uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
123 51 - 100 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Klasson Sundin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Traditionsförmedling eller livslust?: Om barns rätt till andlig utveckling2004In: Om stora barn & små: Supplement till tidningen religion och livsfrågor / [ed] Franck, Olof, Malmö: Föreningen Lärare i Religionskunskap , 2004, no 36, p. 132-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Klasson Sundin, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Vision och verklighet i predikoarbetet1995In: Svensk kyrkotidning, ISSN 0346-2153, no 31/32, p. 337-339Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 53.
    Klasson Sundin, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Evers Rosander, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Bredd, djup och mångfald.: Forskning vid Teologiska fakulteten2001Book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Klasson Sundin, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Olsen, Inger-Lise
    Bara hushållerskor...: ett kvinnligt perspektiv på jubelåret1994Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 55.
    Klasson Sundin, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Weiderud, Peter
    Mission and the Church of Sweden in the Future2000In: Svensk Missionstidskrift/Swedish Missiological Themes, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 45-57Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 56.
    Knutsson Bråkenhielm, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Religion – evolutionens missfoster eller kärleksbarn?: Kognitionsvetenskaplig religionsforskning och dess relevans för religiösa trosföreställningars rationalitet2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is on Cognitive Science of Religion (CSR) and its relevance for the rationality of religious beliefs. An epistemical model for rationality is developed according to which: a person (or group of persons) is rational to hold a certain belief a) if this belief can be assumed to have been generated by one or more reliable cognitive mechanisms, b) applies whether or not she is aware of what these mechanisms are, but c) only as long as it does not exist or arise some reasons (defeaters) to question the belief; if they occur, she must d) reflect on it and find other reasons or grounds to hold the belief in question.     

    Two different positions are examined, namely: 1) negative relevance: the findings and theories in CSR undermines the rationality of religious beliefs; 2) positive relevance: religious beliefs need not be irrational in the light of CSR, in fact CSR may actually support the rationality of religious beliefs.     

    Two lines of argument can be distinguished among those who argue for a negative relevance: a) the natural explanations that are provided by CSR are preferable; and b) religious beliefs are irrational because they are caused by unreliable cognitive mechanisms.     

    Among those who argue for positive relevance two arguments can be distinguised: a) religious beliefs seem to come naturally to humans and therefore are probably true; and b) CSR confirms empirically that we are equipped with a "divine mechanism" that there are reasons to believe is reliable.     

    The conclusions are: CSR has negative relevance to beliefs in "finite supernatural agency", but not for the faith of "infinite supernatural agency". First, the first type of beliefs is easier to explain by being generated by unreliable cognitive mechanisms; secondly they are difficult to integrate with what we otherwise know about the world. A category that falls outside the scope of CSR and thus not even potentially can be affected, is beliefs in "supernatural non-agency".

  • 57.
    Larsson, Mikaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Är lyckan livets mening?: En hermeneutisk analys av Johannes Paulus II och Dalai Lamas syn på vad som konstituerar det goda livet2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 58.
    Leidenhag, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Christian Materialism and the Quest for Human Personhood2017In: Perichoresis. The Theological Journal of Emanuel University, ISSN 1224-984X, E-ISSN 2284-7308, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 83-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a critical exploration of philosopher Kevin Corcoran's proposed Christian Materialism. Corcoran's constitution view claims that we human persons are constituted by our bodies without being identical with the bodies that constitute us. I will critically evaluate this view and argue that Corcoran has not successfully managed to ground a first-person perspective and intentional states in materialism. Moreover, Corcoran's property dualism about mental states and the idea of the causally efficacy of such states seem incompatible with materialism. Corcoran's view of imago Dei is also explored and evaluated. Towards the end of the paper I put forward a brief defense of dualism in light of Corcoran's critique.

  • 59.
    Leidenhag, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    From Emergence Theory to Panpsychism-A Philosophical Evaluation of Nancey Murphy's Non-reductive Physicalism2016In: Sophia, ISSN 0038-1527, E-ISSN 1873-930X, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I offer a critical evaluation of non-reductive physicalism as articulated and defended by Nancey Murphy. I argue that (A) the examples given by Murphy do not illustrate robust emergence and the philosophical idea of downward causation. (B) The thesis of multiple realizability is ontologically neutral, and so cannot support the idea of the causal efficacy of higher-level properties. (C) Supervenience is incompatible with strong emergence. I also argue for the fruitful relationship between emergence theory and panpsychism pertaining to the metaphysical issue of the origin and nature of mind.

  • 60.
    Leidenhag, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    The Relevance of Emergence Theory in the Science-Religion Dialogue2013In: Zygon, ISSN 0591-2385, E-ISSN 1467-9744, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 966-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I call into question the relevance of emergence theories as presently used by thinkers in the science-religion discussion. Specifically, I discuss theories of emergence that have been used by both religious naturalists and proponents of panentheism. I argue for the following conclusions: (1) If we take the background theory to be metaphysical realism, then there seems to be no positive connection between the reality of emergent properties and the validity of providing reality with a religious interpretation, though one could perhaps construe an argument for the positive ontological status of emergence as a negative case for a religious worldview. (2) To be considered more plausible, religious naturalism should interpret religious discourse from the perspective of pragmatic realism. (3) Panentheistic models of divine causality are unable to avoid ontological dualism. (4) It is not obvious that emergent phenomena and/or properties are nonreducible in the ontological sense of the terms; indeed, the tension between weak and strong emergence makes it difficult for the emergentist to make ontological judgments. My general conclusion is that the concept of emergence has little metaphysical significance in the dialogue between science and theology.

  • 61.
    Leidenhag, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Leidenhag, Joanna
    Univ Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9YL, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Science and Spirit: A Critical Examination of Amos Yong's Pneumatological Theology of Emergence2015In: Open Journal of Semantic Web (OJSW), ISSN 0030-3526, E-ISSN 2300-6579, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 425-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a critical examination of Amos Yong's pneumatological use of emergence theory. In seeking to bridge the divide between the worldviews of science and Pentecostalism, Yong sees emergence theory as a fruitful mediating discourse. We will argue for the following: 1) the supernaturalism of Yong's Pentecostal theology renders the concept of emergence obsolete; 2) the ontological independence of various types of spirits in Yong's theology breaks his commitment to supervenience theory; and 3) Yong's transference of scientific concepts into the normative discourse of theology is potentially problematic. These criticisms should be seen as a call for Yong to depart from emergence theory ( and supervenience) in his admirable ambition to harmonize the spirit-filled imagination of Pentecostalism with the scientific culture of the 21st century.

  • 62.
    Leidenhag, Sven Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Naturalizing God?: A Critical Evaluation of Religious Naturalism2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis seeks to critically evaluate religious naturalism as a position in the dialogue between science and religion. I seek to explicate the major topics of debate within religious naturalism (chapter 2), as well as the naturalistic and religious aspects of religious naturalism. It is argued that religious naturalists express reductive as well as non-reductive understandings of naturalism (chapter 3), which I refer to as monistic naturalism and pluralistic naturalism, respectively. It is argued that monistic naturalism cannot account for several important beliefs, regarding agency, intentionality, and semantic normativity. Pluralistic naturalism, although more promising, seems to invite dualism (chapter 4). Another metaphysical framework is, therefore, needed and several alternatives are explored in chapters 7-9.  

    Chapter 5 outlines the religious aspects of religious naturalism. It is shown that religious naturalists express realistic, anti-realistic, and pragmatic understandings of religious discourse. These ways of understanding religion are critically evaluated (chapter 6). Given some of the problems encountered in previous chapters, I propose three alternative frameworks for articulating religious naturalism.

