uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
5678 351 - 357 of 357
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 351.
    Westelius, Tea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    An Evaluation of Jesper Ryberg and Torbjörn Tännsjö’s Solutions to the Repugnant Conclusion2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 352. Whitehouse, Diane
    et al.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Computers, time and speed: Five slow tech case studies2014In: ICT and society / [ed] K. Kimppa, D. Whitehouse, T. Kuusela and J. Phahlamohlaka, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 122-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines briefly the notions of time and speed. It introduces the notion of Slow Tech:information technology that is good, clean and fair, and places an especial emphasis on technologythat is clean. This chapter does not delve deep into the Slow Tech concept. Rather, it highlights a setof arguments about why speed is not always important or necessary. People are now increasinglybeginning to think about much longer periods and phases that may extend at least as long as theexistence of human beings on the globe. As illustrations, the chapter explores five specific casestudies. Each comes from a different location, yet all describe global implications and challenges.One example is in fact a mathematical model. Two sites, in sympathy with the location of theHuman Choice and Computing 11 (HCC11) conference, are from Scandinavia – one from Onkalo,Finland, and a second from Svalbard, a northern Norwegian island. A further two cases are from theUnited States of America. The logic behind these five case studies strengthens the arguments aboutwhy − with the support of the Slow Tech concept − it is increasingly important for society and itsmany stakeholders to question the current information and communication technology (ICT)obsession with speed and rethink the relationships between society and technology.

  • 353. Whitehouse, Diane
    et al.
    Patrignani, Norberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    From slow food to slow tech: A reflection paper2013In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] P. Kommers and C. Gauzente, Prague: IADIS Press, 2013, p. 141-145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing challenges are facing the information society, particularly in terms of its sustainability and continuity. Humanbeings are finding it more and more difficult to cope with the accelerating speed of information and communicationtechnologies (ICT). Society has been seduced by a rapid pace of development of ICT, progressively celebrated year onyear for its growing speed and power. This reflection paper proposes a new way of thinking about ICT in the future: aslower, more careful, more considered, and more ethical manner (a slow tech approach). It concentrates on the need forslow tech: ICT that is good, clean, and fair. It then provides some additional reflections on how such an approach couldbe developed further.

  • 354.
    Wiberg, Emelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Det förändrade underlivet: En undersökning om kosmetisk intimkirurgi borde omfattas av lagen mot könsstympning2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The swedish law against female genital mutilation (FGM) prohibits procedures that removes parts of the female genitalia and thereby makes permanent changes in the body. The problem with the wording of the law is that it may also apply to the western phenomenon cosmetic genital surgery. This paper therefore examines if cosmetic genital surgery should be covered by the swedish law against FGM, by making a critical comparing analysis. The paper begins with comparing FGM with cosmetic genital surgery to prove that there are more similarities than differences between the procedures. By using the theoretical perspectives universalism and postcolonialism, the paper then examines why, particularly in the West, there is a different approach to FGM than to cosmetic genital surgery, regardless of the similarities of the procedures. Further the paper also examines consent and why consent to FGM is seen as illegitimate while consent to cosmetic genital surgery is seen as legitimate. On basis of the critical comparing analysis the paper then argues: that the procedures cosmetic genital surgery and FGM are very much alike; that cosmetic genital surgery is accepted over FGM because it is more familiar in the West and; that consent should be as illegitimate when given to cosmetic genital surgery as when given to FGM. Thus the conclusion of the paper is that cosmetic genital surgery should be covered by the swedish law against FGM.   

  • 355.
    wikblom, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Kvinnans rättigheter i rätten: Om våldtäktsdefinitionen i svensk sexualbrottslagstiftning2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the past 10 years Sweden has updated its penal code for sexual crimes twice. Despite this few are convicted for the crime of rape in Sweden. As the majority of perpetrators being male, this is a problem concerning women’s rights to respect for their bodies and personal integrity. A possible explanation, and this study’s point of departure is a potential discrepancy between the intention of the law and the interpretation of the same as the Swedish legal system rests on a foundation of legal positivism. Hence focus of this study has been the motives behind the definition of rape in the law and the interpretation of the same. The purpose has been to establish the development of the rape law and its political motives, how the judicial system has interpreted the legal text in actual cases and if this is in alignment. As to explain why so few are convicted for the crime of rape and to critically examine how this affects women’s rights as well as how the interpretation of the definition of rape can be carried out in a more legally secure way for the victims. This has been done firstly by examining the states public investigations and state bills before the update of the penal codes definition of rape in 2005 and 2013. Secondly by an analysis of arguments used by the Swedish courts, mainly the district courts, in two rape convictions and three verdicts of acquittal. Arguments used by the courts have then been compared to the motives behind the legal definition of rape to see if the perceived discrepancy between the intended meaning of the law and the interpretation of the same existed. Thirdly, the judicial systems legal basis for interpretation was criticised from the two theoretical perspectives of the study; a criticism to legal positivism and a gender hierarchical perspective.

     

    The analysis shows that the updates of the rape law are clearly morally motivated and women’s rights based. In contrast to the legal positivistic judicial system interpretations, avoiding morally based argumentation relying on the systems foundation solely. The critical investigation shows that both a the perceived gender neutral system as well as legal positivistic tradition of sidestepping moral argumentation in courts result in lack of questioning the system and how it comes to its decisions.  Hence the discrepancy between the two systems can be a part of the explanation why women’s rights are not secured in Sweden. 

  • 356.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Uppsala University, The Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences (SCASSS).
    Neither property right nor heroic gift, neither sacrifice nor aporia: the benefit of the theoretical lens of sharing in donation ethics2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two ethical frameworks have dominated the discussion of organ donation for long: that of property rights and that of gift-giving. However, recent years have seen a drastic rise in the number of philosophical analyses of the meaning of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in ethical debates on organ donation and in critical sociological, anthropological and ethnological work on the gift metaphor in this context. In order to capture the flourishing of this field, this article distinguishes between four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine: those of property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. These frameworks represent four different ways of making sense of donation of organs as well as tissue, gametes and blood, draw on different conceptions of the relations between the self and the other, and bring out different ethical issues as core ones. The article presents these frameworks, argues that all of them run into difficulties when trying to make sense of reciprocity and relational interdependence in donation, and shows how the three gift-giving frameworks (of heroism, sacrifice and aporia) hang together in a critical discussion about what is at stake in organ donation. It also presents and argues in favour of an alternative intercorporeal framework of giving-through-sharing that more thoroughly explicates the gift metaphor in the context of donation, and offers tools for making sense of relational dimensions of live and post mortem donations.

  • 357.
    Farisco, Michele (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Evers, Kathinka (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Neurotechnology and Direct Brain Communication: New insights and responsibilities concerning speechless but communicative subjects2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurotechnology and Direct Brain Communication focuses on recent neuroscientific investigations of infant brains and of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), both of which are at the forefront of contemporary neuroscience. The prospective use of neurotechnology to access mental states in these subjects, including neuroimag- ing, brain simulation, and brain computer interfaces, offers new opportunities for clinicians and researchers, but has also received specific attention from philosophi- cal, scientific, ethical, and legal points of view. This book offers the first systematic assessment of these issues, investigating the tools neurotechnology offers to care for verbally non-communicative subjects and suggesting a multidisciplinary approach to the ethical and legal implications of ordinary and experimental practices.

    The book is divided into three parts: the first and second focus on the scientific and clinical implications of neurological tools for DOC patient and infant care. With refer- ence to these developments, the third and final part presents the case for re-evaluating classical ethical and legal concepts, such as authority, informed consent, and privacy.

    Neurotechnology and Direct Brain Communication will appeal to researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of cognitive science, medical ethics, medical technology, and the philosophy of the mind. With implications for patient care, it will also be a useful resource for clinicians, medical centres, and health practitioners. 

5678 351 - 357 of 357
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf