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  • 51.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Introducing the Past Ahead2012In: The Past Ahead: Language, Culture, and Identity in the Neotropics / [ed] Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2012, 1, p. 7-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Investigating Urban Experiences, Deconstructing Urban Essentialism2012In: UGEC (Urbanization & Global Environmental Change) Viewpoints, ISSN 1935-9160, no 8, p. 25-28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Maya Urban Gardens at Xuch, Campeche, Mexico2013In: Sourcebook for Garden Archaeology: Methods, Techniques, Interpretations and Field Examples / [ed] Amina-Aicha Malek, Bern: Peter Lang , 2013, p. 685-690Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Afrikansk och jämförande arkeologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    New Perspectives in Maya Archaeology.: Review essay of Kepecs, Susan and Rani T. Alexander (eds) (2005) The Postclassic to Spanish-Era Transition in Mesoamerica: Archaeological Perspectives. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press; Prufer, Keith M. and James E. Brady (eds) (2005) Stone Houses and Earth Lords: Maya Religion in the Cave Context. Boulder: University Press of Colorado; Shaw, Justine M. and Jennifer P. Matthews (eds) (2005) Quintana Roo Archaeology. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.2006In: Journal of Latin American Anthropology, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 510-514Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Review of Balée, William and Clark Erickson (eds) (2006) Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology: Studies in the Neotropical Lowlands. New York: Columbia University Press.2007In: Journal of Latin American Anthropology, ISSN 1085-7052, E-ISSN 1548-7180, Vol. 12, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Afrikansk och jämförande arkeologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Review of Lucero, Lisa J. (2006) Water and Ritual: The Rise and Fall of Classic Maya Rulers. Austin: University of Texas Press.2006In: Journal of Latin American Anthropology, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 457-459Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Afrikansk och jämförande arkeologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Review of Palka, Joel W. (2005) Unconquered Lacandon Maya: Ethnohistory and Archaeology of Indigenous Culture Change. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.2006In: Journal of Latin American Anthropology, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 218-220Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Review of Scarborough, Vernon L. (2003) The Flow of Power: Ancient Water Systems and Landscapes. Santa Fe: SAR Press.2005In: Latin American antiquity, ISSN 1045-6635, E-ISSN 2325-5080, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 117-119Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Afrikansk och jämförande arkeologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Review of Sharer, Robert J. and Loa P. Traxler (2006) The Ancient Maya. Sixth edition. Stanford: Stanford University Press.2006In: Journal of Latin American Anthropology, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 220-222Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Review of Stewart, Pamela J. and Andrew Strathern (eds) (2003) Landscape, Memory and History: Anthropological Perspectives. London and Sterling: Pluto Press.2007In: Culture and agriculture, ISSN 1048-4876, E-ISSN 1556-486X, Vol. 29, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Afrikansk och jämförande arkeologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Review of Turner, B.L. II, Jacqueline Geoghegan, and David R. Foster (eds) (2004) Integrated Land-Change Science and Tropical Deforestation in the Southern Yucatán: Final Frontiers. Oxford: Oxford University Press.2006In: Geografiska Annaler, Series B: Human Geography, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 258-259Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Anthropocene forces us to reconsider adaptationist models of human-environment interactions: Comment on “The New World of the Anthropocene”2010In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 44, no 16, p. 6007-6007Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Archaeology of the Lowland Maya and in Eastern Africa: A Discussion of Some Selected Common Issues.1996In: TOR, ISSN 0495-8772, Vol. 28, p. 91-104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Domestication and Early Spread Of Manioc (Manihot Esculenta Crantz): A Brief Synthesis2011In: Latin American antiquity, ISSN 1045-6635, E-ISSN 2325-5080, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 452-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to poor preservation of organic remains in humid environments, direct evidence of early manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivation is exceptionally rare in datable archaeological contexts. Recent research summarized here offers new insights into the spatio-temporal framework of the initial domestication and early spread of manioc in the Neotropics. Integrating evidence from comparative plant genetics and paleoethnobotanic starch analysis to contribute to the archaeology of manioc origins, this review finds that (1) the strongest candidate for the botanical origin of domesticated manioc the wild progenitor of the root crop is the species Manihot esculenta subspecies flabellifolia (Pohl) Ciferri; (2) the geographical origin of manioc the bionic in which the progenitor evolved is most likely in the savannas, the Brazilian Cerrado, to the south of the Amazon rainforest; (3) the Cerrado is also, in our best estimate, the region of agricultural origin of initial cultivation: (4) domesticated manioc had spread from the agricultural origin by the early Holocene, possibly as early as 10,000 years ago, but certainly by 7000 B.C.; and (5) domesticated manioc was a readily available plant in most habitats of the Neotropics by the mid-Holocene, at least some 6500 years ago.

