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  • 301.
    Raffield, Ben
    et al.
    Simon Fraser Univ, Human Evolutionary Studies Program, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Greenlow, Claire
    Simon Fraser Univ, Human Evolutionary Studies Program, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Price, Neil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala Univ, Archaeol, S-75105 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Collard, Mark
    Simon Fraser Univ, Human Evolutionary Studies, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Simon Fraser Univ, Archaeol, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Univ Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB9 1FX, Scotland..
    Ingroup identification, identity fusion and the formation of Viking war bands2016In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 35-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lio, a retinue of warriors sworn to a leader, has long been considered one of the basic armed groups of the Viking Age. However, in recent years the study of lio has been eclipsed by the discussion of larger Viking armies. In this paper, we focus on the key question of how loyalty to the lio was achieved. We argue that two processes that have been intensively studied by psychologists and anthropologists - ingroup identification and identity fusion - would have been important in the formation and operation of lio. In support of this hypothesis, we outline archaeological, historical and literary evidence pertaining to material and psychological identities. The construction of such identities, we contend, would have facilitated the formation of cohesive fighting groups and contributed to their success while operating in the field.

  • 302.
    Raffield, Ben
    et al.
    Simon Fraser University.
    Greenlow, Claire
    Simon Fraser University.
    Price, Neil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Collard, Mark
    Simon Fraser University.
    Ingroup identification, identity fusion and the formation of Viking warbands2015In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 35-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 303.
    Raffield, Ben
    et al.
    Simon Fraser Univ, Human Evolutionary Studies Program, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Archaeol, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Price, Neil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Collard, Mark
    Simon Fraser Univ, Human Evolutionary Studies Program, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Archaeol, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Univ Aberdeen, Dept Archaeol, St Marys Bldg,Elphinstone Rd, Aberdeen AB24 3UF, Scotland..
    Male-biased operational sex ratios and the Viking phenomenon: an evolutionary anthropological perspective on Late Iron Age Scandinavian raiding2017In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 315-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we use a combination of evolutionary theory, ethnographic data, written sources, and archaeological evidence to develop a new explanation for the origins of Viking raiding. Our argument focuses on the operational sex ratio, which is the ratio of males to females in a society who are ready to mate at a given time. We propose that a combination of two practices-polygyny and concubinage-and the increase in social inequality that occurred in Scandinavia during the Late Iron Age resulted in a male-biased operational sex ratio. This would have created a pool of unmarried men motivated to engage in risky behaviours that had the potential to increase their wealth and status, and therefore their probability of entering the marriage market. With high-status men looking to instigate expeditions to acquire plunder and develop their reputations as war leaders, raiding represented a mutually beneficial means of achieving social advancement and success. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 304.
    Raffield, Benjamin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Archaeol, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
    Price, Neil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Collard, Mark
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Archaeol, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
    Religious belief and cooperation: a view from Viking-Age Scandinavia2019In: Religion, Brain & Behavior, ISSN 2153-599X, E-ISSN 2153-5981, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 2-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on two hypotheses at the heart of a debate concerning cooperation, socio-political complexity, and religious belief. One of these contends that moralizing high gods (MHGs) were central to the development of complex societies. The key mechanism here is supernatural monitoring, which is the perception that gods observe humans and punish those who commit transgressions. The other hypothesis - the broad supernatural punishment (BSP) hypothesis - contends that it was fear of supernatural monitoring and punishment by non-MHG deities that fostered the development of socio-political complexity, and that MHGs followed rather than preceded the appearance of complex societies. To test between these hypotheses, we examined evidence for pre-Christian beliefs in Viking-Age Scandinavia (c. 750-1050 CE). We sought answers to two questions: (1) did the Vikings perceive themselves subject to supernatural monitoring and punishment? And (2) were the Norse gods MHGs? The evidence indicates that the Vikings believed themselves to be monitored by supernatural entities in some contexts, and that they could be punished for certain transgressions. However, the Norse gods do not meet all the criteria for recognition as MHGs. Taken together, these findings support the idea that socio-political complexity was fostered by non-MHG deities and not by MHGs.

  • 305.
    Rebecka, Engström
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Den arkeologiska kommunikationen och den privilegierade arkeologen2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is a popular subject that is often depicted in popular media. Archaeology is also an academic field that contributes to national and individual identities. Therefor archaeologists conducting research need to be aware of the political and ethical implications their work may have.

    This essay presents and discuss previous research done about archaeologists and their communication efforts. Moreover, the essay also presents scientist communication goals and tries to discuss it in relation to Uppsala University’s and the department of Archaeology and Ancient History goals and guidelines. The discussion is based largely on a survey made by the author. Questions discussed are: who should write about archaeology? Would a better communication create a more “correct” use of history? Who has the right to write about archaeology? Is Uppsala University’s goals in line with how the scientist perceive and conduct their communication mission?

    The essay is based on previous research and a survey conducted by the author. The survey was sent to eight archaeology professors active at Campus Gotland, Uppsala university. Five responded to the survey. The method used in the essay is comparative literature analysis. The result of the survey is discussed in relation to Uppsala university and departments goals.

    The essay shows that archaeologists need more time to be able to conduct their communication goals more efficient and at a higher volume than present. The essay also states that archaeologists often have other work-related priorities than communication with the adjacent society.

  • 306.
    Reide, Felix
    et al.
    Aarhus University.
    Andersen, Per
    Aarhus University.
    Price, Neil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Does environmental archaeology need an ethical promise?In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 307.
    Riede, Felix
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ.
    Andersen, Per
    Aarhus Univ.
    Price, Neil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Does environmental archaeology need an ethical promise?2017In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 466-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental catastrophes represent profound challenges faced by societies today. Numerous scholars in the climate sciences and the humanities have argued for a greater ethical engagement with these pressing issues. At the same time, several disciplines concerned with hazards are moving towards formalized ethical codes or promises that not only guide the dissemination of data but oblige scientists to relate to fundamentally political issues. This article couples a survey of the recent environmental ethics literature with two case studies of how past natural hazards have affected vulnerable societies in Europe's prehistory. We ask whether cases of past calamities and their societal effects should play a greater role in public debates and whether archaeologists working with past environmental hazards should be more outspoken in their ethical considerations. We offer no firm answers, but suggest that archaeologists engage with debates in human-environment relations at this interface between politics, public affairs and science.

  • 308.
    Runesson, Noah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    New Novgorod?: On the Russian Church in Visby and Hidden Social Structures2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Russian community living in medieval Visby (ca. 1150-1400) is, although known, almost entirely invisible in historical texts. Considering the importance of Russian trade on the Baltic, this generates suspicion as to how they were received by the host society. The present study aims to illuminate these Russians of Visby from a diaspora perspective and attempt to understand their place within the city’s social structure. To achieve this, bones from the ca. 30 graves of the Russian Church in Visby, which was excavated in 1971 and is curated by Gotland’s Museum, was analyzed osteologically. Data from this examination was then woven together into a representation of social structure using a multiple correspondence analysis, which was compared with 20 individuals from the contemporary German-Gotlandic majority population (St. Hans in Visby). From this analysis emerged a picture of what the elusive Russian community looked like and what place it held, socially, in the city. 

  • 309.
    Rössle, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Han, hon eller hen i Håga- Vad spelar det för roll?: En studie i genus, kön och vår syn på forntiden.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study was made with the express purpose to shine a light on how we use the present to understand the past. My focus was directed at how the view on gender during the last couple of hundred years has influenced how we construct arbitrary gender norms for a Scandinavian bronze age society. To complete this study, I looked at the Swedish gravemound “Hågahögen”, on the outskirts of Uppsala, and compared it to three Danish mounds with similar properties. Hågahögen consists of the cremated remains of one, or possibly two, individuals who have been interpreted as male due to the presence of a sword in the grave. The Danish graves are all located on the Danish mainland, known as Jutland, and are called Egtved, Borum Eshøj and Trindhøj. Due to the extraordinarily well-preserved remains in these graves they proved to be an excellent counter to Hågahögen. Because of this the biological sex of these individuals are not in question, therefore I could use them to compare various arguments and how their sex was being portrayed.

    My sources consisted of various articles, archaeological textbooks, reports and popular science books. My results show that graves that contain males are generally valued higher than those that contain females. Power is more often attributed to the male remains while the females are often seen as objects to empower males. The women I studied were either seen as mothers, wives or sexual objects. The men were seen as chieftains, kings, ritual masters or they weren’t described in enough detail to conclude a role for them. The individual in Hågahögen was given masculinity because of the sword in the grave, but also due to the implied sway and power over those who built the grave after their death. That sort of power is rarely seen as a feminine trait, therefor it was impossible for the archaeologists of old to see the occupant of the grave as anything other than male.

  • 310.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Malmström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Univ Johannesburg, Dept Anthropol & Dev Studies, Ctr Anthropol Res, ZA-2006 Auckland Pk, South Africa.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Girdland-Flink, Linus
    Liverpool John Moores Univ, Sch Nat Sci & Psychol, Res Ctr Evolutionary Anthropol & Paleoecol, Liverpool L3 3AF, Merseyside, England.
    Svensson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Simões, Luciana G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    George, Robert
    Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Dept Surg, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia;Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Osteoarchaeol Res Lab, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hollfelder, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Burenhult, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Noble, Gordon
    Univ Aberdeen, Sir Duncan Rice Lib, Museums & Special Collect, Aberdeen AB24 3AA, Scotland.
    Britton, Kate
    Univ Aberdeen, Sir Duncan Rice Lib, Museums & Special Collect, Aberdeen AB24 3AA, Scotland;Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Anthropol, Dept Human Evolut, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Talamo, Sahra
    Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Anthropol, Dept Human Evolut, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Curtis, Neil
    Univ Aberdeen, Sir Duncan Rice Lib, Museums & Special Collect, Aberdeen AB24 3AA, Scotland.
    Brzobohata, Hana
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Archaeol, Dept Prehist Archaeol, CZ-11801 Prague, Czech Republic.
    Sumberova, Radka
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Archaeol, Dept Prehist Archaeol, CZ-11801 Prague, Czech Republic.
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Archaeol Res Lab, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stora, Jan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Osteoarchaeol Res Lab, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Univ Johannesburg, Dept Anthropol & Dev Studies, Ctr Anthropol Res, ZA-2006 Auckland Pk, South Africa.
    Megalithic tombs in western and northern Neolithic Europe were linked to a kindred society2019In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 19, p. 9469-9474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paleogenomic and archaeological studies show that Neolithic lifeways spread from the Fertile Crescent into Europe around 9000 BCE, reaching northwestern Europe by 4000 BCE. Starting around 4500 BCE, a new phenomenon of constructing megalithic monuments, particularly for funerary practices, emerged along the Atlantic facade. While it has been suggested that the emergence of megaliths was associated with the territories of farming communities, the origin and social structure of the groups that erected them has remained largely unknown. We generated genome sequence data from human remains, corresponding to 24 individuals from five megalithic burial sites, encompassing the widespread tradition of megalithic construction in northern and western Europe, and analyzed our results in relation to the existing European paleogenomic data. The various individuals buried in megaliths show genetic affinities with local farming groups within their different chronological contexts. Individuals buried in megaliths display (past) admixture with local hunter-gatherers, similar to that seen in other Neolithic individuals in Europe. In relation to the tomb populations, we find significantly more males than females buried in the megaliths of the British Isles. The genetic data show close kin relationships among the individuals buried within the megaliths, and for the Irish megaliths, we found a kin relation between individuals buried in different megaliths. We also see paternal continuity through time, including the same Y-chromosome haplotypes reoccurring. These observations suggest that the investigated funerary monuments were associated with patrilineal kindred groups. Our genomic investigation provides insight into the people associated with this long-standing megalith funerary tradition, including their social dynamics.

