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  • 301.
    Elmhalli, Fawzeia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Palsson, Katinka
    Royal Inst Technol, Sch Chem Sci & Engn, Dept Chem, Ecol Chem Grp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Örberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Grandi, Giulio
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Acaricidal properties of ylang-ylang oil and star anise oil against nymphs of Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae)2018In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 209-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ylang-ylang oil (YYO) from Cananga odorata (Lam.) Hook.f. & Thomson and star anise oil (SAO) from Illicium verum Hook.f. were tested at four concentrations 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mu l/cm(2). Mortality rates were obtained by counting dead nymphs at 30-min intervals during the first 5h after the start of exposure and then at 24, 48 and 72h. Mortality increased with increasing oil concentration and time of exposure. The two highest concentrations of YYO (0.2, 0.4 mu l/cm(2)) gave maximum lethal concentrations (LC) of 50 and 95% mortality after 4.5h exposure. Mortality of 95% was obtained after 24h with the next highest dose (0.1 mu l/cm(2)), whereas LC95 required 3days with the lowest YYO (0.05 mu l/cm(2)). The lethal effect time (LT) was correlated with the duration of exposure, with a significant effect at 0.4l YYO/cm(2) after 3h' (LT50=3.2h, LT95=4.3h). In contrast, only the highest concentration of SAO, 0.4 mu l SAO/cm(2), showed increasing mortality with time of exposure. This reached LT50 after 10h and LT95 after 24h. However, with the lower concentration (0.2 mu l/cm(2)) 50% mortality was reached after 24h and 100% at 72h. At to the lowest concentration of SAO (0.1 mu l/cm(2)), 67% mortality after 48h. The study indicates that YYO and SAO exhibit strong acaricidal properties against nymphs of I. ricinus and suggest that both YYO and SAO should be evaluated as potentially useful in the control of ticks.

  • 302.
    Engelsdorf, Timo
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Philipps Univ Marburg, Dept Biol, Div Plant Physiol, D-35043 Marburg, Germany.
    Gigli-Bisceglia, Nora
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Veerabagu, Manikandan
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Plant Sci, N-1432 As, Norway.
    McKenna, Joseph F.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Biol, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, England;Oxford Brookes Univ, Dept Biol & Med Sci, Plant Cell Biol, Oxford OX3 0BP, England.
    Vaahtera, Lauri
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Augstein, Frauke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Uppsala Univ, Linnean Ctr Plant Biol, Ullsv 24E, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Van der Does, Dieuwertje
    Norwich Res Pk, Sainsbury Lab, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7UH, Norfolk, England;2Blades Fdn BecA ILRI Hub, POB 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.
    Zipfel, Cyril
    Norwich Res Pk, Sainsbury Lab, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7UH, Norfolk, England.
    Hamann, Thorsten
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    The plant cell wall integrity maintenance and immune signaling systems cooperate to control stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana2018In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 11, no 536, article id eaao3070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell walls surround all plant cells, and their composition and structure are modified in a tightly controlled, adaptive manner to meet sometimes opposing functional requirements during growth and development. The plant cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance mechanism controls these functional modifications, as well as responses to cell wall damage (CWD). We investigated how the CWI system mediates responses to CWD in Arabidopsis thaliana. CWD induced by cell wall-degrading enzymes or an inhibitor of cellulose biosynthesis elicited similar, turgor-sensitive stress responses. Phenotypic clustering with 27 genotypes identified a core group of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and ion channels required for the activation of CWD responses. A genetic analysis showed that the RLK FEI2 and the plasma membrane-localized mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel MCA1 functioned downstream of the RLK THE1 in CWD perception. In contrast, pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) signaling components, including the receptors for plant elicitor peptides (AtPeps) PEPR1 and PEPR2, repressed responses to CWD. CWD induced the expression of PROPEP1 and PROPEP3, which encode the precursors of AtPep1 and AtPep3, and the release of PROPEP3 into the growth medium. Application of AtPep1 and AtPep3 repressed CWD-induced phytohormone accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that AtPep-mediated signaling suppresses CWD-induced defense responses controlled by the CWI mechanism. This suppression was alleviated when PTI signaling downstream of PEPR1 and PEPR2 was impaired. Defense responses controlled by the CWI maintenance mechanism might thus compensate to some extent for the loss of PTI signaling elements.

  • 303.
    Engelsdorf, Timo
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Philipps Univ Marburg, Dept Biol, Div Plant Physiol, D-35043 Marburg, Germany.
    Gigli-Bisceglia, Nora
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Veerabagu, Manikandan
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Plant Sci, N-1432 As, Norway.
    McKenna, Joseph F.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Biol, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, England;Oxford Brookes Univ, Dept Biol & Med Sci, Plant Cell Biol, Oxford OX3 0BP, England.
    Vaahtera, Lauri
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Augstein, Frauke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Van der Does, Dieuwertje
    Norwich Res Pk, Sainsbury Lab, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7UH, Norfolk, England;2Blades Fdn BecA ILRI Hub, POB 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.
    Zipfel, Cyril
    Norwich Res Pk, Sainsbury Lab, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7UH, Norfolk, England.
    Hamann, Thorsten
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Hogskoleringen 5, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    The plant cell wall integrity maintenance and immune signaling systems cooperate to control stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana2018In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 11, no 536, article id eaao3070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell walls surround all plant cells, and their composition and structure are modified in a tightly controlled, adaptive manner to meet sometimes opposing functional requirements during growth and development. The plant cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance mechanism controls these functional modifications, as well as responses to cell wall damage (CWD). We investigated how the CWI system mediates responses to CWD in Arabidopsis thaliana. CWD induced by cell wall-degrading enzymes or an inhibitor of cellulose biosynthesis elicited similar, turgor-sensitive stress responses. Phenotypic clustering with 27 genotypes identified a core group of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and ion channels required for the activation of CWD responses. A genetic analysis showed that the RLK FEI2 and the plasma membrane-localized mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel MCA1 functioned downstream of the RLK THE1 in CWD perception. In contrast, pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) signaling components, including the receptors for plant elicitor peptides (AtPeps) PEPR1 and PEPR2, repressed responses to CWD. CWD induced the expression of PROPEP1 and PROPEP3, which encode the precursors of AtPep1 and AtPep3, and the release of PROPEP3 into the growth medium. Application of AtPep1 and AtPep3 repressed CWD-induced phytohormone accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that AtPep-mediated signaling suppresses CWD-induced defense responses controlled by the CWI mechanism. This suppression was alleviated when PTI signaling downstream of PEPR1 and PEPR2 was impaired. Defense responses controlled by the CWI maintenance mechanism might thus compensate to some extent for the loss of PTI signaling elements.

  • 304.
    Englund, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Carlsbecker, Annelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Engström, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Vergara-Silva, Francisco
    Morphological "primary homology" and expression of AG -subfamily MADS-box genes in pines, podocarps, and yews2011In: Evolution & Development, ISSN 1520-541X, E-ISSN 1525-142X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphological variation among reproductive organs of extant gymnosperms is remarkable, especially among conifers. Several hypotheses concerning morphological homology between various conifer reproductive organs have been put forward, in particular in relation to the pine ovuliferous scale. Here, we use the expression patterns of orthologs of the ABC-model MADS-box gene AGAMOUS (AG) for testing morphological homology hypotheses related to organs of the conifer female cone. To this end, we first developed a tailored 3'RACE procedure that allows reliable amplification of partial sequences highly similar to gymnosperm-derived members of the AG-subfamily of MADS-box genes. Expression patterns of two novel conifer AG orthologs cloned with this procedure-namely PodAG and TgAG, obtained from the podocarp Podocarpus reichei and the yew Taxus globosa, respectively-are then further characterized in the morphologically divergent female cones of these species. The expression patterns of PodAG and TgAG are compared with those of DAL2, a previously discovered Picea abies (Pinaceae) AG ortholog. By treating the expression patterns of DAL2, PodAG, and TgAG as character states mapped onto currently accepted cladogram topologies, we suggest that the epimatium-that is, the podocarp female cone organ previously postulated as a "modified" ovuliferous scale-and the canonical Pinaceae ovuliferous scale can be legitimally conceptualized as "primary homologs." Character state mapping for TgAG suggests in turn that the aril of Taxaceae should be considered as a different type of organ. This work demonstrates how the interaction between developmental-genetic data and formal cladistic theory could fruitfully contribute to gymnosperm systematics.

  • 305.
    Englund, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Carlsbecker, Annelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Engström, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany.
    Vergara-Silva, Francisco
    Morphological "primary homology" and expression of AG -subfamily MADS-box genes in pines, podocarps, and yews2011In: Evolution & Development, ISSN 1520-541X, E-ISSN 1525-142X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphological variation among reproductive organs of extant gymnosperms is remarkable, especially among conifers. Several hypotheses concerning morphological homology between various conifer reproductive organs have been put forward, in particular in relation to the pine ovuliferous scale. Here, we use the expression patterns of orthologs of the ABC-model MADS-box gene AGAMOUS (AG) for testing morphological homology hypotheses related to organs of the conifer female cone. To this end, we first developed a tailored 3'RACE procedure that allows reliable amplification of partial sequences highly similar to gymnosperm-derived members of the AG-subfamily of MADS-box genes. Expression patterns of two novel conifer AG orthologs cloned with this procedure-namely PodAG and TgAG, obtained from the podocarp Podocarpus reichei and the yew Taxus globosa, respectively-are then further characterized in the morphologically divergent female cones of these species. The expression patterns of PodAG and TgAG are compared with those of DAL2, a previously discovered Picea abies (Pinaceae) AG ortholog. By treating the expression patterns of DAL2, PodAG, and TgAG as character states mapped onto currently accepted cladogram topologies, we suggest that the epimatium-that is, the podocarp female cone organ previously postulated as a "modified" ovuliferous scale-and the canonical Pinaceae ovuliferous scale can be legitimally conceptualized as "primary homologs." Character state mapping for TgAG suggests in turn that the aril of Taxaceae should be considered as a different type of organ. This work demonstrates how the interaction between developmental-genetic data and formal cladistic theory could fruitfully contribute to gymnosperm systematics.

  • 306.
    Ericsson, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Söderhäll, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Astakines in arthropods-phylogeny and gene structure2018In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 81, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Astakinel was isolated as a hematopoietic cytokine in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. In this study we detect and compare 79 sequences in GenBank, which we consider to be possible astakine orthologs, among which eleven are crustacean, sixteen are chelicerate and 52 are from insect species. Available arthropod genomes are searched for astakines, and in conclusion all astakine sequences in the current study have a similar exon containing CCXX(X), thus potentially indicating that they are homologous genes with the structure of this exon highly conserved. Two motifs, RYS and YP(N), are also conserved among the arthropod astakines. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that astakinel and astakine2 from P. leniusculus and Procambarus clarkii are distantly related, and may have been derived from a gene duplication occurring early in crustacean evolution. Moreover, a structural comparison using the Mamba intestinal toxin (MITI) from Dendroaspis polylepis as template indicates that the overall folds are similar in all crustacean astakines investigated.

  • 307.
    Eriksson, Ove E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Umeå universitet.
    Checklist of the non-lichenized ascomycetes of Sweden2014 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second edition of a list of all non-lichenized ascomycetes from Sweden, excl. lichenicolous fungi and one-celled yeasts. It enumerates 2935 species in 797 genera and 160 families. For each species is given information on important synonyms and literature where it has been treated, exsiccata, habitats, known distribution in Sweden, and anamorphs. Seperate chapters present Notes, Excluded species, References and an Index to all names of accepted species and genera. Massarina abieticola (Vain.) O.E. Erikss., comb.nov., Niptera bispora Baral, nomen novum, and Neottiella janthina (Fr. Ryman comb.nov. are proposed.

  • 308.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Soil & Environm, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Neonatal exposure to whole body ionizing radiation induces adult neurobehavioural defects: Critical period, dose-response effects and strain and sex comparison2016In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 304, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of the brain includes periods which can be critical for its normal maturation. The present study investigates specifically vulnerable peri-/postnatal periods in mice which are essential for understanding the etiology behind radiation induced neurotoxicity and functional defects, including evaluation of neurotoxicity between sexes or commonly used laboratory mouse strains following low/moderate doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Male Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice, whole body irradiated to a single 500 mGy IR dose, on postnatal day (PND) 3 or PND 10 showed an altered adult spontaneous behaviour and impaired habituation capacity, whereas irradiation on PND 19 did not have any impact on the studied variables. Both NMRI and C57bl/6 male and female mice showed an altered adult spontaneous behaviour and impaired habituation following a single whole body irradiation of 500 or 1000 mGy, but not after 20 or 100 mGy, on PND 10. The present study shows that exposure to low/moderate doses of IR during critical life stages might be involved in the induction of neurological/neurodegenerative disorder/disease. A specifically vulnerable period for radiation induced neurotoxicity seems to be around PND 3-10 in mice. Further studies are needed to investigate mechanisms involved in induction of developmental neurotoxicity following low dose irradiation.

  • 309.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Low-dose Ionizing Radiation Interacts with Environmental Agents During Brain Development: Exacerbation of Cognitive Dysfunction inMice2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Neonatal low-dose co-exposure to the anaesthetic agent ketamine and gamma-radiation causes persistent neurobehavioural defects in adult mice2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Fischer, Celia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Interaction of gamma-radiation and methyl mercury during a  critical phase of neonatal brain development in mice  exacerbates developmental neurobehavioral effects2010In: Neurotoxicology, ISSN 0161-813X, E-ISSN 1872-9711, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our environment, mammals (including humans) are exposed to various types of ionizing radiation and both persistent and non-persistent toxic chemicals. It is known that ionizing radiation, as well as methyl mercury, can induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioural effects in mammals. These developmental neurotoxic effects can be seen following exposure during gestation. There is a lack of knowledge concerning the effects and consequences of low-dose exposure during critical phases of pen natal and/or neonatal brain development, and of the combination of ionizing radiation and environmental chemicals. A recent study has indicated that low doses of ionizing radiation to the human brain during infancy influence cognitive ability in adulthood. In the present study, 10-day old neonatal male NMRI mice were exposed to a single oral dose of MeHg (0.40 or 4.0 mg/kg bw). Four hours after the MeHg exposure the mice were subjected to Co-60 gamma-radiation on one occasion at doses of 0.2 and 0.5 Gy. The animals were then subjected to a spontaneous behaviour test at 2 and 4 months, and a water maze test at the age of 5 months. Neither the single dose of MeHg (0.4 mg/kg bw) nor the radiation dose of 0.2 Gy affected their spontaneous behaviour, whereas the co-exposure to external gamma-radiation and MeHg caused developmental neurotoxic effects. The study shows that gamma-radiation and MeHg can interact and significantly exacerbate developmental neurotoxic effects, as manifested by disrupted spontaneous behaviour, lack of habituation, and impaired learning and memory functions.

  • 312.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Ionizing radiation and environmental toxicants can interact during brain development to exacerbate cognitive defects in mice2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 313.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Co-exposure to radiation and environmental toxicants (PBDE 99 and MeHg) during a defined critical phase of neonatal brain development enhances cognitive defects in adult mice2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö, .
    Co-exposure to radiation and environmental toxicants (PBDE 99 and MeHg) during a defined critical phase of neonatal brain development enhances cognitive defects in adult mice2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö, .
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Developmental co-exposure to low doses of ionising radiation and environmental toxicants during a critical period of brain development exacerbate cognitive defects in adult mice.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 316.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Developmental exposure to PBDEs and environmental toxicants: Effects effects and functional consequences later in life2010In: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 317.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Johansson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Luo, Flora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Neonatal low dose exposure of  female  mice to nicotine alters adult susceptability to paraoxon mannifeested as persistent neurobehavioral defects and  increased levels of protein tau2010In: The Toxicologist, ISSN 1096-6080, Vol. 114, no 1, suppl., p. 38-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 318. Ertz, Damien
    et al.
    Bungartz, Frank
    Diederich, Paul
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Molecular and morphological data place Blarneya in Tylophoron (Arthoniaceae)2011In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 345-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on morphological, anatomical, chemical, ecological and molecular evidence, Blarneya is synonymized here with Tylophoron. The molecular phylogeny derived from sequences obtained from sporodochia of Blarneya places this genus, described to accommodate an anamorphic lichen with white cushion-shaped sporodochia, within Tylophoron. This conclusion is further supported by the discovery of Tylophoron-type ascomata emerging directly from thalli with Blarneya-type sporodochia and producing identical hyaline conidia. In one specimen pycnidia were also observed. This represents a surprising variety of morphologically different conidiomata. A different anamorphic type was previously reported from Tylophoron, and this is confirmed here by molecular analysis for T. moderatum: besides thalli with ascomata this species has anamorphic thalli with an irregularly delimited brown sporodochial felt and brown conidia. Ascomata are not known from these entirely anamorphic thalli, whereas they do occur infrequently in Tylophoron species with Blarneya-type sporodochia. A key to all currently accepted species of Tylophoron is provided. In addition to the corticolous Tylophoron hibernicum, confined to humid forests, two saxicolous species with Blarneya-type sporodochia are described here as new: T. galapagoense, known only from Galapagos, differs from T. hibernicum by a thicker, more compact, beige rather than white, more strongly C+ red thallus, growing below sheltered rock overhangs in dry forests; T. stalactiticum has a C- thallus with stipitate, white, C+ red sporodochia; the species is known only from a single locality in Tenerife, on a large slope with volcanic boulders.

  • 319. Escudero, Marcial
    et al.
    Martin-Bravo, Santiago
    Mayrose, Itay
    Fernandez-Mazuecos, Mario
    Fiz-Palacios, Omar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Hipp, Andrew L.
    Pimentel, Manuel
    Jimenez-Mejias, Pedro
    Valcarcel, Virginia
    Vargas, Pablo
    Luceno, Modesto
    Karyotypic Changes through Dysploidy Persist Longer over Evolutionary Time than Polyploid Changes2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, p. e85266-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosome evolution has been demonstrated to have profound effects on diversification rates and speciation in angiosperms. While polyploidy has predated some major radiations in plants, it has also been related to decreased diversification rates. There has been comparatively little attention to the evolutionary role of gains and losses of single chromosomes, which may or not entail changes in the DNA content (then called aneuploidy or dysploidy, respectively). In this study we investigate the role of chromosome number transitions and of possible associated genome size changes in angiosperm evolution. We model the tempo and mode of chromosome number evolution and its possible correlation with patterns of cladogenesis in 15 angiosperm clades. Inferred polyploid transitions are distributed more frequently towards recent times than single chromosome gains and losses. This is likely because the latter events do not entail changes in DNA content and are probably due to fission or fusion events (dysploidy), as revealed by an analysis of the relationship between genome size and chromosome number. Our results support the general pattern that recently originated polyploids fail to persist, and suggest that dysploidy may have comparatively longer-term persistence than polyploidy. Changes in chromosome number associated with dysploidy were typically observed across the phylogenies based on a chi-square analysis, consistent with these changes being neutral with respect to diversification.

  • 320. Estrada-Pena, Agustín
    et al.
    Farkas, Robert
    Jaenson, Thomas G.T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Madder, Maxime
    Pascucci, Ilaria
    Tarrés-Call, Jordi
    European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy.
    Scientific opinion on the Role of Tick Vectors in the Epidemiology of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever and African Swine Fever in Eurasia: EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare2010In: EFSA Journal, ISSN 1831-4732, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 1-156, article id 1703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The report provides an update on the role of the tick vectors in the epidemiology of African swine fever (ASF) and Crimean and Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in Eurasia, specifically to review of the geographical distribution of the relevant ticks with presentation of maps of their occurrence in Europe and Mediterranean basin; a description of the factors that define the relevant tick population dynamics and identify possible high risk areas in the EU; an update on the role of tick vectors associated with CCHF and ASF in Eurasia; and reviews available methods for the control of the relevant tick vectors. Data were collected through systematic literature review in a database from which maps of geographic distribution of ticks, CCHF virus and ASF virus were issued. The main vectors for CCHF are Hyalomma spp, Increase in the number of fragmented areas and the degradation of agricultural lands to bush lands are the two main factors in the creation of new foci of CCHF in endemic areas. Movement of livestock and wildlife species, which may carry infected ticks, contributes to the spread of the infection. The Middle East and Balkan countries are the most likely sources of introduction of CCHFV into other European countries. All the Ornithodoros species investigated so far can become infective with ASF virus and are perhaps biological vectors. These ticks are important in maintaining the local foci of the ASFV, but do not play an active role in the geographical spread of the virus. Wild boars have never been found infested by Ornithodoros spp. because wild boars normally do not rest inside protected burrows, but above the ground. There is no single ideal solution to the control of ticks relevant for CCHF or ASF. The integrated control approach is probably the most effective.

  • 321. Estrada-Peña, A.
    et al.
    Farkas, R.
    Jaenson, Thomas GT
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Koenen, F.
    Madder, M.
    Pascucci, I.
    Salman, M.
    Tarrés-Call, J.
    Jongejan, F.
    Association of environmental traits with the geographic ranges of ticks (Acari Ixodidae) of medical and veterinary importance in the western Palearctic: a digital data set2013In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 351-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compiled information on the distribution of ticks in the western Palearctic (11°W, 45°E; 29°N, 71°N), published during 1970-2010. The literature search was filtered by the tick's species name and an unambiguous reference to the point of capture. Records from some curated collections were included. We focused on tick species of importance to human and animal health, in particular: Ixodes ricinus, Dermacentor marginatus, D. reticulatus, Haemaphysalis punctata, H. sulcata, Hyalomma marginatum, Hy. lusitanicum, Rhipicephalus annulatus, R. bursa, and the R. sanguineus group. A few records of other species (I. canisuga, I. hexagonus, Hy. impeltatum, Hy. anatolicum, Hy. excavatum, Hy. scupense) were also included. A total of 10,280 records was included in the data set. Almost 42 % of published references are not adequately referenced (and not included in the data set), host is reported for only 61 % of records and a reference to time of collection is missed for 84 % of published records. Ixodes ricinus accounted for 44.3 % of total records, with H. marginatum and D. marginatus accounting for 7.1 and 8.1 % of records, respectively. The lack of homogeneity of the references and potential pitfalls in the compilation were addressed to create a digital data set of the records of the ticks. We attached to every record a coherent set of quantitative descriptors for the site of reporting, namely gridded interpolated monthly climate and remotely sensed data on vegetation (NDVI). We also attached categorical descriptors of the habitat: a standard classification of land biomes and an ad hoc classification of the target territory from remotely sensed temperature and NDVI data. A descriptive analysis of the data revealed that a principal components reduction of the environmental (temperature and NDVI) variables described the distribution of the species in the target territory. However, categorical descriptors of the habitat were less effective. We stressed the importance of building reliable collections of ticks with specific references as to collection point, host and date of capture. The data set is freely downloadable.

  • 322. Estrada-Peña, Agustín
    et al.
    Farkas, Robert
    Jaenson, Thomas G. T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Madder, Maxime
    Pascucci, Ilaria
    Salman, Mo
    Tarrés-Call, Jordi
    European Food Safety (EFSA), Parma, Italy.
    Scientific opinion on geographic distribution of tick-borne infections and their vectors in Europe and the other regions of the Mediterranean Basin: EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW)2010In: EFSA Journal, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 1723 [280 pp.]-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is the second of a series of two technical assessments of the role of ticks in transmission of animal diseases and zoonoses in Eurasia. A previous published scientific opinion (EFSA 2010a) focused on two diseases- Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and African swine fever in Eurasia. The aim of this report is to provide a general overview of the geographic distribution of tick species which have proven involvement in the transmission of pathogens causing animal diseases and zoonoses in Eurasia.The report provides a review of the geographic distribution of the relevant tick species and TBDs in Eurasia by producing maps of the region that display the occurrences of ticks and tick borne pathogens. Systematic literature review of available publications for the last 10 years and other available literature from the experts were used in the retrieval of the geographical reported cases for the presence of ticks and tick borne pathogens. The report includes a description of the factors that influence the dynamics of the relevant tick species and identify possible high-risk areas in the EU for introduction considering the biological and ecological characteristics of the ticks and their ability to adapt to new areas. Surveillance tools and control measures for ticks were discussed.Findings from this review have provided evidence of the extent of ticks and TBDs in geographical ranges and the existing risk areas that should be considered as baseline information to assess potential risk of these diseases. The report indicates the validity of using available literature to support the presence of ticks and TBDs without further predication using weather and other environmental factors associated with the survival of the ticks. Surveillance tools for the detection of the ticks and their control measures are discussed in this report. The report concluded that animal and human movement play a significant impact on the spread of the ticks and TBDs. Climate changes and flight pattern of migratory birds can influence the presence and spread of the ticks and TBDs, These two factors acting by themselves have not been determined be responsible for the widespread distribution of ticks.

  • 323.
    Etterlin, Pernille Engelsen
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Sect Pathol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Morrison, David A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Osterberg, Julia
    Natl Vet Inst SVA, S-75189 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ytrehus, Bjornar
    Norwegian Inst Nat Res NINA, Terr Ecol Dept, N-7485 Trondheim, Norway..
    Heldmer, Eva
    Swedish Anim Hlth Serv SvDHV, S-46432 Mellerud, Sweden..
    Ekman, Stina
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Sect Pathol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Osteochondrosis, but not lameness, is more frequent among free-range pigs than confined herd-mates2015In: ACTA VETERINARIA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0044-605X, Vol. 57, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Organic pig production is expanding and amongst the objectives of organic farming are enhancing animal health and welfare. However, some studies have reported a higher prevalence of lameness and joint condemnation at slaughter in free-range/organic pigs than in conventionally raised pigs. Organic slaughter pigs have free-range housing in which indoor and outdoor access is compulsory, while in conventional farming the pigs are commonly confined to indoor pens. The present study evaluated the effects of free-range and confined housing on lameness prevalence in a herd of 106 finisher pigs, and whether osteochondrosis and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae associated arthritis influences these effects. We also evaluated the association between clinical lameness during the rearing period and joint condemnations at slaughter. Results: Seventy free-range and 36 confined housed fattener pigs were scored for their gait twice during the rearing period and 848 joints were evaluated post mortem. Osteochondrosis was more frequent among free-range than confined pigs (P < 0.05), and when present it was also more severe (P < 0.001). Pigs with more numerous and more severe osteochondral lesions had their gait affected more than did pigs with fewer such lesions (P < 0.05). Hence it was a paradox that we did not detect more lameness among the free-range pigs than the confined pigs. E. rhusiopathiae associated arthritis was not diagnosed. The association between gait remarks/clinical lameness and joint condemnations at slaughter was not significant. Conclusions: The results indicate that free-range housing may have both positive and negative effects on locomotory traits. Free-range pigs may be less clinically affected by osteochondrosis than are confined pigs. One explanation for this effect may be strengthening of joint supportive tissue and pain relief promoted by exercise. Visual gait scoring missed serious joint lesions that probably were harmful to the pigs, and should therefore not be used as a sole indicator of joint/leg health in welfare inspection of pigs. The association between gait scores and joint condemnation appeared to be poor. This study was limited to one herd, and so more and larger studies on the effects of free-range housing on lameness severity and osteochondrosis development in pigs are recommended.

  • 324.
    Fadel, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Maersse, Tiiu
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Palaeoenvironmental signatures revealed from rare earth element (REE) compositions of vertebrate microremains of the Vesiku Bone Bed (Homerian, Wenlock), Saaremaa Island, Estonia2015In: Estonian journal of earth sciences, ISSN 1736-4728, E-ISSN 1736-7557, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have been analysed from fossil vertebrate microremains (thelodont scales) from the Vesiku Bone Bed, Saaremaa, Estonia, using in situ microsampling by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Well-preserved scales of three species of the genus Thelodus (T. carinatus, T. laevis and Thelodus sp.) show very uniform REE patterns with slightly lower overall REE concentrations in enameloid than in dentine, with enrichment in middle REEs, depletion in heavy REEs and pronounced negative europium anomaly, but no cerium anomaly. The results of this study suggest a similar diagenetic history and possibly contemporaneous habitats for all three Thelodus species, as well as possible suboxic to anoxic conditions of the bottom and pore waters during the formation of the Vesiku Bone Bed.

  • 325. Farah, Mohamed
    et al.
    Olsson, Sten
    Bate, Jenny
    Lindquist, Marie
    Edwards, Ralph
    Simmonds, Monique
    Leon, Christine
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Botanical Nomenclature in Pharmacovigilance and a Recommendation for Standardisation2006In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, Vol. 29, p. 1023-1029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nomenclature of plants in pharmacology can be presented by pharmaceutical

    names or scientific names in the form of Linnaean binomials. In this paper,

    positive and negative aspects of both systems are discussed in the context of the

    scientific nomenclatural framework and the systems’ practical applicability. The

    Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) runs the WHO Programme for International

    Drug Monitoring and is responsible for the WHO Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR)

    database that currently contains 3.6 million records WHO Adverse Drug Reaction

    database. In order for the UMC to monitor pharmacovigilance through ADRs to

    herbal medicine products the following species nomenclatural criteria are important:

    (i) the name should indicate only one species of plant; (ii) the source for this

    name must be authoritative; (iii) the name should indicate which part of the plant

    is used. Based on these criteria, the UMC investigated four options: (i) adopt main

    names used in recognised (inter-) national pharmacopoeias or authoritative publications;

    (ii) adopt option 1, but cite the publication for all names in abbreviated

    form; (iii) three-part pharmaceutical names consisting of Latinised part name plus

    Latinised genus name, plus Latinised specific epithet; (iv) scientific binomial

    names, optionally with author and plant part used. The UMC has selectedchosen

    for the latter option and willas its adoption utilizes the scientific botanical

    nomenclature as defined by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.

  • 326.
    Farah, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala Monitoring Centre.
    Olsson, Sten
    Uppsala Monitoring Centre.
    Bate, Jenny
    Uppsala Monitoring Centre.
    Lindquist, Marie
    Uppsala Monitoring Centre.
    Edwards, Ralph
    Uppsala Monitoring Centre.
    Simmonds, Monique
    Royal Botanic Gardens Kew.
    Leon, Christine
    Royal Botanic Gardens Kew.
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Botanical Nomenclature in Pharmacovigilance and a Recommendation for Standardisation2006In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, E-ISSN 1179-1942, Vol. 29, no 11, p. 1023-1029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nomenclature of plants in pharmacology can be presented by pharmaceutical names or scientific names in the form of Linnaean binomials. In this paper, positive and negative aspects of both systems are discussed in the context of the scientific nomenclatural framework and the systems' practical applicability. The Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) runs the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring and is responsible for the WHO Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) database that currently contains 3.6 million records. In order for the UMC to monitor pharmacovigilance through ADRs to herbal medicine products the following nomenclatural criteria are important: (i) the name should indicate only one species of plant; (ii) the source for this name must be authoritative; (iii) the name should indicate which part of the plant is used. Based on these criteria, the UMC investigated four options: (i) adopt main names used in recognised (inter-) national pharmacopoeias or authoritative publications; (ii) adopt option 1, but cite the publication for all names in abbreviated form; (iii) three-part pharmaceutical names consisting of Latinised part name plus Latinised genus name, plus Latinised specific epithet; (iv) scientific binomial names, optionally with author and plant part used. The UMC has chosen the latter option and will at its adoption utilise the scientific botanical nomenclature as defined by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. This decision satisfies all criteria set by the UMC and renders the necessity of creating a new system or upgrading an old inconsistent system obsolete. The UMC has also issued an extensive synonymy checklist of vernacular, pharmaceutical and scientific names for the herbals in the WHO ADR database. We strongly recommend the adoption of scientific names to denote plant ingredients in medicine.

  • 327.
    Farida, Seyed Hamed Moazzami
    et al.
    Bu Ali Sina Univ, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Hamadan, Iran.
    Ghorbani, Abdolbaset
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Tradit Med & Mat Med Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.
    Ajani, Yousef
    IBRC, Plant Bank, Karaj, Iran.
    Sadr, Mohammad
    Encyclopedia Islamica Res Ctr, Hist Sci, Tehran, Iran.
    Mozaffarian, Valiollah
    Res Inst Forests & Rangelands, Tehran, Iran.
    Ethnobotanical Applications and Their Correspondence with Phylogeny in Apiaceae-Apioideae2018In: RESEARCH JOURNAL OF PHARMACOGNOSY, ISSN 2345-5977, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 79-97Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Apiaceae family includes some of the most known medicinal, food and spice species in the world some of which have been used by humans since antiquity. Local people in different regions use many species of the family but the information regarding their uses is scattered. Traditionally used species are good candidates for bioprospecting. Combining traditional uses with phylogenetic data helps in selecting species for bioprospecting. In the present study, an ethnobotanical literature review was conducted to outline a comprehensive overview of the ethnobotanical importance of the family in Iran. To highlight the most ethnobotanically used groups in the family, ethnobotanical data were overlapped with generic phylogeny tree of the subfamily Apioideae. In total, 72 species (17.27%) from 42 genera (33.87%) were found to have ethnobotanical uses. Main uses of the family members were medicinal purposes (67.30%) followed by culinary (25%) and ethnoveterinary (11.11%) uses. Two categories of potential species groups for further bioprospecting investigations have been identified based on the phylogenetic analysis. Based on the findings of the present study, phylogenetic analysis can help in identifying potential groups for bioprospecting studies. More rigorous phylogenetic analysis that combines chemotaxonomy data, ethnomedicinal data and phylogenetic data are necessary to pinpoint exact lineages for specific medicinal properties.

  • 328.
    Farida, Seyed Hamed Moazzami
    et al.
    Shahed Univ, Dept Biol, Fac Basic Sci, Tehran 3319118651, Iran..
    Radjabian, Tayebeh
    Shahed Univ, Dept Biol, Fac Basic Sci, Tehran 3319118651, Iran..
    Ranjbar, Massoud
    Bu Ali Sina Univ, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Hamadan 651754161, Iran..
    Salami, Seyed Alireza
    Univ Tehran, Dept Hort Sci, Fac Agr Sci & Engn, Coll Agr & Nat Resources, Karaj 3158777871, Iran..
    Rahmani, Nosrat
    Shahed Univ, Dept Biol, Fac Basic Sci, Tehran 3319118651, Iran..
    Ghorbani, Abdolbaset
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Fatty Acid Patterns of Seeds of Some Salvia Species from Iran: A Chemotaxonomic Approach2016In: Chemistry and Biodiversity, ISSN 1612-1872, E-ISSN 1612-1880, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 451-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the seed oil content and fatty acid (FA) profile of 21 populations from 16 wild Salvia species of Iran were analyzed by GC. Patterns of chemical variations of the oils among species were identified via numerical analyses and also the taxonomic status of the infrageneric grouping was outlined in the genus. Salvia species were scored based on the contents of main FAs using principal coordinate analysis (PCO). The results showed that the total oil content in the seeds varied significantly, and ranged from 6.68 to 38.53% dry weight. alpha-Linolenic (18:3 omega 3, 1.69 -53.56%), linoleic (18:2 omega 6, 13.04 - 60.64%), oleic (18:1 omega 9, 6.15 - 27.06%), palmitic (16:0, 3.77-9.27%), and stearic (18:0, 1.78 - 3.05%) acid were identified as five major FAs in the oils. The amount of omega-3 and omega-6 FAs ranged between 1.90 - 53.80% and 13.46 - 60.83% of total FAs in the seed oils, respectively. The results confirmed that FA profiles were distinctive among the species and that they can be used as chemotaxonomic markers. The discrimination of Salvia species according to their botanical classification at intersectional level was supported. In general, seed oils of Salvia species were rich sources of polyunsaturated FAs, except in linoleic and alpha-linolenic acid, and may be valuable for food and pharmaceutical industries.

  • 329.
    Farnsworth, B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Radomska, K.J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. IBENS, Dept Biol, Paris, France..
    Zimmermann, B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kettunen, P.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Psychiat & Neurochem, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Clin Neurosci, Dept Neuropathol, Oxford, England..
    Jazin, E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Emilsson, L.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    QKI6B mRNA levels are upregulated in schizophrenia and predict GFAP expression2017In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1669, p. 63-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a heterogeneous symptomatology. Research increasingly indicates the importance of the crucial and often overlooked glial perturbations within schizophrenia. Within this study, we examined an isoform of quaking (a gene encoding an RNA-binding protein that is exclusively expressed in glial cells), known as QKI6B, and a prototypical astrocyte marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), postulated to be under the regulation of QKI. The expression levels of these genes were quantified across post-mortem brain samples from 55 schizophrenic individuals, and 55 healthy controls, using real-time PCR. We report, through an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model, an upregulation of both QKI6B, and GFAP in the prefrontal cortex of brain samples of schizophrenic individuals, as compared to control samples. Previous research has suggested that the QKI protein directly regulates the expression of several genes through interaction with a motif in the target's sequence, termed the Quaking Response Element (QRE). We therefore examined if QICI6B expression can predict the outcome of GFAP, and several oligodendrocyte-related genes, using a multiple linear regression approach. We found that QKI6B significantly predicts the expression of GFAP, but does not predict oligodendrocyte-related gene outcome, as previously seen with other QKI isoforms. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 330.
    Farnsworth, Bryn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Translational research of the quaking gene: Focusing on the conjunction between development and disease2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quaking (QKI) is an RNA binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Originally identified as the cause of hypomyelination in a mouse mutant, it has since been consistently implicated in a wide range of neurological diseases. As a gene exclusively expressed in glial cells of the central nervous system, such associations emphasise the importance of an indirect, or non-neuronal link to aberrant neural function. A role in early neural development has also been suggested from the viable and embryonic lethal mouse mutants, yet detailed and in vivo study has been precluded thus far by the murine uterine gestation, and mutant lethality prior to oligodendrogenesis. This thesis examines the role of QKI in human neurological disease, and explores the use of the zebrafish as a model organism to allow the unimpeded study of neural development.

    We first examined the expression of QKI in human post-mortem brain samples, in separate studies of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and schizophrenia. In AD we found that QKI and the splice variants QKI5, QKI6, and QKI7 were all significantly upregulated, and were additionally implicated in the regulation of genes related to AD pathogenesis. Within schizophrenic samples, we explored the expression of QKI6B, a newly identified splice variant of QKI, alongside GFAP. We found that both were significantly upregulated, and a previously implicated regulation of GFAP by QKI was supported. In order to advance investigations of the potential of QKI to disturb neural development, we established the suitability of zebrafish for studying qki. This was achieved through phylogenetic and syntenic analysis, coupled with examination of the qki genes expression patterns. We found that qkib and qki2 are orthologues of human QKI, and both have distinct, yet overlapping expression patterns in neural progenitors, and are not found in differentiated neurons. Following from this, we explored the effects of knockdown to qkib and qki2, finding that qkib exclusively led to aberrant motor neuron development, cerebellar abnormalities, and alterations to the progenitor domain. This clearly demonstrated the crucial role of qki in early neural development, and confirms a previously speculated, yet occluded, function prior to oligodendrogenesis.

    List of papers
    1. Gene Expression of Quaking in Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease Patients is Both Upregulated and Related to Expression Levels of Genes Involved in Amyloid Plaque and Neurofibrillary Tangle Formation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene Expression of Quaking in Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease Patients is Both Upregulated and Related to Expression Levels of Genes Involved in Amyloid Plaque and Neurofibrillary Tangle Formation
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    2016 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 209-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Quaking (QKI) is a gene exclusively expressed within glial cells. QKI has previously been implicated in various neurological disorders and diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a condition for which increasing evidence suggests a central role of glia cells. The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of QKI and three QKI isoforms (QKI5, QKI6, and QKI7) in AD. Genes that have previously been related to the ontogeny and progression of AD, specifically APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and MAPT, were also investigated. A real-time PCR assay of 123 samples from human postmortem sporadic AD patients and control brains was performed. The expression values were analyzed with an analysis of covariance model and subsequent multiple regressions to explore the possibility of related expression values between QKI, QKI isoforms, and AD-related genes. Further, the sequences of AD-related genes were analyzed for the presence of QKI binding domains. QKI and all measured QKI isoforms were found to be significantly upregulated in AD samples, relative to control samples. However, APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and MAPT were not found to be significantly different. QKI and QKI isoforms were found to be predictive for the variance of APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and MAPT, and putative QKI binding sites suggests an interaction with QKI. Overall, these results implicate a possible role of QKI in AD, although the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains to be uncovered.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IOS Press, 2016
    Keywords
    Amyloid-beta, APP, gene expression, glia, MAPT, neurodegenerative diseases, real-time polymerase chain reaction, PSEN1, PSEN2
    National Category
    Genetics Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-286589 (URN)10.3233/JAD-160160 (DOI)000379742200019 ()27163826 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Göran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of TechnologyTorsten Söderbergs stiftelseSwedish Society of MedicineMagnus Bergvall FoundationLars Hierta Memorial FoundationEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 608743The Swedish Brain Foundation
    Available from: 2016-04-21 Created: 2016-04-21 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
    2. QKI6B is upregulated in schizophrenic brains and predicts GFAP expression
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>QKI6B is upregulated in schizophrenic brains and predicts GFAP expression
    Show others...
    (English)In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a heterogeneous symptomatology. Research increasingly indicates the importance of the crucial and often overlooked glial perturbations within schizophrenic brains. Within this study, we examined an isoform of quaking (gene encoding an RNA-binding protein that is exclusively expressed in glial cells), known as QKI6B, and an astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), postulated to be under the regulation of QKI. The expression levels of these genes were quantified across post-mortem samples from the prefrontal cortex of 55 schizophrenic brains, and 55 healthy control brains, using real-time PCR. We report, through an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model, an upregulation of both QKI6B, and GFAP in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic brains. Previous research has suggested that the QKI protein directly regulates the expression of several genes through interaction with a motif in the target’s sequence, termed the Quaking Response Element (QRE). We therefore examined if QKI6B expression can predict the outcome of GFAP, and several oligodendrocyte-related genes, using a multiple linear regression approach. We found that QKI6B significantly predicts, and possibly regulates the expression of GFAP, but does not predict oligodendrocyte-related gene outcome, as previously seen with other QKI isoforms. 

    National Category
    Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284637 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
    3. Characterization and Expression of the Zebrafish qki Paralogs
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization and Expression of the Zebrafish qki Paralogs
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, article id e0146155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Quaking (QKI) is an RNA-binding protein involved in post-transcriptional mRNA processing. This gene is found to be associated with several human neurological disorders. Early expression of QKI proteins in the developing mouse neuroepithelium, together with neural tube defects in Qk mouse mutants, suggest the functional requirement of Qk for the establishment of the nervous system. As a knockout of Qk is embryonic lethal in mice, other model systems like the zebrafish could serve as a tool to study the developmental functions of qki. In the present study we sought to characterize the evolutionary relationship and spatiotemporal expression of qkia, qki2, and qkib; zebrafish homologs of human QKI. We found that qkia is an ancestral paralog of the single tetrapod Qk gene that was likely lost during the fin-to-limb transition. Conversely, qkib and qki2 are orthologs, emerging at the root of the vertebrate and teleost lineage, respectively. Both qki2 and qkib, but not qkia, were expressed in the progenitor domains of the central nervous system, similar to expression of the single gene in mice. Despite having partially overlapping expression domains, each gene has a unique expression pattern, suggesting that these genes have undergone subfunctionalization following duplication. Therefore, we suggest the zebrafish could be used to study the separate functions of qki genes during embryonic development.

    National Category
    Developmental Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275551 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0146155 (DOI)000367681500058 ()26727370 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Göran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of Technology, 1152Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS12:116Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS13:116Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS14:128The Swedish Brain FoundationMagnus Bergvall FoundationLars Hierta Memorial Foundation
    Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    4. Morpholino knockdown of qkib leads to disturbed neural development in the larval zebrafish.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morpholino knockdown of qkib leads to disturbed neural development in the larval zebrafish.
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quaking (QKI) is a member of the Signal Transduction and Activation of RNA (STAR) protein family and has been found to regulate the splicing, quantity, and translation of mRNA. Several studies have also found an association of QKI with a variety of human neurological disorders, such as schizophrenia, ataxia, and Alzheimer’s disease, amongst others. Mouse mutants show clear developmental defects in myelin formation. Critical periods for the investigation of myelin aberration have been precluded by the embryonic lethality of Qk null mice mutants. We have previously shown that the zebrafish is a suitable tool in which to interrogate qki function. Within this study we employ a gene-knockdown approach with the use of morpholinos and the Tg(olig2:DsRed2), and Tg(-4.9sox10:eGFP) transgenic zebrafish lines, and confocal imaging. We find a reduction in the number of oligodendrocytes, critical for the formation of myelin. We also find aberrations in the development and arborization of motor neurons across the spinal cord, and a complete absence of eurydendroid cells within the cerebellum. These findings have parallels to both neuroanatomical evidence from viable Qk mutant mice, and to aspects of related human neurological disease.

    National Category
    Genetics Developmental Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287372 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-24 Created: 2016-04-24 Last updated: 2016-06-01
  • 331.
    Farnsworth, Bryn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Peuckert, Christiane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Zimmermann, Bettina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kettunen, Petronella
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology.
    Emilsson Sors, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Gene Expression of Quaking in Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease Patients is Both Upregulated and Related to Expression Levels of Genes Involved in Amyloid Plaque and Neurofibrillary Tangle Formation2016In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 209-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quaking (QKI) is a gene exclusively expressed within glial cells. QKI has previously been implicated in various neurological disorders and diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a condition for which increasing evidence suggests a central role of glia cells. The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of QKI and three QKI isoforms (QKI5, QKI6, and QKI7) in AD. Genes that have previously been related to the ontogeny and progression of AD, specifically APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and MAPT, were also investigated. A real-time PCR assay of 123 samples from human postmortem sporadic AD patients and control brains was performed. The expression values were analyzed with an analysis of covariance model and subsequent multiple regressions to explore the possibility of related expression values between QKI, QKI isoforms, and AD-related genes. Further, the sequences of AD-related genes were analyzed for the presence of QKI binding domains. QKI and all measured QKI isoforms were found to be significantly upregulated in AD samples, relative to control samples. However, APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and MAPT were not found to be significantly different. QKI and QKI isoforms were found to be predictive for the variance of APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, and MAPT, and putative QKI binding sites suggests an interaction with QKI. Overall, these results implicate a possible role of QKI in AD, although the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains to be uncovered.

  • 332.
    Farnsworth, Bryn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Radomska, Kataryzna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology. Institut de Biologie de l'École Normale Supérieure, Department of Biology .
    Zimmermann, Bettina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Kettunen, Petronella
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Emilsson, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    QKI6B is upregulated in schizophrenic brains and predicts GFAP expressionIn: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a heterogeneous symptomatology. Research increasingly indicates the importance of the crucial and often overlooked glial perturbations within schizophrenic brains. Within this study, we examined an isoform of quaking (gene encoding an RNA-binding protein that is exclusively expressed in glial cells), known as QKI6B, and an astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), postulated to be under the regulation of QKI. The expression levels of these genes were quantified across post-mortem samples from the prefrontal cortex of 55 schizophrenic brains, and 55 healthy control brains, using real-time PCR. We report, through an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model, an upregulation of both QKI6B, and GFAP in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic brains. Previous research has suggested that the QKI protein directly regulates the expression of several genes through interaction with a motif in the target’s sequence, termed the Quaking Response Element (QRE). We therefore examined if QKI6B expression can predict the outcome of GFAP, and several oligodendrocyte-related genes, using a multiple linear regression approach. We found that QKI6B significantly predicts, and possibly regulates the expression of GFAP, but does not predict oligodendrocyte-related gene outcome, as previously seen with other QKI isoforms. 

  • 333.
    Farnsworth, Bryn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Radomska, Katarzyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Sager, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Kettunen, Petronella
    Emilsson, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Morpholino knockdown of qkib leads to disturbed neural development in the larval zebrafish.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quaking (QKI) is a member of the Signal Transduction and Activation of RNA (STAR) protein family and has been found to regulate the splicing, quantity, and translation of mRNA. Several studies have also found an association of QKI with a variety of human neurological disorders, such as schizophrenia, ataxia, and Alzheimer’s disease, amongst others. Mouse mutants show clear developmental defects in myelin formation. Critical periods for the investigation of myelin aberration have been precluded by the embryonic lethality of Qk null mice mutants. We have previously shown that the zebrafish is a suitable tool in which to interrogate qki function. Within this study we employ a gene-knockdown approach with the use of morpholinos and the Tg(olig2:DsRed2), and Tg(-4.9sox10:eGFP) transgenic zebrafish lines, and confocal imaging. We find a reduction in the number of oligodendrocytes, critical for the formation of myelin. We also find aberrations in the development and arborization of motor neurons across the spinal cord, and a complete absence of eurydendroid cells within the cerebellum. These findings have parallels to both neuroanatomical evidence from viable Qk mutant mice, and to aspects of related human neurological disease.

  • 334.
    Fehling, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Davidson, Keith
    Bolch, Christopher J. S.
    Brand, Tim D.
    Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E.
    The Relationship between Phytoplankton Distribution and Water Column Characteristics in North West European Shelf Sea Waters2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 3, p. e34098-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phytoplankton underpin the marine food web in shelf seas, with some species having properties that are harmful to human health and coastal aquaculture. Pressures such as climate change and anthropogenic nutrient input are hypothesized to influence phytoplankton community composition and distribution. Yet the primary environmental drivers in shelf seas are poorly understood. To begin to address this in North Western European waters, the phytoplankton community composition was assessed in light of measured physical and chemical drivers during the "Ellett Line" cruise of autumn 2001 across the Scottish Continental shelf and into adjacent open Atlantic waters. Spatial variability existed in both phytoplankton and environmental conditions, with clear differences not only between on and off shelf stations but also between different on shelf locations. Temperature/salinity plots demonstrated different water masses existed in the region. In turn, principal component analysis (PCA), of the measured environmental conditions (temperature, salinity, water density and inorganic nutrient concentrations) clearly discriminated between shelf and oceanic stations on the basis of DIN:DSi ratio that was correlated with both salinity and temperature. Discrimination between shelf stations was also related to this ratio, but also the concentration of DIN and DSi. The phytoplankton community was diatom dominated, with multidimensional scaling (MDS) demonstrating spatial variability in its composition. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was used to investigate the link between environment and the phytoplankton community. This demonstrated a significant relationship between community composition and water mass as indexed by salinity (whole community), and both salinity and DIN: DSi (diatoms alone). Diatoms of the Pseudo-nitzschia seriata group occurred at densities potentially harmful to shellfish aquaculture, with the potential for toxicity being elevated by the likelihood of DSi limitation of growth at most stations and depths.

  • 335.
    Ferm, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    A preliminary phylogeny of Zapoteca (Fabaceae: Caesalpinioideae: Mimosoid clade)2019In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 305, no 5, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The legume genus Zapoteca is separated from the genus Calliandra, i.e., by having pollen arranged in 16-grained polyads (compared to 8-grained polyads in Calliandra) and in chromosome number (13 vs. 8 or 11). As currently circumscribed, Zapoteca contains 22 species and 13 subspecies placed in five subgenera. This study included 20 species and 11 subspecies representing all subgenera. Representative species from the closely related genera Calliandra, Havardia, Pithecellobium and Viguieranthus were also included, as the more distantly related species Senegalia senegal and Vachellia farnesiana. The aims of this study were to test the monophyly of Zapoteca and investigate phylogenetic relationships within the genus. Total DNA was extracted from leaf material and the nuclear ETS and ITS, and plastid trnL-trnF regions were amplified. Additional sequence data were downloaded from GenBank, and the data sets were analyzed using Bayesian inference. Results show that Zapoteca is monophyletic and that the monospecific subgenera (subg. Nervosa and subg. Aculeata) are resolved as separate lineages within the genus, subg. Nervosa (containing Z. nervosa) as sister to all remaining taxa of Zapoteca. Subgenera containing more than one species (subg. Amazonica, subg. Zapoteca and subg. Ravenia) are shown to be non-monophyletic. Two subspecies of Z. caracasana, subsp. caracasana and subsp. weberbaueri, are found together in a clade. Furthermore, Zapoteca tehuana and Z. portoricensis subsp. portoricensis, Z. formosa subsp. gracilis and Z. formosa subsp. schottii are shown to be monophyletic. However, the other subspecific taxa of Z. formosa and of Z. portoricensis are not supported as monophyletic.

  • 336.
    Ferm, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Phylogeny of the Neotropical legume genera Zygia and Marmaroxylon and close relatives2019In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neotropical legume genera Zygia and Marmaroxylon have traditionally been considered closely related and are sometimes treated as congeners. They have been referred to the mimosoid tribe Ingeae based on their possession of flowers with basally fused stamen filaments. However, their systematic status and position have not been analysed in a phylogenetic context. This study provides the first molecular phylogeny of Zygia and Marmaroxylon and closely related mimosoid legume genera, particularly from the tribe Ingeae. DNA sequence data were derived from the nuclear external transcribed spacer (ETS) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), and from the chloroplast psbAtrnHand trnLtrnF regions, and were analysed using Bayesian inference. In all, 29 species of Zygia and 7 species of Marmaroxylon were included in the study along with representative species from the closely related genera AbaremaAcacia s.str., ArchidendropsisCalliandraChloroleuconCojobaFaidherbiaHavardiaHydrochoreaIngaLeucochloronMacrosamaneaPithecellobiumPseudosamaneaSamaneaSenegaliaVachellia and Zapoteca. The results show that neither Zygia nor Marmaroxylon are monophyletic as presently circumscribed. Furthermore, these two genera are not monophyletic together. None of the nine presently recognized sections of Zygia that contain more than one species are shown to be monophyletic. Two of the monospecific sections of Zygia, sect. Ingopsis (Z. inundata) and sect. Pseudocojoba (Z. sabatieri), were found in a clade together with species of IngaMarmaroxylon ocumarense and M. magdalenae, previously treated as synonyms (as Zygia), are not conspecific, and are found in a clade with Macrosamaneaand in a clade with species of Abarema and Hydrochorea, respectively. Our results also show the Inga alliance to be non‐monophyletic. In correspondence with the results presented, all species referred to Marmaroxylon, except for Mocumarense and Mmagdalenae, are here included in Zygia, and Z. inundata is treated in Inga, in which genus it was first described.

  • 337.
    Ferm, Julia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Stockholm Univ, Dept Bot, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kårehed, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, The Linnean Gardens of Uppsala.
    Bremer, Birgitta
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Bot, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden; Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Bergius Fdn, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Bergius Fdn, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, Box 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paracarphalea, a new genus of the coffee family segregated from the Malagasy endemic genus Carphalea (Rubiaceae, Rubioideae, Knoxieae)2016In: Phytotaxa, ISSN 1179-3155, E-ISSN 1179-3163, Vol. 263, no 2, p. 98-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Malagasy genus Carphalea (Rubiaceae) consists of six species (C. angulata, C. cloiselii, C. kirondron, C. linearifolia, C. madagascariensis, C. pervilleana) of shrubs or small trees and is recognizable by a distinctly lobed calyx, 2(–4)-locular ovaries, each locule with several ovules on a rod-like stalk arising from the base of the locule, and indehiscent fruits. Carphalea linearifolia, rediscovered in 2010, has not previously been included in any Rubiaceae molecular phylogenetic studies. We re-investigated the monophyly of Carphalea using sequence data from chloroplast (rps16 and trnT-F) and nuclear (ITS and ETS) markers analysed with parsimony and Bayesian methods. Carphalea linearifolia forms a clade with Ccloiselii and the type species C. madagascariensis. This clade is sister to a clade consisting of the rest of the Carphalea species plus the genus Triainolepis. According to these results, the new genus Paracarphalea is here described to accommodate Carphalea angulata, C. kirondron, and C. pervilleana. Theconservation status of Carphalea linearifolia is assessed as critically endangered according to IUCN criteria.

  • 338. Fernandez, Vincent
    et al.