Per
    Medicin och folhälsa Umeå Universitet.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Risk of Recurrent Stroke and Death After First Stroke in Long‐Distance Ski Race Participants2015Ingår i: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, nr 10, artikel-id e002469Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Physical activity is of benefit for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, but it appears to increase the risk for atrial fibrillation. We aimed to study a cohort of patients following a first stroke in individuals with previous high physical activity, compare them to the general population with respect to recurrent stroke and death, and relate these to atrial fibrillation.

    Methods and Results From the participants of the Vasaloppet, the world's largest ski‐race, and matched individuals from the general population (n=708 604), we identified 5964 patients hospitalized with a first‐time stroke between 1994 and 2010. Individuals with severe diseases were excluded. One half percent of skiers and 1% of nonskiers were hospitalized due to stroke. The incidence rate was 8.3 per 100 person‐years among skiers and 11.1 among nonskiers. The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrent stroke or death between the 2 groups was 0.76 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.86). The result was consistent in subgroups. The HR for death was 0.66 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.78) and for recurrent stroke 0.82 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.96). After adjustment for smoking and socioeconomic factors, the HR for death was consistent at 0.70 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.87) while the HR for recurrent stroke was not statistically significant. Outcomes for skiers with atrial fibrillation tended to show a lower risk than for nonskiers.

    Conclusions This large cohort study supports the hypothesis that patients with a stroke and with prior regular physical activity have a lower risk of death, while their risk for recurrent stroke is similar to that of nonskiers. The skiers had a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation, but still no increased risk of recurring stroke.

  • 267.
    Iderberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Ivbar Inst, Hantverkargatan 8, S-11221 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Med Management Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Willers, Carl
    Ivbar Inst, Hantverkargatan 8, S-11221 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgstrom, Fredrik
    Ivbar Inst, Hantverkargatan 8, S-11221 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Med Management Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hagg, Olle
    Spine Ctr Goteborg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moller, Hans
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ornstein, Ewald
    Orebro Univ Hosiptal, Dept Orthopaed, Orebro, Sweden.
    Sandén, Bengt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Stalberg, Holger
    Stockholm Cty Council, Halso O Sjukvardsforvaltningen, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Torevall-Larsson, Hans
    Falu Lasarett, Falun, Sweden.
    Tullberg, Tycho
    Stockholm Spine Ctr AB, Lowenstromska Sjukhuset, Upplands Vasby, Sweden.
    Fritzell, Peter
    Futurum Acad, Jonkoping, Sweden;St Goran Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predicting clinical outcome and length of sick leave after surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in Sweden: a multi-register evaluation2019Ingår i: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 28, nr 6, s. 1423-1432Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) can be surgically treated, with variable outcome. Studies have linked socioeconomic factors to outcome, but no nation-wide studies have been performed. This register-based study, including all patients surgically treated for LSS during 2008-2012 in Sweden, aimed to determine predictive factors for the outcome of surgery.

    Methods: Clinical and socioeconomic factors with impact on outcome in LSS surgery were identified in several high-coverage registers, e.g., the national quality registry for spine surgery (Swespine, FU-rate 70-90%). Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to assess their effect on outcome. Two patient-reported outcome measures, Global Assessment of leg pain (GA) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), as well as length of sick leave after surgery were analyzed.

    Results: Clinical and socioeconomic factors significantly affected health outcome (both GA and ODI). Some predictors of a good outcome (ODI) were: being born in the EU, reporting no back pain at baseline, a high disposable income and a high educational level. Some factors predicting a worse outcome were previous surgery, having had back pain more than 2years, having comorbidities, being a smoker, being on social welfare and being unemployed.

    Conclusions: The study highlights the relevance of adding socioeconomic factors to clinical factors for analysis of patient-reported outcomes, although the causal pathway of most predictors' impact is unknown. These findings should be further investigated in the perspective of treatment selection for individual LSS patients. The study also presents a foundation of case mix algorithms for predicting outcome of surgery for LSS.

  • 268.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Vasan, Ramachandran S.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Klinisk nutrition och metabolism.
    Blomhoff, Rune
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Circulating retinol-binding protein 4, cardiovascular risk factors and prevalent cardiovascular disease in elderly2009Ingår i: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 206, nr 1, s. 239-244Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to examine relations of serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) to cardiovascular risk factors, and prevalent metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a large community-based sample of elderly. METHODS: We evaluated cross-sectional relations of serum RBP4 to cardiovascular risk factors including anthropometrical measures, blood pressure, lipid measures, fasting glucose and insulin, body fat distribution including truncal fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and prevalent MetS in one thousand eight 70-year old participants (50% women) of the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS), and in five hundred seven 82-year old men from Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM). In ULSAM, we also examined associations with prevalent CVD. RESULTS: RBP4 concentrations were positively correlated with serum triglycerides (r=0.30; P<0.0001 in both samples), whereas correlations with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, sagittal abdominal diameter, total and truncal fat mass, total cholesterol, fasting glucose and HOMA-IR were weak. In multivariable-adjusted models, RBP-4 was associated with MetS (odds ratio (OR), 1.16 and 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99-1.37 and 1.05-1.67 per 1-standard deviation (SD) increase in PIVUS and ULSAM, respectively), and prior cerebrovascular disease (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.00-1.88 per 1-SD increase in ULSAM), but not with prior myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION: In elderly, RBP4 concentrations were associated with MetS and its components in both sexes, and prior cerebrovascular disease in men. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that circulating RBP4 could be a marker of metabolic complications and possibly also atherosclerosis and overt CVD.

  • 269.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Klinisk nutrition och metabolism.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Relative importance and conjoint effects of obesity and physical inactivity for the development of insulin resistance2009Ingår i: European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-8267, E-ISSN 1741-8275, Vol. 16, nr 1, s. 28-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Obesity and physical inactivity are related to the development of insulin resistance, but their relative importance and conjoint effects are unclear. METHODS: We related body mass index (BMI) and self-reported leisure-time physical activity (PA) at the age of 50 years to insulin sensitivity measured with euglycemic insulin clamp technique and the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) at a subsequent examination, 20 years later, in 862 men free from diabetes and MetS at baseline. RESULTS: In a multivariable model including BMI, PA, homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and all components of MetS at baseline, both BMI (beta, -0.19 mg/kg bodyweight/min per 1 kg/m; P<0.0001) and PA (adjusted least square means, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4, and 6.2 mg/kg bodyweight/min in individuals with sedentary, moderate, regular, and athletic PA, respectively; P=0.0035) were significant predictors of insulin sensitivity at age 70. When categorizing individuals into four groups by BMI and PA at baseline, insulin sensitivity at the age of 70 years decreased significantly over the following categories: multivariable-adjusted least square means, 5.8 (low BMI/high PA); 5.6 (low BMI/low PA); 5.1 (high BMI/high PA); and 4.6 (high BMI/low PA) mg/kg bodyweight/min, respectively; P value of less than 0.0001. CONCLUSION: In our community-based sample of middle-aged men, BMI and PA were independent predictors of insulin resistance after 20 years of follow-up. Our results imply that obesity and physical inactivity may increase insulin resistance and metabolic risk by partly independent pathways, and emphasize the importance of strategies that address both obesity and physical inactivity to achieve increased public health.

  • 270.
    Jacobsson, Josefin A.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Funktionell farmakologi.
    Sällman Almén, Markus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Funktionell farmakologi.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Funktionell farmakologi.
    Hedberg, Lilia A.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Brooks, Samantha
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Funktionell farmakologi.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för radiologi, onkologi och strålningsvetenskap, Enheten för radiologi.
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Molekylär medicin.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för radiologi, onkologi och strålningsvetenskap, Enheten för radiologi.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för radiologi, onkologi och strålningsvetenskap, Enheten för radiologi.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Funktionell farmakologi.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Funktionell farmakologi.
    Detailed Analysis of Variants in FTO in Association with Body Composition in a Cohort of 70-Year-Olds Suggests a Weakened Effect among Elderly2011Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, nr 5, s. e20158-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

     The rs9939609 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the fat mass and obesity (FTO) gene has previously been associated with higher BMI levels in children and young adults. In contrast, this association was not found in elderly men. BMI is a measure of overweight in relation to the individuals' height, but offers no insight into the regional body fat composition or distribution.

    Objective

    To examine whether the FTO gene is associated with overweight and body composition-related phenotypes rather than BMI, we measured waist circumference, total fat mass, trunk fat mass, leg fat mass, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, and daily energy intake in 985 humans (493 women) at the age of 70 years. In total, 733 SNPs located in the FTO gene were genotyped in order to examine whether rs9939609 alone or the other SNPs, or their combinations, are linked to obesity-related measures in elderly humans.

    Design

    Cross-sectional analysis of the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) cohort.

    Results

     Neither a single SNP, such as rs9939609, nor a SNP combination was significantly linked to overweight, body composition-related measures, or daily energy intake in elderly humans. Of note, these observations hold both among men and women.

    Conclusions

    Due to the diversity of measurements included in the study, our findings strengthen the view that the effect of FTO on body composition appears to be less profound in later life compared to younger ages and that this is seemingly independent of gender.

  • 271. Jensen, Per
    et al.
    Keeling, L.
    Schutz, K.
    Andersson, L.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Mormede, P.
    Brändström, Helena
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Forkman, B.
    Kerje, Susanne
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Fredriksson, Robert
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Ohlsson, C.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Feather pecking in chickens is genetically related to behavioural and developmental traits2005Ingår i: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 86, nr 1-2, s. 52-60Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Feather pecking (FP) is a detrimental behaviour in chickens, which is performed by only some individuals in a flock. FP was studied in 54 red junglefowl (ancestor of domestic chickens), 36 White Leghorn laying hens, and 762 birds from an F(2)-intercross between these two lines. From all F(2)-birds, growth and feed consumption were measured. Age at sexual maturity and egg production in females, and corticosterone levels in males were also measured. From 333 F(2)-birds of both sexes, and 20 parental birds, body composition with respect to bone mineral content, muscle and fat was obtained by post-mortem examinations using Dual X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA). In femurs of the same birds, the bone density and structure were analysed using DXA and Peripheral Quantitative Computerized Tomography (pQCT), and a biomechanical analysis of bone strength was performed. Furthermore, plumage condition was determined in all birds as a measure of being exposed to feather pecking. Using 105 DNA-markers in all F(2)-birds, a genome-wide scan for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL), associated with the behaviour in the F(2)-generation was performed. FP was at least as frequent in the red junglefowl as in the White Leghorn strain studied here, and significantly more common among females both in the parental strains and in the F(2)-generation. In the F(2)-birds, FP was phenotypically linked to early sexual maturation, fast growth, weak bones, and, in males, also high fat accumulation, indicating that feather peckers have a different resource allocation pattern. Behaviourally, F(2) feather peckers were more active in an open field test, in a novel food/novel object test, and in a restraint test, indicating that feather pecking might be genetically linked to a proactive coping strategy. Only one suggestive QTL with a low explanatory value was found on chromosome 3, showing that many genes, each with a small effect, are probably involved in the causation of feather pecking. There were significant effects of sire and dam on the risk of being a victim of feather pecking, and victims grew faster pre- and post-hatching, had lower corticosterone levels and were less active in a restraint test. Hence, a wide array of behavioural and developmental traits were genetically linked to FP.

  • 272. Jia, T
    et al.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Lindholm, B
    Larsson, T E
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Carrero, J J
    Dietary acid load, kidney function, osteoporosis, and risk of fractures in elderly men and women2015Ingår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 26, nr 2, s. 563-570Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Because kidney dysfunction reduces the ability to excrete dietary acid excess, we hypothesized that underlying kidney function may have confounded the mixed studies linking dietary acid load with the risk of osteoporosis and fractures in the community. In a relatively large survey of elderly men and women, we report that dietary acid load did neither associate with DEXA-estimated bone mineral density nor with fracture risk. Underlying kidney function did not modify these null findings. Our results do not support the dietary acid-base hypothesis of bone loss.

    INTRODUCTION:

    Impaired renal function reduces the ability to excrete dietary acid excess. We here investigate the association between dietary acid load and bone mineral density (BMD), osteoporosis, and fracture risk by renal function status.

    METHODS:

    An observational study was conducted in 861 community-dwelling 70-year-old men and women (49 % men) with complete dietary data from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS). The exposure was dietary acid load as estimated from 7-day food records by the net endogenous acid production (NEAP) and potential renal acid load (PRAL) algorithms. Renal function assessed by cystatin C estimated glomerular filtration rate was reduced in 21 % of the individuals. Study outcomes were BMD and osteoporosis state (assessed by DEXA) and time to fracture (median follow-up of 9.2 years).

    RESULTS:

    In cross-section, dietary acid load had no significant associations with BMD or with the diagnosis of osteoporosis. During follow-up, 131 fractures were validated. Neither NEAP (adjusted hazard ratios (HR) (95 % confidence interval (CI)), 1.01 (0.85-1.21), per 1 SD increment) nor PRAL (adjusted HR (95 % CI), 1.07 (0.88-1.30), per 1 SD increment) associated with fracture risk. Further multivariate adjustment for kidney function or stratification by the presence of kidney disease did not modify these null associations.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The hypothesis that dietary acid load associates with reduced BMD or increased fracture risk was not supported by this study in community-dwelling elderly individuals. Renal function did not influence on this null finding.

  • 273.
    Jiang, Xia
    et al.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Nobels Vagen 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finucane, Hilary K.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Schumacher, Fredrick R.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Populat & Quantitat Hlth Sci, 10900 Eucid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Hosp, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Schmit, Stephanie L.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA;H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Gastrointestinal Oncol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Tyrer, Jonathan P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Han, Younghun
    Geisel Sch Med Dartmouth, Dept Biomed Data Sci, 1 Med Ctr Dr, Dartmouth, NS, Lebanon.
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Cyprus Inst Neurol & Genet, Dept Elect Microscopy Mol Pathol, CY-1683 Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Lesseur, Corina
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    UCL, Div Psychiat, Maple House,149 Tottenham Court Rd, London W1T 7NF, England;UCL, UCL Genet Inst, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Dennis, Joe
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Conti, David V.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Casey, Graham
    Univ Virginia, Publ Hlth Sci, POB 800717, Charlottesville, VI 80071 USA;Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, POB 800717, Charlottesville, VI 80071 USA.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Aldrich, Melinda C.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Div Epidemiol, Dept Thorac Surg, Med Ctr, 609 Oxford House, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Andrew, Angeline S.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Med Ctr, Dept Neurol, 7927 Rubin Bldg,Room 860,One Med Ctr Dr, Lebanon, NH 3756 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Mt Sinai Hosp, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Fred ALitwin Ctr Canc Genet, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, 224 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92617 USA.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Antonenkova, Natalia N.
    NNAlexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Settlement Lesnoy 2, Minsk 223040, BELARUS.
    Arnold, Susanne M.
    Univ Kentucky, Markey Canc Ctr, 800 Rose St,Cc445, Lexington, KY 40508 USA.
    Aronson, Kristan J.
    Queens Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, 10 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada;Queens Univ, Canc Res Inst, 10 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada.
    Arun, Banu K.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Breast Med Oncol, 1155 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Bandera, Elisa V.
    Rutgers Canc Inst New Jersey, Canc Prevent & Control Program, 195 Little Albany St,Room 5568, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 USA.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, BMC Biomed Ctr, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Barnes, Daniel R.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Qld, Translat Res Inst, 37 Kent St, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen Nuremberg, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Univ Str 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Calle Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Benlloch, Sara
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Berchuck, Andrew
    Duke Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Med Ctr, 25171 Morris Bldg, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Bickeboeller, Heike
    Univ Med Ctr Goettingen, Dept Genet Epidemiol, Humboldtallee 32, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany.
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, 1959 NE Pacific St,Hlth Sci Bldg,F-350, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Haartmaninkatu 4, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden.
    Boccia, Stefania
    Fdn Policlin Univ AGemelli IRCCS, I-00168 Rome, Italy;Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Bogdanova, Natalia V.
    NNAlexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Settlement Lesnoy 2, Minsk 223040, BELARUS;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Carl Neuberg Str 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Carl Neuberg Str 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    DrMargarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Auerbachstr112, D-70376 Stuttgart, Germany;Univ Tubingen, Geschwister Scholl Pl, D-72074 Tubingen, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenton, James D.
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, England.
    Brook, Mark N.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Brunet, Joan
    CIBERONC, Catalan Inst Oncol, IDIBGI Inst Invest Biomed Girona, Genet Counseling Unit,Hereditary Canc Program, AvFranca S-N, Girona 17007, Spain.
    Brunnstrom, Hans
    Lund Univ, Clin Sci, Box 117, S-22100 Lund, Sweden;Dept Genet & Pathol, Div Lab Med, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Buchanan, Daniel D.
    Univ Melbourne, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Ctr Canc Res, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Colorectal Oncogen Grp, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genom Med & Family Canc Clin, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Neuenheimer Feld 440, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080,Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Butzow, Ralf
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Biomed Helsinki 4th Floor,Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki 00029, Finland;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Biomed Helsinki 4th Floor,Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki 00029, Finland.
    Cadoni, Gabriella
    Fdn Policlin Univ AGemelli IRCCS, I-00168 Rome, Italy;Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Med Oncol Dept, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Calle Prof Martin Lagos, Madrid 28040, Spain.
    Caligo, Maria A.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Lab Med, Sect Genet Oncol, Via Roma 67, I-56126 Pisa, Italy;Univ Hosp Pisa, Via Roma 67, I-56126 Pisa, Italy.
    Campbell, Ian
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia.
    Campbell, Peter T.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Sorbonne Univ, Tenon Hosp, GRC N 5 ONCOTYPE URO, F-75020 Paris, France;Tenon Hosp, CeRePP, F-75020 Paris, France.
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa
    Univ Utah, Dept Med, Div Genet Epidemiol, Sch Med, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;George EWahlen Dept Vet Affairs Med Ctr, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Campa, Daniele
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Pisa, Dept Biol, I-56126 Pisa, Italy.
    Caporaso, Neil
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Carvalho, Andre L.
    Barretos Canc Hosp, Mol Oncol Res Ctr, Rua Antenor Duarte Villela 1331, BR-784400 Barretos, SP, Brazil;Barretos Canc Hosp, Head & Neck Surg Dept, Pio 12,1331 Antenor Duarte Villela St, BR-14784400 Barretos, SP, Brazil.
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Chen, Chu
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Christiani, David C.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Claes, Kathleen B. M.
    Univ Ghent, Ctr Med Genet, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Claessens, Frank
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Cellular & Mol Med, Mol Endocrinol Lab, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Clements, Judith
    Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Qld, Translat Res Inst, 37 Kent St, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.
    Collee, J. Margriet
    Erasmus MC, Dept Clin Genet, Wytemaweg 80, NL-3015 CN Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Correa, Marcia Cruz
    Univ Puerto Rico Med Sci Campus, San Juan, PR 00936 USA;Comprehens Canc Ctr, San Juan, PR 00936 USA.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Cox, Angela
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield Inst Nucle Acids SInFoNiA, Dept Oncol & Metab, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England.
    Cunningham, Julie M.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, 333 Cottman Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA.
    defazio, Anna
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Ctr Canc Res, 176 Hawkesbury Rd, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia;Westmead Hosp, Dept Gynaecol Oncol, Hawkesbury Rd & Darcy Rd, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Pathol, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands.
    Diez, Orland
    Univ Hosp Vall dHebron, Vall dHebron Inst Oncol VHIO, Clin & Mol Genet Area, Oncogenet Grp, Passeig Vall dHebron 119-129, Barcelona 08035, Spain.
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hosp Univ Santiago, SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Genom Med Grp,Galician Fdn Genom Med, Travesia Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, 3855 Hlth Sci Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA.
    Donovan, Jenny L.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol BS8 1TH, Avon, England.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Duell, Eric J.
    ICO IDIBELL, Canc Epidemiol Res Program, Unit Nutr & Canc, AvGran Via 199-203, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Dwek, Miriam
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, 309 Regent St, London W1B 2HW, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    Univ Southampton, Canc Sci Acad Unit, Fac Med, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    Edlund, Christopher K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Edwards, Digna R. Velez
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Genet Inst, 2525 West End Ave,Suite 600, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Ellberg, Carolina
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Barngatan 4, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Univ Manchester, Cent Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Div Evolut & Genom Sci,St Marys Hosp, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9WL, Lancs, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen Nuremberg, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Univ Str 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany;Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Ferris, Robert L.
    Univ Pittsburgh, UPMC Hillman Canc Ctr, Dept Otolaryngol, Canc Pavil,Suite 500,5150 Ctr Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 USA.
    Liloglou, Triantafillos
    Univ Liverpool, Mol & Clin Canc Med, Roy Castle Lung Canc Res Programme, Inst Translat Med, Wiliam Duncan Bldg,6 West Derby St, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England.
    Figueiredo, Jane C.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, 1450 Biggy St, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Fletcher, Olivia
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Inst Canc Res, Breast Canc Now Toby Robins Res Ctr, 123 Old Brompton Rd, London SW7 3RP, England.
    Fortner, Renee T.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Fostira, Florentia
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Mol Diagnost Lab, INRASTES, Neapoleos 10, Athens 15310, Greece.
    Franceschi, Silvia
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Infect, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Susanne Levy Gertner Oncogenet Unit, Emek HaEla St 1, IL-52621 Ramat Gan, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Fac Med, Haim Levanon 30, IL-69978 Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Gallinger, Steven J.
    Mt Sinai Hosp, Dept Surg, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Samuel Lunenfeld Res Inst, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Univ Hlth Network Toronto Gen Hosp, 200 Elizabeth St, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada.
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Jonsson Comprehens Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Control Res, Sch Med, 650 Charles Young Dr South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Jonsson Comprehens Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Control Res, Sch Publ Hlth, 650 Charles Young Dr South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Garber, Judy
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Canc Risk & Prevent Clin, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Med Oncol Dept, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Calle Prof Martin Lagos, Madrid 28040, Spain.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Ctr Canc Prevent & Translat Genom, Spielberg Bldg,8725 Alden Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Biomed Sci, Spielberg Bldg,8725 Alden Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    Univ Kansas, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, Med Ctr, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160 USA.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;McGill Univ, Dept Med, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada;McGill Univ, Royal Victoria Hosp, Div Clin Epidemiol, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Dermatol, Sch Med, 2000 Circle Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Goode, Ellen L.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Goodman, Marc T.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Canc Prevent & Control, 8700 Beverly Blvd,Room 1S37, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Biomed Sci, Commun & Populat Hlth Res Inst, 8700 Beverly Blvd,Room 1S37, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Goodman, Gary
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Swedish Canc Inst, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1221 Madison StSte 300, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Umea Univ, Unit Clin Chem, Dept Med Biosci, 6M Van 2, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    Greene, Mark H.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;NCI, Clin Genet Branch, DCEG, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20850 USA.
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris Sud, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP, Canc & Environm Grp,INSERM, F-94805 Villejuif, France.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Dept Environm Med, Nobels Vag 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Sjukhusbacken 10, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hamdy, Freddie C.
    Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Fac Med Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England.
    Hamilton, Robert J.
    Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, 610 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    Hampe, Jochen
    Tech Univ Dresden, Univ Hosp Dresden, Dept Internal Med 1, D-01307 Dresden, Germany.
    Haugen, Aage
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Inst Occupat Hlth STAMI, Gydas Vei 8, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.
    Heitz, Florian
    DrHorst Schmidt Kliniken Wiesbaden, Dept Gynecol & Gynecol Oncol, Ludwig Erhard Str 100, D-65199 Wiesbaden, Germany;Knappschaft GmbH, Dept Gynecol & Gynecol Oncol, Kliniken Essen Mitte, EvangHuyssens Stiftung, Henricistr 92, D-45136 Essen, Germany.
    Herrero, Rolando
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Early Detect & Prevent Sect, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Hillemanns, Peter
    Hoffmeister, Michael
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hogdall, Estrid
    Danish Canc Soc Res Ctr, Dept Virus Lifestyle & Genes, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Herlev Hosp, Dept Pathol, Mol Unit, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark.
    Hong, Yun-Chul
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Prevent Med, 1 Gwanak Ro, Seoul 151742, South Korea.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Houlston, Richard
    Inst Canc Res, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Ingolstadter Landstr1, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Hulick, Peter J.
    NorthShore Univ HealthSystem, Ctr Med Genet, Evanston, IL 1000 USA;Univ Chicago, Pritzker Sch Med, 924 E 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Huntsman, David G.
    BC Canc Agcy, Vancouver Gen Hosp, British Columbias Ovarian Canc Res OVCARE Program, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;Univ British Columbia, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;BC Canc Agcy Res Ctr, Dept Mol Oncol, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada.
    Idos, Gregory
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;NNPetrov Inst Oncol, Leningradskaya Ul 68, St Petersburg 197758, Russia.
    Ingles, Sue Ann
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown Univ, Lombardi Comprehens Canc Ctr, 3800 Reservoir Rd, Washington, DC 20007 USA.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland;Pomeranian Med Univ, Independent Lab Mol Biol & Genet Diagnost, Rybacka 1, PL-70204 Szczecin, Poland.
    James, Paul
    Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia;Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Parkville Familial Canc Ctr, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia.
    Jenkins, Mark A.
    Univ Melbourne, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Ctr Canc Res, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, 6M Van 2, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Div Oncol, Dept Med, 780 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94304 USA;Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, 780 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94304 USA.
    Joshi, Amit D.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Kaneva, Radka
    Med Univ Sofia, Fac Med, Dept Med Chem & Biochem, Mol Med Ctr, Sofia 1504, Bulgaria.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Womens Canc Program, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Kelemen, Linda E.
    Med Univ South Carolina, Hollings Canc Ctr, 68 President St Bioengineering Bldg,MSC955, Charleston, SC 29425 USA;Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, 68 President St Bioengineering Bldg,MSC955, Charleston, SC 29425 USA.
    Kuhl, Tabea
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Clin Gerontol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, ulZaki Validi 32, Ufa 450076, Russia;Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa Sci Ctr, 71 Prosp Oktyabrya, Ufa 450054, Russia.
    Kibel, Adam S.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Urol Surg, Boston, MA USA.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Radboud Inst Hlth Sci, Med Ctr, Geert Grooteplein 21, NL-6525 EZ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kim, Jeri
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Genitourinary Med Oncol, 1155 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kjaer, Susanne K.
    Danish Canc Soc Res Ctr, Dept Virus Lifestyle & Genes, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Gynaecol, Rigshosp, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Knight, Julia A.
    Sinai Hlth Syst, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Prosserman Ctr Populat Hlth Res, 60 Murray St, Toronto, ON M5T 3L9, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dalla Lana Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, 155 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain;ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona 08036, Spain;IMIM Hosp del Mar Res Inst, Barcelona 08003, Spain;UPF, Barcelona 08002, Spain.
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Koutros, Stella
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, NIH, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Kristensen, Vessela N.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Radiumhosp, Ullernchausseen 70, N-0379 Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Mol Biol, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.
    Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Inst, Ctr Oncol, Dept Pathol & Lab Diagnost, Roentgena 5, PL-02781 Warsaw, Poland.
    Lacko, Martin
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Head & Neck Surg, PDebyelaan 25,POBox 5800, NL-6202 AZ Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Lam, Stephan
    British Columbia Canc Agcy, Dept Integrat Oncol, Room 10-111 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, VIB Ctr Canc Biol, Herestr 49, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium;Univ Leuven, Dept Human Genet, Lab Translat Genet, Oude Markt 13, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Landi, Maria Teresa
    NCI, Integrat Tumor Epidemiol Branch, DCEG, 9609 Med Ctr Dr,Room SG 7E106, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Lazarus, Philip
    Washington State Univ, Coll Pharm, PBS 431 POB 1495, Spokane, WA 99210 USA.
    Le, Nhu D.
    BC Canc Agcy, Canc Control Res, 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada.
    Lee, Eunjung
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Israeli Canc Control Ctr, Clalit Hlth Serv, 2 Horev St, IL-3436212 Haifa, Israel.
    Lenz, Heinz-Josef
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Leslie, Goska
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Lessel, Davor
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Inst Human Genet, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Womens Canc Program, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Levine, Douglas A.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Surg, Gynecol Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA;NYU Langone Med Ctr, Laura & Isaac Pearlmutter Canc Ctr, Gynecol Oncol, 240 East 38th St 19th Floor, New York, NY 10016 USA.
    Li, Li
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Mary Ann Swetland Ctr Environm Hlth, Dept Family Med & Community Hlth, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Serv Galego Saude SERGAS, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
    Li, Christopher I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Translat Res Program, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med & Surg, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Mayo Clin Arizona, Hlth Sci Res, 13400 EShea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 USA.
    Liu, Geoffrey
    Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol, 610 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    Loupakis, Fotios
    Ist Oncol Veneto IRCCS, Dept Clin & Expt Oncol, Unit Oncol 1, I-35122 Padua, Italy.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Maehle, Lovise
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.
    Maier, Christiane
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Human Genet, Prittwitzstr 43, D-89075 Ulm, Germany.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Yliopistonranta 1, Kuopio 70210, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Pathol & Forens Med, KuopioYliopistonranta 1, Kuopio 70210, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, Imaging Ctr, Puijonlaaksontie 2, Kuopio 70210, Finland.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Program Epidemiol, Ctr Canc, 701 Ilalo St, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA.
    Margolin, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    May, Taymaa
    Univ Hlth Network, Div Gynecol Oncol, Princess Margaret Hosp, 610 Univ Ave,OPG Wing 6-811, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Tech Univ Munich, Div Gynaecol & Obstet, Arcisstr 21, D-80333 Munich, Germany.
    Middha, Pooja
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Fac Med, Neuenheimer Feld 672, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Miller, Austin
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Stat & Data Management Ctr, NRG Oncol, Elm & Carlton St, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    MacInnis, Robert J.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Modugno, Francesmary
    Magee Womens Res Inst, Canc Res Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA;Hillman Canc Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA;Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Med, Dept Obstet Gynecol & Reprod Sci, Div Gynecol Oncol, 300 Halket St, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA.
    Montagna, Marco
    Veneto Inst Oncol IOV IRCCS, Immunol & Mol Oncol Unit, Via Gattamelata 64, I-35128 Padua, Italy.
    Moreno, Victor
    Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth CIBER, Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Catalan Inst Oncol, Barcelona 08908, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Moysich, Kirsten B.
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Div Canc Prevent & Control, Elm & Carlton St, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.
    Mucci, Lorelei
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Muir, Kenneth
    Univ Manchester, Div Populat Hlth Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England;Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Div Hlth Sci, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Univ Toronto, Dept Lab Med & Pathobiol, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada;Univ Hlth Network, Lab Med Program, 200 Elizabeth St, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Abramson Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 3400 Civ Ctr Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Neal, David E.
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, England;Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Fac Med Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England;Univ Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hosp, Dept Oncol, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Ness, Andrew R.
    Univ Bristol, NIHR Bristol Biomed Res Ctr Nutr Theme, Upper Maudlin St, Bristol BS2 8AE, Avon, England.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Res Inst City Hope, Dept Populat Sci, 1500 E Duarte, Duarte, CA 91010 USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland.
    Newcomb, Polly A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, 1959 NE Pacific St,Hlth Sci Bldg,F-350, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Newcomb, Lisa F.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Urol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Nielsen, Finn Cilius
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Rigshosp, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nikitina-Zake, Liene
    Latvian Biomed Res & Study Ctr, Ratsupites Str 1, LV-1067 Riga, Latvia.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Canc Genet & Prevent Program, 1600 Div St, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Clin Genet Res Lab, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    Natl Inst Oncol, Dept Mol Genet, Rath Gyorgy u7-9, H-1122 Budapest, Hungary.
    Al Olama, Ali Amin
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Clin Neurosci, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Clin Canc Genet, 5841S Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olshan, Andrew F.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 135 Dauer Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA;UNC Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, 450 West Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Barngatan 4, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Calle Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Pandha, Hardev
    Univ Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey, England.
    Park, Jong Y.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Pashayan, Nora
    UCL, Dept Appl Hlth Res, 1-19 Torrington Pl, London WC1E 6BT, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Strangeways Lab, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Parsons, Michael T.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Pejovic, Tanja
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Pk Rd,L-466, Portland, OR 97239 USA;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Pk Rd,L-466, Portland, OR 97239 USA.
    Penney, Kathryn L.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Peters, Wilbert H. M.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Gastroenterol, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10,Internal BOBox 433, NL-6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Phipps, Amanda I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana
    Macedonian Acad Sci & Arts, Res Ctr Genet Engn & Biotechnol Georgi DEfremov, Blvd Krste Petkov Misirkov, Skopje 1000, Macedonia.
    Pring, Miranda
    Univ Bristol, Bristol Dent Sch, Lower Maudlin St, Bristol BS1 2LY, Avon, England.
    Prokofyeva, Darya
    Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, ulZaki Validi 32, Ufa 450076, Russia.
    Radice, Paolo
    INT, Fdn IRCCS, Dept Res, Unit Mol Bases Genet Risk & Genet Testing, Via Giacomo Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Decode Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ramus, Susan J.
    Univ NSW Sydney, Sch Womens & Childrens Hlth, Fac Med, 18 High St, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia;Garvan Inst Med Res, Kinghorn Canc Ctr, 384 Victoria St, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.
    Raskin, Leon
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, 1161 21st Ave S D3300, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Rennert, Gad
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel.
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Genet, Private Bag X323, ZA-0007 Arcadia, South Africa.
    Riggan, Marjorie J.
    Duke Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Med Ctr, 25171 Morris Bldg, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Yale Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Chron Dis Epidemiol, 60 Coll St, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.
    Risch, Angela
    Salzburg Univ, Dept Mol Biol, Canc Ctr Cluster Salzburg, PLUS, Billrothstr11, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria;DKFZ German Canc Res Ctr, Div Epigen & Canc Risk Factors, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Ctr Lung Res DZL, TLRC H, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Roobol, Monique J.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Urol, Wytemaweg 80, NL-3015 CN Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Rosenstein, Barry S.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Radiat Oncol, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Genet & Genom Sci, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Rossing, Mary Anne
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, M4 C308,1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    De Ruyck, Kim
    Univ Ghent, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Basic Med Sci, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Hereditary Canc Clin, Iraklion 71110, Greece.
    Sandler, Dale P.
    NIEHS, Epidemiol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Guys Hosp Great Maze Pond, Res Oncol, London SE1 9RT, England.
    Schabath, Matthew B.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Univ Turku, Inst Biomed, Turku 20014, Finland;Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Div Lab, Turku 20014, Finland;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Prostate Canc Res Ctr, Tampere 33014, Finland;Univ Tampere, BioMediTech Inst, Tampere 33014, Finland.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Mol Pathol, Plesmanlaan 121, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Psychosocial Res & Epidemiol, Plesmanlaan 121, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Setiawan, V. Wendy
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1450 Biggy St, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Shen, Hongbing
    Nanjing Med Univ, Collaborat Innovat Ctr Canc Personalized Med, Jiangsu Key Lab Canc Biomarkers Prevent & Treatme, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat,Sch Publ Hlth, 101 Longmian Ave, Nanjing 211166, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Siegel, Erin M.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Sieh, Weiva
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Populat Hlth Sci & Policy, Dept Genet & Genom Sci, 1425 Madison Ave,2nd Floor, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Med Univ Vienna, Dept OB GYN, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria;Med Univ Vienna, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Slattery, Martha L.
    Univ Utah, Dept Internal Med, Hlth Sci Ctr, 295 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 USA.
    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark;Aarhus Univ, Dept Clin Med, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci, Precis Med, Monash Hlth, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, Vic 3168, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Cnr Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Royal Parade, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
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    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Stanford, Janet L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Stevens, Victoria L.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
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    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp, Dept Med 3, Marchioninistr15, D-81377 Munich, Germany.
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    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Curtin Univ, Curtin UWA Ctr Genet Origins Hlth & Dis, 35 Stirling Hwy, Perth, WA 6000, Australia;Univ Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.
    Sundfeldt, Karin
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Canc Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Bla Straket 6, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sutphen, Rebecca
    Univ S Florida, Coll Med, Epidemiol Ctr, 3650 Spectrum Blvd,Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Breast Canc Res, London SW7 3RP, England.
    Tajara, Eloiza H.
    Sch Med Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Dept Mol Biol, Av Brig Faria Lima 5416 Vila Sao Pedro, BR-15090000 Sao Jose Do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil;Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Biosci, Dept Genet & Evolut Biol, Rua Matao 321, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
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    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
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    Univ Oviedo, Fac Med, Campus Cristo S-N, E-33006 Oviedo, Spain;CIBERESP, Campus Cristo S-N, Oviedo 33006, Spain.
    Taylor, Jack A.
    NIEHS, Epidemiol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA;NIEHS, Epigenet & Stem Cell Biol Lab, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Teare, M. Dawn
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Hlth & Related Res ScHARR, Med Stat Grp, Regent Court,30 Regent St, Sheffield S1 4DA, S Yorkshire, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncol Inst, Dept Genet, Rua DrAntonio Bernardino de Almeida 62, P-4220072 Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Biomed Sci Inst ICBAS, RJorge de Viterbo Ferreira 228, P-4050013 Porto, Portugal.
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 722 West 168th St, New York, NY 10032 USA.
    Terry, Kathryn L.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Obstet & Gynecol Epidemiol Ctr, 221 Longwood Ave RFB 368, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard THChan Sch Publ Hlth, 221 Longwood Ave RFB 368, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
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    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
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    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Sonder Blvd 29, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark.
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    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Ctr Canc Biomarkers CCBIO, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Tischkowitz, Marc
    McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet & Oncol, Program Canc Genet, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada;Univ Cambridge, Dept Med Genet, Hills Rd, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, 460W12th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Torres, Diana
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Inst Human Genet, Carrera 7 40-90, Bogota, Colombia.
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    Univ Manchester, NIHR Manchester Biomed Res Ctr, Fac Biol Med & Hlth,Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Div Canc Sci,Manchester Canc Res Ctr,Hlth Innovat, Manchester M20 4GJ, Lancs, England.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Oxford OX3 7LF, England.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Tworoger, Shelley S.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
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    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, 2000 Circle Hope,Rm 4125, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;Univ Utah, Dept Populat Hlth Sci, 2000 Circle Hope,Rm 4125, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Alberta, Cross Canc Inst, Dept Oncol, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada;Univ Alberta, Cross Canc Inst, Div Radiat Oncol, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada.
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    Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain;Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
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    Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
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    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
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    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Dept Environm Med, Nobels Vag 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
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    Univ Sheffield, Weston Pk Hosp, Acad Unit Clin Oncol, Whitham Rd, Sheffield S10 2SJ, S Yorkshire, England.
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    Natl Inst Occupat Hlth STAMI, Gydas Vei 8, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.
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    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Anasthesia, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
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    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
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    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Inst Canc Res, Oncogenet Team, Downs Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, Downs Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
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    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
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    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
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    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
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    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Pasaniuc, Bogdan
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, UCLA Path & Lab Med, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 19009 USA.
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    Baylor Coll Med, Inst Clin & Translat Res, Epidemiol Sect, Dept Med, One Baylor Plaza,MS BCM451,Suite 100D, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
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    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
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    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Shared heritability and functional enrichment across six solid cancers2019Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikel-id 431Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantifying the genetic correlation between cancers can provide important insights into the mechanisms driving cancer etiology. Using genome-wide association study summary statistics across six cancer types based on a total of 296,215 cases and 301,319 controls of European ancestry, here we estimate the pair-wise genetic correlations between breast, colorectal, head/neck, lung, ovary and prostate cancer, and between cancers and 38 other diseases. We observed statistically significant genetic correlations between lung and head/neck cancer (r(g) = 0.57, p = 4.6 x 10(-8)), breast and ovarian cancer (r(g) = 0.24, p = 7 x 10(-5)), breast and lung cancer (r(g) = 0.18, p = 1.5 x 10(-6)) and breast and colorectal cancer (r(g) = 0.15, p = 1.1 x 10(-4)). We also found that multiple cancers are genetically correlated with non-cancer traits including smoking, psychiatric diseases and metabolic characteristics. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a significant excess contribution of conserved and regulatory regions to cancer heritability. Our comprehensive analysis of cross-cancer heritability suggests that solid tumors arising across tissues share in part a common germline genetic basis.

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    O'Reilly, Paul F.
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Social Genet & Dev Psychiat, De Crespigny Pk, London SE5 8AF, England..
    Aschard, Hugues
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA USA.;Inst Pasteur, Ctr Bioinformat Biostat & Biol Integrat C3BI, F-75724 Paris, France..
    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, 1200 Ctr St, Boston, MA 02131 USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard & Massachusetts Inst Technol, Boston, MA 02142 USA..
    Richards, J. Brent
    Dept Med, 3755 Cote Ste Catherine Rd,Suite H-413, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada.;Dept Human Genet, 3755 Cote Ste Catherine Rd,Suite H-413, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada.;Dept Epidemiol, 3755 Cote Ste Catherine Rd,Suite H-413, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada.;Dept Biostat, 3755 Cote Ste Catherine Rd,Suite H-413, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada..
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    Boston Univ, Dept Biostat, Sch Publ Hlth, Crosstown Ctr, 801 Massachusetts Ave,3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, 73 Mt Wayte Ave, Framingham, MA 01702 USA..
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Molekylär epidemiologi. Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Dept Med, Stanford, USA.
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    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, 1200 Ctr St, Boston, MA 02131 USA..
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    Med Univ Graz, Div Endocrinol & Diabetol, Dept Internal Med, Auenbruggerpl 15, A-8036 Graz, Austria..
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    UCL, Populat Policy & Practice, Inst Child Hlth, Great Ormond St, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Kestenbaum, Bryan
    Kidney Res Inst, Div Nephrol, 325 Ninth Ave, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Zheng, Jusheng
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Luan, Jianan
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Sofianopoulou, Eleni
    Univ Cambridge, Strangeways Res Lab, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England..
    Streeten, Elizabeth A.
    Univ Maryland, Genet & Personalized Med Program, Sch Med, Howard Hall Room 567, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Metabol Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Lutsey, Pamela L.
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol & Community Hlth, 1300S 2nd St,Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454 USA..
    Yao, Lu
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol & Community Hlth, 1300S 2nd St,Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454 USA..
    Tang, Weihong
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol & Community Hlth, 1300S 2nd St,Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454 USA..
    Econs, Michael J.
    Indiana Univ, Dept Med, Endocrinol, 1120W Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA..
    Wallaschofski, Henri
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Clin Chem & Lab Med, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-13316 Greifswald, Germany..
    Voelzke, Henry
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-13316 Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, SHIP Klinisch Epidemiol Forsch, Walther Rathenau Str 48, D-17475 Greifswald, Germany..
    Zhou, Ang
    Univ South Australia, Ctr Populat Hlth Res, Sansom Inst Hlth Res, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    Power, Chris
    UCL, Populat Policy & Practice, Inst Child Hlth, Great Ormond St, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Univ Oxford, Churchill Hosp, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Old Rd, Oxford OX3 7LJ, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Ctr Human Genet, Roosevelt Dr, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Churchill Hosp, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Old Rd, Oxford OX3 7LJ, England..
    Michos, Erin D.
    Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Ciccarone Ctr Prevent Heart Dis, Div Cardiol, Baltimore, MD 21287 USA.;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, Ctr Human Genet, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Weinstein, Stephanie J.
    NCI, Metabol Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Freedman, Neal D.
    NCI, Metabol Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Huang, Wen-Yi
    NCI, Occupat & Environm Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Van Schoor, Natasja M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Boelelaan 1089a, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    van der Velde, Nathalie
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.;AMC, Internal Med, Dept Geriatr, POB 22700, NL-1100 DE Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.
    Wageningen Univ, Dept Human Nutr, POB 176700, NL-700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Enneman, Anke
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Boston Univ, Dept Biostat, Sch Publ Hlth, Crosstown Ctr, 801 Massachusetts Ave,3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, 73 Mt Wayte Ave, Framingham, MA 01702 USA..
    Booth, Sarah L.
    Tufts Univ, Vitamin K Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Vasan, Ramachandran S.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, 73 Mt Wayte Ave, Framingham, MA 01702 USA..
    Liu, Ching-Ti
    Boston Univ, Dept Biostat, Sch Publ Hlth, Crosstown Ctr, 801 Massachusetts Ave,3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Zhou, Yanhua
    Boston Univ, Dept Biostat, Sch Publ Hlth, Crosstown Ctr, 801 Massachusetts Ave,3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Univ Helsinki, Stat & Translat Genet, Biomedicum, Tukholmankatu 8, Helsinki 2U, Finland..
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Vita Straket 11, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Vita Straket 11, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Geriatr Med, S-43180 Molndal, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-43180 Molndal, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Gen Practice & Primary Hlth Care, POB 20,Tukholmankatu 8 B, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, POB 20,Tukholmankatu 8 B, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Folkhalsan Res Ctr, POB 2000014, Helsinki, Finland..
    Shea, M. Kyla
    Tufts Univ, Vitamin K Lab, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutr Res Ctr Aging, 711 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Houston, Denise K.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Sticht Ctr Healthy Aging & Alzheimers Prevent, Med Ctr Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Kritchevsky, Stephen B.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Sticht Ctr Healthy Aging & Alzheimers Prevent, Med Ctr Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Liu, Yongmei
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Med Ctr Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Lohman, Kurt K.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Dept Biostat Sci, Med Ctr Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    NIA, Longitudinal Studies Sect, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21225 USA..
    Peacock, Munro
    Indiana Univ, Dept Med, Endocrinol, 1120W Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA..
    Gieger, Christian
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Mol Epidemiol, AME, Ingolstadter Landstr 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Beekman, Marian
    Leiden Univ, Mol Epidemiol, Med Ctr, Einthovenweg 20, NL-2333 ZC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Slagboom, Eline
    Leiden Univ, Mol Epidemiol, Med Ctr, Einthovenweg 20, NL-2333 ZC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Deelen, Joris
    Leiden Univ, Mol Epidemiol, Med Ctr, Einthovenweg 20, NL-2333 ZC Leiden, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Biol Ageing, Joseph Stelzmann Str 9b, D-50931 Cologne, Germany..
    van Heemst, Diana
    Leiden Univ, Gerontol & Geriatr, Med Ctr, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands..
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med Nephrol Hypertensiol Rheumatol Endocrino, Theodor Kutzer Ufer1, D-68167 Mannheim, Germany..
    Maerz, Winfried
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med Nephrol Hypertensiol Rheumatol Endocrino, Theodor Kutzer Ufer1, D-68167 Mannheim, Germany.;Med Univ Graz, Clin Inst Med & Chem Lab Diagnost, Auenbruggerpl 15, A-8036 Graz, Austria.;SYNLAB Holding Deutschland GmbH, Gubener Str 39, D-86156 Augsburg, Germany..
    de Boer, Ian H.
    Univ Washington, Div Nephrol, 325 Ninth Ave, Washington, DC 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Kidney Res Inst, 325 Ninth Ave, Washington, DC 98104 USA..
    Wood, Alexis C.
    ARS, USDA, Childrens Nutr Res Ctr, 1100 Bates Ave, Houston, TX 77071 USA..
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Torrance, CA 90502 USA.;Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Torrance, CA 90502 USA..
    Rich, Stephen S.
    Univ Virginia, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.;Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA..
    Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne
    Vanderbilt Univ, Div Nephrol, Dept Med, Med Ctr, 1161 21st Ave S, Nashville, TN 37232 USA..
    den Heijer, Martin
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Imperial Coll London, Epidemiol & Biostat Sch Publ Hlth, 156 Norfolk Pl,St Marys Campus, London W2 1PG, England.;Univ Oulu, Fac Med, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu 90014, Finland.;Univ Oulu, Bioctr Oulu, POB 5000,Aapistie 5A, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland.;Oulu Univ Hosp, Unit Primary Care, Kajaanintie 50 POB 20,90029 OYS, FI-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Cavadino, Alana
    UCL, Populat Policy & Practice, Inst Child Hlth, Great Ormond St, London WC1E 6BT, England.;Queen Mary Univ London, Ctr Environm & Prevent Med, Wolfson Inst Prevent Med, Barts & London Sch Med & Dent, Charterhouse Sq, London EC1M 6BQ, England..
    Joshi, Peter K.
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Wilson, James F.
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, MRC Inst Genet Mol Med, Western Gen Hosp, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Hayward, Caroline
    Univ Edinburgh, MRC Inst Genet Mol Med, Western Gen Hosp, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Trompet, Stella
    Leiden Univ, Gerontol & Geriatr, Med Ctr, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands.;Leiden Univ, Dept Cardiol, Med Ctr, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands..
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Broer, Linda
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Zgaga, Lina
    Univ Dublin, Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Inst Populat Hlth, D02 PN40, Dublin 24, Ireland..
    Campbell, Harry
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Theodoratou, Evropi
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Farrington, Susan M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Timofeeva, Maria
    Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Dunlop, Malcolm G.
    Univ Edinburgh, Western Gen Hosp, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Valdes, Ana M.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus,Westminster Bridge Rd, London SE1 7EH, England.;Univ Nottingham, Sch Med, City Hosp, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB, England..
    Tikkanen, Emmi
    Univ Helsinki, FIMM Inst Mol Med Finland, POB 20, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Finnish Cardiovasc Res Ctr Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Finnish Cardiovasc Res Ctr Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Kahonen, Mika
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Physiol, Finnish Cardiovasc Res Ctr Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Raitakari, Olli T.
    Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol & Nucl Med, Turku 20521, Finland.;Univ Turku, Res Ctr Appl & Prevent Cardiovasc Med, Turku 20014, Finland..
    Mikkila, Vera
    Acad Finland, Hakaniemenranta 6,POB 131, FI-00531 Helsinki, Finland..
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Postbus 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Sattar, Naveed
    BHF Glasgow Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Fac Med, Univ Ave, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland..
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Dept Cardiol, Med Ctr, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands.;Leiden Univ, Einthoven Lab Expt Vasc Med, Med Ctr, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands..
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Gundersen, Thomas E.
    Vitas AS, Gaustadaleen 21, N-0349 Oslo, Norway..
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Strangeways Res Lab, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England..
    Butterworth, Adam S.
    Univ Cambridge, Strangeways Res Lab, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England..
    Danesh, John
    Univ Cambridge, Strangeways Res Lab, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.;Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge CB10 1SA, England..
    Spector, Timothy
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus,Westminster Bridge Rd, London SE1 7EH, England..
    Wang, Thomas J.
    Vanderbilt Heart & Vasc Inst, Div Cardiovasc Med, 2220 Pierce Ave 383 Preston Res Bldg, Nashville, TN 37232 USA..
    Hypponen, Elina
    UCL, Populat Policy & Practice, Inst Child Hlth, Great Ormond St, London WC1E 6BT, England.;Univ South Australia, Ctr Populat Hlth Res, Sansom Inst Hlth Res, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA USA..
    Kiel, Douglas P.
    Hebrew SeniorLife, Inst Aging Res, 1200 Ctr St, Boston, MA 02131 USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard & Massachusetts Inst Technol, Boston, MA 02142 USA..
    Genome-wide association study in 79,366 European-ancestry individuals informs the genetic architecture of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 260Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that is associated with a range of human traits and diseases. Previous GWAS of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations have identified four genome-wide significant loci (GC, NADSYN1/DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1). In this study, we expand the previous SUNLIGHT Consortium GWAS discovery sample size from 16,125 to 79,366 (all European descent). This larger GWAS yields two additional loci harboring genome-wide significant variants (P = 4.7×10−9 at rs8018720 in SEC23A, and P = 1.9×10−14 at rs10745742 in AMDHD1). The overall estimate of heritability of 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentrations attributable to GWAS common SNPs is 7.5%, with statistically significant loci explaining 38% of this total. Further investigation identifies signal enrichment in immune and hematopoietic tissues, and clustering with autoimmune diseases in cell-type-specific analysis. Larger studies are required to identify additional common SNPs, and to explore the role of rare or structural variants and gene–gene interactions in the heritability of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

  • 275.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Cornefjord, Michael
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Öhrvik, John
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Psychosocial stress factors among patients with lumbar disc herniation, scheduled for disc surgery in comparison with patients scheduled for arthroscopic knee surgery2007Ingår i: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 16, nr 7, s. 961-970Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Returning to work after disc surgery appears to be more heavily influenced by psychological aspects of work than by MR-identified morphological alterations. It is still not known whether psychosocial factors of importance for outcome after disc surgery are present preoperatively or develop in the postoperative phase. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of work-related stress, life satisfaction and demanding life events, among patients undergoing first-time surgery for lumbar disc herniation in comparison with patients scheduled for arthroscopic knee surgery. Sixty-nine patients with disc herniation and 162 patients awaiting arthroscopy were included in the study, during the time period March 2003 to May 2005. Sixty-two percent of the disc patients had been on sick leave for an average of 7.8 months and 14 percent of the knee patients had been on sick leave for an average of 4.2 months. The psychosocial factors were investigated preoperatively using a questionnaire, which was a combination of the questionnaire of quality of work competence (QWC), life satisfaction (LiSat9) and life events as a modification of the social readjustment scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of work-related stress or the occurrence of demanding life events. The disc patients were significantly less satisfied with functions highly inter-related to pain and discomfort, such as present work situation, leisure-time, activities of daily living (ADL) function and sleep. Patients with disc herniation on sick leave were significantly less satisfied with their present work situation than knee patients on sick leave; this sub-group of patients with disc herniation also reported significantly higher expectations in relation to future job satisfaction than knee patients. The results indicate that psychosocial stress is not more pronounced preoperatively in this selected group of disc patients, without co-morbidity waiting for first-time disc surgery, than among knee patients awaiting arthroscopy. It was notable that the disc patients had high expectations in terms of improved job satisfaction after treatment by surgery.

  • 276.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Gunnarsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linton, Steven J.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk kemi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Biokemisk endokrinologi.
    Nilsson, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Cornefjord, Michael
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Pain, disability and coping reflected in the diurnal cortisol variability in patients scheduled for lumbar disc surgery2008Ingår i: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 12, nr 5, s. 633-640Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Symptoms of lumbar disc herniation can be induced by both mechanical compression of the nerve roots and by biochemical irritants from the disc tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines, as well as stress are potent stimulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, reflected in enhanced release of cortisol from the adrenal cortex. Altered cortisol production is also associated to behaviour and coping patterns. The aim of the present study was to explore the relation between pain, physical function, psychosocial factors and quality of life to the diurnal cortisol variability, in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    METHOD:

    This study had a cross-sectional design. Forty-two patients with lumbar disc herniation, verified by magnetic resonance imaging and a clinical examination by an orthopaedic surgeon, were included in the study. All patients were scheduled for disc surgery. The diurnal cortisol variability was examined before surgery. The patients were dichotomised into two groups based on low or high diurnal cortisol variability. Pain, disability, work related stress, quality of life, coping and fear avoidance beliefs, were estimated by standardised questionnaires.

    RESULTS:

    The low diurnal cortisol variability group was distinguished by a higher median score regarding leg pain at activity and significantly more disability (p<0.05). The patients with a low diurnal cortisol variability had significantly lower coping self-statement scores, but higher pain coping catastrophising scores (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSION:

    Patients with lumbar disc herniation and a low diurnal cortisol variability had lower physical function, perceived lower possibilities of influencing their pain, and were more prone to catastrophise than patients with lumbar disc herniation and a high diurnal cortisol variability.

  • 277.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Nilsson, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Cornefjord, Michael
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Clinic-based training in comparison to home-based training after first-time lumbar disc surgery: a randomised controlled trial2009Ingår i: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 398-409Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The effectiveness of physiotherapy after first-time lumbar disc surgery is still largely unknown. Studies in this field are heterogeneous and behavioural treatment principles have only been evaluated in one earlier study. The aim of this randomised study was to compare clinic-based physiotherapy with a behavioural approach to a home-based training programme regarding back disability, activity level, behavioural aspects, pain and global health measures. A total of 59 lumbar disc patients without any previous spine surgery or comorbidity participated in the study. Clinic-based physiotherapy with a behavioural approach was compared to home-based training 3 and 12 months after surgery. Additionally, the home training group was followed up 3 months after surgery by a structured telephone interview evaluating adherence to the exercise programme. Outcome measures were: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), physical activity level, kinesiophobia, coping, pain, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Treatment compliance was high in both groups. There were no differences between the two groups regarding back pain disability measured by ODI 3 and 12 months after surgery. However, back pain reduction and increase in quality of life were significantly higher in the home-based training group. The patients in the clinic-based training group had significantly higher activity levels 12 months after surgery and were significantly more satisfied with physiotherapy care 3 months after surgery compared to the home-based training group. Rehabilitation after first-time lumbar disc surgery can be based on home training as long as the patients receive both careful instructions from a physiotherapist and strategies for active pain coping, and have access to the physiotherapist if questions regarding training arise. This might be a convenient treatment arrangement for most patients.

  • 278.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Nilsson, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    A prospective study of cognitive behavioural factors as predictors of pain, disability and quality of life one year after lumbar disc surgery2010Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, nr 7, s. 521-529Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The primary aim of this study was to analyse the predictive value of cognitive and behavioural factors, in relation to pain, disability and quality of life (QoL) one year after lumbar disc surgery.

    Method

    The study design was prospective. Fifty-nine patients scheduled for first time lumbar disc surgery were included. Pain, disability, QoL, coping, fear avoidance beliefs, expected outcome and sick leave were assessed preoperatively and 12 months after surgery. Multiple backward stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed to study the contribution of the preoperatively measured independent behavioural/cognitive factors (coping, fear avoidance beliefs and assessed chance to return to work within 3 months) to the dependent variables pain, disability and quality of life at 12 months after surgery.

    Results

    Low expectations on work return within 3 months after surgery was significantly predictive for residual leg pain, odds ratio (OR) = 8.2, back pain, OR = 9.7, disability, OR = 13.8 and sick leave, OR = 19.5. Low QoL, was best predicted by preoperatively high scores on fear avoidance beliefs OR = 6.6 and being a woman OR = 6.0. The regression model explained 26-40% of the variance in pain, disability, QoL and sick leave.

    Conclusions

    Eliciting patients' expectations on work return after surgery could contribute to early identification of those who run the risk of developing long-term disability and sick-leave.

  • 279.
    Johansson, Jakob
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Blomberg, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk farmakogenomik och osteoporos.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Karlsten, Rolf
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Anestesiologi och intensivvård. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) training of ambulance caregivers and impact on survival of trauma victims2012Ingår i: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 83, nr 10, s. 1259-1264Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) course has been widely implemented and approximately half a million prehospital caregivers in over 50 countries have taken this course. Still, the effect on injury outcome remains to be established. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between PHTLS training of ambulance crew members and the mortality in trauma patients.

    METHODS:

    A population-based observational study of 2830 injured patients, who either died or were hospitalized for more than 24h, was performed during gradual implementation of PHTLS in Uppsala County in Sweden between 1998 and 2004. Prehospital patient records were linked to hospital-discharge records, cause-of-death records, and information on PHTLS training and the educational level of ambulance crews. The main outcome measure was death, on scene or in hospital.

    RESULTS:

    Adjusting for multiple potential confounders, PHTLS training appeared to be associated with a reduction in mortality, but the precision of this estimate was poor (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-1.19). The mortality risk was 4.7% (36/763) without PHTLS training and 4.5% (94/2067) with PHTLS training. The predicted absolute risk reduction is estimated to correspond to 0.5 lives saved annually per 100,000 population with PHTLS fully implemented.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    PHTLS training of ambulance crew members may be associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients, but the precision in this estimate was low due to the overall low mortality. While there may be a relative risk reduction, the predicted absolute risk reduction in this population was low.

  • 280.
    Johansson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Hailer, Nils P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Rahme, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    High incidence of periprosthetic joint infection with propionibacterium acnes after the use of a stemless shoulder prosthesis with metaphyseal screw fixation: a retrospective cohort study of 241 patients propionibacter infections after eclipse TSA2017Ingår i: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, artikel-id 203Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A stemless shoulder prosthesis with humeral metaphyseal screw fixation was introduced in order to save bone-stock and to facilitate reconstruction of biomechanics (Eclipse (R)). The aim of this study was to analyze whether the risk of infection is different with this implant compared to conventional shoulder prosthesis.

    Methods: Two hundred and forty-one patients (54.8% females) were operated with a shoulder arthroplasty and followed for median 2.0 (0.1-5.7) years. One hundred and two (42.3%) had received an Eclipse (R) prosthesis, the remaining patients were operated with other implants. There was an overrepresentation of males in the Eclipse (R) group (63.7% males) when compared with the control group (31.7% males).

    Results: In the Eclipse (R) group 10 (9.8%) patients developed a periprosthetic joint infection, as opposed to 1 (0.7%) in the control group. The most common bacteria was Propionibacterium acnes. Unadjusted infection-free survival after 4 years was 88.8% (CI 82.5-95.7) for Eclipse (R) patients and 95.7% (CI 87.7-100.0) for controls (p = 0.002). After adjustment for age, gender, diagnosis, and type of shoulder prosthesis (total or hemi), the risk ratio for revision due to infection was 4.3 (CI 0.5-39.1) for patients with the Eclipse (R) prosthesis.

    Conclusions: Deep infections seem to be more common after the use of the metaphyseally fixed Eclipse (R) prosthesis than after conventional shoulder implants, but a predominance of male gender and younger age in the Eclipse group may have biased our findings. Future studies on larger cohorts and in vitro investigations on bacterial adherence and biofilm formation are needed.

  • 281. Johansson Niemelä, Birgitta
    et al.
    Tjernström, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Mended But Not healed: Somatic and Mental Health 10 Years after Leg Lengthening with Ilixarov2014Ingår i: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 3, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the somatic and mental health in patients who had leg lengthening (LL) in a 10-year follow-up and to compare it with the 1 year-follow-up. Earlier studies have demonstrated severe maladaptive reactions in children and adolescents on a short term basis but also that they tolerate it without sustained psychological impact. Cohort sequential longitudinal studies, in which individuals from different age groups are followed over time, are needed to tease apart aging and cohort effects. Methods: This was a prospective study with 28 patients, mean age of 20, who had undergone leg lengthening (LL) between 1997-2005 at the Department of Pediatric Orthopedics, Uppsala University Hospital. The somatic health was studied by a structured medical assessment of the reconstructed leg and an interview focused on the patient’s experiences of surgery, outcome and function. The mental health was studied by Beck depression- and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventories and a specially designed questionnaire for patient with LLI. Results: When the patients rated their mental health, 20 were within a normal level and 7 had symptoms of depression. Patients’ self-esteem was on a median level. Those who had scored highly on the depression inventory also had high levels on both State- and Trait anxiety scale. Conclusion: One fourth of the patients reported themselves to be depressed at the 10-year follow-up, while 7% of the patients were depressed one year after LL. Self-esteem results for the cohort were on a median level, both one and ten years after LL. Interview data demonstrated that the majority of patients were preoccupied with their LLI and more psychological support during the lengthening period would have been desirable. From available data we cannot conclude that the leg lengthening per se caused the depressive symptoms in the patients.

  • 282.
    Johansson Niemelä, Birgitta
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Tjernström, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Sundelin Wahlsten, Viveka
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatri.
    Does Leg Lengthening Pose a Threat to a Child’s Mental Health?: An Interim Report one year after surgery2007Ingår i: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, ISSN 0271-6798, E-ISSN 1539-2570, Vol. 27, nr 6, s. 611-617Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies suggest that children react with functional and psychological disturbances after leg lengthening (LL). Long-term effects are not known, and there is a lack of prospective studies. The aim of this interim prospective study was to investigate the psychological impact of the Ilizarov technique on a sample of children 1 year after surgery. Methods: The subjects were 27 patients aged 6 to 16 years treated using the Ilizarov technique at the Pediatric Orthopaedic Department, Uppsala University Hospital, between 1997 and 2005. A control group of healthy children matched for age and sex were also included. Semistructured interviews and psychometric measures (anxiety, depression, self-esteem, behavior) were administered to patients and parents before surgery and 1 year after. Psychological measures were correlated with medical records (days of hospitalization, gained length, etc). The control group was examined at initial assessment only. Results: Before reconstructive surgery, the LL group had a significantly lower self-esteem compared with the control group. Aggressive behavior, attention and externalization problems, anxiety, and depression were significantly reduced after LL. Parents' state anxiety was also reduced. There were no differences in trait anxiety between the parents of patients and the parents of the control children. Conclusions: Patients reported pain, psychological discomfort, complications, and restrained function during LL. However, there were no adverse psychological effects at 1-year follow-up; rather, there were signs of improved mental health. No single psychological parameter could predict the outcome after LL.

  • 283. Johnsson, M.
    et al.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Genomik.
    Hoglund, A.
    Sahlqvist, Anna-Stina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet.
    Jonsson, Kenneth B
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Kerje, Susanne
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Genomik.
    Ekwall, Olov
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet.
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Genomik.
    Jensen, P.
    Wright, D.
    The role of pleiotropy and linkage in genes affecting a sexual ornament and bone allocation in the chicken2014Ingår i: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 23, nr 9, s. 2275-2286Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual selection and the ornaments that inform such choices have been extensively studied, particularly from a phenotypic perspective. Although more is being revealed about the genetic architecture of sexual ornaments, much still remains to be discovered. The comb of the chicken is one of the most widely recognized sexual ornaments, which has been shown to be correlated with both fecundity and bone allocation. In this study, we use a combination of multiple intercrosses between White Leghorn populations and wild-derived Red Junglefowl to, first, map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for bone allocation and, second, to identify expression QTL that correlate and colocalize with comb mass. These candidate quantitative genes were then assessed for potential pleiotropic effects on bone tissue and fecundity traits. We identify genes that correlate with both relative comb mass and bone traits suggesting a combination of both pleiotropy and linkage mediates gene regulatory variation in these traits.

  • 284. Johnsson, Martin
    et al.
    Gustafson, Ida
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Sahlqvist, Anna-Stina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet.
    Jonsson, Kenneth B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Kerje, Susanne
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet.
    Ekwall, Olov
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet.
    Kämpe, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Autoimmunitet.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Jensen, Per
    Wright, Dominic
    A Sexual Ornament in Chickens Is Affected by Pleiotropic Alleles at HAO1 and BMP2, Selected during Domestication2012Ingår i: PLOS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 8, nr 8, s. e1002914-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestication is one of the strongest forms of short-term, directional selection. Although selection is typically only exerted on one or a few target traits, domestication can lead to numerous changes in many seemingly unrelated phenotypes. It is unknown whether such correlated responses are due to pleiotropy or linkage between separate genetic architectures. Using three separate intercrosses between wild and domestic chickens, a locus affecting comb mass (a sexual ornament in the chicken) and several fitness traits (primarily medullary bone allocation and fecundity) was identified. This locus contains two tightly-linked genes, BMP2 and HAO1, which together produce the range of pleiotropic effects seen. This study demonstrates the importance of pleiotropy (or extremely close linkage) in domestication. The nature of this pleiotropy also provides insights into how this sexual ornament could be maintained in wild populations.