    First, I outline and evaluate possible naturalistic solutions (chapter 7), including liberal naturalism, agnostic naturalism and pragmatic naturalism, and how they may help religious naturalism in moving forward. It is argued that both liberal naturalism and agnostic naturalism encounter the problem of competing ontologies. That is, it remains unclear why we should prefer a naturalistic ontology over non-naturalistic ontologies. Pragmatic naturalism is critiqued for reducing philosophical issues to linguistic agreements between speakers.

    Second, I evaluate two possible theistic frameworks: panentheism and Fiona Ellis’ attempt to fuse naturalism with theism (chapter 8). I suggest that panentheism fails to avoid dualism, and that the theistic dimension of Ellis’ proposal remains unclear. Hence, these forms of theism cannot aid religious naturalism, and instead we must turn to a third alternative framework.

    Third, I propose panpsychism as the final and most promising framework (chapter 9). According to panpsychism, mind-properties are widespread and every physical entity has an experiential dimension to it. It is argued that panpsychism carries metaphysical, eco-ethical, as well as religious benefits. Panpsychism, therefore, can help religious naturalism in moving forward.

  • 63.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    About free-will: In search for a philosophical and theistic understanding of free-will2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 64.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Creativity in Process Panpsychist Panentheism and the MindIn: Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences, ISSN 2195-9773, E-ISSN 2197-2834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Whiteheadian panentheism, the underlying metaphysics is often a form of process panpsychism in which creativity is understood as an ‘ultimate’. In this paper I develop the thought that creativity by the ‘reversed panentheistic analogy’, as suggested by Philip Clayton, in combination with the doctrine of Imago Dei, is reflected in the world in general and specifically in the human mind. In a first step, I describe Whiteheadian process panpsychism as a metaphysics in which both creativity and mentality go ‘all the way down’, and argue that a process panpsychist ontology is a reasonable position for panentheists in general. Next, by applying the panentheistic analogy in reverse, together with the doctrine of Imago Dei, the inherent pan-creativity, panpsychism, and with support from scientific research on the human mind, I argue that the process of the human mind, which ultimately results in consciousness and self-consciousness, should be understood both as a creative activity and a re-creation of the world. As a consequence, I suggest that attempts to create artificial consciousness may profit from research in this direction.

  • 65.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Francis Jonbäck. Meningslöst lidande. Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag. 2018. 87 s.2019In: Signum : katolsk orientering om kyrka, kultur, samhälle, ISSN 0347-0423, Vol. 45, no 5Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 66.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Neuroscience and the soul: A study of physicalism and dualism with respect to the mind/body problem and Christian beliefs2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 67.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Panentheism and the Conception of the Ultimate in John B. Cobb’s Process Philosophy2019In: Sophia, ISSN 0038-1527, E-ISSN 1873-930XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of ultimate reality has an important role in the metaphysics of religious pluralism. John B. Cobb—a process philosopher in the Whiteheadian tradition—has suggested not only two ultimates, like other process philosophers, but three ultimates: God, creativity, and the cosmos. Based on this, I argue, firstly, that Cobb’s tripartite conception of the ultimate offers greater conceptual resources for inter-religious dialog than, for example, John Hick’s conception of ultimate reality or ‘the Real’. In support of this first claim, I will apply Cobb’s conception of the ultimate to Zen-Buddhism, thus exemplifying the resources of this conception. Secondly, given the conclusion that Cobb’s conception of the ultimate does indeed offer greater conceptual resources, I further explicate how panentheism, understood as the thesis of a transcendent, immanent divine being who is bilaterally related to the world, can be read in terms of Cobb’s conception of the ultimate. I thus argue that panentheism in general inherits and retains many of the conceptual resources of Cobb’s understanding of the ultimate, and can be seen as a preferable position in relation to religious pluralism. Finally, I conclude from the example of Zen-Buddhism that, although Cobb’s conception offers greater resources for engaging in a dialog from a metaphysical point of view, work has to be done to adequately address questions on the level of soteriology.

  • 68.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Panentheism in the light of mathematical understandings of infinity and connectednessIn: Theology and Science, ISSN 1474-6700, E-ISSN 1474-6719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates some consequences of a  mathematical understanding of infinity and connectedness for a panentheistic conception of God.  Given the existence of God and an understanding of the  world in terms of the finite, countable infinity, or uncountable infinity I argue, (a) that a panentheistic conception of God is  supported  given a  mathematical understanding of the infinite, (b) that by applying the notion of uncountable infinity and the mathematical concept of connectedness a panentheistic God can be seen as unifying irrespective of whether the world includes a finite, countably infinite or an uncountably infinite number of entities. 

  • 69.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Panentheism, Panpsychism and Neuroscience: In Search of an Alternative Metaphysical Framework in Relation to Neuroscience, Consciousness, Free Will, and Theistic Beliefs2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis philosophically examines, critically discusses, and proposes how a plausible philosophical framework of consciousness and free will should be formulated. This framework takes into account contemporary scientific research on human consciousness and free will and its possible challenges; also it is examined how this framework should be related to theistic beliefs – especially those connected to human and divine consciousness and free will.

    First, an overview of important research within the natural sciences about the conscious mind is presented together with its challenges to a theistic worldview. Next, questions related to reductive physicalism and dualism as a thesis and an antithesis are discussed. This dialectical approach leads to two lines for possible alternatives: emergence theories and process panpsychism. The subsequent analysis suggests that a form of process panpsychism in combination with a weaker form of emergence is most plausible.

    After a discussion of some central ideas about determinism and indeterminism, together with a brief overview of standard arguments within the philosophical free will debate, the proposed emergent process panpsychism is related to these standard arguments in the free will debate and scientific research about decision-making. As  a result it will be suggested how free will should be understood in relation to the emergent process panpsychism.

    The consequences of these results are then discussed in relation to a theistic worldview. Here panentheism will be suggested as the most reasonable conception of God. Also, the consequences for divine consciousness, divine action and interaction, the human soul, life before birth and after death, and more briefly a personal relationship with God, theological determinism, omniscience, and omnipotence will be discussed specifically in relation to panentheism in an emergent  process panpsychist setting.

  • 70.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Strategier i materialsökning2018In: Filosofiska metoder i praktiken / [ed] Stenmark, Mikael; Johannesson, Karin;Zackariasson, Ulf; Jonbäck, Francis, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2018, p. 39-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Takeshi Morisato Faith and Reason in Continental and Japanese Philosophy. (New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019). Pp. xiv + 269. £76.50 (Hbk). ISBN 9781350092518.In: Religious studies (Print), ISSN 0034-4125, E-ISSN 1469-901XArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Lind, Anna-Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Lövheim, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions.
    Zackariasson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Introduction – Religion, Law and Democracy: New Challenges for Society and Research2016In: Reconsidering Religion, Law, and Democracy: New Challenges for Society and Research / [ed] Lind, Anna-Sara, Lövheim, Mia, Zackariasson, Ulf, Nordic Academic Press, 2016, p. 7-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Lind, Anna-Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Lövheim, MiaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions.Zackariasson, UlfUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Reconsidering Religion, Law, and Democracy: New Challenges for Society and Research2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How are Western, mostly secular, societies handling religion in its increasingly pluralistic and complex forms? In Recon­sidering Religion, Law, and Democracy the authors study the interaction and negotiations between religious organizations and religious citizens on the one hand, and the state, the ju­dicial system, the media, and secular citizens on the other.

    Religion has become increasingly visible in contemporary society and is, more often than before, recognized as a pub­lic matter and not merely a private issue. As such it presents new challenges or opportunities to scholarly research and to society at large. The contributors to this volume shed light on what follows when expressions of religion meet different spheres of society.

    The authors explicitly point to the need to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the roles played by religion in society today. By presenting case studies, fresh perspec­tives and new questions they suggest that deeper knowledge is best achieved by further, increasingly nuanced interdisci­plinary research.

  • 74.
    Lönngren, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Literature. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Adomnicai, Diana-Petronela
    Eddebo, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Grahn, Lisa
    Jordal, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Juckenack, Astrid
    Luzon, Cecilia
    Lungu, Carmen
    Rapport från konferensen Borders and bridges. Nordic nationalisms and transationalisms: Scandinavian studies, UC Berkeley, 9-10 mars, 20182018In: Multiethnica. Meddelande från Centrum för multietnisk forskning, Uppsala universitet, ISSN 0284-396X, Vol. 38, p. 4p. 34-37Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 75.
    Runehov, Anne L. C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Cyborg and Smart Mice: How Human can they get?2007In: Studies in Science and Theology (SSTh), Vol. XIArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The philosopher Hypathia, who lived 370 to 415 AD, was said to possess Plato’s Brain and Aphrodite’s Body. For that time, having these features was considered as something extraordinary. Today we would not be impressed unless Plato’s Brain implies: enhanced cognition, improved or reengineered memory, improved motor systems, attention, learning, mood and affect and furthermore, Aphrodite’s Body were to be reengineered with metal arms and legs, were to be tremendously strong and insensitive to heat and cold, were to have no need for oxygen or food and could be preserved for thousands of years. Today, smart mice and cyborgs seem to be the stalking horses for an immortal human species. The scientific dream of immortality is, however, problematic from, at least, a philosophical point of view. The aim of this paper is therefore to give a critical philosophical analysis of the problems.

  • 76.
    Runehov, Anne L. C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Sacred or neural?: The potential of neuroscience to explain religious experience2007Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Are religious experiences, experiences of God or Ultimate Reality are religious experiences merely a product of the human nervous system? In other words, are religious experiences sacred or merely neural? The starting point for this philosophical analysis has been that today, neuroscientists place different explanations at our disposal concerning what religious experiences are and what causes these experiences. For instance, some neuroscientists explain religious experiences in terms of consequences of a damaged, malfunctioning or mentally deranged brain. Others explain them in terms of existential crises. Again other neuroscientists maintain that religious experiences are correlated with the brain as do all human experiences. As the title reveals, the purpose of Sacred or Neural is to investigate the potential of contemporary neuroscientists to explain religious experiences. Therefore, the author particularly analyses and evaluates the research performed on religious experiences of the Canadian neuropsychologist Michael Persinger and the American neurologist Andrew Newberg and his fellow researcher, the late Eugene d’Aquili. The main question asked is in what way and to what extent can neuroscientists explain religious experience? To answer this question, the author establishes specific criteria for when an experience can be considered to be a religious one, she suggests models for how religious experiences can be explained interdisciplinary and presents erroneous and accurate ways of reduction. Her conclusion is that neuroscientists can explain religious experiences in a methodologically restricted way and to a methodologically limited extent. However, also philosophical and theological explanations are limited by their methods. To put it differently, as soon as we explain something, we have to reduce this something in some manner or to some extent, regardless academic discipline. Religious experiences are not sacred OR neural, but sacred AND neural. Hence there is a quest for interdisciplinarity.

  • 77.
    Skogholt, Christoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Att analysera och utvärdera relationen mellan vetenskap och religion2018In: Filosofiska metoder i praktiken / [ed] Stenmark, Mikael; Johannesson, Karin; Jonbäck, Francis & Zackariasson, Ulf, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018, p. 251-272Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Sluys, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Getting the Message and Grasping it: the Give-and-Take of Discourse2019In: Philosophia (Ramat Gan), ISSN 0048-3893, E-ISSN 1574-9274, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 207-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can one fully succeed in performing illocutionary acts addressed to others if they do not understand what one is purportedly saying? Can one, for example, tell others something if they do not understand what one supposedly said? It is not uncommon for speech act theorist to claim that one cannot. I, in contrast, will be arguing that it is possible for a speaker to fully succeed in performing interpersonal illocutionary acts even if addressee understanding of what is said is not produced, is not intended to be produced and is even intended not to be produced.

  • 79.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Att filosofiskt studera religioner och livsåskådningar2018In: Filosofiska metoder i praktiken / [ed] Mikael Stenmark; Karin Johannesson; Francis Jonbäck; Ulf Zackariasson, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018, p. 15-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Competing conceptions of God: The personal God versus the God beyond being2015In: Religious studies (Print), ISSN 0034-4125, E-ISSN 1469-901X, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 205-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among philosophers and theologians today, one of the most important dividing lines is the one separating those who advocate a personal conception of God (personal theism) from those who embrace the idea of a God beyond or without being (alterity theism). There is not much dialogue between these groups of scholars; rather the two groups ignore each other, and each party typically believes that there is a fairly straightforward knockdown argument against the other. In this article I explore these two standard objections – the idolatry objection and the no-sense objection – and show why they both fail to be convincing. This failure to convince is a good thing, because it opens up the possibility that both personal theism and alterity theism are legitimate research programmes, each worthy of being further developed in philosophical theology.

  • 81.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Ethics, Sustainable Development and the Millennium Declaration2007In: Sustainable development and global ethics, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Is Belief in God a (Scientific) Hypothesis?2017In: Revista Brasileira de Filosofia da Religiao, ISSN 2358-8284, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 22-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beliefs are acquired, revised or rejected in both science and religion. In science this primarily occurs when scientists propose hypotheses, test them against available evidence, and then come to a verdict about which one among the rival hypotheses is best justified. The question I want to address in this essay is whether we should proceed in the same way in religion – either because this is actually the way things are done already, or because it is the way things should be done, no matter what the current practice is.

  • 83.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Panentheism and its neighbors2019In: International journal for philosophy of religion, ISSN 0020-7047, E-ISSN 1572-8684, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I suggest that we should identify panentheism on a scale, with deism at one extreme and pantheism at the other. The surprising outcome of the analysis is that many of the things which in the philosophical and theological debate are simply taken for granted as distinguishing panentheism from traditional theism (and vice versa) turn out to be possible extension claims rather than core doctrines of these different conceptions of God. Nevertheless, I maintain that it remains possible to draw a line between them. It is also emphasized that the greatest challenge many panentheists face is to give a convincing argument why we should think that God’s power can never be coercive, but must always be persuasive. The good news is that there is nothing in panentheism that requires that we must accept this particular doctrine.

  • 84.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Relativism - Pervasive Feature of the Contemporary Western World?2015In: Social Epistemology, ISSN 0269-1728, E-ISSN 1464-5297, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is relativism? Why should we (or should we not) adopt a relativistic stance towards what we and others hold to be true about the world? And how did relativism come to be such a pervasive feature of the contemporary Western world? These are questions which I address in this paper. To relativize is to maintain that what is true-and not merely what is taken to be true-is dependent upon (is relative to) group, community, society, culture and the like and is not simply true in a universal way; that is, the same everywhere and for everyone. This is the Relativist Thesis. This thesis, in combination with some of the other theses concerning relativism, in particular the Expansionist Thesis-the idea that the scope of what is relative is significantly greater than what has previously been thought-makes the refutation of relativism much harder than philosophers in general have commonly assumed.

  • 85.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Relativism as a Challenge to Religion: Christianity, Truth and the "Dictatorship of Relativism"2018In: Relativism and Post-Truth in Contemporary Society: Relativism and Post-Truth in Contemporary Society / [ed] Mikael Stenmark; Steve Fuller; Ulf Zackariasson, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 177-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why is relativism perceived to be a danger to Christianity and even to the whole Western world? What is it that the former pope, Benedict XVI (Joseph Ratzinger), in particular, thinks is so deeply problematic about relativism? In this chapter Stenmark offers reasons why Benedict might be correct in thinking that a new epistemology is emerging and shaping people’s worldviews in the West. But secondly, he argues that this shift in epistemology, which is often called “relativism,” is not a unified phenomenon and it is not necessarily applied in the same way to all areas of human life. It is rather cluster of related epistemic attitudes, but their implications for what we should think about truth and knowledge are not the same. Thirdly, Stenmark assesses the claims made by Benedict, showing in what way it is and is not reasonable to maintain that relativism is a new and different challenge to Christianity than those it has encounter before.

  • 86.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Religion and Science2007In: The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Religion, London: Routledge , 2007, p. 692-701Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 87.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Religionsfilosofi och filosofisk teologi2011In: Motståndets möjligheter: Filosofiska repliker till Eberhard Herrmann / [ed] Lena Edlund, Olof Franck, Karin Johannesson, Mikael Stenmark, Skellefteå: Artos & Norma , 2011, p. 109-135Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Scientism and its rivals2018In: Scientism: Prospects and Problems / [ed] Jeroen de Ridder, Rik Peels, Rene van Woudenberg, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 57-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is scientism and, no less important, where and why does it differ from its rivals? The second aspect is crucial because, in assessing scientism, we also need to identify its rivals and the borderlines and grey zones between scientism and these rivals − if we reject one we need to know what alternatives there are and where possible overlaps are. In this chapter I shall offer answers to these questions and besides distinguish between different types of scientism also suggest that liberal naturalism, humanism, social constructionism, religious naturalism, and theism are best understood as rivals to scientism, although that does not mean that they are on all accounts necessarily incompatible with scientism. It merely means that they contain elements that are in serious tension with the epistemology and ontology of scientism or its overall tendency to be deeply suspicious about everything in reality which cannot be described, understood or explained by the natural science.

  • 89.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Scientism, humaniora och vetandets gränser2017In: Kungl. Humanistiska Vetenskapssamfundet i Uppsalas årsbok, ISSN 0349-0416, p. 55-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idenna essä vill jag beskriva och analysera en verklighetsuppfattning ellervärldsbild som kanske inte alltid uppmärksammas men som har ett avsevärtinflytande på vår samtid. Inte minst skriver många av dess företrädare bästsäljareinom den populärvetenskapliga genren och sprider inte bara naturvetenskap utanockså sin verklighetsuppfattning till en bredare allmänhet. Jag tänkte alltså presenteraoch närmare granska vad som på engelska kallas för ”scientism” eller som dennaverklighetsuppfattning ibland kallas på svenska, ”vetenskapstro”. Jag avser ocksådiskutera några konsekvenser en sådan förståelse av verkligheten får för vårsyn på vår vardagliga livsvärld, humaniora och vetandets gränser och varför vii slutändan bör ställa oss tveksamma inför en sådan världsbild ellerlivsåskådning.

  • 90.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Tage Kurtén om religiös sanning och tillit till Gud2015In: Teologinen Aikakauskirja, ISSN 0040-3555, no 5/6, p. 467-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tage Kurtén has argued that the way in which many theologians and philosophers typically approach religious belief is misguided and deeply problematic. These thinkers model religious belief too much on scientific belief formation and evaluation, and consequently treat belief in God in skeptical way – as a kind of tentative hypothesis. Instead Kurtén maintains that we should see belief in God as we see the relationship of trust between a husband and a wife who truly love each other. For this reason we need a paradigm shift in theology and philosophy of religion. I agree with many of the things that Kurtén says, but I still think that in a number of places his arguments are not convincing and I therefore suggest that we should draw partially different conclusions. What he in particular fails to take into account is that rational belief, including belief in God, is person-relative

  • 91.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    The Darwinian Account of Religion2008In: An Anthology of Living Religions. 2. ed., Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Fuller, SteveZackariasson, UlfUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Relativism and post-truth in contemporary society: Possibilities and Challanges2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Stenmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Johannesson, KarinUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.Jonbäck, FrancisUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.Zackariasson, UlfUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Filosofiska metoder i praktiken2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Sörhuus, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Spiritual Knowledge as Embodied Appraisals: A Reading of Jonathan Edwards from an Emotion Theory Point of View2016In: Issues In Science And Theology: Do Emotions Shape The World? / [ed] Evers, D; Fuller, M; Runehov, A; Saether, KW, 2016, p. 223-233Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of emotions and religious experience is a prominent theme in the theology of Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758). His concept of 'the sense of the heart' involves a synthesis of emotion, perception, intellect and dispositions for moral action. Due to the vague distinctions and relations between these components, an apparently internal tension has been the focus of several interpretations. In this paper I argue that we ought to reexamine Edwards's position through contemporary emotion theory. By doing this, much of the internal tension of the sense of the heart can be decreased. The theory used in this paper is Jesse Prinz's modern version of the James-Lange theory, in which emotions are embodied appraisals. Emotions are perceptive in a double way: as feelings of bodily changes and trackers of relations between an organism and an organism-signifi cant environment. There is no necessary confl ict between value-content, bodily feelings, cognitions and actionenablers in the emotional process. In the light of this, it is reasonable to conceptualize the sense of the heart as a primarily emotional faculty. Heart, head and body need not exclude each other.

  • 95.
    Wirén, Sacharias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    En mångfalds påverkan: En religionsfilosofisk studie i trosvisshet relaterat till religiös pluralism2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The premise for this study is the question how we should relate to people with different religious beliefs. The aim is to examine if an existence characterized by a religious diversity should affect the certainty and confidence in our faith. To answer my question I have turned to the philosophers David Basinger, Mikael Stenmark, William Lane Craig and Robert McKims different views on this issue. Using an approach based on a comparative method and argument analysis I have then assessed their different opinions in the matter. Based on my own discussion of these arguments I conclude that a religious diversity should imply a reduction in our own religious confidence and that it should be reduced in relation to the amount of disagreement that exist between conflicting religious perspectives in an specific case and matter. This may also foster a reduction of religious intolerance through a nuanced of our own belief while highlighting the conceptions and values in our own religion that stresses tolerance.

  • 96.
    Zackariasson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    A Critique of foundationalist conceptions of comprehensive doctrines in the religion in politics-debate2009In: International journal for philosophy of religion, ISSN 0020-7047, E-ISSN 1572-8684, Vol. 65, p. 11-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper comprises a critical examination of foundationalist conceptions of comprehensive doctrines. I argue that John Rawls, the towering figure of this debate, operates with a foundationalist conception of comprehensive doctrines that has shaped the debate's view of relevant alternatives (often referred to as exclusivism and inclusivism).

  • 97.
    Zackariasson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    A Problem with Alston's Indirect Analogy-Argument from Religious Experience2006In: Religious studies (Print), ISSN 0034-4125, E-ISSN 1469-901X, Vol. 42, p. 329-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, William Alston's arguemnt from religious experience in Perceiving God is characterized and assessed as an indirect analogy-argument. Such arguments, I propose,, should establish two similarities between sense perception (sp) and religious experience (cmp): a structural and a functional. I argue that Alston neglects functional similarity, and that sp and cmp actually perform different functions within the practices they belong to. Alston's argument is therefore significantly weaker than generally assumed. Finally, I argue that regardless of whether an increased emphasis on fruits could strengthen indirect analogy-arguments or not, this is not a strategy available to Alston as long as he retains his commitments to religious exclusivism and a religious metaphysical realism.

  • 98.
    Zackariasson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Argument för och emot Guds existens2002In: Unga filosofer. Antologi för gymnasieskolan, Natur & Kultur, Stockholm , 2002, p. 181-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Zackariasson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Att arbeta pragmatiskt: Vikten av att förstå skillnaden mellan teori, metod och material2018In: Filosofiska metoder i praktiken / [ed] Mikael Stenmark, Karin Johannesson, Francis Jonbäck, Ulf Zackariasson, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2018, p. 49-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Zackariasson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Att filosofera om religion: Mot en fördjupad debatt kring filosofiska religionsförståelser2006In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 81, p. 15-25Article in journal (Refereed)
123 51 - 100 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf