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  • 301. Adami, Johanna
    et al.
    Gäbel, H.
    Lindelöf, B.
    Ekström, K.
    Rydh, B.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ekbom, A.
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Granath, F.
    Cancer risk following organ transplantation: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden2003In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 89, no 7, p. 1221-1227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial excess risk of lymphomas and nonmelanoma skin cancer has been demonstrated following organ transplantation. Large sample size and long follow-up time may, however, allow more accurate risk estimates and detailed understanding of long-term cancer risk. The objective of the study was to assess the risk of cancer following organ transplantation. A nationwide cohort study comprising 5931 patients who underwent transplantation of kidney, liver or other organs during 1970-1997 in Sweden was conducted. Complete follow-up was accomplished through linkage to nationwide databases. We used comparisons with the entire Swedish population to calculate standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), and Poisson regression for multivariate internal analyses of relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, we observed 692 incident first cancers vs 171 expected (SIR 4.0; 95% CI 3.7-4.4). We confirmed marked excesses of nonmelanoma skin cancer (SIR 56.2; 95% CI 49.8-63.2), lip cancer (SIR 53.3; 95% CI 38.0-72.5) and of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (SIR 6.0; 95% CI 4.4-8.0). Compared with patients who underwent kidney transplantation, those who received other organs were at substantially higher risk of NHL (RR 8.4; 95% CI 4.3-16). Besides, we found, significantly, about 20-fold excess risk of cancer of the vulva and vagina, 10-fold of anal cancer, and five-fold of oral cavity and kidney cancer, as well as two- to four-fold excesses of cancer in the oesophagus, stomach, large bowel, urinary bladder, lung and thyroid gland. In conclusion, organ transplantation entails a persistent, about four-fold increased overall cancer risk. The complex pattern of excess risk at many sites challenges current understanding of oncogenic infections that might become activated by immunologic alterations.

  • 302. Adami, Johanna
    et al.
    Nyrén, Olof
    Bergström, Reinhold
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Engholm, Göran
    Englund, Anders
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Smoking and the risk of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma (Sweden)1998In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While several epidemiologic studies have indicated a link between smoking and the risk of developing hematolymphoproliferative cancers (chiefly leukemias, lymphomas, and multiple myelomas), in particular myeloid leukemia, the role of tobacco in the etiology of these neoplasms remains unclear. To evaluate the potential impact of tobacco use on development of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, we conducted a cohort study of 334,957 Swedish construction workers using prospectively collected exposure-information with complete long-term follow-up. A total of 1,322 incident neoplasms occurred during the study period, 1971-91. We found no significant association between smoking status, number of cigarettes smoked, or duration of smoking and the risk of developing leukemias, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma. There was a suggestion of a positive association between smoking and the risk of developing Hodgkin's disease, although the rate ratios were not significantly elevated, except for young current smokers. No positive dose-risk trends emerged. Our study provides no evidence that smoking bears any major relationship to the occurrence of leukemias, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

  • 303. Adami, Johanna
    et al.
    Nyrén, Olof
    Bergström, Reinhold
    Ekbom, Anders
    McLaughlin, Joseph
    Hogman, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Fraumeni, Joseph F.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Blood transfusion and non-Hodgkins lymphoma: Lack of association1997In: Annals of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0003-4819, E-ISSN 1539-3704, Vol. 127, no 5, p. 365-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the seventh most commonly diagnosed malignant condition worldwide, and its incidence has increased markedly in recent decades. Blood transfusions have been implicated as a possible risk factor for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether blood transfusions are associated with an elevated risk for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. DESIGN: Population-based, nested case-control study. SETTING: Nationwide cohort in Sweden. PATIENTS: 361 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 705 matched controls, nested within a population-based cohort of 96795 patients at risk for blood transfusion between 1970 and 1983. Prospectively collected information on exposure was retrieved from computerized transfusion registries. MEASUREMENTS: Odds ratios obtained from conditional logistic regression models were used as measures of relative risks. RESULTS: No association was found between blood transfusions and the risk for non-Hodgkin lymphoma when patients who had received transfusions were compared with patients who had not received transfusions (odds ratio, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.71 to 1.23]). A reduction in risk was seen among persons who received transfusion of blood without leukocyte depletion (odds ratio, 0.72 [CI, 0.53 to 0.97]). Risk was not related to number of transfusions, and no interaction was seen with latency after transfusion. CONCLUSION: The findings in this study do not support previous observations of an association between blood transfusions and the risk for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  • 304.
    Adamiak, Grazyna Teresa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Påverkan av organisatoriska och miljömässiga faktorer på tillgänglighet till akutsjukvården2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The settings investigated were departments of internal medicine (IM), orthopaedics and surgery in acute care hospitals in Sweden. The objective was to identify exogenous and endogenous determinants of accessibility of health care. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis of utilisation was performed on national and regional level of data aggregation. The study proposes that accessibility to acute health services is influenced by exogenous factors, partly outside the control of health care professionals, such as season, physical proximity and overall supply. Organisational properties such as availability of inpatient beds, hospital and physician specialisation and the degree of system integration between provides of emergency care have effects on the quality of care. The novel finding is the strong association between acute readmissions and remaining inpatient utilisation indicating effects of bed supply on global use within IM. These conclusions follow:

    § structural changes on system level work as a method of prioritisation between patient groups by changes in criteria of accessibility;

    § the natural and organisational environments determine waiting times in EDs in hospitals by fluctuations of demand;

    § geographical accessibility coincides with the supply in terms of over- or underutilisation mirrored in the outcome of medical care;

    § effective access is determined by the divide of resources between inpatient and outpatient care and the total supply of inpatient care;

    § increasing demands on inpatient care in IM may be derived from deficiencies in the care of chronically ill, elderly patients;

    § transition of information and communication among care givers and patients varies in efficiency depending on vehicles for coordination and system integration;

    § the level of training of the admitting physician has effects on effective accessibility to inpatient care.

    There are conflicts between accessibility, efficiency and appropriateness of settings calling for attention to capacity to benefit in addition to needs as priority criteria.

    List of papers
    1. Integrated care for the elderly.: The background and effects of the reform of Swedish care of the elderly.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated care for the elderly.: The background and effects of the reform of Swedish care of the elderly.
    2000 In: International Journal of Integrated Care, ISSN 1568-4156, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91354 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-13 Created: 2004-02-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Lack of inegration and seasonal variation in demand explained performance problems and waiting times for patients at emergency departments: A 3 years evaluation of the shift of responsibility between primary and secondary care by closure of two acute hospitals
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of inegration and seasonal variation in demand explained performance problems and waiting times for patients at emergency departments: A 3 years evaluation of the shift of responsibility between primary and secondary care by closure of two acute hospitals
    2001 In: Health Policy, Vol. 55, p. 187-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91355 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-13 Created: 2004-02-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Impact of proximity and hospital specialisation on appropriateness of emergency readmissions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of proximity and hospital specialisation on appropriateness of emergency readmissions
    (English)In: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical PracticeArticle in journal (Refereed) Accepted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91356 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-02-13 Created: 2004-02-13 Last updated: 2010-05-24Bibliographically approved
    4. Situation in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Situation in Sweden
    2003 In: Integrated Care in Europe.: Description and comparison of integrated care in six EU countries., 2003, p. 41-68Chapter in book (Other academic) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91357 (URN)90 352 2605-4 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2004-02-13 Created: 2004-02-13Bibliographically approved
    5. The impact of physician training level on emergency readmissions within internal medicine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of physician training level on emergency readmissions within internal medicine
    2004 (English)In: International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, ISSN 0266-4623, E-ISSN 1471-6348, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 516-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The research question was whether training level of admitting physicians and referrals from practitioners in primary health care (PHC) are risk factors for emergency readmission within 30 days to internal medicine.