  • 285. Johnsson, Martin
    et al.
    Jonsson, Kenneth B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Jensen, Per
    Wright, Dominic
    Genetic Regulation of Bone Metabolism in the Chicken: Similarities and Differences to Mammalian Systems2015Ingår i: PLOS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 11, nr 5, artikel-id e1005250Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Birds have a unique bone physiology, due to the demands placed on them through egg production. In particular their medullary bone serves as a source of calcium for eggshell production during lay and undergoes continuous and rapid remodelling. We take advantage of the fact that bone traits have diverged massively during chicken domestication to map the genetic basis of bone metabolism in the chicken. We performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) and expression QTL (eQTL) mapping study in an advanced intercross based on Red Junglefowl (the wild progenitor of the modern domestic chicken) and White Leghorn chickens. We measured femoral bone traits in 456 chickens by peripheral computerised tomography and femoral gene expression in a subset of 125 females from the cross with microarrays. This resulted in 25 loci for female bone traits, 26 loci for male bone traits and 6318 local eQTL loci. We then overlapped bone and gene expression loci, before checking for an association between gene expression and trait values to identify candidate quantitative trait genes for bone traits. A handful of our candidates have been previously associated with bone traits in mice, but our results also implicate unexpected and largely unknown genes in bone metabolism. In summary, by utilising the unique bone metabolism of an avian species, we have identified a number of candidate genes affecting bone allocation and metabolism. These findings can have ramifications not only for the understanding of bone metabolism genetics in general, but could also be used as a potential model for osteoporosis as well as revealing new aspects of vertebrate bone regulation or features that distinguish avian and mammalian bone.

  • 286.
    Johnsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Biol, AVIAN Behav Genom & Physiol Grp, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Kenneth B.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi.
    Jensen, Per
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Biol, AVIAN Behav Genom & Physiol Grp, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Wright, Dominic
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Biol, AVIAN Behav Genom & Physiol Grp, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken2016Ingår i: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, ISSN 2160-1836, E-ISSN 2160-1836, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 311-319Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species.

  • 287. Järvinen, T L N
    et al.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Aspenberg, P
    Sievänen, H
    Osteoporosis: the emperor has no clothes2015Ingår i: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 277, nr 6, s. 662-73Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    UNLABELLED: Current prevention strategies for low-trauma fractures amongst older persons depend on the notions that fractures are mainly caused by osteoporosis (pathophysiology), that patients at high risk can be identified (screening) and that the risk is amenable to bone-targeted pharmacotherapy (treatment). However, all these three notions can be disputed.

    PATHOPHYSIOLOGY: Most fracture patients have fallen, but actually do not have osteoporosis. A high likelihood of falling, in turn, is attributable to an ageing-related decline in physical functioning and general frailty.

    SCREENING: Currently available fracture risk prediction strategies including bone densitometry and multifactorial prediction tools are unable to identify a large proportion of patients who will sustain a fracture, whereas many of those with a high fracture risk score will not sustain a fracture.

    TREATMENT: The evidence for the viability of bone-targeted pharmacotherapy in preventing hip fracture and other clinical fragility fractures is mainly limited to women aged 65-80 years with osteoporosis, whereas the proof of hip fracture-preventing efficacy in women over 80 years of age and in men at all ages is meagre or absent. Further, the antihip fracture efficacy shown in clinical trials is absent in real-life studies. Many drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis have also been associated with increased risks of serious adverse events. There are also considerable uncertainties related to the efficacy of drug therapy in preventing clinical vertebral fractures, whereas the efficacy for preventing other fractures (relative risk reductions of 20-25%) remains moderate, particularly in terms of the low absolute risk reduction in fractures with this treatment.

  • 288. Järvinen, Teppo L N
    et al.
    Jokihaara, Jarkko
    Guy, Pierre
    Alonso-Coello, Pablo
    Collins, Gary S
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Sievänen, Harri
    Conflicts at the heart of the FRAX tool2014Ingår i: CMJA. Canadian Medical Association Journal. Onlineutg. Med tittel: ECMAJ. ISSN 1488-2329, ISSN 0820-3946, E-ISSN 1488-2329, Vol. 186, nr 3, s. 165-167Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 289. Järvinen, Teppo LN
    et al.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Jokihaara, Jarkko
    Collins, Gary S
    Perry, Thomas L
    Mintzes, Barbara
    Musini, Vijaya
    Erviti, Juan
    Gorricho, Javier
    Wright, James M
    Sievänen, Harri
    Overdiagnosis of bone fragility in the quest to prevent hip fracture2015Ingår i: The BMJ, ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 350, artikel-id h2088Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical context

    Hip fractures cause considerable morbidity and mortality and are associated with high healthcare costs. With a growing elderly population their incidence is predicted to rise

    Diagnostic change

    Before the late 1980s, osteoporosis was diagnosed after a bone fracture. A new definition was introduced in 1994 based on low bone mineral density, expanding indications for pharmacotherapy. The introduction of fracture risk calculators exacerbated the trend

    Rationale for change

    Fractures are a function of bone fragility, which is measureable and can be improved with drugs

    Leap of faith

    Identifying and treating patients with fragile bones is a cost effective strategy to prevent fractures, particularly hip fractures

    Impact on prevalence

    Current fracture risk predictors have at least doubled the number of candidates for drug treatment. Under US guidelines about 75% of white women aged over 65 years have become candidates for drug treatment

    Evidence of overdiagnosis

    Rates of hip fracture continue to decline, and most occur in people without osteoporosis. Our meta-analysis indicates that 175 postmenopausal women with bone fragility must be treated for about three years to prevent one hip fracture

    Harms from overdiagnosis

    Being labelled as at risk of fracture imposes a psychological burden. Drug treatment is associated with adverse events, such as gastrointestinal problems, atypical femoral fractures, and osteonecrosis of the jaw

    Limitations of evidence

    Hip fractures are caused predominantly by falls in frail older adults. Few studies on preventive pharmacotherapy included adults aged ≥80, but evidence suggests no treatment benefit. Evidence is also sparse on treatment of men and optimum duration of treatment

  • 290. Järvinen, Teppo
    et al.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Jokihaara, Jarkko
    Collins, Gary S.
    Perry, Thomas L.
    Mintzes, Barbara
    Musini, Vijaya
    Erviti, Juan
    Gorricho, Javier
    Wright, James M.
    Sievänen, Harri
    Authors’ reply to Lee and colleagues2015Ingår i: The BMJ, ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 351, artikel-id h3737Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 291. Kakar, Sanjeev
    et al.
    Tornetta, Paul
    Schemitsch, Emil H
    Swiontkowski, Marc F
    Koval, Kenneth
    Hanson, Beate P
    Jönsson, Anders
    Bhandari, Mohit
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Technical considerations in the operative management of femoral neck fractures in elderly patients: a multinational survey.2007Ingår i: The Journal of trauma, injury, infection, and critical care, ISSN 1079-6061, Vol. 63, nr 3, s. 641-646Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify current opinions among orthopedic traumatologists relating to technical aspects of internal fixation and arthroplasty for patients with femoral neck fractures. METHODS: We developed and administered a survey to orthopedic surgeons who were members of the Orthopedic Trauma Association and European clinics affiliated with AO International (Davos, Switzerland). Surgeons reported preferences in specific aspects of the surgical technique for internal fixation as well as arthroplasty. Each surgeon received either a mailed package (7-page survey, a personalized cover letter, and a stamped return envelope) or an email with a link to the same survey on the Internet with an identification code. At 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 18 weeks after the initial mailing, we remailed the questionnaire to all nonresponders. RESULTS: Of the 442 surgeons who were sent the questionnaire, 298 (68%) responded. The typical respondent was a North American aged more than 40 years, in academic practice, supervised residents, had fellowship training in trauma, and worked in a low-volume center. Among surgeons who treated displaced femoral neck fractures with arthroplasty, significant disparities existed in terms of the type of anesthesia (51% preferring general anesthesia), surgical approach (47% used posterior approach), and placement of unipolar implants (50%). Surgeons tended to agree on the use of cement fixation (69%), repairing the capsule (80%), and not using a drain postoperatively (68%). Surgeons who preferentially treated hip fractures with internal fixation tended to have a lack of consensus in terms of what constituted acceptable surgical delays (43% allowing greater than 48 hours) and which screw configuration to use, with more than half using a triangle with base inferior construct. Surgeons tended to agree on the use of closed fracture reduction techniques (69%), three cannulated screws (73%), and did not routinely perform a capsulotomy (80%) or aspirate the fracture hematoma (90%). Within both treatment groups (internal fixation and arthroplasty), surgeons tended to agree on the use of perioperative antibiotics (>92%), thromboprophylaxis (98%), and postoperative weight bearing status (>87%). CONCLUSIONS: A general lack of consensus exists among orthopedic trauma surgeons in the management of displaced femoral neck fractures. With an ever-growing emphasis upon the practice of evidence-based medicine, we have demonstrated several disparities in the technical aspects of fixation and perioperative care likely caused by a general lack of available evidence. We recommend the need for future research and large collaborative efforts.

  • 292.
    Kaluza, J
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper.
    Håkansson, N
    Harris, H R
    Orsini, N
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Influence of anti-inflammatory diet and smoking on mortality and survival in men and women: two prospective cohort studies.2019Ingår i: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 285, nr 1, s. 75-91Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The associations between an anti-inflammatory diet and both all-cause and cause-specific mortality have been studied previously; however, the influence of an anti-inflammatory diet on survival time has not been investigated. Moreover, the potential modification of these associations by smoking status remains unclear.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine the associations between an anti-inflammatory diet index (AIDI) and all-cause and cause-specific mortality, to determine the association between the AIDI and differences in survival time and to assess effect modification by smoking status.

    METHODS: The study population included 68 273 Swedish men and women (aged 45-83 years) at baseline. The anti-inflammatory potential of the diet was estimated using the validated AIDI, which includes 11 potential anti-inflammatory and five potential pro-inflammatory foods. Cox proportional hazards and Laplace regression were used to estimate hazard ratios and differences in survival time.

    RESULTS: During 16 years of follow-up (1 057 959 person-years), 16 088 deaths [5980 due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 5252 due to cancer] were recorded. Participants in the highest versus lowest quartile of the AIDI had lower risks of all-cause (18% reduction, 95% CI: 14-22%), CVD (20%, 95% CI: 14-26%) and cancer (13%, 95% CI: 5-20%) mortality. The strongest inverse associations between the highest and lowest quartiles of AIDI and risk of mortality were observed in current smokers: 31%, 36% and 22% lower risks of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality, respectively. The difference in survival time between current smokers in the lowest AIDI quartile and never smokers in the highest quartile was 4.6 years.

    CONCLUSION: Adherence to a diet with high anti-inflammatory potential may reduce all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality and prolong survival time especially amongst smokers.

  • 293. Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Harris, Holly
    Linden, Anders
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term unprocessed and processed red meat consumption and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective cohort study of women2019Ingår i: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 58, nr 2, s. 665-672Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Limited studies have examined red meat consumption in relation to risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and none have examined the impact of long-term diet on COPD risk. We sought to investigate the association between long-term red meat consumption and risk of COPD.

    METHODS: The population-based prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort included 34,053 women, aged 48-83 years, followed for the current analyses from 2002 to 2014. Unprocessed and processed red meat consumption was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire in 1987 and 1997. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

    RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years (2002-2014; 393,831 person-years), 1488 COPD cases were ascertained via linkage to the Swedish health registers. A positive association between long-term processed red meat (average from 1987 to 1997) and risk of COPD was observed. In contrast, no association was observed with unprocessed red meat with corresponding HRs of 1.36 (95% CI 1.03-1.79) for processed and 0.87 (95% CI 0.74-1.02) for unprocessed red meat among women who consumed ≥ 50 g/day compared to < 25 g/day. The observed association with processed meat was confined to ex-smokers (P for interaction = 0.30); women consuming of ≥ 50 g/day of processed meat had a 2.3-fold (95% CI 1.24-4.12) higher risk of COPD than those consuming < 25 g/day. No similar associations were observed among current or never smokers.

    CONCLUSION: In this prospective cohort of women with moderate red meat consumption, long-term processed red meat consumption was associated with an increased risk of COPD particularly among ex-smokers.

  • 294.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.; Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Nutr Res Lab, 159C Nowoursynowska St, PL-02776 Warsaw, Poland..
    Harris, Holly
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Program Epidemiol, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk farmakogenomik och osteoporos.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Questionnaire-Based Anti-Inflammatory Diet Index as a Predictor of Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation.2018Ingår i: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 78-84Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is accumulating evidence that diet may be associated with markers of inflammation. We have evaluated if an empirically developed questionnaire-based Anti-Inflammatory Diet Index (AIDI) may predict low-grade systemic chronic inflammation in a Nordic population. The AIDI was developed using a 123-item food frequency questionnaire among 3503 women (56-74 years old) with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) plasma concentration <20 mg/L. Using Spearman correlations, we identified 20 foods (AIDI-20) statistically significantly related to hsCRP. The median (range) of AIDI-20 was 8 (0-17) scores, and the median concentration of hsCRP in the lowest versus the highest quintile of AIDI-20 (≤6 vs. ≥11 scores) varied by 80% (1.8 vs. 1.0 mg/L, respectively). In a multivariable-adjusted linear regression model, women in the highest quintile of AIDI-20 compared with those in the lowest had a 26% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18-33%; p-trend <0.001) lower hsCRP concentration; each 1-score increment in the AIDI-20 was associated with a 0.06 (95% CI 0.04-0.08) mg/L lower hsCRP. The observed association between the AIDI-20 and hsCRP was robust by all hsCRP levels and in subgroups defined by inflammatory-related factors. Our results lead to the hypothesis that the empirically developed questionnaire-based dietary anti-inflammatory index may predict low-grade systemic inflammation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 78-84.

  • 295.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Nutr Res Lab, Warsaw, Poland.
    Harris, Holly R
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Linden, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Lung & Airway Res, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Lung Allergy Clin, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term consumption of fruits and vegetables and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective cohort study of women2018Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, nr 6, s. 1897-1909Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fruits and vegetables, due to high antioxidant capacity, may protect the lung from oxidative damage caused by tobacco smoke and potentially prevent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Only one study based on baseline diet has examined fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to risk of COPD, and no previous studies have examined long-term diet.

    Methods: We investigated whether long-term fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with COPD incidence among 34 739 women (age 48-83 years) in the population-based prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed twice (1987, 1997) with a self-administered questionnaire. Cases of COPD were identified by linkage to the Swedish health register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

    Results: During follow-up from 2002 to 2014, 1512 women were diagnosed with COPD. Long-term fruit was associated with lower risk of COPD; women in the highest vs lowest quintile of consumption (≥2.5 vs <0.8 servings/day) had a 37% lower risk of COPD (95% CI: 25-48%; P-trend < 0.0001). No association was observed with long-term vegetable intake. Current and ex-smokers with low long-term consumption of fruits (<1 serving/day) in comparison to never smokers with high consumption (≥3 servings/day) had a 38-fold (HR: 38.1; 95% CI: 20.2-71.7) and 13-fold (HR: 12.5, 95% CI: 6.5-24.1) higher risk of COPD, respectively. However, no significant interaction between smoking status and fruit intake in relation to COPD incidence was observed (P-interaction = 0.95).

    Conclusions: In this prospective cohort of middle-age and older women, long-term consumption of fruits but not vegetables was inversely associated with COPD incidence.

  • 296. Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Harris, Holly
    Wallin, Alice
    Linden, Anders
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dietary Fiber Intake and Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study of Men.2018Ingår i: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 254-260Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The limited literature suggests that dietary fiber intake from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables is negatively associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) via fiber's anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the association between total fiber and fiber sources and risk of COPD in the population-based prospective Cohort of Swedish Men (45,058 men, aged 45-79 years) with no history of COPD at baseline.

    METHODS: Dietary fiber intake was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire in 1997 and was energy-adjusted using the residual method. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) adjusted for potential confounders.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 13.1 years (1998-2012), 1,982 incident cases of COPD were ascertained via linkage to the Swedish health registers. A strong inverse association between total fiber intake (≥36.8 vs. <23.7 g/day) and COPD was observed in current smokers (hazard ratio [HR]=0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.43-0.67) and ex-smokers (HR=0.62, 95%CI=0.50-0.78) but not in never smokers (HR=0.93; 95%CI=0.60-1.45;P-interaction=0.04). For cereal fiber, HRs for highest vs. lowest quintile were 0.62 (95%CI=0.51-0.77,P-trend<0.001) in current smokers and 0.66 (95%CI=0.52-0.82,P-trend<0.001) in ex-smokers; for fruit fiber the HR was 0.65 (95%CI=0.52-0.81,P-trend<0.001) in current smokers and 0.77 (95%CI=0.61-0.98,P-trend=0.17) in ex-smokers; for vegetable fiber it was 0.71 (95%CI=0.57-0.88,P-trend=0.003) in current smokers and 0.92 (95%CI=0.71-1.19,P-trend=0.48) in ex-smokers.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that high fiber intake was inversely associated with COPD incidence in men who are current or ex-smokers.

  • 297. Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Larsson, Susanna C
    Orsini, Nicola
    Linden, Anders
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of COPD: a prospective cohort study of men.2017Ingår i: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 72, nr 6, s. 500-509Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Antioxidants present in fruits and vegetables may protect the lung from oxidative damage and prevent COPD.

    AIMS: To determine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of COPD by smoking status in men.

    METHODS: The population-based prospective Cohort of Swedish Men included 44 335 men, aged 45-79 years, with no history of COPD at baseline. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 13.2 years, 1918 incident cases of COPD were ascertained. A strong inverse association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and COPD was observed in smokers but not in never-smokers (p-interaction=0.02). The age-standardised incidence rate per 100 000 person-years in the lowest quintile (<2 servings/day) of total fruit and vegetable consumption was 1166 in current smokers and 506 in ex-smokers; among those in the highest quintile (≥5.3 servings/day), 546 and 255 per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The multivariable HR of COPD comparing extreme quintiles of total fruit and vegetable consumption was 0.60 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.76, p-trend <0.0001) in current smokers and 0.66 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.85, p-trend=0.001) in ex-smokers. Each one serving per day increment in total fruit and vegetable consumption decreased risk of COPD significantly by 8% (95% CI 4% to 11%) in current smokers and by 4% (95% CI 0% to 7%) in ex-smokers.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that high consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced COPD incidence in both current and ex-smokers but not in never-smokers.

  • 298.
    Kammerlander, Christian
    et al.
    Munich Univ Hosp LMU, Dept Trauma Surg, Nussbaumstr 20, D-80336 Munich, Germany.;Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Trauma Surg & Sportsmed, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Neuerburg, Carl
    Munich Univ Hosp LMU, Dept Trauma Surg, Nussbaumstr 20, D-80336 Munich, Germany..
    Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Orthopaed, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Schmoelz, Werner
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Trauma Surg & Sportsmed, Anichstr 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria..
    Miclau, Theodore
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Orthopaed Trauma Inst, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    The use of augmentation techniques in osteoporotic fracture fixation2016Ingår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 47, s. S36-S43Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There are an increasing number of fragility fractures, which present a surgical challenge given the reduced bone quality of underlying osteoporosis. Particularly in aged patients, there is a need for early weight bearing and mobilization to avoid further complications such as loss of function or autonomy. As an attempt to improve fracture stability and ultimate healing, the use of biomaterials for augmentation of osseous voids and fracture fixation is a promising treatment option. Augmentation techniques can be applied in various locations, and fractures of the metaphyseal regions such as proximal humerus, femur, tibia and the distal radius remain the most common areas for its use. The current review, based on the available mechanical and biological data, provides an overview of the relevant treatment options and different composites used for augmentation of osteoporotic fractures.

  • 299. Kanerva, Mervi
    et al.
    Jonsson, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Öron-, näs- och halssjukdomar.
    Berg, Thomas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Axelsson, Sara
    Stjernquist-Desatnik, Anna
    Engström, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Öron-, näs- och halssjukdomar.
    Pitkäranta, Anne
    Sunnybrook and house-brackmann systems in 5397 facial gradings2011Ingår i: Otolaryngology and head and neck surgery, ISSN 0194-5998, E-ISSN 1097-6817, Vol. 144, nr 4, s. 570-574Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study the correlation between Sunnybrook and House-Brackmann facial grading systems at different time points during the course of peripheral facial palsy.

    Study Design: Prospective multicenter trial.

    Setting: Seventeen otorhinolaryngological centers.

    Subjects and Methods: Data are part of the Scandinavian Bell's palsy study. The facial function of 1920 patients with peripheral facial palsy was assessed 5397 times with both Sunnybrook and House-Brackmann (H-B) facial grading systems. Grading was done at initial visit, at days 11 to 17 of palsy onset, and at 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. Statistical evaluation was by Spearman correlation coefficient and box plot analysis.

    Results: Spearman correlation coefficient varied from -0.81 to -0.96, with the weakest correlation found at initial visit. Box plot analysis for all assessments revealed that Sunnybrook scores were widely spread over different H-B grades. With 50% of the results closest to the median, Sunnybrook composite scores varied in H-B grades as follows: H-B I, 100; H-B II, 71 to 90; H-B III, 43 to 62; H-B IV, 26 to 43; H-B V, 13 to 25; and H-B VI, 5 to 14.

    Conclusion: Gradings correlated better in follow-up assessments than at initial visit. As shown by the wide overlap of the grading results, subjective grading systems are only approximate. However, a conversion table for Sunnybrook and H-B gradings was obtained and is included in the article. It can be used for further development of facial grading systems.

  • 300. Karampampa, Korinna
    et al.
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Andersson, Tomas
    Drefahl, Sven
    Modig, Karin
    Declining incidence trends for hip fractures have not been accompanied by improvements in lifetime risk or post-fracture survival: A nationwide study of the Swedish population 60 years and older2015Ingår i: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 78, s. 55-61Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hip fracture is a common cause of disability and mortality among the elderly. Declining incidence trends have been observed in Sweden. Still, this condition remains a significant public health problem since Sweden has one of the highest incidences worldwide. Yet, no Swedish lifetime risk or survival trends have been presented. By examining how hip fracture incidence, post-fracture survival, as well as lifetime risk have developed between 1995 and 2010 in Sweden, this study aims to establish how the burden hip fractures pose on the elderly changed over time, in order to inform initiatives for improvements of their health. Material and Methods: The entire Swedish population 60 years-old and above was followed between 1987 and 2010 in the National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. Annual age-specific hip fracture cumulative incidence was estimated using hospital admissions for hip fractures. Three-month and one-year survival after the first hip fracture were also estimated. Period life table was used to assess lifetime risk of hip fractures occuring from age 60 and above, and the expected mean age of the first hip fracture. Results: The age-specific hip fracture incidence decreased between 1995 and 2010 in all ages up to 94 years, on average by 1% per year. The lifetime risk remained almost stable, between 9% and 11% for men, and between 18% and 20% for women. The expected mean age of a first hip fracture increased by 2.5 years for men and by 2.2 years for women. No improvements over time were observed for the 3-month survival for men, while for women a 1% decrease per year was observed. The 1-year survival slightly increased over time for men (0.4% per year) while no improvement was observed for women. Conclusions: The age-specific hip fracture incidence has decreased overtime. Yet the lifetime risk of a hip fracture has not decreased because life expectancy in the population has increased in parallel. Overall, survival after hip fracture has not improved.

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