  • 65.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Domestication and Early Spread of Manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz): A Brief Synthesis.2011In: Latin American antiquity, ISSN 1045-6635, E-ISSN 2325-5080, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 452-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to poor preservation of organic remains in humid environments, direct evidence of early manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivation is exceptionally rare in datable archaeological contexts. Recent research summarized here offers new insights into the spatio-temporal framework of the initial domestication and early spread of manioc in the Neotropics. Integrating evidence from comparative plant genetics and paleoethnobotanic starch analysis to contribute to the archaeology of manioc origins, this review finds that (1) the strongest candidate for the botanical origin of domesticated manioc—the wild progenitor of the root crop—is the species Manihot esculenta subspecies flabellifolia (Pohl) Ciferri; (2) the geographical origin of manioc—the biome in which the progenitor evolved—is most likely in the savannas, the Brazilian Cerrado, to the south of the Amazon rainforest; (3) the Cerrado is also, in our best estimate, the region of agricultural origin of initial cultivation; (4) domesticated manioc had spread from the agricultural origin by the early Holocene, possibly as early as 10,000 years ago, but certainly by 7000 B.C.; and (5) domesticated manioc was a readily available plant in most habitats of the Neotropics by the mid-Holocene, at least some 6,500 years ago.

  • 66.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Mesoamerican Experience. Review essay of Ardren, Traci and Scott R. Hutson (eds) (2006) The Social Experience of Childhood in Ancient Mesoamerica. Boulder: University Press of Colorado; Houston, Stephen, David Stuart, and Karl Taube (2006) The Memory of Bones: Body, Being, and Experience among the Classic Maya. Austin: University of Texas Press.2007In: Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology, Vol. 12, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Past Ahead: Language, Culture, and Identity in the Neotropics2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Andean cognition the embodiment of the past is different from many other ways to spatiallyrelate the position of the body to time. This epistemology is for instance expressed in the Quechuaword ñawpa, which signifies that the past is “in front of us;” it is known and can be seen. Seeing andknowing the past in this way reverberates within the historical ecological argument that the presentis contingent with the past and is explicitly reflected within the contributions to this volume. “ThePast Ahead: Language, Culture, and Identity in the Neotropics” forms a collection of reworkedpapers originally presented in shorter format by archaeologists, anthropologists, and linguists atthe research symposium “Archaeology and Society in Bolivia” organized at Uppsala University bythe editor. The volume includes chapters by Jan-Åke Alvarsson, Lisbet Bengtsson, Roger Blench,Sergio Calla, Christian Isendahl, Carla Jaimes, John Janusek, Adriana Muñoz, Heiko Prümers,Walter Sánchez, Per Stenborg, Juan Marcelo Ticona, and Charlotta Widmark examining a series ofdifferent aspects of agriculture, complex societies, identities, landscape, languages, and urbanism inthe highland and lowland Neotropics that all highlight the significance of the past in the present.

  • 68.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Puuc urban landscape: settlement archaeology at Xuch, Campeche2006In: Mexicon, ISSN 0720-5988, Vol. 28, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The Weight of Water: A New Look at Prehispanic Puuc Maya Water Reservoirs2011In: Ancient Mesoamerica, ISSN 0956-5361, E-ISSN 1469-1787, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 185-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Maya lowlands ancient water management was multi-componential, diverse across space, and shifted over time. In the seasonally dry Puuc region of the northwestern Yucatan Peninsula, large reservoirs dominated water management during the Late Classic to Early Postclassic periods (a.d. 600–1250). Research reported here suggests that reservoirs were central components of Puuc urban settlements and that natural depressions—from which water reservoirs could be made in the Puuc terrain—were key settlement attractors in the region. In particular, new evidence of the pre-Hispanic construction of a berm of monumental proportions along the perimeter of a water reservoir at Xuch—a Late Classic to Early Postclassic Puuc Maya agro-urban settlement in Campeche, Mexico—stresses the political, economic, and symbolic importance of water and water reservoirs in pre-Hispanic Maya communities, previously demonstrated by colleagues working elsewhere in the Maya lowlands. This article discusses the “weight” of water reservoirs in Classic period Puuc Maya landscapes, adds to the literature on water management in other regions of the Maya lowlands, and explores aspects of economy, power, environment, and cosmology in water management systems of the dry regions of the northern Yucatan Peninsula.

  • 70.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Thinking about landscape and religion in the pre-hispanic Maya lowlands2011In: Ecology, power, and religion in Maya landscapes: 11th European Maya Conferende, Malmö University, December 2006 / [ed] Christian Isendahl and Bodil Liljefors Persson, Anton Saurwein Verlag , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Transformed Maya Continuities: Spiritual Rejuvenation and Forest Conservation. Review essay of Molesky-Poz, Jean (2006) Contemporary Maya Spirituality: The Ancient Ways Are Not Lost. Austin: University of Texas Press; Nations, James D. (2006) The Maya Tropical Forest: People, Parks, and Ancient Cities. Austin: University of Texas Press.2008In: Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology, Vol. 13, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Isendahl, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Dunning, Nicholas P.
    University of Cincinnati.
    Sabloff, Jeremy A.
    Santa Fe Institute.
    Growth Dependency and Decline in Classic Maya Puuc Political Economies2013In: The Resilience and Vulnerability of Ancient Landscapes: Transforming Maya Archaeology through IHOPE / [ed] Arlen F. Chase and Vernon L. Scarborough, Arlington: AP3A , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Isendahl, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Liljefors Persson, BodilMalmö högskola.
    Ecology, power and religion in Maya landscapes2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Isendahl, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Liljefors Persson, Bodil
    Malmö högskola.
    Ekologi, makt och religion på Yucatán i ett långt tidsperspektiv2006In: Miljöhistoria över gränser / [ed] Fredrik Björk, Per Eliasson, Bo Fritzbøger, Malmö: Malmö högskola , 2006, p. 97-126Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Isendahl, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Smith, Michael E.
    Arizona State University.
    Sustainable agrarian urbanism: The low-density cities of the Mayas and Aztecs2013In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 31, p. 132-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maya and Aztec cities exhibited a distinctive kind of low-density urbanism common in ancient Mesoamerica. The non-monumental components of these cities differed from the high-density ancient and historical cities in the Old World that are often considered the norm for pre-modern urbanism. Distinctive features include the practice of intensive agricultural cultivation within urban settlements, residential zones that were dispersed and unplanned, and the arrangement of houses into spatial clusters that served as urban neighborhoods. The residential areas of Maya and Aztec cities resembled modern peri-urban zones and informal settlements. Because of the benefits of smallholder intensive urban agriculture, cities thrived for many centuries, and some were successful for millennia. On the basis of this longevity, we argue that these were sustainable cities, and their form and dynamics may hold lessons for understanding contemporary urbanization processes.

  • 76.
    Isendahl, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Ticona, Juan Marcelo
    Calla Maldonado, Sergio
    Cultivating the Yungas: Notes on Current Farming at Rasupampa and Tablas Monte2012In: The Past Ahead: Language, Culture, and Identity in the Neotropics / [ed] Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2012, 1, p. 229-259Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [es]

    En la corriente dominante de economía del desarrollo agrícola los términos agricultura“pre-industrial,” “indígena” y “tradicional” a menudo se utilizan como sinónimos intercambiablespara los sistemas agrarios considerados como algo estático. Sin embargo, lacreciente evidencia de la investigación arqueológica a escala global presenta un panoramaradicalmente diferente; éstas descripciones de los sistemas de producción de alimentos enel pasado sugieren una diversidad espacial y una variación temporal. Un ejemplo de elloes el paisaje agro-arqueológico que recientemente ha sido descubierto en Rasupampa,en la región de los Yungas del Departamento de Cochabamba, Bolivia. Inicialmente investigado,descrito y documentado por Walter Sánchez (2008), estos restos incluyen unavariedad con respecto a tenencia de la tierra, control de la erosión de la capa superior delsuelo y soluciones de gestión del agua que no han sido reportados en una configuraciónsimilar en otras partes de los Andes. Las investigaciones en curso exploran diferentesaspectos de este agro-sistema y la ecología histórica de los Yungas. Una parte importantede esta investigación es conocer las actuales prácticas agrícolas y sistemas agronómicos deconocimiento locales. Este trabajo resume las prácticas actuales de agricultores en Rasupampay las regiones circundantes, a partir de una serie de entrevistas con los agricultoresde la población de Tablas Monte.

  • 77.
    Juma, Abdurahman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Unguja Ukuu on Zanzibar: An archaeological study of early urbanism2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes archaeological excavations carried out at Unguja Ukuu on the main island of Zanzibar, Tanzania. The site has long remained obscure, oral histories do not mention it and no particular group among the living community of the island describes its origin from the site. A stone well at Unguja Ukuu together with several other early monuments of the east African coast that survive on the site have been attributed to the Wadebuli, suspected by early scholars to be people of Arab descent from their colonies in India or elsewhere on the Islands of eastern Indian Ocean.

    Surface survey and the drilling of more than 200 cores have defined the lateral extent and the stratigraphy of the site. Unguja Ukuu is a large site (c.16–17 ha) and the study reveals that it is a major center of an African iron-using farming community who occupied it from c. 500 AD. Radiocarbon dating and pottery provide the basis for this chronology.

    The study addresses an old controversy whether some of the pre-stone built settlements that developed on the east African coast could be indications of urbanization. Knowledge of the functional specialization of the settlement prior to its abandonment c. 900 AD is based on the evidence on the density of craft activity, community engagement in the regional trade with the mainland African continent, as far away as Roman Egypt, and in the interregional trade connected to the Indian Ocean, as well as redistribution of foreign merchandise to other sites and areas in the region. These as well as the location of the site linking the external trade and the mainland resource base indicate that Unguja Ukuu was a key urban centre built of mud and timber structures. This challenges our previous understanding of 8–9th centuries AD as the onset of early urbanism on the east African coast. The study proposes cycles of urbanism and emphasizes the need to reassess the problem of early urban identity and the use of wide range of criteria to overcome limitations of previous early urban investigations south of the Sahara and beyond.

    The results of the investigation given in this study are relevant to the history and archaeology of Zanzibar and the rest of East Africa and make a contribution particularly to extending the known time depth of the early urban tradition often conceived to occur in the late first millennium ad.

  • 78.
    Karlström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Preserving Impermanence: The Creation of Heritage in Vientiane, Laos2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is about the heritage in Vientiane. In an attempt to go beyond a more traditional descriptive approach, the study aims at bringing forward a discussion about the definition, or rather the multiplicity of definitions, of the concept of heritage as such. The unavoidabe tension emanating from a modern western frame of thought being applied to the geographical and cultural setting of the study provides an opportunity to develop a criticism of some of the assumptions underlying our current definitions of heritage.

    For this particular study, heritage is defined as to include stories, places and things. It is a heritage that is complex and ambiguous, because the stories are parallel, the definitions and perceptions of place are manifold and contested, and the things and their meaning appear altered, depending on what approach to materiality is used. The objective is not to propose how to identify and manage such a complex heritage. Rather, it is about what causes this complexity and ambiguity and what is in between the stories, places and things. In addition, the study aims to critically deconstruct the contemporary heritage discourse, which privileges material authenticity, form and fabric and the idea that heritage values are universal and should be preserved for the future and preferably forever.

    In Laos, Buddhism dominates as religious practice. In this context, the notion of material impermanence also governs the perception of reality. Approaches to materiality in Buddhism are related to the general ideas that things are important from a contemporary perspective and primarily as containers for spiritual values, that the spiritual values carry the connection to the past, and that heritage is primarily spiritual in nature and has little to do with physical structure and form. By exploring the concepts of restoration, destruction and consumption in such a perspective, we understand that preservation and restoration are active processes of materialisation. We also understand that destruction and consumption are necessary for the appreciation of certain heritage expressions, and that heritage is being constantly created. With this understanding, this book is an argument for challenging contemporary western heritage discourse and question its fundamental ideology of preservationism.

  • 79.
    Karlström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Threats and Potentials to Cultural Heritage in Vientiane Province, Laos: SAREC Planning Study Feb-March 20002000Report (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Karlström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Bouasisengpaseuth, Bounheuang
    Lao National Museum, Ministry of Information and Culture, Vientiane, Laos.
    Vientiane Archaeological Survey 2001-20032003Report (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Karlström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Keosopha, Kanda
    Ministry of Information and Culture, Department of Museums and Archaeology, Vientiane, Laos.
    Report from the archaeological excavation at Vat Pho Saeng Alun, Ban Thalat, Keo Oudom district, Vientiane Province2004Report (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Karlström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Keosopha, Kanda
    Ministry of Information and Culture, Department of Museums and Archaeology, Vientiane, Laos.
    Report from the archaeological investigation at That Don Keo, Phonhong district, Vientiane Province2004Report (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Karlström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Keosopha, Kanda
    Ministry of Information and Culture, Department of Museums and Archaeology, Vientiane, Laos.
    Bouasisengpaseuth, Bounheuang
    Lao National Museum, Ministry of Information and Culture, Vientiane, Laos.
    Viengkham and Say Fong archaeological excavations 2003-20042005Report (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Kohtamaki, Marjaana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    An ethnoarchaeological study of Twa potters in southern Rwanda2010In: Azania, ISSN 0067-270X, E-ISSN 1945-5534, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 298-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an ethnoarchaeological study of Twa potter communities in southern Rwanda. The study was conducted in summer 2007 and explored pottery production within four Twa communities. Field research consisted of recording production sequences within the communities and conducting individual interviews with 18 potters. Drawing from the field data, this article critically considers the archaeological implications of this ethnoarchaeological research, and more specifically how the results of the study support and contradict previous archaeological assumptions concerning Twa pottery.

  • 85.
    Kohtamäki, Marjaana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Transitions: a landscape approach to social and cultural changes in southern Mozambique 5000 BC-1000 AD2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The discussion of interactions between foragers and farmers in southern Africa has conventionally been linked to the migrations of Bantu-speaking farmers and their associated material culture. Further, the transition from foraging to farming has typically been interpreted as a rapid replacement of the former lifestyle by the latter, allegedly superior socio-economic package. The aim of this thesis is to find alternative means of approaching transitions in technologies and activities through space and time in the landscapes of southern Mozambique. The new approaches are used for elucidating the nature of transitions and interactions through material culture in different types of landscapes. The methodological approaches employed here are tested against a range of potential scenarios of interactions between foragers and farmers. The material culture described and analysed in this thesis is derived from surveys and excavations of two ecologically distinctive landscapes in Maputo province. The material culture is analysed by employing a range of field and post-excavation analyses. The analyses are particularly focused on ceramic and lithic assemblages. The distribution and use of material culture are further considered in relation to the differing types of landscapes in the study area. The methodologies used for the analysis of material culture and landscape are evaluated and the applicability of the varied scenarios of interactions considered.

