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  • 51.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Heroes: living or dead?2015In: Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion / [ed] E. Eidinow & J. Kindt, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 383-396Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Holocaust2013In: The Encyclopedia of Ancient History / [ed] R.S. Bagnall, K. Brodersen, C.B. Champion, A. Erskine & S.R. Huebner, Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 3279-3280Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Holocaustic sacrifices in ancient Greek religion and the ritual relations to the Levant2018In: Change, continuity, and connectivity: North-EasternMediterranean at the turn of the Bronze Age and in the early Iron Age / [ed] L. Niesiolowski-Spanò; M. Wecowski, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2018, p. 308-326Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Holocaustic sacrifices in ancient Greek religion: Some comments on practice and theory2017In: Animal sacrifice in ancient Greece: Proceedings of the first international workshops in Kraków / [ed] Bielawski, Krzysztof, Warsawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe Sub Lupa , 2017, p. 45-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Homeric echoes?: Archaizing language in Greek religious inscriptions2014In: Öffentlichkeit-Monument-Text: XIV congressus internationalis epigraphiae graecae et latinae 27.-31. Augusti MMXII. Akten / [ed] W. Eck & P. Funke, Berlin: De Gruyter , 2014, p. 619-621Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Libations, Greek2013In: The Encyclopedia of Ancient History / [ed] R.S. Bagnall, K. Brodersen, C.B. Champion, A. Erskine & S.R. Huebner, Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 4051-4052Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Meat for the gods2011In: Nourrir les dieux?: Sacrifice et répresentation du divin, actes de la VIe rencontre du Groupe de recherche européen "Figura, représentation du divin dans les sociétés grecque et romaine" / [ed] V. Pirenne-Delforge & F. Prescendi, Liège: Centre International d'Étude de la Religion Grecque Antique , 2011, p. 15-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Homer, the practice of giving the gods cooked meat is evidenced by Eumaios’ sacrifice in Odyssey XIV, while at this and other sacrifices pieces of raw meat from the animal victim were placed on top of the thighbones, which were then burnt in the altar fire as a part of the god’s portion, a procedure labelled omothetein. In the Classical period, gifts of meat for the gods are well attested in the epigraphical evidence, in the form of trapezomata or theoxenia, but also in literary sources and iconography. This paper will discuss when the practice of meat offerings came into being and how it develops, what the gods may have been thought of actually receiving on these occasions and why meat was given. It will be argued that the gifts of meat for the gods may have arisen from the honouring of kings and exceptional individuals with choice portions of meat, and that their growing importance in cult can be linked to the significance of banquets in Archaic society as a means for expressing status and hierarchies, perhaps under the influence of Near Eastern ritual practices. The gods were never perceived as craving or eating the meat and the central concept of meat offerings was the bestowing of honour, time. Still, by offering the gods something, which both could and was consumed by man, the meat offerings may have created possibilities for a different and closer interaction between mortals and immortals, in particular by evoking a context of xenia.

  • 58.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Men vad håller kentauren i handen?: Avbildningar av och attityder till köttkonsumtion i antikens Grekland2018In: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademiens årsbok, ISSN 0083-6796, p. 165-182Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Mytologiska matkrig: Ett ganska okänt rödfigurigt vasmotiv2013In: Institutionens historier: En vänbok till Gullög Nordquist / [ed] Erika Weiberg, Susanne Carlsson, Gunnel Ekroth, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2013, p. 51-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Nora Brüggemann, Tiryns XVIII. Kult im archaischen Tiryns. Eine Analyse neuer Befunde und Funde, Reichert Verlag, Wiesbaden 20152018In: Gnomon. Kritische Zeitschrift für die gesamte klassische Altertumswissenschaft, ISSN 0017-1417, Vol. 90, p. 539-545Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Pelops joins the party: Transformations of a hero-cult within the festival at Olympia2012In: Greek and Roman festivals: Content, Meaning, and Practice / [ed] J.R. Brandt & J.W. Iddeng, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2012, p. 95-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Response to Göran Eidevall2013In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 78, p. 47-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Round trip to Hades in the Eastern Mediterranean tradition: Visits to the underworld from antiquity to Byzantium2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Round Trip to Hades in the Eastern Mediterranean Tradition explores how the theme of visiting the Underworld and returning alive has been treated, transmitted and transformed in the ancient Greek and Byzantine traditions. The journey was usually a descent (katabasis) into a dark and dull place, where forgetfulness and punishment reigned, but since ‘everyone’ as there, it was also a place that offered opportunities to meet people and socialize. Famous Classical round trips to Hades include those undertaken by Odysseus and Aeneas, but this pagan topic also caught the interest of Christian writers. The contributions of the present volume allow the reader to follow the passage from pagan to Christian representations of Hades–a passage that may seem surprisingly effortless.