    Methods: This report is a prospective multicenter study carried out during 1 month in 1997 in seven departments of internal medicine in the County of Stockholm, Sweden. Two of the units were at university hospitals, three at county hospitals and two in district hospitals. The study area is metropolitan–suburban with 1,762,924 residents. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression.

    Results: A total of 5,131 admissions, thereby 408 unplanned readmissions (8 percent) were registered (69.8 percent of 7,348 true inpatient episodes). The risk of emergency readmission increased with patient's age and independently 1.40 times (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.13–1.74) when residents decided on hospitalization. Congestive heart failure as primary or comorbid condition was the main reason for unplanned readmission. Referrals from PHC were associated with risk decrease (odds ratio, 0.53; 95 percent CI, 0.38–0.73).

    Conclusion: The causes of unplanned hospital readmissions are mixed. Patient contact with primary health care appears to reduce the recurrence. In addition to the diagnoses of cardiac failure, training level of admitting physicians in emergency departments was an independent risk factor for early readmission. Our conclusion is that it is cost-effective to have all decisions on admission to hospital care confirmed by senior doctors. Inappropriate selection of patients to inpatient care contributes to poor patient outcomes and reduces cost-effectiveness and quality of care.

    Keywords
    Emergency readmission; Clinical experience; Training level; Internal medicine; Referrals.
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91358 (URN)10.1017/S0266462304001448 (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-02-13 Created: 2004-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 305.
    Adamiak, Grazyna Teresa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Karlberg, Ingvar
    Situation in Sweden2003In: Integrated Care in Europe.: Description and comparison of integrated care in six EU countries., 2003, p. 41-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 306.
    Adamiak, Grazyna Teresa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Karlberg, Ingvar
    The impact of physician training level on emergency readmissions within internal medicine2004In: International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, ISSN 0266-4623, E-ISSN 1471-6348, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 516-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The research question was whether training level of admitting physicians and referrals from practitioners in primary health care (PHC) are risk factors for emergency readmission within 30 days to internal medicine.

    Methods: This report is a prospective multicenter study carried out during 1 month in 1997 in seven departments of internal medicine in the County of Stockholm, Sweden. Two of the units were at university hospitals, three at county hospitals and two in district hospitals. The study area is metropolitan–suburban with 1,762,924 residents. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression.

    Results: A total of 5,131 admissions, thereby 408 unplanned readmissions (8 percent) were registered (69.8 percent of 7,348 true inpatient episodes). The risk of emergency readmission increased with patient's age and independently 1.40 times (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.13–1.74) when residents decided on hospitalization. Congestive heart failure as primary or comorbid condition was the main reason for unplanned readmission. Referrals from PHC were associated with risk decrease (odds ratio, 0.53; 95 percent CI, 0.38–0.73).

    Conclusion: The causes of unplanned hospital readmissions are mixed. Patient contact with primary health care appears to reduce the recurrence. In addition to the diagnoses of cardiac failure, training level of admitting physicians in emergency departments was an independent risk factor for early readmission. Our conclusion is that it is cost-effective to have all decisions on admission to hospital care confirmed by senior doctors. Inappropriate selection of patients to inpatient care contributes to poor patient outcomes and reduces cost-effectiveness and quality of care.

  • 307.
    Adamiak, Grazyna Teresa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Karlberg, Ingvar
    Rosenqvist, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Impact of proximity and hospital specialisation on appropriateness of emergency readmissionsIn: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical PracticeArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 308.
    Adamo, Hanibal
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Hammarsten, Peter
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Scherdin, Tove Dahl
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Egevad, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Bergström, Sofia Halin
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, 6M, Umea, Sweden.
    Prostate cancer induces C/EBP expression in surrounding epithelial cells which relates to tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome2019In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 435-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Implantation of rat prostate cancer cells into the normal rat prostate results in tumor-stimulating adaptations in the tumor-bearing organ. Similar changes are seen in prostate cancer patients and they are related to outcome. One gene previously found to be upregulated in the non-malignant part of tumor-bearing prostate lobe in rats was the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein- (C/EBP).

    Methods: To explore this further, we examined C/EBP expression by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot in normal rat prostate tissue surrounding slow-growing non-metastatic Dunning G, rapidly growing poorly metastatic (AT-1), and rapidly growing highly metastatic (MatLyLu) rat prostate tumors?and also by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA) from prostate cancer patients managed by watchful waiting.

    Results: In rats, C/EBP mRNA expression was upregulated in the surrounding tumor-bearing prostate lobe. In tumors and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue, C/EBP was detected by immunohistochemistry in some epithelial cells and in infiltrating macrophages. The magnitude of glandular epithelial C/EBP expression in the tumor-bearing prostates was associated with tumor size, distance to the tumor, and metastatic capacity. In prostate cancer patients, high expression of C/EBP in glandular epithelial cells in the surrounding tumor-bearing tissue was associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages (iNOS+) and favorable outcome. High expression of C/EBP in tumor epithelial cells was associated with high Gleason score, high tumor cell proliferation, metastases, and poor outcome.

    Conclusions: This study suggest that the expression of C/EBP-beta, a transcription factor mediating multiple biological effects, is differentially expressed both in the benign parts of the tumor-bearing prostate and in prostate tumors, and that alterations in this may be related to patient outcome.

  • 309. Adams, Charleen
    et al.
    Richmond, Rebecca C
    Santos Ferreira, Diana L
    Spiller, Wes
    Tan, Vanessa Y
    Zheng, Jie
    Wurtz, Peter
    Donovan, Jenny L
    Hamdy, Freddie C
    Neal, David E
    Lane, J Athene
    Davey Smith, George
    Relton, Caroline L
    Eeles, Rosalind A
    Henderson, Brian E
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Schumacher, Fredrick R
    Amin Al Olama, Ali
    Benlloch, Sara
    Muir, Kenneth
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Conti, David V
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Stevens, Victoria L
    Tangen, Catherine M
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Clements, Judith A
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Pashayan, Nora
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    West, Catharine M L
    Mucci, Lorelei A
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Koutros, Stella
    Sørensen, Karina D
    Maehle, Lovise
    Travis, Ruth C
    Hamilton, Robert
    Ingles, Sue Ann
    Rosenstein, Barry S
    Lu, Yong-Jie
    Giles, Graham G
    Kibel, Adam S
    Vega, Ana
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Penney, Kathryn L
    Park, Jong Y
    Stanford, Janet L
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Nordestgaard, Borge G
    Brenner, Hermann
    Maier, Christiane
    Kim, Jeri
    John, Esther M
    Teixeira, Manuel R
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    DeRuyck, Kim
    Razack, Azad
    Newcomb, Lisa F
    Lessel, Davor
    Kaneva, Radka P
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Claessens, Frank
    Townsend, Paul
    Gago Dominguez, Manuela
    Roobol, Monique J
    Menegaux, Florence
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa A
    Pandha, Hardev
    Thibodeau, Stephen N
    Martin, Richard M
    Circulating Metabolic Biomarkers of Screen-Detected Prostate Cancer in the ProtecT Study.2018In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, article id cebp.0079.2018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether associations between circulating metabolites and prostate cancer are causal is unknown. We report on the largest study of metabolites and prostate cancer (2,291 cases and 2,661 controls) and appraise causality for a subset of the prostate cancer-metabolite associations using two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The case-control portion of the study was conducted in nine UK centres with men aged 50-69 years who underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer within the Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Two data sources were used to appraise causality: a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of metabolites in 24,925 participants and a GWAS of prostate cancer in 44,825 cases and 27,904 controls within the Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium.

    RESULTS: Thirty-five metabolites were strongly associated with prostate cancer (p <0.0014, multiple-testing threshold). These fell into four classes: i) lipids and lipoprotein subclass characteristics (total cholesterol and ratios, cholesterol esters and ratios, free cholesterol and ratios, phospholipids and ratios, and triglyceride ratios); ii) fatty acids and ratios; iii) amino acids; iv) and fluid balance. Fourteen top metabolites were proxied by genetic variables, but MR indicated these were not causal.

    CONCLUSIONS: We identified 35 circulating metabolites associated with prostate cancer presence, but found no evidence of causality for those 14 testable with MR. Thus, the 14 MR-tested metabolites are unlikely to be mechanistically important in prostate cancer risk.

    IMPACT: The metabolome provides a promising set of biomarkers that may aid prostate cancer classification.

  • 310.
    Adams, Emma A.
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Ontario Shores Ctr Mental Hlth Sci, Strateg Initiat, Whitby, ON, Canada.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trondheim, Norway.
    Wijewardene, Kumudu
    Univ Sri Jayewardenepura, Fac Med Sci, Dept Community Med Hlth, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka.
    Infanti, Jennifer J.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Perceptions on the sexual harassment of female nurses in a state hospital in Sri Lanka: a qualitative study2019In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1560587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Sexual harassment occurs within the nursing profession globally, challenging the health and safety of nurses and the quality and efficiency of health systems. In Sri Lanka, no studies have explored this issue in the health sector; however, female employees face sexual harassment in other workplace settings.

    Objective:

    To explore female nurses' perceptions of workplace sexual harassment in a large state hospital in Sri Lanka.

    Methods:

    This is a qualitative study conducted in an urban, mainly Buddhist and Singhalese context. We invited all female senior and ward nurses working in the hospital to participate in the study. We conducted individual in-depth interviews with four senior nurses and focus group discussions with 29 nurses in three groups.

    Results:

    The nurses described a variety of perceived forms of sexual harassment in the hospital. They discussed patient-perpetrated incidents as the most threatening and the clearest to identify compared with incidents involving doctors and other co-workers. There was significant ambiguity regarding sexual consent and coercion in relationships between female nurses and male doctors, which were described as holding potential for exploitation or harassment. The nurses reported that typical reactions to sexual harassment were passive. Alternatively, they described encountering inaction or victim blaming when they attempted to formally report incidents. They perceived that workplace sexual harassment has contributed to negative societal attitudes about the nursing profession and discussed various informal strategies, such as working in teams, to protect themselves from sexual harassment in the hospital.

    Conclusions:

    Sexual harassment was a perceived workplace concern for nurses in this hospital. To develop effective local prevention and intervention responses, further research is required to determine the magnitude of the problem and explore differences in responses to and consequences of sexual harassment based on perpetrator type and intent, and personal vulnerabilities of the victims, among other factors.

  • 311.
    Adams, Hieab H. H.
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hibar, Derrek P.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Chouraki, Vincent
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Univ Lille, RID AGE Risk Factors & Mol Determinants Aging Rel, CHU Lille, Inserm,Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Stein, Jason L.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC USA.;Univ N Carolina, UNC Neurosci Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Nyquist, Paul A.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Neurol, Dept Anesthesia Crit Care Med, Dept Neurosurg, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA..
    Renteria, Miguel E.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Trompet, Stella
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Seshadri, Sudha
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Desrivieres, Sylvane
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Beecham, Ashley H.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Dr John T Macdonald Fdn, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Jahanshad, Neda
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Wittfeld, Katharine
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE Rostock Greifs, Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Van der Lee, Sven J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Abramovic, Lucija
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Alhusaini, Saud
    McGill Univ, Montreal Neurol Inst, Dept Neurol & Neurosurg, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Amin, Najaf
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Andersson, Micael
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Arfanakis, Konstantinos
    IIT, Dept Biomed Engn, Chicago, IL 60616 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Diagnost Radiol & Nucl Med, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Aribisala, Benjamin S.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Lagos State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Lagos, Nigeria.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Armstrong, Nicola J.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Murdoch Univ, Math & Stat, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Athanasiu, Lavinia
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Beiser, Alexa
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA.;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA..
    Bernard, Manon
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA USA..
    Blanken, Laura M. E.
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Blanton, Susan H.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Dr John T Macdonald Fdn, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Bohlken, Marc M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Boks, Marco P.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Bralten, Janita
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Brickman, Adam M.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, GH Sergievsky Ctr, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Dept Neurol, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Carmichael, Owen
    Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA..
    Chakravarty, M. Mallar
    Douglas Mental Hlth Univ Inst, Cerebral Imaging Ctr, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Psychiat & Biomed Engn, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Chauhan, Ganesh
    Univ Bordeaux, INSERM Unit U1219, Bordeaux, France..
    Chen, Qiang
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Ching, Christopher R. K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Sch Med, Interdept Neurosci Grad Program, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Den Braber, Anouk
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Doan, Nhat Trung
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Ehrlich, Stefan
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Div Psychol & Social Med & Dev Neurosci, Dresden, Germany.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA..
    Filippi, Irina
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Ge, Tian
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Goldman, Aaron L.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Gottesman, Rebecca F.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Greven, Corina U.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Kings Coll London, Med Res Council Social, Genet & Dev Psychiat Ctr, Inst Psychol Psychiat & Neurosci, London, England..
    Grimm, Oliver
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Griswold, Michael E.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Ctr Biostat & Bioinformat, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Guadalupe, Tulio
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Int Max Planck Res Sch Language Sci, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Hass, Johanna
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dresden, Germany..
    Haukvik, Unn K.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Dept Res & Dev, Oslo, Norway..
    Hilal, Saima
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Hofer, Edith
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria.;Med Univ Graz, Inst Med Informat Stat & Documentat, Graz, Austria..
    Hoehn, David
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Holmes, Avram J.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Yale Univ, Dept Psychol, New Haven, CT USA..
    Hoogman, Martine
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Janowitz, Deborah
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Jia, Tianye
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Kasperaviciute, Dalia
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England.;Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, London, England..
    Kim, Sungeun
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Klein, Marieke
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Kraemer, Bernd
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Gen Psychiat, Sect Expt Psychopathol & Neuroimaging, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Lee, Phil H.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Lurie Ctr Autism, Lexington, MA USA..
    Liao, Jiemin
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore..
    Liewald, David C. M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Lopez, Lorna M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Luciano, Michelle
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Macare, Christine
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Marquand, Andre
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Matarin, Mar
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Mather, Karen A.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Mattheisen, Manuel
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biomed, Aarhus, Denmark.;iPSYCH, Lundbeck Fdn Initiat Integrat Psychiat Res, Aarhus, Denmark.;iPSYCH, Lundbeck Fdn Initiat Integrat Psychiat Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, iSEQ, Ctr Integrated Sequencing, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Mazoyer, Bernard
    UMR5296 Univ Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, Bordeaux, France..
    Mckay, David R.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA..
    McWhirter, Rebekah
    Univ Tasmania, Menzies Inst Med Res, Hobart, Tas, Australia..
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    VU Univ Med Ctr GGZ Geest, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, Dept Psychiat, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;VU Univ Med Ctr GGZ Geest, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Muetzel, Ryan L.
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Maniega, Susana Munoz
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Nho, Kwangsik
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Nugent, Allison C.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Loohuis, Loes M. Olde
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Ctr Neurobehav Genet, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Oosterlaan, Jaap
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Clin Neuropsychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Papmeyer, Martina
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Bern, Univ Hosp Psychiat, Translat Res Ctr, Div Syst Neurosci Psychopathol, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Pappa, Irene
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus Univ, Sch Pedag & Educ Sci, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pirpamer, Lukas
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria..
    Pudas, Sara
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Puetz, Benno
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Rajan, Kumar B.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England.;Univ Oxford, Jenner Inst Labs, Oxford, England..
    Richards, Jennifer S.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Risacher, Shannon L.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Roiz-Santianez, Roberto
    Univ Cantabria IDIVAL, Sch Med, Dept Med & Psychiat, Univ Hosp Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.;CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain..
    Rommelse, Nanda
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Rose, Emma J.
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Psychosis Res Grp, Dept Psychiat, Dublin, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Trinity Translat Med Inst, Dublin, Ireland..
    Royle, Natalie A.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Rundek, Tatjana
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Saemann, Philipp G.
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Satizabal, Claudia L.
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Schmaal, Lianne
    Orygen, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Youth Mental Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Schork, Andrew J.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Neurosci, Multimodal Imaging Lab, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Cognit Sci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA..
    Shen, Li
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Shin, Jean
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Shumskaya, Elena
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Smith, Albert V.
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Sprooten, Emma
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA.;Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Strike, Lachlan T.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Teumer, Alexander
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Thomson, Russell
    Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana
    CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain.;Valdecilla Biomed Res Inst IDIVAL, Neuroimaging Unit, Technol Facil, Santander, Cantabria, Spain..
    Toro, Roberto
    Inst Pasteur, Paris, France..
    Trabzuni, Daniah
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Dept Genet, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Vaidya, Dhananjay
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Van der Grond, Jeroen
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    van der Meer, Dennis
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Van Eijk, Kristel R.
    UMC Utrecht, Human Neurogenet Unit, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Van Erp, Theo G. M.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Psychiat & Human Behav, Irvine, CA 92717 USA..
    Van Rooij, Daan
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Walton, Esther
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dresden, Germany..
    Westlye, Lars T.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Psychol, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Whelan, Christopher D.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Windham, Beverly G.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Winkler, Anderson M.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Woldehawariat, Girma
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Wolf, Christiane
    Univ Wurzburg, Dept Psychiat Psychosomat & Psychotherapy, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Wolfers, Thomas
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Xu, Bing
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Yanek, Lisa R.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Yang, Jingyun
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Zijdenbos, Alex
    Biospect Inc, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Zwiers, Marcel P.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Dept Res & Dev, Oslo, Norway.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Aggarwal, Neelum T.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Almasy, Laura
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ Penn, Dept Genet, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Dept Biomed & Hlth Informat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Ames, David
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Natl Ageing Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Acad Unit Psychiat Old Age, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Univ Lille, RID AGE Risk Factors & Mol Determinants Aging Rel, CHU Lille, Inserm,Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France..
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Arepalli, Sampath
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Assareh, Amelia A.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Barral, Sandra
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA..
    Bastin, Mark E.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Becker, Diane M.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Becker, James T.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychiat, Pittsburgh, PA USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Neurol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA..
    Bennett, David A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Blangero, John
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    van Bokhoven, Hans
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Brodaty, Henry
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Dementia Collaborat Res Ctr Assessment & Better, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Brouwer, Rachel M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Brunner, Han G.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Buckner, Randy L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Univ, Dept Psychol, Ctr Brain Sci, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Buitelaar, Jan K.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Bulayeva, Kazima B.
    Dagestan State Univ, Dept Evolut & Genet, Makhachkala, Dagestan, Russia..
    Cahn, Wiepke
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Calhoun, Vince D.
    Mind Res Network, Albuquerque, NM USA.;LBERI, Albuquerque, NM USA.;Univ New Mexico, Dept ECE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA..
    Cannon, Dara M.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland..
    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Chen, Christopher
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Cheng, Ching -Yu
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Acad Med Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Cichon, Sven
    Univ Basel, Dept Biomed, Div Med Genet, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Bonn, Inst Human Genet, Bonn, Germany.;Res Ctr Julich, Inst Neurosci & Med INM1, Julich, Germany..
    Cookson, Mark R.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Corvin, Aiden
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Psychosis Res Grp, Dept Psychiat, Dublin, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Trinity Translat Med Inst, Dublin, Ireland..
    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto
    Univ Cantabria IDIVAL, Sch Med, Dept Med & Psychiat, Univ Hosp Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.;CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain..
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Czisch, Michael
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Dale, Anders M.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Ctr Multimodal Imaging & Genet, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Neurosci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Radiol, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Cognit Sci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA..
    Davies, Gareth E.
    Avera Inst Human Genet, Sioux Falls, SD USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Neurol, Program Translat NeuroPsychiat Gen, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Psychiat, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    De Geus, Eco J. C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    De Jager, Philip L.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA..
    de Zubicaray, Greig I.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Fac Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Delanty, Norman
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland.;Beaumont Hosp, Div Neurol, Dublin 9, Ireland..
    Depondt, Chantal
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Hop Erasme, Dept Neurol, Brussels, Belgium..
    DeStefano, Anita L.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Dillman, Allissa
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Oslo, Norway..
    Donohoe, Gary
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Cognit Genet & Cognit Therapy Grp, Neuroimaging Cognit & Genom Ctr NICOG, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Sch Psychol, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Discipline Biochem, Galway, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Psychiat, Neuropsychiat Genet Res Grp, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Inst Psychiat, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Janssen Res & Dev LLC, Titusville, NJ USA..
    Duggirala, Ravi
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Dyer, Thomas D.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Erk, Susanne
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Psychol, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Evans, Denis A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Fedko, Iryna
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Fernandez, Guillen
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    NIA, Intramural Res Program, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Fisher, Simon E.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Fleischman, Debra A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Behav Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Ford, Ian
    Univ Glasgow, Robertson Ctr Biostat, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Foroud, Tatiana M.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Fox, Peter T.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 USA..
    Francks, Clyde
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Fukunaga, Masaki
    Natl Inst Physiol Sci, Div Cerebral Integrat, Aichi, Japan..
    Gibbs, J. Raphael
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Glahn, David C.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA..
    Gollub, Randy L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Goring, Harald H. H.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Grabe, Hans J.
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Green, Robert C.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Div Genet, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Gruber, Oliver
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Gen Psychiat, Sect Expt Psychopathol & Neuroimaging, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Guelfi, Sebastian
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Hansell, Narelle K.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Hardy, John
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hashimoto, Ryota
    Osaka Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Osaka, Japan.;Osaka Univ, United Grad Sch Child Dev, Mol Res Ctr Childrens Mental Dev, Osaka, Japan..
    Hegenscheid, Katrin
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Diagnost Radiol & Neuroradiol, Greifswald, Germany..
    Heinz, Andreas
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Hernandez, Dena G.
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE, Tubingen, Germany..
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Ho, Beng-Choon
    Univ Iowa, Dept Psychiat, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Hoekstra, Pieter J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hoffmann, Wolfgang
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE Rostock Greifs, Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Holsboer, Florian
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany.;HMNC Brain Hlth, Munich, Germany..
    Homuth, Georg
    Univ Med Greifswald, Interfac Inst Genet & Funct Gen, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hosten, Norbert
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Diagnost Radiol & Neuroradiol, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Ikeda, Masashi
    Fujita Hlth Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan..
    Ikram, M. Kamran
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore.;Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Acad Med Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore..
    Jack, Clifford R., Jr.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Radiol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Jenldnson, Mark
    Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Johnson, Robert
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, NICHD Brain & Tissue Bank Dev Disorders, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Jonsson, Erik G.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Kahn, Rene S.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Kanai, Ryota
    Univ Sussex, Sch Psychol, Brighton, E Sussex, England.;UCL, Inst Cognit Neurosci, London, England.;Araya Brain Imaging, Dept Neuroinformat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Kloszewska, Iwona
    Med Univ Lodz, Lodz, Poland..
    Knopman, David S.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Neurol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Kochunov, Peter
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Maryland Psychiat Res Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Kwok, John B.
    Neurosci Res Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Sch Med Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Lawrie, Stephen M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Lemaitre, Herve
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Liu, Xinmin
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Longo, Dan L.
    NIA, Genet Lab, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Longstreth, W. T., Jr.
    Univ Washington, Dept Neurol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Lopez, Oscar L.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Neurol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychiat, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Lovestone, Simon
    Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford, England.;Kings Coll London, NIHR Dementia Biomed Res Unit, London, England..
    Martinez, Oliver
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Neurol, Imaging Dementia & Aging IDeA Lab, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Ctr Neurosci, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA..
    Martinot, Jean-Luc
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Mattay, Venkata S.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Radiol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    McDonald, Colm
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland..
    McIntosh, Andrew M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    McMahon, Katie L.
    Univ Queensland, Ctr Adv Imaging, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    McMahon, Francis J.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Mecocci, Patrizia
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Sect Gerontol & Geriatr, Perugia, Italy..
    Melle, Ingrid
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Mohnke, Sebastian
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Morris, Derek W.
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Cognit Genet & Cognit Therapy Grp, Neuroimaging Cognit & Genom Ctr NICOG, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Sch Psychol, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Discipline Biochem, Galway, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Psychiat, Neuropsychiat Genet Res Grp, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Inst Psychiat, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Mosley, Thomas H.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Muhleisen, Thomas W.
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland.;Res Ctr Julich, Inst Neurosci & Med INM1, Julich, Germany..
    Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany.;Munich Cluster Syst Neurol SyNergy, Munich, Germany.;Univ Liverpool, Inst Translat Med, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Nalls, Michael A.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Nauck, Matthias
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Clin Chem & Lab Med, Greifswald, Germany.;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK eV, Partner Site Greifswald, Berlin, Germany..
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England.;Univ Warwick, Dept Stat, Coventry, W Midlands, England.;Univ Warwick, Warwick Mfg Grp, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Niessen, Wiro J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Med Informat, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Delft Univ Technol, Fac Sci Appl, Delft, Netherlands..
    Noethen, Markus M.
    Univ Bonn, Inst Human Genet, Bonn, Germany.;Univ Bonn, Life & Brain Ctr, Dept Genom, Bonn, Germany..
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Ohi, Kazutaka
    Osaka Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Osaka, Japan..
    Olvera, Rene L.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 USA..
    Ophoff, Roel A.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Ctr Neurobehav Genet, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Pandolfo, Massimo
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Hop Erasme, Dept Neurol, Brussels, Belgium..
    Paus, Tomas
    Univ Toronto, Rotman Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Psychol, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Psychiat, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.;Child Mind Inst, New York, NY USA..
    Pausova, Zdenka
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Phys, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Nutr Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Pike, G. Bruce
    Univ Calgary, Dept Radiol, Calgary, AB, Canada.;Univ Calgary, Dept Clin Neurosci, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Potkin, Steven G.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Psychiat & Human Behav, Irvine, CA 92717 USA..
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Grp Hlth Res Inst, Grp Hlth, Seattle, WA USA..
    Reppermund, Simone
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW Med, Sch Psychiat, Dept Dev Disabil Neuropsychiat, Kensington, NSW, Australia..
    Rietschel, Marcella
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Roffman, Joshua L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Med Ctr, Ilnst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst & Pediat Harbor, Torrance, CA 90509 USA..
    Ryten, Mina
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England..
    Sacco, Ralph L.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Inst, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Sachdev, Perminder S.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Prince Wales Hosp, Neuropsychiat Inst, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Saykin, Andrew J.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Schmidt, Reinhold
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria..
    Schofield, Peter R.
    Neurosci Res Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Sch Med Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland..
    Simmons, Andy
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Neuroimaging, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Biomed Res Ctr Mental Hlth, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Biomed Res Unit Dementia, London, England..
    Singleton, Andrew
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Sisodiya, Sanjay M.
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England..
    Smith, Colin
    Univ Edinburgh, Acad Dept Neuropathol, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, MRC Edinburgh Brain Bank, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Smoller, Jordan W.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Soininen, Hindu.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Neurol, Kuopio, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Neuroctr Neurol, Kuopio, Finland..
    Srikanth, Velandai
    Peninsula Hlth & Monash Univ, Dept Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Stott, David J.
    Univ Glasgow, Fac Med, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Sussmann, Jessika E.
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Toga, Arthur W.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Inst Neuroimaging & Informat, Lab Neuro Imaging, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Traynor, Bryan J.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Troncoso, Juan
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Brain Resource Ctr, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Turner, Jessica A.
    Georgia State Univ, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA..
    Tzourio, Christophe
    Univ Bordeaux, Institute Neurodegenerat Disorders, CEA, CNRS,UMR 5293, Bordeaux, France..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Van der Brug, Marcel
    Genentech Inc, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Van der Lugt, Aad
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Van der Wee, Nic J. A.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Leiden, Netherlands.;Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Leiden Inst Brain & Cognit, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Van't Ent, Dennis
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Van Tol, Marie Jose
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Neuroimaging Ctr, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Vardarajan, Badri N.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA..
    Veltman, Dick J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Vernooij, Meike W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Voelzke, Henry
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Walter, Henrik
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Wardlaw, Joanna M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Wassink, Thomas H.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Psychiat, Carver Coll Med, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Weale, Michael E.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England..
    Weinberger, Daniel R.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurosci, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Inst Med Genet, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Weiner, Michael W.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, San Francisco VA Med Ctr, Ctr Imaging Neurodegenerat Dis, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Wen, Wei
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Westman, Eric
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    White, Tonya
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Wong, Tien Y.
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Dagestan State Univ, Dept Evolut & Genet, Makhachkala, Dagestan, Russia.;Natl Univ Singapore, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Wright, Clinton B.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Inst, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Zielke, H. Ronald
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, NICHD Brain & Tissue Bank Dev Disorders, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Deary, Ian J.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    DeCarli, Charles
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Neurol, Imaging Dementia & Aging IDeA Lab, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Ctr Neurosci, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA..
    Schmidt, Helena
    Med Univ Graz, Inst Mol Biol & Biochem, Graz, Austria..
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    De Craen, Anton J. M.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Gerontol & Geriatr, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Wright, Margaret J.
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Ctr Adv Imaging, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Launer, Lenore J.
    NIA, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Schumann, Gunter
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Fornage, Myriam
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, Inst Mol Med & Human Genet Ctr, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Franke, Barbara
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Debette, Stephanie
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Bordeaux Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Bordeaux, France..
    Medland, Sarah E.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Neurol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Thompson, Paul M.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Western Sydney, Sch Comp Engn & Math, Parramatta, NSW, Australia..
    Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association2016In: Nature Neuroscience, ISSN 1097-6256, E-ISSN 1546-1726, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 1569-1582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (rho(genetic) = 0.748), which indicates a similar genetic background and allowed us to identify four additional loci through meta-analysis (N-combined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, and Parkinson's disease, and were enriched near genes involved in growth pathways, including PI3K-AKT signaling. These findings identify the biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and their link to physiological and pathological traits.

  • 312.
    Adamski, Jan
    et al.
    Satakunta Dist Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care, Pori, Finland..
    Nowakowski, Piotr
    Czerniakowski Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Therapy, Warsaw, Poland..
    Gorynski, Pawel
    Ctr Monitoring Populat Hlth Status, Dept Hyg, Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Warsaw, Poland..
    Onichimowski, Dariusz
    Reg Specialist Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Therapy, Olsztyn, Poland..
    Weigl, Wojciech
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Incidence of in-hospital cardiac arrest in Poland2016In: ANAESTHESIOLOGY INTENSIVE THERAPY, ISSN 1642-5758, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 288-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In-hospital cardiac arrest with its poor prognosis is a challenging problem in hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate in Polish hospitals the frequency of in-hospital cardiac arrests with the subsequent mortality, with special emphasis on the type of unit at which the event occurred, and the patient's demographic data, such as age and sex.

    Methods: The study was a retrospective analysis of data for 2012 registered in the Polish General Hospital Morbidity Study. This research covered all Polish hospitals, excluding only government and psychiatric hospitals. The study inclusion criterion was the incidence of cardiac arrest in any hospital ward, recorded by the respective ICD-10 diagnosis code.

    Results: Of the 7,775,553 patients hospitalized, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest was reported in a total of 22,602 patients, which included 22,317 adults (98.7% of all patients) and 285 children (1.3%). Overall mortality after cardiac arrest among adults was 74.2%, and in children 46.7%. In both absolute numbers and as percentages of all documented cases, cardiac arrests occurred most often at the departments of intensive care, internal medicine, cardiology and emergency medicine. The accompanying mortality was lower than average at the departments of intensive care, cardiology, cardiology high dependency unit and emergency medicine. The median age of patients with cardiac arrest who died in the hospital was higher than the median age of those who survived (72 vs. 64; P < 0.05). Although cardiac arrests were reported more often among men than women (58.2% vs. 41.8%; P < 0.001), the hospital mortality was higher among women (79.2% vs. 71.6%; P < 0.001).

    Conclusion: The frequency of in-hospital cardiac arrests in Polish hospitals and the subsequent mortality is not substantially different from that observed in other countries. However, our study, based on ICD-10 diagnosis codes, gives only limited information about the patients and circumstances of this event. An in-depth analysis of the causes, prognoses, and outcome of in-hospital cardiac arrests could be facilitated by the creation of a national registry.

  • 313.
    Adamson, L.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, B.
    Gothenburg Univ, Immunol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kiessling, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nasman-Glaser, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karlsson-Parra, Alex
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    GMP-production of an allogenic DC-based cancer vaccine (INTUVAX) for treatment of patients with metastatic kidney-or primary liver cancer. Comparison of two production platforms for DC-generation2016In: European Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0014-2980, E-ISSN 1521-4141, Vol. 46, p. 946-947Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 314. Adamson, R. E.
    et al.
    Frazier, A. A.
    Evans, H.
    Chambers, K. F.
    Schenk, E.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Birnie, R.
    Mitry, R. R.
    Dhawan, A.
    Maitland, N. J.
    In Vitro Primary Cell Culture as a Physiologically Relevant Method for Preclinical Testing of Human Oncolytic Adenovirus2012In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 218-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ad[I/PPT-E1A] is an oncolytic adenovirus that specifically kills prostate cells via restricted replication by a prostate-specific regulatory element. Off-target replication of oncolytic adenoviruses would have serious clinical consequences. As a proposed ex vivo test, we describe the assessment of the specificity of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] viral cytotoxicity and replication in human nonprostate primary cells. Four primary nonprostate cell types were selected to mimic the effects of potential in vivo exposure to Ad[I/PPT-E1A] virus: bronchial epithelial cells, urothelial cells, vascular endothelial cells, and hepatocytes. Primary cells were analyzed for Ad[I/PPT-E1A] viral cytotoxicity in MTS assays, and viral replication was determined by hexon titer immunostaining assays to quantify viral hexon protein. The results revealed that at an extreme multiplicity of infection of 500, unlikely to be achieved in vivo, Ad[I/PPT-E1A] virus showed no significant cytotoxic effects in the nonprostate primary cell types apart from the hepatocytes. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed high levels of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] sequestered in the cytoplasm of these cells. Adenoviral green fluorescent protein reporter studies showed no evidence for nuclear localization, suggesting that the cytotoxic effects of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] in human primary hepatocytes are related to viral sequestration. Also, hepatocytes had increased amounts of coxsackie adenovirus receptor surface protein. Active viral replication was only observed in the permissive primary prostate cells and LNCaP prostate cell line, and was not evident in any of the other nonprostate cells types tested, confirming the specificity of Ad[I/PPT-E1A]. Thus, using a relevant panel of primary human cells provides a convenient and alternative preclinical assay for examining the specificity of conditionally replicating oncolytic adenoviruses in vivo.

  • 315.
    Adamsson, I
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Edlund, C
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Seensalu, R
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Engstrand, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    The use of AP-PCR and flaA-RFLP typing to investigate treatment failure in Helicobacter pylori infection2000In: Clin Microbiol Infect, Vol. 6, p. 265-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 316.
    Adamsson, Viola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    A Healthy Nordic Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: Intervention Studies with Special Emphasis on Plasma Lipoproteins2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A healthy diet is important in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Several risk factors, modifiable by diet, are involved in the development of CVD, e.g. hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, obesity and hypertension. Little data however exist on diets composed of foods originating from the Nordic countries, and their potential to reduce CVD risk.

    This thesis aimed to investigate whether an ad libitum healthy Nordic diet (ND), either provided as a whole diet, or as a prudent breakfast (PB) alone, could influence CVD risk factors in healthy, mildly hypercholesterolemic men and women. Another aim was to describe the nutrient and food composition of the ND, both by using self-reported data and serum biomarkers of dietary fat quality.

    The primary clinical outcome measure was LDL-cholesterol, and other cardiometabolic risk factors were secondary outcomes.

    Two parallel, randomised, controlled intervention studies were conducted in free-living subjects. Clinical and dietary assessments were performed at baseline and at the end of dietary interventions. All foods were provided to subjects randomised to ND, whereas only breakfast items were supplied to subjects randomised to PB. Control groups followed their habitual diet/breakfast.

    Compared with controls, ND reduced body weight and improved several CVD risk factors including LDL-cholesterol, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Several, but not all effects were probably partly mediated by diet-induced weight loss. ND accorded with Nordic nutrition recommendations and was defined as “a plant-based diet, where animal products are used sparingly as side dishes”. Compared with average Swedish diet, ND was high in dietary fibre, but low in sodium, meat, high-fat dairy products, sweets and alcohol. A decreased intake of saturated fat and increased intake of n-3 PUFA during ND was partly reflected in serum lipids. Eating a PB without other dietary changes did not improve lipid or glucose metabolism, but decreased markers of visceral fat and inflammation, without influencing body weight.

    This thesis suggests that a whole ND, but not PB alone, promotes weight loss and improves multiple CVD risk factors in healthy subjects after 6 weeks. These results suggest that ND could have a potential role in the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in hypercholesterolaemic subjects: a randomized controlled trial (NORDIET)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in hypercholesterolaemic subjects: a randomized controlled trial (NORDIET)
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 150-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on cardiovascular risk factors. Design and subjects. In a randomized controlled trial (NORDIET) conducted in Sweden, 88 mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects were randomly assigned to an ad libitum ND or control diet (subjects' usual Western diet) for 6 weeks. Participants in the ND group were provided with all meals and foods. Primary outcome measurements were low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and secondary outcomes were blood pressure (BP) and insulin sensitivity (fasting insulin and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance). The ND was rich in high-fibre plant foods, fruits, berries, vegetables, whole grains, rapeseed oil, nuts, fish and low-fat milk products, but low in salt, added sugars and saturated fats. Results. The ND contained 27%, 52%, 19% and 2% of energy from fat, carbohydrate, protein and alcohol, respectively. In total, 86 of 88 subjects randomly assigned to diet completed the study. Compared with controls, there was a decrease in plasma cholesterol (-16%, P < 0.001), LDL cholesterol (-21%, P < 0.001), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (-5%, P < 0.01), LDL/HDL (-14%, P < 0.01) and apolipoprotein (apo)B/apoA1 (-1%, P < 0.05) in the ND group. The ND reduced insulin (-9%, P = 0.01) and systolic BP by -6.6 +/- 13.2 mmHg (-5%, P < 0.05) compared with the control diet. Despite the ad libitum nature of the ND, body weight decreased after 6 weeks in the ND compared with the control group (-4%, P < 0.001). After adjustment for weight change, the significant differences between groups remained for blood lipids, but not for insulin sensitivity or BP. There were no significant differences in diastolic BP or triglyceride or glucose concentrations. Conclusions. A healthy ND improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure at clinically relevant levels in hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    Keywords
    cardiovascular risk factors, cholesterol, diet, Nordic foods, nutrition
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146074 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2796.2010.02290.x (DOI)000286110100004 ()20964740 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2011-02-15 Created: 2011-02-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. What is a healthy Nordic diet?: Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is a healthy Nordic diet?: Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 56, p. 18189-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A healthy Nordic diet (ND), a diet based on foods originating from the Nordic countries, improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure and body weight in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Objective: To describe and compare food and nutrient composition of the ND in relation to the intake of a Swedish reference population (SRP) and the recommended intake (RI) and average requirement (AR), as described by the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR). Design: The analyses were based on an estimate of actual food and nutrient intake of 44 men and women (mean age 53 +/- 8 years, BMI 26 +/- 3), representing an intervention arm receiving ND for 6 weeks. Results: The main difference between ND and SRP was the higher intake of plant foods, fish, egg and vegetable fat and a lower intake of meat products, dairy products, sweets and desserts and alcoholic beverages during ND (p<0.001 for all food groups). Intake of cereals and seeds was similar between ND and SRP (p>0.3). The relative intake of protein, fat and carbohydrates during ND was in accordance with RI. Intake of all vitamins and minerals was above AR, whereas sodium intake was below RI. Conclusions: When compared with the food intake of an SRP, ND is primarily a plant-based diet. ND represents a balanced food intake that meets the current RI and AR of NNR 2004 and has a dietary pattern that is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality.

    Keywords
    Nordic foods, nutrient intake, food intake, Swedish reference population, Nordic nutrition recommendations
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200134 (URN)10.3402/fnr.v56i0.18189 (DOI)000317128500001 ()
    Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
    3. Influence of a healthy Nordic diet on serum fatty acid composition and associations with blood lipoproteins: results from the NORDIET study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of a healthy Nordic diet on serum fatty acid composition and associations with blood lipoproteins: results from the NORDIET study
    2014 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 58, p. 24114-Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The fatty acid (FA) composition of serum lipids is related to the quality of dietary fat. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on the FA composition of serum cholesterol esters (CE-FA) and assess the associations between changes in the serum CE-FA composition and blood lipoproteins during a controlled dietary intervention.

    Methods: The NORDIET trial was a six-week randomised, controlled, parallel-group dietary intervention study that included 86 adults (53±8 years) with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol LDL-C. Serum CE-FA composition was measured using gas chromatography. Diet history interviews were conducted, and daily intake was assessed using checklists.

    Results: Food and nutrient intake data indicated that there was a reduction in the fat intake from dairy and meat products and an increase in the consumption of fatty fish with the ND, decreasing the levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in the diet, slightly decreasing the levels of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and moderately increasing the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Concomitantly, the levels of CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0, but not 16:0, decreased during the ND, and these changes differed from those observed in the control diet group (p<0.01). In contrast, serum 22:6n-3 increased during the ND compared with the control diet (p<0.01). The changes in CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0 during the intervention correlated positively with those in LDL-C, HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, ApoA1 and ApoB (p<0.01), whereas the changes in CE-PUFA 22:6n-3 were negatively correlated with changes in the corresponding serum lipids.

    Conclusions: The decreased intake of saturated fat and increased intake of n-3 PUFA in a healthy Nordic diet are partly reflected by changes in the serum CE-FA composition, which are associated with an improved serum lipoprotein pattern.

    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211868 (URN)10.3402/fnr.v58.24114 (DOI)000345968000001 ()25476792 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2013-12-02 Created: 2013-12-02 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
    4. Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized controlled trial
    (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    Methods: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels. In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

    Results: No differences were found in LDL-C, blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 were lower during PB compared with controls (p<0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and b-glucan compared with controls (p<0.05).

    Conclusions: Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation.

     

    Keywords
    Prudent breakfast, LDL-cholesterol, cardiometabolic risk factors, Nordic diet, inflammation, visceral fat
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Research subject
    Nutrition
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211870 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-12-02 Created: 2013-12-02 Last updated: 2014-01-24Bibliographically approved
  • 317.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Influence of a healthy Nordic diet on serum fatty acid composition and associations with blood lipoproteins: results from the NORDIET study2014In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 58, p. 24114-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The fatty acid (FA) composition of serum lipids is related to the quality of dietary fat. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on the FA composition of serum cholesterol esters (CE-FA) and assess the associations between changes in the serum CE-FA composition and blood lipoproteins during a controlled dietary intervention.

    Methods: The NORDIET trial was a six-week randomised, controlled, parallel-group dietary intervention study that included 86 adults (53±8 years) with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol LDL-C. Serum CE-FA composition was measured using gas chromatography. Diet history interviews were conducted, and daily intake was assessed using checklists.

    Results: Food and nutrient intake data indicated that there was a reduction in the fat intake from dairy and meat products and an increase in the consumption of fatty fish with the ND, decreasing the levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in the diet, slightly decreasing the levels of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and moderately increasing the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Concomitantly, the levels of CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0, but not 16:0, decreased during the ND, and these changes differed from those observed in the control diet group (p<0.01). In contrast, serum 22:6n-3 increased during the ND compared with the control diet (p<0.01). The changes in CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0 during the intervention correlated positively with those in LDL-C, HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, ApoA1 and ApoB (p<0.01), whereas the changes in CE-PUFA 22:6n-3 were negatively correlated with changes in the corresponding serum lipids.

    Conclusions: The decreased intake of saturated fat and increased intake of n-3 PUFA in a healthy Nordic diet are partly reflected by changes in the serum CE-FA composition, which are associated with an improved serum lipoprotein pattern.

  • 318.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, A.
    Fredriksson, I. -B
    Hammarström, E.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Johansson, G.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in hypercholesterolaemic subjects: a randomized controlled trial (NORDIET)2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 150-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on cardiovascular risk factors. Design and subjects. In a randomized controlled trial (NORDIET) conducted in Sweden, 88 mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects were randomly assigned to an ad libitum ND or control diet (subjects' usual Western diet) for 6 weeks. Participants in the ND group were provided with all meals and foods. Primary outcome measurements were low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and secondary outcomes were blood pressure (BP) and insulin sensitivity (fasting insulin and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance). The ND was rich in high-fibre plant foods, fruits, berries, vegetables, whole grains, rapeseed oil, nuts, fish and low-fat milk products, but low in salt, added sugars and saturated fats. Results. The ND contained 27%, 52%, 19% and 2% of energy from fat, carbohydrate, protein and alcohol, respectively. In total, 86 of 88 subjects randomly assigned to diet completed the study. Compared with controls, there was a decrease in plasma cholesterol (-16%, P < 0.001), LDL cholesterol (-21%, P < 0.001), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (-5%, P < 0.01), LDL/HDL (-14%, P < 0.01) and apolipoprotein (apo)B/apoA1 (-1%, P < 0.05) in the ND group. The ND reduced insulin (-9%, P = 0.01) and systolic BP by -6.6 +/- 13.2 mmHg (-5%, P < 0.05) compared with the control diet. Despite the ad libitum nature of the ND, body weight decreased after 6 weeks in the ND compared with the control group (-4%, P < 0.001). After adjustment for weight change, the significant differences between groups remained for blood lipids, but not for insulin sensitivity or BP. There were no significant differences in diastolic BP or triglyceride or glucose concentrations. Conclusions. A healthy ND improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure at clinically relevant levels in hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

  • 319.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    What is a healthy Nordic diet?: Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study2012In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 56, p. 18189-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A healthy Nordic diet (ND), a diet based on foods originating from the Nordic countries, improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure and body weight in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Objective: To describe and compare food and nutrient composition of the ND in relation to the intake of a Swedish reference population (SRP) and the recommended intake (RI) and average requirement (AR), as described by the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR). Design: The analyses were based on an estimate of actual food and nutrient intake of 44 men and women (mean age 53 +/- 8 years, BMI 26 +/- 3), representing an intervention arm receiving ND for 6 weeks. Results: The main difference between ND and SRP was the higher intake of plant foods, fish, egg and vegetable fat and a lower intake of meat products, dairy products, sweets and desserts and alcoholic beverages during ND (p<0.001 for all food groups). Intake of cereals and seeds was similar between ND and SRP (p>0.3). The relative intake of protein, fat and carbohydrates during ND was in accordance with RI. Intake of all vitamins and minerals was above AR, whereas sodium intake was below RI. Conclusions: When compared with the food intake of an SRP, ND is primarily a plant-based diet. ND represents a balanced food intake that meets the current RI and AR of NNR 2004 and has a dietary pattern that is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality.

  • 320.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Lantmännen.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized controlled trialArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    Methods: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels. In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

    Results: No differences were found in LDL-C, blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 were lower during PB compared with controls (p<0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and b-glucan compared with controls (p<0.05).

    Conclusions: Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation.

     

  • 321.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Marklund, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: A randomized controlled trial2015In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS:

    It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels.

    METHODS:

    In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The primary outcome was plasma LDL-C. Secondary outcomes were other blood lipids, body weight, sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD), glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and inflammation markers (C-reactive protein [CRP] and tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 [TNF-R2]), and blood pressure. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

    RESULTS:

    No differences were found in LDL-C, other blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 decreased more during PB compared with controls (p < 0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and β-glucan compared with controls (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation. The trial was registered in the Current Controlled Trials database (http://www.controlled-trials.com); International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 84550872.

  • 322.
    Adde, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas: Studies of Treatment, FDG-PET Evaluation and Prognostic Factors2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve outcome in young, high-risk lymphoma patients, treatment was intensified, adding etoposide and rituximab to standard CHOP treatment. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) ena