  • 86.
    Källén, Anna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    And Through Flows the River: Archaeology and the Pasts of Lao Pako2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a story about Lao Pako. Lao Pako is located on a small hill on the southern bank of the river Nam Ngum in central Laos. Four seasons of archaeological fieldwork have yielded considerable amounts of pottery, metallurgical remains, glass beads, stone artefacts, spindle whorls as well as other material and structural information that have created a foundation for interpretation. The archaeological interpretation presents Lao Pako as a place where people came to perform rituals c. 1500 years ago. In these rituals, sophisticated combinations of pottery depositions, infant burials and iron production produced a narrative about what it means to be in the world. Things in and on the ground created, and continue to create, non-verbal sentences about life and death, fertility, decay and worldly reproduction.

    The archaeological interpretation is, however, not the only valid story about Lao Pako. This is a place where spirits are; it is also a tourist resort and a national treasure. These other stories all work to create Lao Pako as a place of interest and are used in this thesis to define the archaeological story, and to visualize the aims and agendas inherent in the production of archaeological knowledge.

    Using the conceptual apparatus of postcolonial and other critical theory, the thesis aims to critically deconstruct the archaeology performed by the author and others. It entails an explicit critique of the deterministic temporal unilinearity that is inherent in the archaeological narrative of the evolution of humankind, as well as against essentialist notions of culture and the dissociation of the past as exotic otherness. Thus, the stories about Lao Pako demonstrate the need to critically revise the role of archaeology in a postcolonial world, and create archaeological stories by which we are touched, moved and disturbed, without resorting to imperialist notions of time and progress.

  • 87.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    “African Church”, Botswana2015In: Trophies, Relics and Curios? : Missionary Heritage from Africa and the Pacific / [ed] Karen Jacobs, Chantal Knowles and Chris Wingfield, Leiden: Sidestone Press, 2015, p. 118-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Being ‘indigenous’ and being ‘colonised’ in Africa: contrasting experiences and their implications for a post-colonial archaeology.2014In: Rethinking Colonial Pasts through Archaeology / [ed] Neal Ferris, Rodney Harrison and Michael V. Wilcox, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 423-444Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Early agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa to ca. AD 5002015In: Cambridge World HistoryVolume II: A World with Agriculture / [ed] Graeme Barker and Candice Goucher, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, p. 736-773Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Ethnicity, archaeological ceramics and changing paradigms in East African archaeology2015In: Ethnic Ambiguities in African Archaeology: Materiality, History, and the Shaping of Cultural Identities / [ed] Kevin C. MacDonald and Francois Richard, Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press Inc., 2015, p. 245-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Hunter-gatherer-fishers, ethnoarchaeology and analogical reasoning2014In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Hunter-Gatherers / [ed] Vicki Cummings, Peter Jordan and Marek Zvelebil, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 104-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Introduction: archaeological ivories in a global perspective2015In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 317-332Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Iron Age imaginaries and barbarian encounters: British prehistory’s African past2015In: Theory in Africa, Africa inTheory: Locating Meaning in Archaeology / [ed] Stephanie Wynne-Jones and Jeffrey B. Fleisher, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 175-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Just how long does ‘long-term’ have to be?: Matters of temporal scale as impediments to interdisciplinary understanding in historical ecology2015In: Oxford Handbook of AppliedArchaeology / [ed] Christian Isendahl and Daryl Stump, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phrase ‘long term’ is increasingly used as a keyword descriptive for research proposals and outputs claiming to contribute to debates on past and future climate change, sustainable economies, and the resilience of different landscapes. Scholars from across the environmental and social sciences and the humanities are engaged in this kind of research and are keen to see their results used to influence policy and practice. While ostensibly addressing mutually common issues, scrutiny of these studies indicates very divergent uses of the term ‘long term’. Such variation can act as an impediment to the development of truly interdisciplinary historical ecologies, especially since scholars often fail to specify the precise temporal range they have in mind when they employ the phrase ‘long term’. This chapter reviews these alternative understandings of the term and their associated problems, and offers some suggestions as to how these might be overcome.