  • 64.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Sacred meals in ancient Greece?: Dining in domestic settings as compared to sanctuaries2017In: The Eucharist - its origins and context.: Sacred Meal, Communal Meal, TableFellowship in Late Antiquity, Early Judaism and Early Christianity / [ed] D. Hellholm & D. Sänger, Mohr Siebeck, 2017, p. 1389-1411Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The crocodile on Samos or Africa in the Aegean2018In: The resilience of heritage: Cultivating a future ofthe past. Essays in honour of professor Paul J.J. Sinclair / [ed] A. Ekblom; Ch. Isendahl; K.-J. Lindholm, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2018, p. 61-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Ull, pengar och sex: Tolkningar av ett attiskt, rödfigurigt vasmotiv2011In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 67.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Vernant et les os: Théorie et practique du sacrifice grec2016In: Relire Jean-Pierre Vernant / [ed] S. Georgoudi et al., Paris: Centre ANHIMA , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Vernant et les os: Théorie et pratique du sacrufuce grec2018In: Relire Vernant / [ed] S. Georgoudi; F. de Polignac, Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 2018, p. 83-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    "Jean-Pierre Vernant (1914-2007), philosophe et helléniste d'exception, a révolutionné la compréhension de la Grèce antique et la réflexion sur la place des cultures anciennes dans le monde contemporain. Plus de dix ans après sa disparition, le moment est venu de porter un regard distancié sur le parcours d'un homme qui a toujours entrelacé sa vie de chercheur et sa vie de citoyen. Car Vernant s'est nourri en permanence des débats de son époque pour faire de l'étude des anciens Grecs une force intellectuelle libératrice. Mais avec le temps, l'écart se creuse avec les conditions originelles de la création de son oeuvre. Le risque existe que la diversité de cette pensée ne soit réduite aux approximations d'une vulgate appauvrie. Les auteurs sollicités pour ce volume représentent des pays, des disciplines et des courants de pensée divers, de la science politique à l'archéologie, de la philologie à l'histoire de l'art ou l'histoire des religions. Ils mènent une réflexion qui entrecroise les considérations sur l'action de Vernant citoyen, l'analyse approfondie de son oeuvre et la mise en perspective de la réception de cette oeuvre dans différents pays et institutions. En se focalisant sur l'étude du religieux, sur le politique et la question de la cité, enfin sur le rayonnement international de Vernant, ils reconsidèrent une pensée multiforme, la replacent dans son contexte et montrent par quelles voies elle a exercé son influence, bref ressaisissent ce qui en fit l'originalité, la puissance; et le rayonnement."--Page 4 of cover.

  • 69.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    What we like the bones to tell us: a sacrificial wish list2013In: Bones, behaviour and belief: The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice in ancient Greece and beyond / [ed] Gunnel Ekroth & Jenny Wallensten, Stockholm: Svenska institutet i Athen , 2013, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal bones comprise the only category of evidence for Greek cult which is constantly significantly increasing. The use of ever more sophisticated excavation methods demonstrates the importance of the zooarchaeological material for the study of Greek religion and how such material can throw light on texts, inscriptions and images, as the animal bones constitute remains of actual ritual actions and not mere descriptions or representations. This paper outlines some areas where the zooarchaeological evidence may be of particular pertinence, for example, in elucidating the complex and idiosyncratic religious terminology of shares of sacrificial victims mentioned in sacred laws and sacrificial calendars, or in providing a context for a better understanding of the representations of animal parts on Attic vases. The role of meat within ancient Greek society, the choice of sacrificial victims and the handling of “non-sacrificable” animals such as game, dogs and equids within Greek cult can also be clarified by comparisons with the animal remains. 

  • 70.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Why does Zeus care about burnt thighbones from sheep?: Defining the divine and structuring the world through animal sacrifice in ancient Greece2019In: History of Religions, ISSN 0018-2710, E-ISSN 1545-6935, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 225-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gunnel Ekroth, in “Why Does Zeus Care about Burnt Thighbones from sheep?  Defining the Divine and Structuring the World Through Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greece,” sets the plate for this volume by reassessing the historical backdrop against which nascent Christian traditions related to animal sacrifice emerge.  Animal sacrifice was the central ritual action of ancient Greek religion, as well as in most religions of the eastern Mediterranean in antiquity.  Although modern scholars have studied this religious practice for more than 100 years, animal sacrifice has always posed something of a problem, as it is so fundamentally alien to western European Christian culture. In order to understand animal sacrifice in the ancient world, one needs to encounter it in its own historical setting.  This means not only exploring its role in what moderns more narrowly construe as the religious sphere, but also in social and political orderings as well. Of central importance, to archaeologists of sacrifice like Ekroth, is the practical execution of the rituals.

    Ekroth introduces readers to a relatively new wealth of material evidence about animal sacrifice in the pre-Christian, Greek world.  Ekroth’s critical contribution is to assess the results of recent research on the archaeology of sacrifice.  Her main concern is with historical animal sacrifice as it was actually performed, primarily, in the thysia ritual, which occurred across ancient Greek sanctuaries between the 8th and 1st centuries BCE.  At these events, mainly domesticated animals along with the fruit of agricultural labor and libations, after being dedicated to a deity, were sacrificed and shared – with butchered portions ostensibly going to gods like Zeus who preferred thighbones, while the rest of the animal, in particular the meat, was given to the human participants.  Ekroth encounters in the material handling, treatment, and distribution of meat derived from ritualized animal sacrifice an ancient structuring of the world.  Analysis of these sacrificial rituals provides us with windows to the cosmologies, hierarchies of social power, and group identities associated with those who participated.    

  • 71.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Heroes, ancestors or just any old bones?: Contextualizing the consecration of human remains from the Mycenaean shaft graves at Lerna in the Argolid2016In: Metaphysis. Ritual, myth and symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age: Proceedings of the 15th international Aegean conference, Vienna, 22-25 April 2014 / [ed] E. Alram-Stern et al., Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2016, p. 235-243Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Introduction2018In: Round trip to Hades inthe Eastern Mediterranean tradition: Visits to the Underworldfrom antiquity to Byzantium / [ed] G. Ekroth; I. Nilsson, Leiden: Brill , 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wallensten, JennySvenska institutet i Athen.
    Bones, behaviour and belief: The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice in ancient Greece and beyond2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of the osteological evidence as a source for ritual practices in ancient Greece is gradually becoming widely recognized. Animal bones form the only category of evidence for Greek cult which is constantly increasing, and they can complement and elucidate the information provided by texts, inscriptions and images. This volume brings together sixteen contributions exploring ritual practices and animal bones from different chronological and geographical perspectives, foremost ancient Greece in the historical period, but also in the Bronze Age and as early as the Neolithic period, as well as Anatolia, France and Scandinavia, providing new empirical evidence from a number of major sanctuaries and cult-places. On a methodological level, the complexity of identifying ritual activity from the osteological evidence is a recurrent theme, as is the prominence of local variation visible in the bone material, suggesting that the written sources and iconography may offer simplified or idealized versions of the rituals actually performed. Although osteology needs to and should be integrated with other kinds of sources, the independent study of the bones in an unbiased manner is of utmost importance, as the bones can provide a different “reality” than that encountered in our other sources.

  • 74.
    Ekroth, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wallensten, Jenny
    Svenska institutet i Athen.
    Introduction: Bones of contention?2013In: Bones, behaviour and belief: The zooarchaeological evidence as a source for ritual practice on ancient Greece and beyond / [ed] Gunnel Ekroth & Jenny Wallensten, Stockholm: Svenska institutet i Athen , 2013, p. 9-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 75.
    El Shazly, Amina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    An Historical Ecology of the Baladi Dog in Egypt2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Dogs have a long but neglected history as companion species in Egypt history. From the most valued companion in ancient Egypt the relationship between dogs and humans has changed over time. However, in the present day the Egyptian baladi dog has been abused, neglected, unwanted for centuries. In this thesis, I investigate the nature and relationships between humans and dogs in Egypt in the past and present drawing on archeological, historical and genetic information. I will dig deeper into dog genetics to better understand the distinction between the baladi dog in relation to other breeds. Using online surveys, I interview baladi and non-baladi dog owners to understand how Egyptians perceive the baladi dog today exploring also how and why this perception is changing. Moreover, through interviews with rescuers and veterinarians I examine further the general perception of baladi dogs in Egypt from their perspectives. As I show, perceptions of the baladi dog have changed positively over the recent years both in Egypt and abroad, though there is still a long way to go. The better status of the perceptions of the baladi dog has also meant thatthe baladi is increasingly seen as a ‘breed’ or a particular dog type. The changing perceptions of the baladi dog and the debates around them is discussed and scrutinized in relation to urban planning and policy.

  • 76.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messinia, Greece..
    Holmgren, Karin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messinia, Greece.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Shen, Chuan-Chou
    Natl Taiwan Univ, High Precis Mass Spectrometry & Environm Change L, Dept Geosci, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Hu, Hsun-Ming
    Natl Taiwan Univ, High Precis Mass Spectrometry & Environm Change L, Dept Geosci, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Boyd, Meighan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messinia, Greece.;Royal Holloway Univ London, Dept Earth Sci, Egham, Surrey, England..
    Stocker, Sharon
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Class, 410 Blegen Lib, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Late Bronze Age climate change and the destruction of the Mycenaean Palace of Nestor at Pylos2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0189447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers new high-resolution oxygen and carbon isotope data from Stalagmite S1 from Mavri Trypa Cave, SW Peloponnese. Our data provide the climate background to the destruction of the nearby Mycenaean Palace of Nestor at Pylos at the transition from Late Helladic (LH) IIIB to LH IIIC, similar to 3150-3130 years before present (before AD 1950, hereafter yrs BP) and the subsequent period. S1 is dated by 24 U-Th dates with an averaged precision of +/- 26 yrs (2s), providing one of the most robust paleoclimate records from the eastern Mediterranean for the end of the Late Bronze Age (LBA). The delta O-18 record shows generally wetter conditions at the time when the Palace of Nestor at Pylos was destroyed, but a brief period of drier conditions around 3200 yrs BP may have disrupted the Mycenaean agricultural system that at the time was likely operating close to its limit. Gradually developing aridity after 3150 yrs BP, i.e. subsequent to the destruction, probably reduced crop yields and helped to erode the basis for the reinstitution of a central authority and the Palace itself.

  • 77.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Holmgren, Karin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Sundqvist, Hanna S.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Climate in the eastern Mediterranean, and adjacent regions, during the past 6000 years: A review2011In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 3153-3173Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eastern Mediterranean, with its long archaeological and historical records, provides a unique opportunity to study human responses to climate variability. We review paleoclimate data and reconstructions from the region with a focus on the last 6000 years. We aim to provide an up-to-date source of information on climate variability and to outline present limitations and future opportunities. The review work is threefold: (1) literature review, (2) spatial and temporal analysis of proxy records, and (3) statistical estimation of uncertainties in present paleoclimate reconstructions (temperature, °C). On a regional scale the review reveals a wetter situation from 6000 to 5400 yrs BP (note: all ages in this paper are in calibrated years before present (i.e. before 1950), abbreviated yrs BP, unless otherwise stated). This is followed by a less wet period leading up to one of fully-developed aridity from c. 4600 yrs BP. There is a need for more high-resolution paleoclimate records, in order to (i) better understand regional patterns and trends versus local climate variability and to (ii) fill the gap of data from some regions, such as the Near East, Greece and Egypt. Further, we evaluate the regional occurrence of a proposed widespread climate event at 4200 yrs BP. This proposed climate anomaly has been used to explain profound changes in human societies at different locations in the region around this time. We suggest that although aridity was widespread around 4200 yrs BP in the eastern Mediterranean region, there is not enough evidence to support the notion of a climate event with rapidly drying conditions in this region.

  • 78.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salonen, Sakari
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Geosci & Geog, POB 64, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland;Univ Bordeaux, Environm & Paleoenvironm Ocean & Continentaux, UMR 5805, F-33615 Pessac, France.
    Frank, Norbert
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Environm Phys, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Helmens, Karin F.
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Helsinki, Inst Atmospher & Earth Syst Res INAR Phys, Varrio Res Stn, POB 64, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Environm Phys, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Deininger, Michael
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Geosci, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Holzkämper, Steffen
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Last Interglacial Climate in Northern Sweden - Insights from a Speleothem Record2019In: QUATERNARY, ISSN 2571-550X, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continental records with absolute dates of the timing and progression of climatic conditions during the Last Interglacial (LIG) from northern Europe are rare. Speleothems from northern Europe have a large potential as archives for LIG environmental conditions since they were formed in sheltered environments and may be preserved beneath ice sheets. Here, we present delta C-13 and delta O-18 values from speleothem Kf-21, from Korallgrottan in Jamtland (northwest Sweden). Kf-21 is dated with five MC-ICPMS U-Th dates with errors smaller than similar to 1 ka. Kf-21 started forming at similar to 130.2 ka and the main growth phase with relatively constant growth rates lasted from 127.3 ka to 124.4 ka, after which calcite formation ceased. Both delta C-13 and delta O-18 show rapid shifts but also trends, with a range of values within their Holocene counterparts from Korallgrottan. Our results indicate an early onset of the LIG in northern Europe with ice-free conditions at similar to 130 ka. Higher growth rates combined with more negative delta O-18 values between similar to 127.3 and 126.8 ka, interpreted here as warmer and more humid conditions, as well as indications of a millennial-scale cold spell centered at 126.2 ka, resemble findings from speleothem records from other parts of Europe, highlighting that these were regional scale climatic patterns.

  • 79.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Navarino Environmental Observatory, Navarino Dunes, Costa Navarino, Greece.
    Woodbridge, Jessie
    Labuhn, Inga
    Roberts, C. Neil
    Holocene hydro-climatic variability in the Mediterranean: A synthetic multi-proxy reconstruction2019In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 847-863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we identify and analyze proxy data interpreted to reflect hydro-climatic variability over the last 10,000 years from the Mediterranean region to (1) outline millennial and multi-centennial-scale trends and (2) identify regional patterns of hydro-climatic variability. A total of 47 lake, cave, and marine records were transformed to z-scores to allow direct comparisons between sites, put on a common time scale, and binned into 200-year time slices. Six different regions were identified based on numerical and spatial analyzes of z-scores: S Iberia and Maghreb, N Iberia, Italy, the Balkans, Turkey, and the Levant, and the overall hydro-climate history of each region was reconstructed. N Iberia is largely decoupled from the five other regions throughout the Holocene. Wetter conditions occur in the five other regions between 8500 and 6100 yr BP. After 6000 yr BP, climate oscillated until around 3000 ± 300 yr BP, which seems to have been the overall driest period in the eastern Mediterranean and North Africa. In contrast, Italy and N Iberia seem to have remained wetter during this period. In addition, non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) was applied to 18 long, continuous climate z-score records that span the majority of the Holocene. nMDS axes 1 and 2 illustrate the main trends in the z-score data. The first axis captures a long-term development of drier condition in the Mediterranean from 7900 to 3700 yr BP. Rapid shifts occur in nMDS axis 2 at 6700–6300 BP, 4500–4300 BP, and 3500–3300 BP indicating centennial-scale climate change. Our synthesis highlights a dominant south/east versus north/west Mediterranean hydro-climate dipole throughout the Holocene and therefore confirms that there was no single climate trajectory characterizing the whole Mediterranean basin during the last 10 millennia.

  • 80.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lejdegård, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Victor, Helena
    The Fall and Decline of the Roman Urban Mind2011In: The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics / [ed] Paul Sinclair, Gullög Nordquist, Frands Herrschend & Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia , 2011, p. 277-294Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Frejman, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Religious continuity through space: Four phases in the history of Labraunda2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Labraunda has a long and manifold history. The sanctuary starts out small in the Archaic period, is the most important in Karia during the Hekatomnid dynasty, reverts to a more normal position during the Hellenistic time, and is finally converted into a Christian sanctuary in the Late Roman period. This study aims to investigate the spatial pattern of what the visitor could have been perceived as religiously important at the sanctuary, in four different phases. Plans of the architecture and theory about ritual activity have formed the basis for analysing religious importance. What this study has shown is that a movement of religiously important space can be observed at Labraunda. Moving away from the origins at the Split Rock, for a long period being concentrated to the Temple Terrace, and consequently moving out to the two churches built outside the temenos.

  • 82. Galik, A.
    et al.
    Forstenpointner, G.
    Weissengruber, G.E.
    Thanheiser, U.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Smetana, R.
    Gauss, W.
    Bioarchaeological investigations at Kolonna, Aegina (Early Helladic III to Late Helladic III)2013In: Diet, Economy and Society in the Ancient Greek World: Towards a Better Integration of Archaeology and Science. Proceedings of the International Conference Held at the Netherlands Institute at Athens on 22-24 March 2010 / [ed] S. Voutsaki and S.M. Valamoti, Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2013, p. 163-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 83. Gauss, Walter
    et al.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Smetana, Rudolfine
    The Middle Helladic Large Building Complex at Kolonna. A Preliminary View2011In: Our Cups are Full: Pottery and Society in the Aegean Bronze Age: Papers Presented to Jeremy B. Rutter on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday / [ed] W. Gauss, M. Lindblom, R.A.K. Smith, J.C. Wright, Oxford: Archaeopress , 2011, p. 76-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the so-called Large Building Complex at Kolonna, Aegina for the first time in a comprehensive way. The “Large Building Complex” is the thus far largest building found at Kolonna, except the fortification wall. The Building was constructed at the beginning of the Middle Helladic period (MH I/II) and remained in use until the beginning of the Late Helladic period (LH I/II ). Within its long history, it underwent a series of changes and modifications. Size and dimensions as well as the rich finds from its interior clearly indicate that the “Large Building Complex” is the unambiguous residential building from Middle Helladic Kolonna

  • 84. Gauss, Walter
    et al.
    Lindblom, MichaelUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.Smith, R. Angus K.Wright, James C.
    Our Cups Are Full: Pottery and Society in the Aegean Bronze Age: Papers Presented to Jeremy B. Rutter on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Gierow, Kristine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Protovillanova culture in San Giovenale: A study of ceramics and huts2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents an overview of the spreading of the Protovillanovan culture on the Acropolis of San Giovenale through a typological study of the materials such as the oval huts and the ceramics of this period. Through a typological study of ceramics this study will be able to define what type of ceramic vessels are more common during the Protovillanova period. The oval huts are included in this study in order to see the size and the spreading of the proto-urban society of San Giovenale.

  • 86. Gillis, Carole
    et al.
    Sjöberg, BirgittaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Trade and Production in Premonetary Greece : Crossing Borders: Proceedings of the 7th, 8th and 9th International Workshops, Athens 1997-19992008Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Gillis, Carole
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Sjöberg L., BirgittaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Crossing Borders: Proceedings of the 7th, 8th and 9th International Workshops Athen 1997-19992008Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Gosling, Nicole
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Making Sense of Cattle: A story from farm to food2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores how those involved in a mobile-slaughtering mode of beef production engage with, and experience cattle bodies throughout the beef producing process. These experiences are examined in relation to historical accounts of how people have experienced cattle bodies in both pre-industrialized and post industrialized modes of beef production. Furthermore, an ethnographic study of a Swedish mobile-slaughtering company was conducted, followed by analysis using hermeneutic phenomenology and the concepts of liminality and Ellis’ boundary labour (2014). This thesis has shown that cattle bodies are experienced differently depending on the context of interaction, and that these experiences are both similar and different from those in pre-industrial and industrial beef production. This research contributes to a larger body of research exploring human-animal interactions, and contributes to understanding the experiences of those who are engaged in beef production.

  • 89.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Abbreviated references or "ideal herms": An abbreviated account2018In: Frusna ögonblick: Essäer tillägnade Anne-Marie Leander Touati / [ed] Henrik Gerding, Lovisa Brännstedt & Renée Forsell, Lund: Lunds universitet , 2018, 1, p. 85-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Intertextuality and Roman visual culture: A new approach to Roman ideal sculpture2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to acquire new knowledge regarding the role of ideal sculpture in the Roman world. Since the mid-19th century, such sculptures have been studied primarily as Roman copies of Greek originals, using the method of copy criticism. During the last two decades, the dominating influence of this approach has been repeatedly criticized as it does not investigate the place of such sculptures in the Roman cultural context. Yet, no alternative approach has managed to rival that of copy criticism. This project aims to formulate a new mode of studying this fascinating material, an approach that has great potential to produce new insights into the role of ideal sculptures in Roman society. Turning to the concept of intertextuality, this project also aims to introduce a theoretical and multidisciplinary element to the current debate on how to interpret Roman ideal sculpture.

  • 91.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Pompejanska fantasier i nöjets tjänst2015In: Romhorisont. Tidskrift för Föreningen svenska rominstitutets vänner och Svenska institutet i Rom, ISSN 0349-5590, no 62, p. 20-22Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Om pompejanska influenser i 1920-talets färgglada klassicism. Texten är en återgivning av det föredrag som författaren höll på temadagen "Inspiration och ideal. Pompejanskt i Sverige under 1700-talet-1900-talet" på Konstakademien i Stockholm den 22 november 2014. Temadagen arrangerades av Föreningen svenska rominstitutets vänner, i samband med Pompejiutställningen på Millesgården.

  • 93.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Stockholms Apollon Musagetes genom århundradena2016In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 24-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 94.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The propriety of decorative luxury possessions: Reflections on the occurrence of kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers in Roman visual culture2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possession / [ed] Alison Klevnäs; Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Stockholm University, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2015, p. 93-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a well-known passage of his De architectura (written during thelast decades BC) Vitruvius describes the Roman domus (house) as aself-evident part of the public image of its owner. To Vitruvius, thehouse is not a private sphere, at least not in the sense we like to thinkof our homes today. Instead, Vitruvius emphasizes that the domusserves as the backdrop for at least a part of its owner’s public life,and as such its layout and appearance has a bearing on the owner’spublic persona (Vitr. De arch. 6.5.1-3; Granger 1934:36–39). But itwas not just the appearance of the house itself that was important inthis regard: there was a similar relationship between the home-ownerand the possessions that he chose to put on display in his house.

    During the Late Republican era (133–31 BC), many members ofthe Roman elite set out to acquire art collections to be displayed intheir homes. This paper shows that the decorative luxury possessionsacquired had a power and a capacity of their own. The owner’s tasteand personality were established through the acquisition and displayof these collections.

    To illustrate this point, two motifs are discussed: kalathiskos dancersand pyrrhic dancers (fig. 1). Within the Roman cultural context,these motifs are primarily represented on decorative luxury items.The paper aims to explore the occurrence of the motifs and to explainwhy pyrrhic dancers were depicted less often than kalthiskos dancers(fig. 2), and to relate this circumstance to the agency of decorativeluxury possessions within the Roman cultural context.

  • 95.
    Hagelin, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Dygder för frigivna2017In: Classica, Vol. 1, p. 7-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 96.
    Hagelin, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Freedmen, status, age and gender in the Roman Late Republic and Early Empire2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Hagelin, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Från en ledsen mor till en ogudaktig son.: Varför lät romare göra gravinskrifter till barn?2013In: Institutionens historier.: En vänbok till Gullög Nordquist / [ed] E. Weiberg, S.Carlsson & G. Ekroth, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2013, p. 79-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Hagelin, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    New perspectives in unfree labour history: a comparative approach from antiquity to the middle ages: Freedmen, labour and masculinities in Ancient Rome2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Hagelin, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Nya perspektiv på maskuliniteter i det antika Rom: dygden virtus och frigivna slavar som ett exempel2018In: Gender, history , futures: Report from the XI Nordic Women's and Gender History Conference / [ed] D. Nyström & J. Overud, Umeå, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Hallvig, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Bona Dea Cult2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay concern the Bona Dea cult and women in the Roman Republic. By using ancient literary sources and inscriptions the different aspects of the cult is examined from a gender and an intersectional perspective. The essay covers the lives and rights of Roman women, their role in religion in general and how they participated in the Bona Dea cult specifically. The aim of the study is to understand the importance of the cult for women, freedmen and slaves, as well as analysing the paradox of letting women participate in rituals and customs otherwise forbidden to them.

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