  • 311.
    Sandhagen, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ajvides flinta under luppen: Flintslagare och slagplatser för flinta på en gropkeramisk lokal på Gotland2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 312.
    Santic, Ivan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Sankt Domnius katedralen i Split: En studie om katedralens utveckling från tidigmedeltid till högmedeltid2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay, The Saint Domnius cathedral in Split, is written with the intention to examine the Sankt Domnius cathedral. By examining the cathedral and the contemporary historic contexts in the Croatian region of Dalmatia from the antique period up to the 13th century middle ages, the study shows how the process of change due to the historic contexts is visible on the cathedral building itself. The main questions in this study are: how has the early Christians community’s relationship to the antique legacy and the antique remains influenced the building of Saint Domnius cathedral between the early and high middle age periods?  Which historic contexts can have influenced the Christian community’s relationship to the antique legacy and the antique remains?

     To answer these questions this study has done a detailed description of the relevant historic events and people in the region of Dalmatia. The study has also showed relevant earlier study’s made on the campanile of Saint Domnius cathedral and the sphinxes found in the nearby area and the history and documentation of restorations made on the original mausoleum building that today is the Saint Domnius cathedral. A field study has also been made at the cathedral that revealed multiply carved crosses and names on the outside walls.

    The conclusion of the study shows that the antique legacy and ancient remains of Emperor Diocletian’s palace was regarded with hatred and forbidden by the early Christian community from the 4th to 5th century. The early Christians showed their hatred for Diocletian by destroying antique material that contained a symbolic meaning. This was an act of revenge from the Christian community for the prosecution that Diocletian had brought upon the Christians at the beginning of the 4th century. The revenge resulted in the destruction of Diocletian’s sarcophagus and the sphinxes that represented his honour and status. The walls on his mausoleum also got carved with crosses. From the 5th until the 7th century the palace was abounded because of escalating threats in the area. This resulted in the preservation of the palace and the mausoleum. When the palace once again got inhabited in the 7th century the Christian community did probably not regard the once hated antique remains with content.  The reason for this can be that the people had simply forgotten the symbolic meaning behind the remains and regarded it only as decorative remains. Besides this, the Croatians that had immigrated to the area at the same time showed a dominated position in the region. The Croatian were mostly pagan until the 9th century and therefore they may have lacked the sympathy for the early Christians prosecution.  At the same time the mausoleum was turned in to a cathedral, the building was probably chosen because of its central position and it’s already exclusive furnishing and material it contained. The reason why I don’t believe this was an act of revenge was as stated above, the ignorance of the remains true symbolic meaning and the dominant pagan Croatians influence in the region. However they also left a central motif of Diocletian unharmed in the new converted cathedral.

    The middle ages continued with periods of greatness for the Croatian people, they formed the kingdom of Croatia and expanded the borders. When a feud with the kingdom of Hungary about the rights to the crown ended with the defeat for the Croats in the 12th century, they were forced in to a political union with Hungary. The Croats lost their independence and developed a yearning for their once dominant position in this part of Europe. They manifested this yearning by building the campanile at Sankt Domnius cathedral. The campanile was finished at the 13th century and displayed consciously selected symbolic material that linked the Croatians prehistory to the antique prehistory in the region. The campanile became a monument that showcased the Croatian identity.

  • 313.
    Seki, Hamidu
    et al.
    Department of Geography, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Mkwawa University College of Education, Iringa, Tanzania.
    Shirima, Deo
    Department of Ecosystems and Conservation, College of Forestry, Wildlife and Tourism, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.
    Courtney Mustaphi, Colin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Marchant, Rob
    Environment Department, York Institute for Tropical Ecosystems, University of York, York, UK.
    Munishi, Pantaleo
    Department of Ecosystems and Conservation, College of Forestry, Wildlife and Tourism, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.
    The impact of land use and land cover change on biodiversity within and adjacent Kibasira Swamp in Kilombero valley, Tanzania2018In: African Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0141-6707, E-ISSN 1365-2028, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 518-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetlands are crucial ecosystems with multiple values and functions to a range of different stakeholders. The future of wetlands depends both on the legacy of the past and how they are currently used. Using 48 vegetation survey plots (0.08 ha) combined with Landsat 5 and 7 TM imagery, we assessed the influence of long‐term (1990–2011) land use and land cover change on the biodiversity of the Kibasira Swamp. Information on perceptions of adjacent communities on historical changes and drivers for the changes were also collected. Results showed an increase in the area covered by open water by 1% and forest by 4% between 1990 and 1998 whilst Cyperus papyrus L and cultivated land area decreased by 8% and 3%, respectively on the same period. Between 1998 and 2011, there was a decrease in areas covered by water by 35% and forest by 9% whereas C. papyrus L increased by 40% and cultivated land increased by 8%. These changes have affected the biodiversity of the swamp and adjacent to it as numbers of mammals have declined. However, the Swamp still provides extensive habitat for plants and bird species despite the ongoing human pressure. Interventions may be necessary to maintain biodiversity in Kibasira Swamp to ensure sustainable ecosystem services.

  • 314.
    Senby Posse, Lovisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Det andra könet: En intersektionell tolkning av kvinnliga gravar i Birka från vikingatiden2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Birka is Sweden’s first urban settlement during the Viking period and its growth is mainly because of the settlement’s extensive trade. The area has many graves and the female graves in Birka are a good source for interpretation of the Viking woman and the variety of roles and work she had. Archaeologists are assessing graves and interpreters them from the material remains found, such as jewelry, weapons, and gifts. Researchers often have a predetermined interpretation on certain items that are considered feminine or masculine and the gender is determined from this. After the gender is decided it is commonly that the individuals are categorized into groups, and women tend be grouped together into one, regardless that the archaeological data and material shows that they have different attributes, and should be categorized as such. Men on the other hand have a variety of activities and jobs from which they can be determined by, whilst women’s work tends to be highlighted as chores, rather than work, as their doings usually are in the private sphere. To put women together as one simply because they are women is not only problematic regarding what the material shows, but it is also preventing the development in research of women. There will be a gap in the narrative due to the lack of female activities which occurred but are either ignored or reduced. During the last few decades, there has been an increase in research regarding women in all fields of research and a development of several theories on how to interpret various factors. One of them is intersectional theory, which will be used in this paper. A selection of female Viking graves from Birka are used with this theory to develop a greater picture of what women were doing, rather than just being women, and what needs to be considered to do so.

  • 315.
    Shoemaker, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Location and attribute analysis of ceramics, lithics, and special finds recovered during 2015 surveys and excavations in Olgulului/Olarashi Group Ranch, Kenya: A supplement to the PhD thesis of Anna C. Shoemaker (2018) on the archaeology of Amboseli2018Data set
    Abstract [en]

    This data was acquired during the production of a PhD thesis pertaining to the archaeology of Amboseli. The amount of information obtained during ceramic and lithic analysis was often in excess of the immediate aims of this research project. This level of detail was recorded to build a robust dataset that will allow different questions to be asked of the data in the future. To facilitate ongoing analysis, supplementary data relating to the attributes and location of the lithics, ceramics, and special finds encountered during surveys and excavations has been made available here.

  • 316.
    Sinclair, Paul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Nordquist, GullögUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.Herschend, FrandsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.Isendahl, ChristianUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 317.
    Starå, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ett sanningens ögonblick bakom Gotlands storgårdar.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 318.
    Sten, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Dämba 279, Fårö socken, Gotland: En osteologisk analys av två gravar2015Report (Other academic)
  • 319.
    Sten, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Gamle fiskbein, styr, strämming, tåsk med fleira2013In: Hushållningssällskapet Gotlands tidskrift, ISSN 2000-5784, no 3, p. 21-23Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 320.
    Sten, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Gamle fiskbein, styr, strämming, tåsk med fleira2013Report (Other academic)
  • 321.
    Sten, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Skeletten från S:t Olofssholm 1:19, Hellvi socken, Gotland.: Osteologisk Rapport. Uppsala universitet Campus Gotland. November 2014.2014Report (Other academic)
  • 322.
    Sten, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Slutrapport i Genomförandeprojektet Osteoporosis och osteoarthritis, då och nu2015Report (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Sten, Sabine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lovén, Christian
    Riksarkivet,Box 12541, SE-10229 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms Univ, Inst Arkeologi Antikens kultur, Osteologiska Skningslab, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Liden, Kerstin
    Stockholms Univ, Inst Arkeologi Antikens kultur, Arkeologiska Skningslabo, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vretemark, Maria
    Västergotlands Museum, SE-53232 Skara, Sweden..
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Univ Goteborgs, Enheten Geriatrik Inst Medicin, Sahlgrenska Akademin, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Fjällstrom, Markus
    Uppsala Univ, Arkeol Forskningslab, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Shalabi, Adel
    Bild­ och funktionsmedicinskt centrum, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Bild­ och funktionsmedicinskt centrum, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Segelsjö, Monica
    Bild­ och funktionsmedicinskt centrum, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Malmström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Erik den heliges skelett2016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 27-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Saint Erik was King of Sweden for a few years up to 1160, when he was killed. A skeleton attributed to him is kept in Uppsala Cathedral. It underwent scientific reappraisal in 2014. The analyses included computer tomography, Xray absorptiometry, isotope analysis and DNA sampling. Radiocarbon confirms the alleged age of the bones. They belong to a 35-40-year-old man in excellent physical shape. The many wounds that he received in connection with his death fit surprisingly well with the saint's legend, whose preserved version was written 130 years after the event.

  • 324.
    Stengard, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Svärdet i ån - offer till gudarna eller olyckshändelse2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 325.
    Stenhaug, Belinda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Artros – för alltid en folksjukdom?: En kartläggning av artros inom det medeltida gravfältet vid S:t Hans och S:t Pers kyrkoruiner i Visby2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most common general diseases in modern society Sweden. It is also one of the most common diseases traced within archaeological human remains. The aetiology of osteoarthritis has been widely debated within the field of medicine and paleopathology. The initial claim that the degenerative disease is caused by activity and ageing has been questioned and factors such as environment, diet and genetic markers has been brought up and to some extent studied. Even though osteoarthritis being one of the most common diseases recognized among archaeological human remains, it has during recent years often been neglected within the field and referred to mostly in different palaeopathological atlases. By studying human remains from the medieval churchyard of St: Hans in Visby, Gotland, the notion of osteoarthritis as a general disease in the past is discussed in the following study. The concept of a medieval “general public” is examined by looking at social strata through grave placement on the studied graveyard.

  • 326. Strutt, Kristian D.
    et al.
    Graham, Angus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    Aberystwyth University.
    Pennington, Benjamin Thomas
    University of Southampton.
    Löwenborg, Daniel J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Emery, Virginia Leigh
    American University in Dubai.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    University of Southampton.
    Hunter, Morag Ann
    University of Cambridge.
    Masson-Berghoff, Aurélia
    British Museum.
    Lindholm, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Manipulating Mud: (re-)constructing cosmogonical landscapes in the Nile Valley, Thebes, Egypt2015In: Archaeologia Polonia, ISSN 0066-5924, Vol. 53, p. 514-517Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Sundström, Lars
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Det hotade kollektivet: Neolitiseringsprocessen ur ett östmellansvenskt perspektiv2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation questions the established view on the social process in connection with Neolithisation. Therefore it has been necessary to discuss more general principles, on how to understand this process of change, when iterant hunter-gatherers became settled farmers. The dissertation begins with a theoretical discussion on the foundations for the interpretation and most important a discussion on differences between the interpretations presented and the treatment of the empirical material on which they are based.

    A necessary point of departure for understanding the implications an incorporation of domesticates in prehistoric society, i.e. emergence of Funnel Beaker Culture in Sweden, is a principal discussion, social mechanisms of hunters-gatherers on one hand and peoples reactions to changes threatening the social ideology, on the other. Four case studies are used to discuss people’s reaction to change. They clearly indicate that the reaction involved the lifting up of blurred and semiconscious structures to a conscious, ideological level. Inherent in this awareness process has been an active use of material culture, both in the production of symbols and in communication. The most important reason for stating that the Neolithisation must have meant a clear break with the earlier existence is the abandonment of itinerant way of life, both geographically and socially. This abandonment resulted in reactionary process involving material culture. Thus the material culture of the Funnel-Beaker period can be perceived as instruments of reproduction of a historically well-anchored egalitarian ideology. In the dispersed settlement system of autonomous individual farmsteads the collective aggregation sites are given a focal role of the discussion on social reproduction.

    The social mechanisms of the Early Neolithic society of Eastern Central Sweden are investigated on a local settlement level by an analysis of the production of locally available raw material. This study involve a petrological investigation showed a system of local management in relation to raw material extraction, production and consumption. This system is considered as one way of upholding the social ideology historically situated in the life style of hunters and gatherers.

  • 328.
    Svedjemo, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Landscape Dynamics: Spatial analyses of villages and farms on Gotland AD 200-17002014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation deals with the long-term dynamics and fluctuations of settlements on Gotland for the period from AD 200 up until early modern times. The settlement structure on Gotland is most often described as very stable and consisting of solitary farms, established in the Iron Age. A contrasting view is presented by analyses of a vast source material from different periods.

    The source material consists of both physical remains, noted in the Swedish national Archaeological Sites Information System, FMIS and large scale historical maps, as well as other written sources. For the first studied period, the locations of some 2 000 houses are known, since they were constructed with sturdy stone walls and are thus preserved. The source material for the following periods is scarcer, but some hundred Viking Age sites are identified, mainly by the find places of silver hoards. By retrogressive analyses of historical maps, from the decades around the year 1700, and other written sources, later periods are analysed. All available data are gathered in geodatabases, which enables both generalised and detailed spatial and statistical analyses.

    The results of the analyses show a more varied picture, with great fluctuations in the number of farms; the existence of villages is also clearly indicated in a large part of the settlements. The villages are centred on kinship and the lack of strong royal power or landed gentry meant they were not fixed in cadastres, as fiscal units, as villages were on the Swedish mainland.

    Two peaks, followed by major dips, were identified in the number of settlements and thus in the population. The first peak occurred during the late Roman Iron Age/Migration period, which was followed by a reduction in the Vendel period of possibly up to 30-50%. After this, a recovery started in the Viking Age, which culminated during the heydays of Gotland in the High Middle Ages, with population numbers most probably not surpassed until late in history. This upward trend was broken by the diminishing trade of Gotland, the Medieval agrarian crisis, The Danish invasion and later events. All this resulted in a decline, probably as great as after the Migration period.

  • 329.
    Sørensen, Mikkel
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Njalsgade 80, DK-2300 KBH.S..
    Rankama, Tuija
    University of Helsinki, Institute of Cultural Research, Department of Archaeology, PO Box 59, FI-00014, Finland..
    Kankaanpää, Jarmo
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Knutsson, Helena
    Melvold, Stine
    Valentin Eriksen, Berit
    Glørstad, Håkon
    The first eastern migrations of people and knowledge into Scandinavia: evidence from studies of Mesolithic technology, 9th-8th millennium BC2013In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 19-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a team of Scandinavian researchers identifies and describes a Mesolithic technological concept, referred to as the conical core pressure blade' concept, and investigates how this concept spread intoFennoscandia and across Scandinavia. Using lithic technological, contextual archaeological and radiocarbon analyses, it is demonstrated that this blade concept arrived with post-Swiderian' hunter-gatherer groups from the Russian plain into northern Fennoscandia and the eastern Baltic during the 9th millennium bc. From there it was spread by migrating people and/or as transmitted knowledge through culture contacts into interior central Sweden, Norway and down along the Norwegian coast. However it was also spread intosouthern Scandinavia, where it was formerly identified as the Maglemosian technogroup 3 (or the Svaerdborg phase'). In this paper it is argued that theidentification and spread of the conical core pressure blade concept representsthe first migration of people, technology and ideas into Scandinavia from thesouth-eastern Baltic region and the Russian plain.

  • 330.
    ten Brink, Daniël
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    From Colonialism to Fairtrade: Power Struggles Between Indonesia and the Netherlands Through the Perspective of Coffee2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since coffee was first introduced to Indonesia by Dutch merchants in the late seventeenth century, power relationships have shifted as a result of coffee trade between Indonesia and the Netherlands. In this thesis I analyse changes and recurrent themes in the struggles around coffee, structured around three main narratives spanning over 300 years: colonialism, Indonesian independence, and Fairtrade. The time-frames are chosen on the basis of significant development in the socio-economic and socio-political environment in the Indonesian coffee industry. The first narrative depicts the link between the Max Havelaar novel and the Max Havelaar Foundation, which sets the scene for bridging past and present in the triangular drama between coffee, colonialism and the Dutch-Indonesian relationship. In the second narrative, I will look at the history of relationships between Indonesia and the Netherlands, from the perspective of coffee. The inclusion of the lens of a feature or commodity, like coffee, provides a new approach to the Dutch-Indonesian history. The third narrative entails a discussion on the coffee supply chain, its environmental impact, and the price volatility that characterises the global coffee market. Additionally, the rise of sustainability certifications in the coffee sector are discussed, in relation to its impact on the Indonesian coffee industry. Finally, the three narratives come together in a final discussion, in which I reflect on the history of power struggles that arose from coffee trade between Indonesia and the Netherlands. The chapter links past and present by revealing similarities in the contest for power during colonial times and modern times in the Indonesian coffee industry.

  • 331.
    Thomelius, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Kommunikationens landskap: En studie av kommunikation i två gotländska socknar2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, two parishes on Gotland have been the focus for intense study regarding the organisation and formation of local communications networks. The parishes of Buttle and Fröjel have been studied to see if it is possible to say anything about local communication during the 6th century, a task that earlier research has shown to be difficult. The parishes represent two different types of landscapes, one costal and one inland. The paper has also asked questions about how the development and quality of the roads and communications networks have changed over time. It also discuss how the topographical- and cultural landscape has influenced the organisation of the communications network.

    The following questions are asked in this paper; 1. How was local communication (communications between the farmstead, its economic resources and its connections to the larger communications network) in the parishes organised? 2. What can be said about the communications networks development and quality through time? 3. How was the topographical- and cultural landscape organisation connected to the communications network?  

    The main methodology used in the paper is the retrogressive methodology used to recreate a possible 6th century communications network. This methodology utilises and studies the relationship between the earliest known communications network, registered in the 18th century maps, together with Iron Age sites registered, in the FMIS database, as well as topographical and geological maps to recreate a possible 6th century communications network.

    The analysis shows that it is hard to grasp the local communications during the 6th century. The local communications only emerge when the local roads merge with the regional ones. In many cases, the local roads were probably not much more than paths in the edges of the fields or only identified by the use of known landmarks. The investigation also shows that the regional (and local) roads were situated closer to the 6th century settlements than previously thought.

    It is also shown that the development of the road network has steadily lead to a more refined and rationalised network. The largest changes can be related to the 19th century laga skifte and to the later introduction of motor vehicles. Before the 19th century the situation is quite stable, only some minor changes during the 18th century can be seen until you reach the beginning of the middle ages. The major changes probably relate to changes in the landscape organisation in relation to the introduction of Christianity. However, it might also relate to the expansion of cultivated land and the resulting changes of settlement patterns.

    The investigation also shows that the topographical landscape on Gotland provides little hindrance for the organisation of the landscape. Instead, it feels very much like an artificial landscape where borders and organisation are created by humans, rather than by natural landscape formations. The borders in this case are created by the use of graves and their location in the landscape.

  • 332.
    Toonen, W. H. J.
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Fac Arts, Egyptol Unit, Leuven, Belgium.
    Graham, Angus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Masson-Berghoff, A.
    British Museum, Dept Greece & Rome, London, England.
    Peeters, J.
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Phys Geog, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Winkels, T. G.
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Phys Geog, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Pennington, B. T.
    Univ Southampton, Geog & Environm, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Hunter, M. A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Earth Sci, Cambridge, England.
    Strutt, K. D.
    Univ Southampton, Archaeol, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Barker, D. S.
    Univ Southampton, Archaeol, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Emery, V. L.
    Carthage Coll, Kenosha, WI USA.
    Sollars, L.
    Univ Glasgow, Dept Archaeol, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Sourouzian, H.
    German Inst Archaeol, Cairo, Egypt.
    Amenhotep III's Mansion of Millions of Years in Thebes (Luxor, Egypt): Submergence of high grounds by river floods and Nile sediments2019In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 25, p. 195-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New Kingdom royal cult temples in Thebes (Luxor, Egypt) are all located on the lower desert edge. Kom el-Hettan (Amenhotep III: reign 1391-1353 BCE, 18th Dynasty) is an exception, as it is located in the present Nile floodplain. Its anomalous position has puzzled Egyptologists, as has the termination of its use, which traditionally has been attributed to natural hazards such as flooding or earthquakes. Geoarchaeological analyses of the subsurface shows that Amenhotep III's temple was initially founded on a wadi fan that stood several metres above the contemporary surrounding floodplain landscape. The temple was fronted by a minor branch of the Nile, which connected the temple to the wider region, but the temple itself was relatively safe from the annual flood of the Nile. This geoarchaeological study comprised a coring programme to determine the c. 4000-yr landscape history of the local area. Chronological control was provided by the analysis of ceramic fragments recovered from within the sediments. This study shows that the New Kingdom period was, at least locally, characterised by extremely high sedimentation rates that caused a rapid rise of the floodplain and gradual submergence of the pre-existing high temple grounds. This is, however, not a plausible reason for the destruction of the temple, as frequent inundation did not begin until the temple was already out of use and largely dismantled.

  • 333.
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    et al.
    Aberystwyth Univ, Dept Geog & Earth Sci, Aberystwyth, Dyfed, Wales.
    Graham, Angus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Pennington, Benjamin T.
    Univ Southampton, Dept Geog & Environm, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Hunter, Morag A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Earth Sci, Cambridge, England.
    Strutt, Kristian D.
    Univ Southampton, Dept Archaeol, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    Univ Southampton, Dept Archaeol, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Masson-Berghoff, Aurelia
    British Museum, Dept Greece & Rome, London, England.
    Emery, Virginia L.
    Carthage Coll, Kenosha, WI USA.
    Holocene fluvial history of the Nile's west bank at ancient Thebes, Luxor, Egypt, and its relation with cultural dynamics and basin-wide hydroclimatic variability2018In: Geoarchaeology, ISSN 0883-6353, E-ISSN 1520-6548, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 273-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Theban area around modern Luxor (Egypt), the River Nile divides the temple complexes of Karnak and Luxor from New Kingdom royal cult temples on the western desert edge. Few sites have been archaeologically identified in the western flood plain, despite its presumed pivotal role in the ancient ritual landscape as the territory that both physically divided and symbolically connected the areas inhabited by the living and the areas occupied by the dead. Using borehole data and electrical resistivity tomography, the current investigation of subsurface deposits reveals the location of an abandoned channel of the Nile. This river course was positioned in the western, distal part of the Nile flood plain. Over 2100 ceramic fragments recovered from boreholes date the abandonment of the relatively minor river channel to the (late) New Kingdom. This minor river branch could have played an important role in the cultural landscape, as it would have served to connect important localities in the ritual landscape. Changes in the fluvial landscape match with established periods of basin-wide hydroclimatic variability. This links cultural and landscape changes observed on a regional scale to hydroclimatic dynamics in the larger Nile catchment, in one of the focal areas of Ancient Egyptian cultural development.

  • 334.
    Tsoumari, Vasiliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Villages and valleys: connectivity and land use in Northern Messenia during Middle and Late Helladic periods.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The use of past archaeological survey data for examination of landscape dynamics became very popular during the last decades of the 20th century, when Geographical Information Systems analysis were introduced in archaeology. In the present thesis, past survey data from Northern Messenia’s Middle and Late Helladic periods are combined to the topography and the environment of the region. These data are examined under the GIS prism, which attempts to update our knowledge on this geographical area.

                The main scope of this thesis is to examine potential settlement patterns and land use, connectivity between sites and sites’ hierarchies. In the first query, the Kernel Density analysis has been used for estimating settlements’ patterns, and to consequently estimate preference of specific topographical features for land use, such as slope. Based on the patterns formed as a result of the analysis conducted in the first query, connectivity and hierarchy between sites is being tested with the use of cost connectivity and visibility tools.

                The outcome of this analysis shows that the inhabitants of the past were significantly interacting with the landscape, since they preferred to nest around the protective slopes of the Soulima and the Kyparissian valleys. The area around their settlements reveals that these inhabitants opted to cultivate in flat or marginal land, while visibility from the sites seems to be an important factor for monitoring the region. However, it has been proved that a good number of collaborating sites were required to supervise the entire territory, which disproves any hierarchical ranking between them. On the other hand, connectivity depicts potential movement over Northern Messenia’s terrain and indicates that a few sites in the heart of the study area were to be considered as panoptic meeting grounds of the eastern and the western side. In conclusion, the overall analysis reveals a potential spatial bond between sites rather than a relationship based on rivalry.

     

  • 335. Tunón, Håkan
    et al.
    Frändén, MäritUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.Ojala, Carl-GöstaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.Öhman, May-BrittUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Uppsala mitt i Sápmi: Rapport från ett symposium arrangerat av Föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Upplandsmuseet 4-5 maj 20112012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 336.
    Törnros, Linnéa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    En nyansering av amulettringarnas sociala funktion under vendeltid och vikingatid2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 19th century archaeologists have found different types om amulet rings on various dig sites around Scandinavia with the biggest concentration in the Mälardal area. It is an object connect to old Viking age and Vendel period societies found from time to time during archaeological excavations. The problem with the amulet rings is, that the scientists don’t know how to fully interpret these artefacts. The common belief is that amulet rings are object connected to religious practice and the pagan cult.

    The purpose of this essay is to give the amulet rings a larger meaning and try to put new light on them, to widen the understanding of the object and to point out that more than religion can be interpreted around the artefacts and the context they are preserved in. This will put the rings in a more social sphere and widen the meaning and use of the object and the understanding of the Viking people.

    This essay is written with an intention to give a broader image surrounding the social role of the amulet rings in Viking age societies. This will be done through a descriptive and investigative mapping of the micro contexts of the amulet rings. The archaeological sites that will be used to do so are Lilla Ullevi and Kalvshälla in Uppland with a contextual approach as a theoretical perspective.

    In this essay, it has been shown that the sites have used the amulet rings to find religious connections in the Viking age and Vendel period complexes by schematically interpreting the rings as religious objects instead of seeing the possibilities in the material. Even if religion seems to be present the distribution of the rings indicates a larger scale of social use and not only religious actions. The result is that the ring is more flexible and complex then previously thought and more in-depth research into amulet rings is needed to fully understand the object and to use them in bigger archaeological interpretations.

  • 337.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A fragment of the Life of Moses of Abydos in the British Library2011In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, Vol. 179, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Edition of a fragment of the Vita of Moses of Abydos, a 6th century Coptic monastic leader.

  • 338.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A hitherto unattested section of the Sahidic Old testament2010In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, Vol. 173, p. 63-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Edition of a parchment fragment in the collections of Corpus Christi College Cambridge, containing Genesis 10:9-19 in Sahidic Coptic.

  • 339.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A leaf of the Coptic Martyrdom of Ptolemy in Cambridge2010In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, p. 179-184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A lexicographic note on an Egyptian crocodile spell2010In: Göttinger Miszellen, Vol. 226, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 341.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A note on pronominal resumption in Earlier Egyptian relative clauses2009In: Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, ISSN 0307-5133, Vol. 95, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 342.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A preliminary report of the edition project 'Martyrs and Archangels: Five Coptic Texts in the Pierpont Morgan Library'2016In: Coptic Society, Literature and Religion from Late Antiquity to Modern Times: Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress of Coptic Studies, Rome, September 17th-22th, 2012 and Plenary Reports fo the ninth International Congres of Coptic Studies, Cairo, September 15th-19th, 2008, vol. II / [ed] Buzi, Paola; Camplani, Alberto & Contardi, Federico, Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2016, p. 1147-1152Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 343.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A Sahidic leaf of the Gospel of John in Trinity College, Cambridge2011In: Göttinger Miszellen, Vol. 228, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 344.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Aarteita ullakolla. Kolme kadonnutta koptilaista tekstiä2014In: Kirjuri, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 345.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Adverbial sentence WH-questions in Earlier Egyptian2009In: Revue d'égyptologie, ISSN 0035-1849, E-ISSN 1783-1733, Vol. 60, p. 147-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 346.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Agreement domains and resumption in Earlier Egyptian2013In: Zeitschrift für Ägyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde, ISSN 0044-216X, Vol. 140, p. 78-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rule conditioning the use of resumptive pronouns in Earlier Egyptian relative clauses is shown to apply also in cases deemed questionable by the scholar who originally formulated it. According to this rule, omission of resumptive pronouns follows from locality with the agreement-carrying expression. It is shown that the latter should be understood in an extended sense to refer to the prosodic unit containing the agreement morphology rather than the mere ‘carrier’ alone. It is suggested that it is more precisely locality with this wider ‘agreement domain’ that determines whether or not a resumptive pronoun appears in the relative clause

  • 347.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    An unattested section of the New Testament in Fayyumic Coptic2015In: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, ISSN 0084-5388, Vol. 194, p. 68-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Edition of parchment fragments used as bindings of a codex currently in the collections of Pierpont Morgan Library in New York and containing Mk 12:37-13:9, 14:50-52, 56-58, 60-62, and 65-67 in Fayyumic Coptic.

  • 348.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Archaeology of language: A case study from Middle Kingdom/Second Internediate Period Egypt and Nubia2010In: Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur, ISSN 0340-2215, Vol. 39, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Begging the question. Earlier Egyptian WH-questions and the marking of information structure2012In: Lingua Aegyptia, Vol. 20, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier Egyptian wh-questions are argued to show a tripartite system of marking information structure vis-à-vis unmarked sentence construal. The use of the three strategies, termed ‘second tensing’, clefting, and wh-movement, is surveyed in the various verbal and non-verbal proposition types attested in this language

  • 350.
    Uljas, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Cairo Bowl lines 7-82004In: Göttinger Miszellen, Vol. 201, p. 95-104Article in journal (Other academic)
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