  • 95.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Peripheral vision: Reflections on the death and rebirth of ethnoarchaeology2015In: Breaking Barriers: Proceedings of the 47th Chacmool Archaeology Conference / [ed] Robyn Cook, Kim Edwards & Colleen Hughes, Calgary: Department of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Calgary , 2015, p. 19-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Initially formalized as a distinct domain of archaeological research in 1960s and 1970s as part of ‘processual archaeology’, but with intellectual roots (and routes) extending back to the beginnings of antiquarianism in early post-medieval European society, ethnoarchaeology has persistently been regarded as a supplier of the raw materials of theoretical and methodological insight rather than as producer in its own right. Both literally and metaphorically, its practioners have been regarded as occupying the periphery of the discipline supplying convenient ‘ethnographic facts’ that can be refashioned into overarching theories by those at the disciplinary centre. Drawing on an analysis of the contributions of ethnoarchaeological research conducted in Africa over the last four-five decades, this paper offers an alternative perspective that celebrates the theoretically innovative nature of a hybridized, post-colonial ethnoarchaeology.

  • 96.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Presencing the past: Implications for bridging the history-prehistory divide2014In: The Death of Prehistory / [ed] Peter R. Schmidt and Stephen A. Mrozowski, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 47-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Geog Archaeol & Environm Studies, ZA-2050 Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Sustainability: Primordial conservationists,environmental sustainability and the rhetoric of pastoralist cultural heritagein East Africa.2015In: Heritage Keywords: Rhetoric and Redescriptionin Cultural Heritage / [ed] Trinidad Rico and Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels, Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado , 2015, p. 259-283Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The archaeological potential for the history of labor relations in East Africa, ca.1500–19002014In: History in Africa - A Journal of Method, ISSN 0361-5413, E-ISSN 1558-2744, Vol. 41, p. 227-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies of past labor relations in different parts of Africa have relied almost entirely on documentary sources. While such records can provide valuable insights into the range of different labor categories that have existed and the relative proportions of the population involved, for much of the continent they are severely restricted in a temporal sense. Thus, for many areas suitable documentary materials covering the periods prior to AD 1850 are scarce; as is the case, for example, for much of East Africa. To extend scholarly understanding of the nature of labor relations prior to this date, alternative sources need to be utilized. This paper presents a brief overview of the potential scope for utilizing archaeological data, with specific reference to mainland Tanzania. The paper also highlights the many limitations of archaeological data and offers some thoughts on how these might be addressed from both a conceptual and methodological perspective. The paper concludes with an appeal for more studies oriented toward investigation of the archaeological remains of the last five hundred years and greater dialogue between the region’s historian and archaeologists.

  • 99.
    Lane, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    The archaeology of pastoralism and stock-keeping in East Africa2013In: The Oxford Handbook of African Archaeology / [ed] Peter Mitchell & Paul J. Lane, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 581-597Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Lane, Paul
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Marchant, Robert A.
    University of York.
    Past perspectives for the future: foundations for sustainable development in East Africa2014In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 51, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    East African ecosystems are shaped by long-term interactions with a dynamic climate and increasing human interventions. Whereas in the past the latter have often been regarded solely in a negative light, more recent research from the perspective of historical ecology has shown that there has often been a strong beneficial connection between people and ecosystems in East Africa. These relationships are now being strained by the rapidly developing and growing population, and their associated resource needs. Predicted future climatic and atmospheric change will further impact on human-ecosystem relationships culminating in a host of challenges for their management and sustainable development, compounded by a backdrop of governance, land tenure and economic constraints. Understanding how ecosystem-human interactions have changed over time and space can only be derived from combining archaeological, historical and palaeoecological data. Although crucial gaps remain, the number and resolution of these important archives from East Africa is growing rapidly, and the application of new techniques and proxies is allowing a more comprehensive understanding of past ecosystem response to climate change to be developed. When used in conjunction it is possible to disentangle human from climate change impacts, and assess how the former interacts with major environmental changes such as increased use offire, changing herbivore densities and increased atmospheric CO2 concentration. With forecasted environmental change it is imperative that our understanding of past human-ecosystem interactions is queried to impart effective long term conservation and land use management strategies. Such an approach, that has its foundation in the long term, will enhance possibilities for a sustainable future for East African ecosystems and maximise the livelihoods of the populations that rely on them.

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