uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
78910 451 - 465 of 465
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 451.
    Zelano, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Halawa, Imad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Hyponatremia augments kainic-acid induced status epilepticus in the mouse: A model for dysmetabolic status epilepticus2013In: Epilepsy Research, ISSN 0920-1211, E-ISSN 1872-6844, Vol. 106, no 1-2, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a dreaded neurological emergency. A reignited interest in SE has resulted in a more adaptive use of treatment protocols. More knowledge on SE of various aetiologies is therefore needed. We are interested in treatment of SE under hyponatremia, and have here evaluated whether SE induced by systemic kainic acid could be a suitable platform for such studies. Acute hyponatremia was induced in C57/BL6 mice by intraperitoneal injection of dDAVP and water loading. Hyponatremic mice displayed an increased frequency of epileptiform spikes on EEG and 5/9 hyponatremic mice displayed electrographic seizures. After kainic acid (20mg/kg) treatment, hyponatremic mice displayed significantly longer time with electrographic seizure activity, which was also seen after treatment with diazepam (20mg/kg). We conclude that hyponatremia augments kainic acid-induced SE, This model might be a valuable platform for studies on treatment of SE in hyponatremia.

  • 452.
    Zelano, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Genetics.
    Evaluation of Novel Behavioural Correlates to Electrographic Seizure Activity in Mice2012In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 53, no S5, p. 105-105Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 453.
    Zelano, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Levetiracetam as alternative stage two antiepileptic drug in status epilepticus: A systematic review2012In: Seizure, ISSN 1059-1311, E-ISSN 1532-2688, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 233-236Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of new antiepileptic drugs (AED) in the treatment of status epilepticus (SE) is of interest, especially in benzodiazepine-resistant status epilepticus where phenytoin is deemed inappropriate due to allergy or comorbidity. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a new AED with few side effects. It is easy to administer. Reports exist of its use in SE in adults.

    Aims: To clarify the evidence for use of LEV as an alternative stage two AED in treatment of SE by a systematic review of the literature.

    Method: An online MEDLINE search identified 118 articles. The abstracts were screened for studies written in English, in which (1) at least two adults had been treated, and (2) LEV had been administered intravenously as the first AED, on its own or together with benzodiazepines. Ten studies were included.

    Results: Out of the ten studies, seven were retrospective observational, two prospective observational, and one prospective randomized. The studies described a total of 334 patients. The most common reason for administrating LEV was that standard treatment was deemed inappropriate. The efficacy ranged from 44% to 94%, with higher efficacy reported in the retrospective studies.

    Conclusions: The evidence for use of LEV as an alternative stage two AED in SE is limited. The higher efficacy reported in retrospective studies indicates possible publication bias, and caution is advised when the results of these retrospective studies are considered in clinical decision-making.

  • 454.
    Zelano, Johan
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Larsson, David
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Pre-stroke seizures: A nationwide register-based investigation2017In: Seizure, ISSN 1059-1311, E-ISSN 1532-2688, Vol. 49, p. 25-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The relationship between cerebroyascular disease and seizures is clearly illustrated by poststroke epilepsy. Seizures can also be the first manifestation of cerebrovascular disease and case control studies have demonstrated that seizures carry an increased risk of subsequent stroke. Thus, seizures could serve as a marker for vascular risk that merits intervention, but more data is needed before proper trials can be conducted. The occurrence of pre-stroke seizures has not been assessed on a national scale. We asked what proportion of strokes in middle-aged and elderly patients was preceded by seizures. Methods: All patients over 60 years of age with first-ever stroke in 2005-2010 (n = 92,596) were identified in the Swedish stroke register (Riksstroke) and cross-sectional data on a history of a first seizure or epilepsy diagnosis in the ten years preceding stroke were collected from national patient registers with mandatory reporting. Results: 1372 patients (1.48%) had a first seizure or epilepsy diagnosis registered less than ten years prior to the index stroke. The mean latency between seizure and stroke was 1474 days (SD 1029 days). Conclusions: Seizures or epilepsy preceded 1.48% of strokes in patients > 60 years of age. Based on recent national incidence figures, 5-20% of incident cases of seizures or epilepsy after 60 years of age could herald stroke, depending on age group. These proportions are of a magnitude that merit further study on how to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with late-onset seizures or epilepsy.

  • 455.
    Zelano, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Lundberg, Rebecca Gertz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Baars, Leopold
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedegård, Emelie
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Clinical course of poststroke epilepsy: a retrospective nested case-control study2015In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 5, no 9, article id e00366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Recently, several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that epilepsy develops after approximately 10% of all cerebrovascular lesions. With an aging population, poststroke epilepsy is likely to be of increasing relevance to neurologists and more knowledge on the condition is needed. Patients with poststroke epilepsy are likely to differ from other epilepsy patient populations regarding age, side-effect tolerability, comorbidities, and life expectancy, all of which are important aspects when counselling newly diagnosed patients to make informed treatment decisions. Method: We have here performed a nested case-control study on 36 patients with poststroke epilepsy and 55 controls that suffered stroke but did not develop epilepsy. The average follow-up time was between 3 and 4 years. Results: In our material, two-thirds of patients achieved seizure freedom and 25% experienced a prolonged seizure (status epilepticus) during the follow-up period. Cases consumed more health care following their stroke, but did not suffer more traumatic injuries. Interestingly, the mortality among cases and controls did not differ significantly. This observation needs to be confirmed in larger prospective studies, but indicate that poststroke epilepsy might not infer additional mortality in this patient group with considerable comorbidities. Conclusions: The observations presented can be of value in the counselling of patients, reducing the psychosocial impact of the diagnosis, and planning of future research on poststroke epilepsy.

  • 456.
    Zelano, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Moller, F.
    Dobesberger, J.
    Trinka, E.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Infections in Status Epilepticus: A Retrospective 5-Year Cohort Study2014In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 55, p. 37-38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 457.
    Zelano, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Moller, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Dobesberger, Judith
    Trinka, Eugen
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Infections in status epilepticus: A retrospective 5-year cohort study2014In: Seizure, ISSN 1059-1311, E-ISSN 1532-2688, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 603-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Status epilepticus (SE) has attracted renewed interest lately, and efforts are made to optimize every treatment stage. For refractory SE, optimal supporting care involves mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Infections often complicate SE and recently a single-centre observational study demonstrated an association between infections and poor short-term outcome of SE in a cohort of severely ill patients. We have here attempted to replicate those findings in a different cohort. Method: We performed a retrospective observational study and included all patients with a diagnosis of SE during 2008-2012 at a Swedish tertiary referral centre. Results: The cohort consisted of 103 patients (53% female, 47% male, median age 62 years, range 19-87 years). In house mortality was less than 2 and 70% of the patients' were discharged home. The most common aetiologies of SE were uncontrolled epilepsy (37%) and brain tumours (16%). A total of 39 patients suffered infections during their stay. Presence of infection was associated with mechanical ventilation (OR 3.344, 95% Cl 1.44-7.79) as well as not being discharged home (OR2.705, 95% Cl 1.14-6.44), and duration of SE was significantly longer in patients with infection (median 1 day vs. 2.5 days, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that the previously described association between infections, a longer SE duration, and an unfavourable outcome of SE seems valid also in SE of less severe aetiology.  

  • 458.
    Zetterberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Färnstrand, Catarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Aquilonius, Sten-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Lindmark, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy.
    Physiotherapy in Cervical Dystonia: Six experimental single-case studies2008In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 275-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the outcome of a physiotherapy program targeted to improve the quality of life of people with cervical dystonia (CD) by reducing pain, improving awareness of postural orientation, increasing muscle strength, and reducing the effort of moving the head and neck. In six single case studies, the primary outcome measure for each case was the Cervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ) to measure the impact of the program on the individuals' quality of life. Secondary outcome measures were identified for the different components of the physiotherapy program: Visual Analogue Scale (pain); Postural Orientation Index (postural orientation awareness); and Movement Energy Index (effort of moving head and neck). Each of the cases had the severity of their problems scored on the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Scale. The study period was 26 weeks: 2 weeks' baseline period, 4 weeks' treatment period, and 20 weeks' follow-up. All measures except the Movement Energy Index (MEI) and CDQ-24 were taken three times per week for the first 6 weeks of the study and then once at 3 and 6 months. The MEI was taken once a week during the pretreatment and the treatment periods and during the first 2 weeks of follow-up and also after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. The CDQ-24 was taken once in the pretreatment period, once after completion of treatment, once 2 weeks after treatment, and once at 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Five of the six case studies reported an increase in quality of life at 6-month follow-up, as measured on the CDQ-24. Three of the six cases reported a reduction in pain and severity of the dystonia and had improved scores on the postural orientation measure at 6-month follow-up. All six patients had a reduction in the movement energy scores, but this was not significant. The outcomes of the six case studies would suggest that further investigation is required to show the effectiveness of physiotherapy programs in the management of CD.

  • 459.
    Zetterling, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Berhane, Luwam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Jakola, Asgeir S
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prognostic markers for survival in patients with oligodendroglial tumors; a single-institution review of 214 cases2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 11, article id e0188419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In the 2016 WHO classification, the diagnosis of oligodendroglioma has been restricted to IDH mutated, 1p19q codeleted tumors (IDHmut-codel). IDHmut oligoastrocytoma is now classified either as oligodendroglioma or astrocytoma based on presence of 1p19q codeletion. There is growing evidence that this molecular classification more closely reflects patient outcome. Due to the strong association between IDHmut-codel with oligodendroglial morphology, the additional impact of these markers on prognostic accuracy is largely unknown. Our aim was to assess the prognostic impact of IDHmut-codel in an unselected cohort of morphologically classified oligodendroglial tumors.

    METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of oligodendroglial tumors (WHO grade II and III) operated since 1983. A total of 214 tumors were included, and molecular information was available for 96 tumors. The prognostic impact of IDHmut-codel together with clinical parameters was analyzed by multivariate Cox regression.

    RESULTS: IDHmut-codel was registered in 64 tumors while for 150 tumors the molecular profile was negative for IDHmut-codel, unknown or incomplete. Comparison between the two groups showed that patients with IDHmut-codel tumors were younger (42 vs. 48 years), had more frequent frontal tumor location (48 vs. 33%) and presented more often with seizures (72 vs. 51%) and no signs of neurological impairment (14 vs. 30%) than patients harboring tumors with unknown or incomplete molecular profile. Multivariate survival analysis identified young age (HR 1.78 ≥ 40 years), the absence of neurological deficits or personality changes (HR 0.57), frontal tumor location (HR 0.64) and the presence of IDHmut-codel (HR 0.50) as independent predictors for longer survival, whereas tumor grade was not.

    CONCLUSION: In this unselected single-institution cohort, the presence of IDHmut-codel was associated with more beneficial clinical parameters and was identified as an independent prognostic factor. We conclude that the classical oligodendroglioma genotype provides additional prognostic data beyond clinical characteristics, morphology and tumor grade.

  • 460.
    Zetterling, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Roodakker, Kenney Roy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Latini, Francesco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Linköping Univ, Ctr Med Image Sci & Visualizat, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Danish Epilepsy Ctr, Dianalund, Denmark.
    Extension of diffuse low-grade gliomas beyond radiological borders as shown by the coregistration of histopathological and magnetic resonance imaging data2016In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 1155-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging tends to underestimate the extent of diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGGs). With the aim of studying the presence of tumor cells outside the radiological border, the authors developed a method of correlating MRI findings with histological data in patients with suspected DLGGs in whom en bloc resections were performed.

    Methods: Five patients with suspected DLGG suitable for en bloc resection were recruited from an ongoing prospective study. Sections of the entire tumor were immunostained with antibodies against mutated IDH1 protein (IDH1-R132H). Magnetic resonance images were coregistered with corresponding IDH1 images. The growth pattern of tumor cells in white and gray matter was assessed in comparison with signal changes on corresponding MRI slices.

    Results: Neuropathological assessment revealed DLGG in 4 patients and progression to WHO Grade III glioma in 1 patient. The tumor core consisted of a high density of IDH1-R132H–positive tumor cells and was located in both gray and white matter. Tumor cells infiltrated along the peripheral fibers of the white matter tracts. In all cases, tumor cells were found outside the radiological tumor border delineated on T2-FLAIR MRI sequences.

    Conclusions: The authors present a new method for the coregistration of histological and radiological characteristics of en bloc–removed infiltrative brain tumors that discloses tumor invasion at the radiological tumor borders. This technique can be applied to evaluate the sensitivity of alternative imaging methods to detect scattered tumor cells at tumor borders. Accurate methods for detection of infiltrative tumor cells will improve the possibility of performing radical tumor resection. In future studies, the method could also be used for in vivo studies of tumor invasion.

  • 461.
    Zhang, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Shaanxi Normal Univ, Natl Engn Lab Resource Developing Endangered Chin, Coll Life Sci, Key Lab, Minist Educ Med Plant Resource & Nat Phar, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    He, Liqun
    Tianjin Med Univ Gen Hosp, Key Lab Postneuroinjury Neurorepair & Regenerat C, Tianjin Neurol Inst, Dept Neurosurg, Minist Educ & Tianjin City, Tianjin, Peoples R China.
    Lugano, Roberta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Roodakker, Kenney Roy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Umeå Univ Hosp, Dept Radiat Sci & Oncol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    IDH mutation status is associated with distinct vascular gene expression signatures in lower-grade gliomas2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 1505-1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vascular gene expression patterns in lower-grade gliomas (LGGs; diffuse World Health Organization [WHO] grades II–III gliomas) have not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study was to molecularly characterize LGG vessels and determine if tumor isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status affects vascular phenotype.

    Methods: Gene expression was analyzed using an in-house dataset derived from microdissected vessels and total tumor samples from human glioma in combination with expression data from 289 LGG samples available in the database of The Cancer Genome Atlas. Vascular protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in human brain tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs) representing WHO grades II–IV gliomas and nonmalignant brain samples. Regulation of gene expression was examined in primary endothelial cells in vitro.

    Results: Gene expression analysis of WHO grade II glioma indicated an intermediate stage of vascular abnormality, less severe than that of glioblastoma vessels but distinct from normal vessels. Enhanced expression of laminin subunit alpha 4 (LAMA4) and angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) in WHO grade II glioma was confirmed by staining of human TMAs. IDH wild-type LGGs displayed a specific angiogenic gene expression signature, including upregulation of ANGPT2 and serpin family H (SERPINH1), connected to enhanced endothelial cell migration and matrix remodeling. Transcription factor analysis indicated increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and hypoxia signaling in IDH wild-type LGGs. A subset of genes specifically induced in IDH wild-type LGG vessels was upregulated by stimulation of endothelial cells with TGFβ2, vascular endothelial growth factor, or cobalt chloride in vitro.

    Conclusion: IDH wild-type LGG vessels are molecularly distinct from the vasculature of IDH-mutated LGGs. TGFβ and hypoxia-related signaling pathways may be potential targets for anti-angiogenic therapy of IDH wild-type LGG.

  • 462.
    Zhang, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feenstra, Tjerk
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Li, Xiujuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Laaniste, Liisi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Ohlin, K Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Magnusson, Peetra U
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg, Karin Nilsson
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Dieterich, Lothar C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.2015In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 8, no 406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization.

  • 463.
    Zhang, Zhi-Jia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Wang, Jia-Lun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Muhr, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Synergistic inhibitory effects of interferon-alpha and 5-fluorouracil on human meningeoma cells in vitro1996In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 100, no 1-2, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the effects of interferon-α (IFN-α) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on meningioma cells in two different culture systems, evaluated by the uptake of radiolabelled methionine. With both IFN-α and 5-FU an inhibitory effect on the uptake of radiolabelled methionine by the meningioma cells was demonstrated, and we found a synergistic inhibitory effect with a combination of IFN-α and 5-FU. To obtain a maximal inhibition of cell metabolism without causing cell toxicity, we were able to decrease the dose of 5-FU by simultaneously adding IFN-α. Our results suggest that a combined treatment of IFN-α and 5-FU may be a successful alternative for patients with inoperable meningiomas. A novel in vitro positron emission tomography technique was used for the study of metabolic changes in tumour cells caused by drug treatment, which is complementary to conventional cell culture techniques.

  • 464.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Engman, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Persson, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Medial temporal lobe resection attenuates superior temporal sulcus response to faces2014In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 61, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Face perception depends on activation of a core face processing network including the fusiform face area, the occipital face area and the superior temporal sulcus (STS). The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is also involved in decoding facial expression and damage to the anterior MTL, including the amygdala, generally interferes with emotion recognition. The impairment in emotion recognition following anterior MTL injury can be a direct result from injured MTL circuitry, as well as an indirect result from decreased MTL modulation of areas in the core face network. To test whether the MTL modulates activity in the core face network, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate activation in the core face processing network in patients with right or left anterior temporal lobe resections (ATR) due to intractable epilepsy. We found reductions of face-related activation in the right STS after both right and left ATR together with impaired recognition of facial expressions. Reduced activity in the fusiform and the occipital face areas was also observed in patients after right ATR suggesting widespread effects on activity in the core face network in this group. The reduction in face-related STS activity after both right and left ATR suggests that MTL modulation of the STS may facilitate recognition of facial expression.

  • 465.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Arousal enhanced memory retention is eliminated following temporal lobe resection2010In: Brain and Cognition, ISSN 0278-2626, E-ISSN 1090-2147, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 176-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amygdala, situated in the anterior medial temporal lobe (MTL), is involved in the emotional enhancement of memory. The present study evaluated whether anterior MTL-resections attenuated arousal induced memory enhancement for pictures. Also, the effect of MTL-resections on response latencies at retrieval was assessed. Thirty-one patients with unilateral MTL-resections (17 left, 14 right) together with 16 controls participated in a forced choice memory task with pictorial stimuli varying in arousal. Response latencies increased with stimulus arousal in controls but not in patients. This was paralleled by attenuated recognition memory for moderately and highly arousing pictures in MTL-resectioned patients as compared to healthy controls. However, patients and controls did not differ in memory performance for non-arousing pictures. These results suggest that the MTL is necessary for arousal induced memory enhancement.

78910 451 - 465 of 465
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf