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  • 51.
    Borg, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hernefalk, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Development of a pelvic discomfort index to evaluate outcome following fixation for pelvic ring injury2015In: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery, ISSN 1022-5536, E-ISSN 2309-4990, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 146-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To develop a pelvic discomfort index (PDI) to evaluate outcome following fixation for pelvic ring injury. Methods. 29 female and 44 male consecutive patients (mean age, 36 years) underwent internal fixation for pelvic ring injury of type B1 (n=10), B2 (n=22), B3 (n=15), C1 (n=18), C2 (n=5), and C3 (n=3), based on the AO/OTA classification. At postoperative 6, 12, and 24 months, patients were asked to assess their discomfort in the pelvis using a 14-item questionnaire. Three questions were open-ended, and responses were categorised by a single assessor. The remaining 11 questions were closed-ended and had 6 ordinal options from 'no discomfort' (score=0) to' extremely severe discomfort' (score=5). The content validity and relevance of the 11 closed-ended questions was determined. The 14-item questionnaire was compared with the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results. Respectively at postoperative 6, 12, and 24 months, 78%, 71%, and 71% of the patients completed the 14-item questionnaire. Based on the factor analysis and responses to the open-ended questions, the number of items was reduced to 6 including pain, walking, mobility of the hips, loss of sensation in the legs, sexual life, and operation scar. Four factors could explain 96% of the total variance. The first factor involved the first 3 items (pain, walking, and hip motion) and addressed 'pelvis', whereas 3 factors involved the remaining items and each addressed peripheral neurology, sexual life, and operation scar. A PDI was developed using these 6 items. The PDI had high internal reliability (alpha=0.89), adequate content and criterion validity, and moderate correlation with the SF-36 total score or scores of physical function, bodily pain, and general health (r=0.50-0.77). Conclusion. The PDI provides valid, specific, and relevant information to assess

  • 52.
    Borg, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hernefalk, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hailer, Nils P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Acute total hip arthroplasty combined with internal fixation for displaced acetabular fractures in the elderly: A short-term comparison with internal fixation alone after a minimum of two years2019In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 101B, no 4, p. 478-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Displaced, comminuted acetabular fractures in the elderly are increasingly common, but there is no consensus on whether they should be treated non-surgically, surgically with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), or with acute total hip arthroplasty (THA). A combination of ORIF and acute THA, an approach called 'combined hip procedure' (CHP), has been advocated and our aim was to compare the outcome after CHP or ORIF alone.

    Patients and Methods

    A total of 27 patients with similar acetabular fractures (severe acetabular impaction with or without concomitant femoral head injury) with a mean age of 72.2 years (50 to 89) were prospectively followed for a minimum of two years. In all, 14 were treated with ORIF alone and 13 were treated with a CHP. Hip joint and patient survival were estimated. Operating times, blood loss, radiological outcomes, and patient-reported outcomes were assessed.

    Results

    No patient in the CHP group required further hip surgery, giving THA a survival rate of 100% (95% confidence interval (CI) 100 to 100) after three years, compared with 28.6% hip joint survival in the ORIF group (95% CI 12.5 to 65.4; p = 0.001). No dislocations or deep infections occurred in the CHP group. No patient died within the first year after index surgery, but patient survival was lower in the CHP group after three years. There were no relevant differences in patient-reported outcomes.

    Conclusion

    The CHP confers a considerably reduced need of further surgery when compared with ORIF alone in elderly patients with complex acetabular fractures. These findings encourage both further use of, and larger prospective studies on, the CHP.

  • 53.
    Borg, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Holstad, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Quality of life in patients operated for pelvic fractures caused by suicide attempt by jumping2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Jumping from great height is an aggressive method of suicide attempt where the frequent combination of psychiatric disorder and somatic injuries makes treatment difficult. Our aim was to evaluate survival rate and get patient-reported outcome in patients operated for a pelvic or acetabular fracture sustained when jumping from a height as a suicide attempt. Patients and Methods: During the period 2003-2004, 12 patients (11 women) of whom eight were below 30 years of age, were prospectively included. At two years HRQoL (Health-Related Quality of Life) questionnaires (SF-36 and LiSat-11) were used to describe outcome, and at four years a structured psychiatric interview SCID-I (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders) was done. Results: At four years all patients were alive. One patient had made a new suicide attempt. Eight patients gave adequate reply on SF-36 and LiSat-11 at two years. In all domains patients scored lower than a norm group with the relatively lowest values in physical domains. Younger patients assessed life as better when compared with middle aged patients. Conclusions: This study showed a very low recurrence rate into suicidal behaviour in a group of jumpers and all patients were alive at four years after a suicidal attempt by jumping. The high proportion of psychiatric disorder in these patients highlights the need for a combined treatment effort between orthopaedic and psychiatric expertise.

  • 54.
    Brüggemann, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fredlund, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hailer, Nils P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Are porous tantalum cups superior to conventional reinforcement rings?: A retrospective cohort study of 207 acetabular revisions2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Porous tantalum cups have been introduced as an alternative to various reinforcement rings in revision hip surgery. We hypothesized that porous tantalum cups would be superior to muller acetabular roof reinforcement rings (MARRs) in revision hip surgery with re-revision for aseptic loosening as the primary outcome measure. Patients and methods - 207 hips operated with either a porous tantalum cup (TM cup, n = 111) or a MARR (n = 96) at index procedure were identified in our local arthroplasty register. Acetabular defects were classified according to Paprosky. There were 96 men and 111 women with a median age of 71 (35-95) years, presenting acetabular defect size type I in 39 cases, IIA in 22, IIB in 27, IIC in 43, IIIA in 32, and IIIB in 37 cases. Analysis of medical records identified all patients with subsequent re-revision and reasons for re-revisions. Kaplan-Meier survival functions were used to estimate implant survival. Results - With re-revision for aseptic loosening as the end-point, the 6-year unadjusted cumulative survival was 97% (95% CI: 94-100) for TM cups and 96% (CI: 92-100) for MARR (p = 0.6). Using re-revision for any reason as the endpoint, 6-year survival was 87% (CI: 81-94) for TM cups and 95% (CI: 90-99) for MARR (p = 0.06). The main reason for re-revision in the TM group was dislocation (n = 10), followed by loosening (n = 3), whereas the main reason for re-revision in the MARR group was aseptic loosening (n = 8). Duration of the index procedure and perioperative blood loss were lower in the TM group. Interpretation - Both TM and MARR lead to good 6-year results in acetabular revision surgery. The methods differ in their respective failure mechanisms. We conclude that TM cups are a valuable treatment option in acetabular revision surgery, but the reasons underlying dislocations after the use of TM cups must be analyzed further.

  • 55.
    Brüggemann, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hailer, Nils P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Do dual-mobility cups cemented into porous tantalum shells reduce the risk of dislocation after revision surgery?: A retrospective cohort study on 184 patients2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose Dual-mobility cups (DMCs) reduce the risk of dislocation and porous tantalum (TM) shells show favorable osseointegration after acetabular revision surgery, yet the combination of these implants has not been studied. We hypothesized that (1) cementing a DMC into a TM shell decreases the risk of dislocation; (2) DMCs cemented into TM shells are not at greater risk of re-revision; (3) liberation of tantalum ions is marginal after use of this combined technique.Patients and methods We investigated the outcome in 184 hips (184 patients) after acetabular revision surgery with TM shells, fitted either with DMCs (n = 69), or with standard polyethylene (PE) liners (n = 115). Chart follow-up was complete for all patients, and the occurrence of dislocations and re-revisions was recorded. 20 were deceased, 50 were unable to attend follow-up, leaving 114 for assessment of hip function after 4.9 (0.5-8.9) years, radiographs were obtained in 99, and tantalum concentrations in 84 patients.Results 1 patient with a DMC had a dislocation, whereas 14 patients with PE liners experienced at least 1 dislocation. 11 of 15 re-revisions in the PE group were necessitated by dislocations, whereas none of the 2 re-revisions in the DMC group was performed for this reason. Hence, dislocation-free survival after 4 years was 99% (95% CI 96-100) in the DMC group, whereas it was 88% (CI 82-94, p = 0.01) in the PE group. We found no radiographic signs of implant failure in any patient. Mean tantalum concentrations were 0.1 mu l/L (CI 0.05-0.2) in the DMC group and 0.1 mu g/L (CI 0.05-0.2) in the PE group.Interpretation Cementing DMCs into TM shells reduces the risk of dislocation after acetabular revision surgery without jeopardizing overall cup survival, and without enhancing tantalum release.

  • 56. Burgaz, A.
    et al.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Rautiainen, S.
    Orsini, N.
    Håkansson, N.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, A.
    Confirmed hypertension and plasma 25(OH)D concentrations amongst elderly men2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 211-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives.

    The results of experimental studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency activates the renin-angiotensin system and predisposes to hypertension. Results of previous epidemiological studies investigating the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status and hypertension have not been consistent, perhaps because of their sole reliance on office blood pressure (BP) measurements leading to some misclassification of hypertension status. No previous studies have examined the association between 25(OH)D status and confirmed hypertension assessed with both office and 24-h BP measurements.

    Design.

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated 833 Caucasian men, aged 71 +/- 0.6 years, to determine the association between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations, measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and the prevalence of hypertension. We used both supine office and 24-h BP measurements for classifying participants as normotensive or confirmed hypertensive; participants with inconsistent classifications were excluded.

    Results.

    In a multivariable adjusted logistic regression model, men with 25(OH)D concentrations < 37.5 nmol L-1 had a 3-fold higher prevalence of confirmed hypertension compared to those with >= 37.5 nmol L-1 25(OH)D (odds ratio = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.0-11.0).

    Conclusions.

    Our results show that low plasma 25(OH)D concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of confirmed hypertension.

  • 57. Burgaz, Ann
    et al.
    Åkesson, A.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, A.
    25-hydroxyvitamin D accumulation during summer in elderly women at latitude 60 degrees N2009In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 266, no 5, p. 476-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: During half of the year, cutaneous synthesis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is not detectable at northern latitudes, leaving the population dependent on other sources for optimal vitamin D status. During April to September, 25(OH)D status may be improved by solar exposure. In this study, we measured seasonal differences in serum 25(OH)D concentrations and identified the major predictors of summer 25(OH)D concentrations. DESIGN: We assessed serum 25(OH)D concentrations during both winter and summer amongst 100 women, aged 61-83 years, randomly sampled from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Participants completed two detailed questionnaires covering diet, use of dietary supplements and sun-related behaviour, the first in January through March and a second time in August through September. RESULTS: The mean seasonal increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations was 38% from mean 72 +/- 23 nmol L(-1) during winter to 99 +/- 29 nmol L(-1) in summer. High summer 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with higher winter concentrations, preference of staying in sun instead of shade, having a nonsensitive skin type and normal body mass index. Based on multiple linear regression modelling, preferring sun, having nonsensitive skin type and normal weight as compared with preferring shade, having sensitive skin type and being obese, was associated with a 64 nmol L(-1) higher 25(OH)D concentrations during summer. CONCLUSIONS: Women with high winter 25(OH)D serum concentrations, with preference of staying in the sun instead of shade during summer, a skin type allowing for longer sun exposure and a normal weight had the highest summer 25(OH)D concentrations.

  • 58.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bellavia, Andrea
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Susanna C
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women.2016In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 2098-2105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Mediterranean diet, known to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, may also influence the risk of hip fracture although previous studies present discrepant results. We therefore aimed to determine whether the rate of hip fracture was associated with degree of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. We combined two Swedish cohort studies consisting of 37,903 men and 33,403 women (total n = 71,333, mean age 60 years) free of previous cardiovascular disease and cancer who answered a medical and a food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. A modified Mediterranean diet score (mMED; range, 0 to 8 points) was created based on high consumption of fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts, whole grains, fermented dairy products, fish, and olive/rapeseed oil, moderate intake of alcohol, and low intake of red and processed meat. Incident hip fractures between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012, were retrieved from the National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for potential confounders were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Differences in age at hip fracture were calculated using multivariable Laplace regression. During follow-up, 3175 hip fractures occurred at a median age of 73.3 years. One unit increase in the mMED was associated with 6% lower hip fracture rate (adjusted HR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96) and with a 3-month higher median age at hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 2.8 months; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.2). Comparing the highest quintile of adherence to the mMED (6 to 8 points) with the lowest (0 to 2 points) conferred an adjusted HR of hip fracture of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.89) and a 12-month higher median age of hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 11.6 months; 95% CI, 4.2 to 19.0). Results were similar in men and women. We conclude that higher adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet is associated with lower risk of future hip fracture.

  • 59.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bellavia, Andrea
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Solna, Sweden.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Solna, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Solna, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of hip fracture: A cohort study of Swedish men and women2015In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 976-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary guidelines recommend a daily intake of five servings of fruit and vegetables. Whether such intakes are associated with a lower risk of hip fracture is at present unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the dose-response association between habitual fruit and vegetable intake and hip fracture in a cohort study based on 40,644 men from the Cohort of Swedish Men (COSM) and 34,947 women from the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC) (total n=75,591), free from cardiovascular disease and cancer, who answered lifestyle questionnaires in 1997 (age 45-83 years). Intake of fruit and vegetables (servings/day) was assessed by food frequency questionnaire and incident hip fractures were retrieved from the Swedish Patient Register (1998-2010). The mean follow-up time was 14.2 years. One third of the participants reported an intake of fruit and vegetables of >5 servings/day, one third >3 to ≤5 servings/day, 28% >1 to ≤3 servings/day, and 6% reported ≤1 serving/day. During 1,037,645 person-years we observed 3,644 hip fractures (2,266, 62%, in women). The doseresponse association was found to be strongly non-linear (P<0.001). Men and women with zero consumption had 88% higher rate of hip fracture compared with those consuming 5 servings/day; adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 1.88 (95% CI, 1.53-2.32). The rate was gradually lower with higher intakes; adjusted HR for 1 vs 5 servings/day, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.21-1.58). However, more than 5 servings/day did not confer additionally lower HRs (adjusted HR for 8 vs. 5 servings/day, 0.96 (95% CI, 0.90-1.03). Similar results were observed when men and women were analyzed separately. We conclude that there is a dose-response association between fruit and vegetable intake and hip fracture such that an intake below the recommended 5 servings/day confers higher rates of hip fracture. Intakes above this recommendation do not seem to further lower the risk.

  • 60.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Cars, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Prediction of fracture risk in men: A cohort study2012In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 797-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    FRAX is a tool that identifies individuals with high fracture risk who will benefit from pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis. However, a majority of fractures among elderly occur in people without osteoporosis and most occur after a fall. Our aim was to accurately identify men with a high future risk of fracture, independent of cause. In the population-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM) and using survival analysis we studied different models' prognostic values (R(2) ) for any fracture and hip fracture within 10 years from age 50 (n = 2322), 60 (n = 1852), 71 (n = 1221), and 82 (n = 526). During the total follow-up period from age 50, 897 fractures occurred in 585 individuals. Of these, 281 were hip fractures occurring in 189 individuals. The rates of any fracture were 5.7/1000 person-years at risk from age 50 and 25.9/1000 person-years at risk from age 82. Corresponding hip fractures rates were 2.9 and 11.7/1000 person-years at risk. The FRAX model included all variables in FRAX except bone mineral density. The full model combining FRAX variables, comorbidity, medications, and behavioral factors explained 25-45% of all fractures and 80-92% of hip fractures, depending on age. The corresponding prognostic values of the FRAX model were 7-17% for all fractures and 41-60% for hip fractures. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) comparing the full model with the FRAX model ranged between 40 and 53% for any fracture and between 40 and 87% for hip fracture. Within the highest quintile of predicted fracture risk with the full model, 1/3 of the men will have a fracture within 10 years after age 71 years and 2/3 after age 82 years. We conclude that the addition of comorbidity, medication and behavioral factors to the clinical components of FRAX can substantially improve the ability to identify men at high risk of fracture, especially hip fracture. 

  • 61.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Warensjö Lemming, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cancer death is related to high palmitoleic acid in serum and to polymorphisms in the SCD-1 gene in healthy Swedish men2014In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 551-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A high proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or a high ratio of MUFAs to saturated fatty acids in plasma, reflecting a high activity of the lipogenic enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), has been shown to be related to cancer death and incidence in some studies.

    OBJECTIVES:

    The objective was to study whether the serum cholesteryl ester proportion of palmitoleic acid [16:1n-7 (16:1ω-3)] and the ratio of palmitoleic to palmitic acid (16:1n-7/16:0), as an estimation of the activity of SCD-1, are related to cancer death and to investigate whether polymorphisms in the SCD-1 gene are related to cancer mortality.

    DESIGN:

    A community-based cohort of 50-y-old men was followed for a maximum of >40 y. Survival analysis was used to relate fatty acid composition in serum, analyzed at baseline by gas-liquid chromatography (n = 1981), and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the SCD-1 gene (n = 986) to cancer death. A 7-d dietary record was completed at age 70 y (n = 880).

    RESULTS:

    The proportions of 16:1n-7 and the ratio of 16:1n-7 to 16:0 were associated with cancer mortality during follow-up in a comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile of 16:1n-7 (adjusted HR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.82). Inherited variance of the SCD-1 gene seemed to be related to cancer death, especially among men with a low proportion of PUFA in the diet in a comparison of the highest with the lowest weighted genetic risk score (HR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.13, 4.04).

    CONCLUSION:

    The findings are compatible with the hypothesis that there is an association between endogenously synthesized MUFAs and cancer death.

  • 62.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Berglund, Lars G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Total mortality after changes in leisure time physical activity in 50 year old men: 35 year follow-up of population based cohort2009In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 338, p. b688-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how change in level of physical activity after middle age influences mortality and to compare it with the effect of smoking cessation. DESIGN: Population based cohort study with follow-up over 35 years. SETTING: Municipality of Uppsala, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 2205 men aged 50 in 1970-3 who were re-examined at ages 60, 70, 77, and 82 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Total (all cause) mortality. RESULTS: The absolute mortality rate was 27.1, 23.6, and 18.4 per 1000 person years in the groups with low, medium, and high physical activity, respectively. The relative rate reduction attributable to high physical activity was 32% for low and 22% for medium physical activity. Men who increased their physical activity level between the ages of 50 and 60 continued to have a higher mortality rate during the first five years of follow-up (adjusted hazard ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 5.27, compared with unchanged high physical activity). After 10 years of follow-up their increased physical activity was associated with reduced mortality to the level of men with unchanged high physical activity (1.10, 0.87 to 1.38). The reduction in mortality associated with increased physical activity (0.51, 0.26 to 0.97, compared with unchanged low physical activity) was similar to that associated with smoking cessation (0.64, 0.53 to 0.78, compared with continued smoking). CONCLUSIONS: Increased physical activity in middle age is eventually followed by a reduction in mortality to the same level as seen among men with constantly high physical activity. This reduction is comparable with that associated with smoking cessation.

  • 63.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Berglund, Lars G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Total mortality after changes in leisure time physical activity in 50 year old men: 35 year follow-up of population based cohort (Reprinted from BMJ, vol 338, b688, 2009)2009In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 482-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how change in level of physical activity after middle age influences mortality and to compare it with the effect of smoking cessation.

    DESIGN: Population based cohort study with follow-up over 35 years.

    SETTING: Municipality of Uppsala, Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: 2205 men aged 50 in 1970-3 who were reexamined at ages 60, 70, 77, and 82 years.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Total (all cause) mortality.

    RESULTS: The absolute mortality rate was 27.1, 23.6, and 18.4 per 1000 person years in the groups with low, medium, and high physical activity, respectively. The relative rate reduction attributable to high physical activity was 32% for low and 22% for medium physical activity. Men who increased their physical activity level between the ages of 50 and 60 continued to have a higher mortality rate during the first five years of follow-up (adjusted hazard ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 5.27, compared with unchanged high physical activity). After 10 years of follow-up their increased physical activity was associated with reduced mortality to the level of men with unchanged high physical activity (1.10, 0.87 to 1.38). The reduction in mortality associated with increased physical activity (0.51, 0.26 to 0.97, compared with unchanged low physical activity) was similar to that associated with smoking cessation (0.64, 0.53 to 0.78, compared with continued smoking).

    CONCLUSIONS: Increased physical activity in middle age is eventually followed by a reduction in mortality to the same level as seen among men with constantly high physical activity. This reduction is comparable with that associated with smoking cessation

  • 64.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women: Comments on Feskanich et al.2018In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 1221-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Goodman, Anna
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Birth Weight is not Associated With Risk of Fracture: Results from Two Swedish Cohort Studies2014In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 2152-2160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development and growth in utero has been suggested to influence bone health. However, the relationship with risk of fracture in old age is largely unknown. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we studied the association between birth weight and fractures at ages 50-94 among 10,893 men and women (48% women) from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study (UBCoS, born 1915-29) and 1334 men from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM, born 1920-24). Measured birth weight was collected from hospital or midwives' records and fractures from the Swedish National Patient Register. We observed 2796 fractures (717 of these were hip fractures) in UBCoS and 335 fractures (102 hip fractures) in ULSAM. In UBCoS, the hazard ratio (HR) per 1 kg increase in birth weight, adjusted for sex and socioeconomic status at birth, was 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94-1.09] for any fracture and 1.06 (95% CI, 0.91-1.23) for hip fracture. Estimates in ULSAM were similar. We did not observe a differential association of birth weight with fractures occurring before age 70 or after age 70 years. Neither birth weight standardized for gestational age nor gestational duration was associated with fracture rate. In linear regression, birth weight was not associated with bone mineral density among 303 men who were 82-years-old in ULSAM but showed positive associations with total body bone mineral content (β per kg increase in birth weight, adjusted for social class and age, 133; 95% CI, 30-227). This association was attenuated after further adjustment for body mass index and height (β, 41; 95% CI, -43-126). We conclude that birth weight is associated with bone mineral content but this association does not translate into an association with risk of fracture in men and women aged 50-94 years.

  • 66.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Koupil, I
    Size at birth is not associated with risk of hip fracture: results from two population-based cohorts2013In: Bone Abstracts, ISSN 2052-1219, Vol. 1, p. OC1.3-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early life growth has been suggested to influence bone health. However, the relationship with risk of hip fracture in old age has not been thoroughly investigated. We therefore studied the association between birth weight and hip fracture incidence after age 50 among 10 893 men and women (48% women) from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study (UBCoS, born 1915–1929) and 1334 men from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM, born 1920–1924). Birth weight was collected from hospital or midwives’ records and hip fractures were obtained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register.

    We observed 717 hip fractures in UBCoS (458 in women, 259 in men, end of follow-up: 31 December 2008) and 102 hip fractures in ULSAM (end of follow-up: 31 December 2009). There were no indications of non-linear associations. Results are presented as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CI per 1 kg increase in birth weight.

    The crude HR for 1 kg increase in birth weight on hip fracture rate in UBCoS was 0.99 (95% CI: 0.85–1.14). After controlling for gender and socioeconomic status at birth, the HR was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.91–1.23). Additional adjustment for adult height and comorbidity in a subgroup of UBCoS men (n=1241, 50 hip fractures) gave a HR of 0.97 (95% CI: 0.52–1.80). Parity and gestational age did not largely influence the estimates. Neither birth weight standardized for gestational age nor gestational duration was associated with hip fracture rate.

    The unadjusted HR in ULSAM was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.73–1.53). After adjustment for adult body mass index, height, social class, comorbidity, and smoking status, the HR was 1.03 (95% CI: 0.70–1.51).

    Based on the results from two population-based cohorts with accurate assessment of both birth weight and hip fractures, we conclude that there is no association between birth weight and risk of hip fracture.

  • 67.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Olsson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Karlström, Brita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Reply to WB Grant2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 700-701Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Olsson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Karlström, Brita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Reply to Y Mao and H Yu.2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 698-699Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 69. Campbell, Peter T
    et al.
    Newton, Christina C
    Kitahara, Cari M
    Patel, Alpa V
    Hartge, Patricia
    Koshiol, Jill
    McGlynn, Katherine A
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Berrington de González, Amy
    Beane Freeman, Laura E
    Bernstein, Leslie
    Buring, Julie E
    Freedman, Neal D
    Gao, Yu-Tang
    Giles, Graham G
    Gunter, Marc J
    Jenab, Mazda
    Liao, Linda M
    Milne, Roger L
    Robien, Kim
    Sandler, Dale P
    Schairer, Catherine
    Sesso, Howard D
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Xiang, Yong-Bing
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    Zheng, Wei
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Body Size Indicators and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Individual-Level Data from 19 Prospective Cohort Studies.2017In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 597-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are few established risk factors for gallbladder cancer beyond gallstones. Recent studies suggest a higher risk with high body mass index (BMI), an indicator of general heaviness, but evidence from other body size measures is lacking.Methods: Associations of adult BMI, young adult BMI, height, adult weight gain, waist circumference (WC), waist-height ratio (WHtR), hip circumference (HC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) with gallbladder cancer risk were evaluated. Individual-level data from 1,878,801 participants in 19 prospective cohort studies (14 studies had circumference measures) were harmonized and included in this analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: After enrollment, 567 gallbladder cancer cases were identified during 20.1 million person-years of observation, including 361 cases with WC measures. Higher adult BMI (per 5 kg/m2, HR: 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.35), young adult BMI (per 5 kg/m2, HR: 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00-1.26), adult weight gain (per 5 kg, HR: 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12), height (per 5 cm, HR: 1.10; 95% CI, 1.03-1.17), WC (per 5 cm, HR: 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02-1.17), WHtR (per 0.1 unit, HR: 1.24; 95% CI, 1.00-1.54), and HC (per 5 cm, HR: 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.22), but not WHR (per 0.1 unit, HR: 1.03; 95% CI, 0.87-1.22), were associated with higher risks of gallbladder cancer, and results did not differ meaningfully by sex or other demographic/lifestyle factors.Conclusions: These findings indicate that measures of overall and central excess body weight are associated with higher gallbladder cancer risks.Impact: Excess body weight is an important, and potentially preventable, gallbladder cancer risk factor. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(4); 597-606. ©2017 AACR.

  • 70.
    Canova, Cristina
    et al.
    Univ Padua, Dept Cardiol Thorac & Vasc Sci, Padua, Italy.
    Pitter, Gisella
    Univ Padua, Dept Cardiol Thorac & Vasc Sci, Padua, Italy.
    Zanier, Loris
    Hlth Directorate, Epidemiol Serv, Udine, Italy.
    Simonato, Lorenzo
    Univ Padua, Dept Cardiol Thorac & Vasc Sci, Padua, Italy.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas E.
    Columbia Univ, Coll Phys & Surg, Dept Med, New York, NY USA;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Orebro Univ, Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Orebro, Sweden;Univ Nottingham, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Nottingham, England.
    Risk of Fractures in Youths with Celiac Disease-A Population-Based Study2018In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 198, p. 117-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess the risk of any fracture requiring hospital care in a cohort of individuals with celiac disease diagnosed in childhood/adolescence compared with reference individuals matched by age and sex. Study design Our study cohort consisted of 213 635 people born and residing in Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, Italy, in 1989-2011. We selected, through pathology reports, hospital discharge records, or co-payment exemptions, 1233 individuals with celiac disease (aged 0-17 years at diagnosis) and compared them with 6167 reference individuals matched by sex and year of birth. Fractures were identified through hospital discharge records. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for any fracture after celiac disease diagnosis (or index date for reference individuals) with Cox regression and ORs for any fracture before celiac disease diagnosis with conditional logistic regression. Results During the follow-up period (maximum 23 years), 22 individuals with celiac disease (9394 person-years) and 128 reference individuals (47 308 person-years) experienced a fracture. giving an overall HR of 0.87 (95% CI 0.55-1.37). The risk was not modified by sex, age at diagnosis, or calendar period of diagnosis. We obtained similar HRs when excluding fractures occurring after the age of 18 years and adjusting for maternal education or vitamin D supplementation. The odds of previous fracture also did not differ between subjects with celiac disease and reference individuals (22 and 96 cases, respectively: OR 1.15: 95% CI 0.72-1.84). Conclusions We did not find any evidence of an increased risk of fractures during childhood and youth among patients with celiac disease.

  • 71.
    Carlsson, Anders-Petter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Kharazmi, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Thor, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Surgical pneumatization through maxillary sinus wall and the schneiderian membrane: A new technique to facilitate augmentation of the maxillary sinus.2017In: Indian Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0970-9290, E-ISSN 1998-3603, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 207-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A minimum subantral bone height in the posterior maxilla may require a bone augmentation where a sinus lift procedure is the most commonly used technique, either preceding or simultaneously with the implant installation. While elevating the Schneiderian membrane ruptures are common, possibly resulting in less bone formation. In this paper, we propose the surgical pneumatization of the Schneiderian membrane as a new technique to minimize the risk of such complications. This can be achieved mainly by creating a hole for the immediate and increased passage of air through the Schneiderian membrane and the maxillary sinus wall above the region of augmentation.

  • 72.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Physical activity, obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men during a median of 30 years of follow-up2016In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 359-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    We aimed to investigate associations between combinations of body mass index (BMI)-categories, levels of physical activity and long-term risk of cardiovascular disease.

    METHOD AND RESULTS:

    At age 50 years, cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 2196 participating men of the ULSAM-study. This investigation was repeated at age 60, 70, 77 and 82 years. Being physically active (PA) was defined as three hours of recreational or hard physical training per week. The men were categorized according to BMI/PA-status, as PA/normal weight (n = 593 at baseline), non-PA/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m(2), n = 580), PA/overweight (n = 418), non-PA/overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m(2), n = 462), PA/obese (n = 62), non-PA/obese (BMI >30 kg/m(2), n = 81). We used updated data on BMI and physical activity obtained at all examinations. During follow-up (median 30 years) 850 individuals suffered a cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure). Using updated data on BMI/PA categories, an increased risk for cardiovascular disease was seen with increasing BMI, but a high physical activity was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease within each BMI category: non-PA/normal weight (hazard ratio (HR) 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.66), PA/overweight (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.20-1.94), non-PA/overweight (HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.31-2.07) PA/obese (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.44-2.92) and non-PA/obese (HR 2.39, 95% CI 1.74-3.29), using PA/normal weight men as referent.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Although physical activity was beneficial at all levels of BMI regarding the risk of future cardiovascular disease, there was still a substantial increased risk associated with being overweight or obese during 30 years of follow-up.

  • 73.
    Carlsson, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Mestres, Gemma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Treerattrakoon, Kiatnida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lopez, Alejandro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    In vitro and in vivo response to low-modulus PMMA-based bone cement2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 594284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high stiffness of acrylic bone cements has been hypothesized to contribute to the increased number of fractures encountered after vertebroplasty, which has led to the development of low-modulus cements. However, there is no data available on the in vivo biocompatibility of any low-modulus cement. In this study, the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility of two types of low-modulus acrylic cements, one modified with castor oil and one with linoleic acid, were evaluated using human osteoblast-like cells and a rodent model, respectively. While the in vitro cytotoxicity appeared somewhat affected by the castor oil and linoleic acid additions, no difference could be found in the in vivo response to these cements in comparison to the base, commercially available cement, in terms of histology and flow cytometry analysis of the presence of immune cells. Furthermore, the in vivo radiopacity of the cements appeared unaltered. While these results are promising, the mechanical behavior of these cements in vivo remains to be investigated.

  • 74. Carlsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Andersson, Tomas
    de Faire, Ulf
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Using Twin Controls to Study the Effects of BMI on Mortality2011In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 107-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75. Carlsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Andersson, Tomas
    de Faire, Ulf
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Body mass index and mortality: is the association explained by genetic factors?2011In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher mortality. We investigated the extent to which this association might be explained by genetic factors. METHODS: We used data from the Swedish Twin Registry on twins born 1886-1958 who answered a questionnaire in 1969/1970 or 1972 (n = 44,258). Information on mortality from all-causes (n = 14,217), cardiovascular disease (CVD; n = 9009), and coronary heart disease (CHD; n = 3564) was obtained by linkage to the national Causes of Death Registry for the years 1972-2004. The association between BMI and mortality was studied without control for genetic factors in cohort analyses and with control for genetic factors in co-twin control analyses. RESULTS: In cohort analyses, there was a clear dose-response relationship between BMI and mortality. Hazard ratios per 1 unit increase in BMI in subjects with BMI ≥18.5 were 1.05 (95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.06) for all-cause mortality, 1.07 (1.07-1.09) for CVD mortality, and 1.09 (1.08-1.10) for CHD mortality. Similar results were seen in co-twin control analyses of dizygotic twins. However, within monozygotic twins, BMI was associated with death from CHD (OR = 1.06; 1.00-1.12), whereas the association with all-cause mortality (1.01, 0.98-1.04) and CVD mortality (1.02, 0.98-1.06) was weak. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that there is an association between high BMI and mortality from CHD that is not explained by genetic confounding. However, a large part of the association between BMI and other causes of death may be explained by genes rather than by a causal link between these factors.

  • 76. Carlsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Andersson, Tomas
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Genetic effects on physical activity: results from the Swedish Twin Registry2006In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1396-1401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic effects on leisure-time physical activity using data from the Swedish Twin Registry. METHODS: We investigated 13,362 twin pairs (5334 monozygotic and 8028 dizygotic pairs) aged 14-46 yr. Information on leisure-time physical activity was obtained by questionnaire. Correlations and odds ratios of physical activity were calculated for males, females, and monozygotic and dizygotic twins, respectively. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the contribution of genetic effects as well as common and nonshared environmental factors on leisure-time physical activity. RESULTS: About one third of the twins reported that they exercised regularly (26% in females and 39% in males). The correlations of physical activity were twice as high in monozygotic compared with dizygotic twins, suggesting the presence of genetic effects. The variation in physical activity due to heritage was 57% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.49-0.63) in males and 50% (95% CI = 0.49-0.55) in females. The common environmental influence on physical activity was very small compared with the influence from environmental factors unique to the individual. CONCLUSIONS: Our study establishes heredity as an important component behind individual differences in physical activity in adult men and women. This may be one reason behind difficulties in convincing people to adopt an active lifestyle. Still, this study shows that there is a substantial influence on physical activity from environmental factors unique to the individual.

  • 77. Carlsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Andersson, Tomas
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Physical activity and mortality: is the association explained by genetic selection?2007In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 166, no 3, p. 255-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public health recommendations promote physical activity to improve health and longevity. Recent data suggest that the association between physical activity and mortality may be due to genetic selection. Using data on twins, the authors investigated whether genetic selection explains the association between physical activity and mortality. Data were based on a postal questionnaire answered by 13,109 Swedish twin pairs in 1972. The national Cause of Death Register was used for information about all-cause mortality (n=1,800) and cardiovascular disease mortality (n=638) during 1975-2004. The risk of death was reduced by 34% for men (relative risk=0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.50, 0.83) and by 25% for women (relative risk=0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.50, 1.14) reporting high physical activity levels. Within-pair comparisons of monozygotic twins showed that, compared with their less active co-twin, the more active twin had a 20% (odds ratio=0.80, 95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.99) reduced risk of all-cause mortality and a 32% (odds ratio=0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 0.95) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. Results indicate that physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of mortality not due to genetic selection. This finding supports a causal link between physical activity and mortality.

  • 78. Carlsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Andersson, Tomas
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Late retirement is not associated with increased mortality, results based on all Swedish retirements 1991-20072012In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 483-486Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79. Carrasquilla, Germán D
    et al.
    Frumento, Paolo
    Berglund, Anita
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Bottai, Matteo
    Chiavenna, Chiara
    Eliasson, Mats
    Engström, Gunnar
    Hallmans, Göran
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Magnusson, Patrik K
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Leander, Karin
    Postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of stroke: A pooled analysis of data from population-based cohort studies.2017In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 14, no 11, article id e1002445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Recent research indicates a favourable influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) if initiated early, but not late, on subclinical atherosclerosis. However, the clinical relevance of timing of HT initiation for hard end points such as stroke remains to be determined. Further, no previous research has considered the timing of initiation of HT in relation to haemorrhagic stroke risk. The importance of the route of administration, type, active ingredient, and duration of HT for stroke risk is also unclear. We aimed to assess the association between HT and risk of stroke, considering the timing of initiation, route of administration, type, active ingredient, and duration of HT.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data on HT use reported by the participants in 5 population-based Swedish cohort studies, with baseline investigations performed during the period 1987-2002, were combined in this observational study. In total, 88,914 postmenopausal women who reported data on HT use and had no previous cardiovascular disease diagnosis were included. Incident events of stroke (ischaemic, haemorrhagic, or unspecified) and haemorrhagic stroke were identified from national population registers. Laplace regression was employed to assess crude and multivariable-adjusted associations between HT and stroke risk by estimating percentile differences (PDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The fifth and first PDs were calculated for stroke and haemorrhagic stroke, respectively. Crude models were adjusted for age at baseline only. The final adjusted models included age at baseline, level of education, smoking status, body mass index, level of physical activity, and age at menopause onset. Additional variables evaluated for potential confounding were type of menopause, parity, use of oral contraceptives, alcohol consumption, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes, family history of cardiovascular disease, and cohort. During a median follow-up of 14.3 years, 6,371 first-time stroke events were recorded; of these, 1,080 were haemorrhagic. Following multivariable adjustment, early initiation (<5 years since menopause onset) of HT was associated with a longer stroke-free period than never use (fifth PD, 1.00 years; 95% CI 0.42 to 1.57), but there was no significant extension to the time period free of haemorrhagic stroke (first PD, 1.52 years; 95% CI -0.32 to 3.37). When considering timing as a continuous variable, the stroke-free and the haemorrhagic stroke-free periods were maximal if HT was initiated approximately 0-5 years from the onset of menopause. If single conjugated equine oestrogen HT was used, late initiation of HT was associated with a shorter stroke-free (fifth PD, -4.41 years; 95% CI -7.14 to -1.68) and haemorrhagic stroke-free (first PD, -9.51 years; 95% CI -12.77 to -6.24) period than never use. Combined HT when initiated late was significantly associated with a shorter haemorrhagic stroke-free period (first PD, -1.97 years; 95% CI -3.81 to -0.13), but not with a shorter stroke-free period (fifth PD, -1.21 years; 95% CI -3.11 to 0.68) than never use. Given the observational nature of this study, the possibility of uncontrolled confounding cannot be excluded. Further, immortal time bias, also related to the observational design, cannot be ruled out.

    CONCLUSIONS: When initiated early in relation to menopause onset, HT was not associated with increased risk of incident stroke, regardless of the route of administration, type of HT, active ingredient, and duration. Generally, these findings held also for haemorrhagic stroke. Our results suggest that the initiation of HT 0-5 years after menopause onset, as compared to never use, is associated with a decreased risk of stroke and haemorrhagic stroke. Late initiation was associated with elevated risks of stroke and haemorrhagic stroke when conjugated equine oestrogen was used as single therapy. Late initiation of combined HT was associated with haemorrhagic stroke risk.

  • 80.
    Carrwik, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Murakami, Hideki
    Kanazawa University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Japan.
    Willander, Johan
    Gävle University, Department of Psychology, Gävle, Sweden.
    Robinson, Yohan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Potential harms of interventions for spinal metastatic disease2017In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:

    The primary objective of this review is to compare the potential harms of treatment for spinal metastatic disease for the following treatments:

    1. Surgical intervention.

    2. Surgical intervention with radiation therapy.

    3. Radiation therapy alone.

    Our secondary objectives are:

    1. comparing the harms of different surgical methods;

    2. comparing the harms between different radiation protocols.

  • 81.
    Cerani, Agustin
    et al.
    McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst, Montreal, PQ, Canada;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol Biostat & Occupat Hlth, 3755 Cote Ste Catherine Rd,Suite H-413, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada.
    Zhou, Sirui
    McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst, Montreal, PQ, Canada;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol Biostat & Occupat Hlth, 3755 Cote Ste Catherine Rd,Suite H-413, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada.
    Forgetta, Vincenzo
    McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Morris, John A.
    McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst, Montreal, PQ, Canada;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Trajanoska, Katerina
    Univ Med Ctr, Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Univ Med Ctr, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Univ Med Ctr, Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Univ Med Ctr, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Richards, J. Brent
    McGill Univ, Jewish Gen Hosp, Lady Davis Inst, Montreal, PQ, Canada;McGill Univ, Dept Epidemiol Biostat & Occupat Hlth, 3755 Cote Ste Catherine Rd,Suite H-413, Montreal, PQ H3T 1E2, Canada;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Genetic predisposition to increased serum calcium, bone mineral density, and fracture risk in individuals with normal calcium levels: mendelian randomisation study2019In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 366, article id l4410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if genetically increased serum calcium levels are associated with improved bone mineral density and a reduction in osteoporotic fractures. DESIGN Mendelian randomisation study.

    SETTING: Cohorts used included: the UK Biobank cohort, providing genotypic and estimated bone mineral density data; 25 cohorts from UK, USA, Europe, and China, providing genotypic and fracture data; and 17 cohorts from Europe, providing genotypic and serum calcium data (summary level statistics).

    PARTICIPANTS: A genome-wide association meta-analysis of serum calcium levels in up to 61 079 individuals was used to identify genetic determinants of serum calcium levels. The UK Biobank study was used to assess the association of genetic predisposition to increased serum calcium with estimated bone mineral density derived from heel ultrasound in 426 824 individuals who had, on average, calcium levels in the normal range. A fracture genome-wide association metaanalysis comprising 24 cohorts and the UK Biobank including a total of 76 549 cases and 470 164 controls, who, on average, also had calcium levels in the normal range was then performed.

    RESULTS: A standard deviation increase in genetically derived serum calcium (0.13 mmol/L or 0.51 mg/dL) was not associated with increased estimated bone mineral density (0.003 g/cm(2), 95% confidence interval -0.059 to 0.066; P=0.92) or a reduced risk of fractures (odds ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 1.15; P=0.85) in inverse-variance weighted mendelian randomisation analyses. Sensitivity analyses did not provide evidence of pleiotropic effects.

    CONCLUSIONS: Genetic predisposition to increased serum calcium levels in individuals with normal calcium levels is not associated with an increase in estimated bone mineral density and does not provide clinically relevant protection against fracture. Whether such predisposition mimics the effect of short term calcium supplementation is not known. Given that the same genetically derived increase in serum calcium is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease, widespread calcium supplementation in the general population could provide more risk than benefit.

  • 82. Chaparro, M Pia
    et al.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Byberg, L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and offspring body composition in young adulthood: the modifying role of offspring sex and birth order.2017In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, no 17, p. 3084-3089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and offspring's body composition in late adolescence and young adulthood varies by offspring birth order and sex.

    DESIGN: Family cohort study, with data from registers, questionnaires and physical examinations. The main outcome under study was offspring body composition (percentage fat mass (%FM), percentage lean mass (%LM)) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    SETTING: Uppsala, Sweden.

    SUBJECTS: Two hundred and twenty-six siblings (first-born v. second-born; average age 19 and 21 years) and their mothers.

    RESULTS: In multivariable linear regression models, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was positively associated with daughter's %FM, with stronger estimates for first-born (β=0·97, 95 % CI 0·14, 1·80) v. second-born daughters (β=0·64, 95 % CI 0·08, 1·20). Mother's BMI before her first pregnancy was associated with her second-born daughter's body composition (β=1·05, 95 % CI 0·31, 1·79 (%FM)) Similar results albeit in the opposite direction were observed for %LM. No significant associations were found between pre-pregnancy BMI and %FM (β=0·59, 95 % CI-0·27, 1·44 first-born; β=-0·13, 95 % CI-0·77, 0·52 second-born) or %LM (β=-0·54, 95 % CI-1·37, 0·28 first-born; β=0·11, 95 % CI-0·52, 0·74 second-born) for sons.

    CONCLUSIONS: A higher pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with higher offspring %FM and lower offspring %LM in late adolescence and young adulthood, with stronger associations for first-born daughters. Preventing obesity at the start of women's reproductive life might reduce the risk of obesity in her offspring, particularly for daughters.

  • 83. Chen, Antonia
    et al.
    Haddad, Fares
    Lachiewicz, Paul
    Bolognesi, Michael
    Cortes, Luis E
    Franceschini, Massimo
    Gallo, Jiri
    Glynn, Aaron
    Della Valle, Alejandro Gonzalez
    Gahramanov, Aydin
    Khatod, Monti
    Lazarinis, Stergios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lob, Guenther
    Nana, Arvind
    Ochsner, Peter
    Tuncay, Ibrahim
    Winkler, Tobias
    Zeng, YiRong
    Prevention of late PJI2014In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 32, no Suppl. 1, p. S158-S171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84. Chen, Antonia
    et al.
    Haddad, Fares
    Lachiewicz, Paul
    Bolognesi, Michael
    Cortes, Luis E
    Franceschini, Massimo
    Gallo, Jiri
    Glynn, Aaron
    Gonzalez Della Valle, Alejandro
    Gahramanov, Aydin
    Khatod, Monti
    Lazarinis, Stergios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Lob, Guenther
    Nana, Arvind
    Ochsner, Peter
    Tuncay, Ibrahim
    Winkler, Tobias
    Zeng, Yirong
    Prevention of Late PJI2014In: The Journal of Arthroplasty, ISSN 0883-5403, E-ISSN 1532-8406, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Christersson, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fractures of the distal radius: Factors related to radiographic evaluation, conservative treatment and fracture healing2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Distal radius fractures (DRFs) are one of the most common injuries encountered in orthopaedic practise. Such fractures are most often treated conservatively, but surgical treatment has become increasingly common. This trend is not entirely scientifically based

    The aims of this thesis were threefold: to increase measurement precision in dorsal angulation (DA) on radiographs and computer tomographies (CTs); to assess the results after shortened plaster cast fixation time in reduced DRFs; and to evaluate the feasibility and safety of applying Augment® (rhPDGF-BB/β-TCP) in DRFs.

    In Paper I and Appendix 1 and 2, a semi-automatic CT-based three-dimensional method was developed to measure change in DA over time in DRFs. This approach proved to be a better (more sensitive) method than radiography in determining changes in DA in fractures of the distal radius.

    In Paper II, a CT model was used to simulate lateral radiographic views of different radial directions in relation to the X-ray. Using an alternative reference point on the distal radius, precision and accuracy in measuring DA was increased.

    Paper III and IV are based on a prospective and randomised clinical study (the GitRa trial) that compares clinical and radiographic outcomes after plaster cast removal at 10 days versus 1 month in 109 reduced DRFs. Three patients in the early mobilised group were excluded because of fracture dislocation (n=2) or a feeling of fracture instability (n=1). For the remaining patients in the early mobilised group (51/54) a limited but temporary gain in range of motion, but a slight increase in radiographic displacement were observed. Our results suggest that plaster cast removal at 10 days after reduction of DRFs is not feasible.

    Paper V is based on a prospective, randomised clinical study (the GEM trial) in which 40 externally fixated DRFs were randomised to rhPDGF-BB/β-TCP into the fracture gap or to the control group. Augment® proved to be convenient and safe during follow-up (24 weeks). However, because of the nature of the study design, the effect on fracture healing could not be determined. A decrease in pin infections was seen in the Augment® group, a finding we could not explain.

    List of papers
    1. Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Skeletal Radiology, ISSN 0364-2348, E-ISSN 1432-2161, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 763-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the reliability and agreement between a computer tomography-based method (CT) and digitalised 2D radiographs (XR) when measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures. Materials and methods Radiographs from 33 distal radius fractures treated with external fixation were retrospectively analysed. All fractures had been examined using both XR and CT at six times over 6 months postoperatively. The changes in dorsal angulation between the first reference images and the following examinations in every patient were calculated from 133 follow-up measurements by two assessors and repeated at two different time points. The measurements were analysed using Bland-Altman plots, comparing intra- and inter-observer agreement within and between XR and CT. Results The mean differences in intra- and inter-observer measurements for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were close to zero, implying equal validity. The average intra- and inter-observer limits of agreement for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were +/- 4.4 degrees, +/- 1.9 degrees and +/- 6.8 degrees respectively. Conclusions For scientific purpose, the reliability of XR seems unacceptably low when measuring changes in dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures, whereas the reliability for the semi-automatic CT-based method was higher and is therefore preferable when a more precise method is requested.

    National Category
    Orthopaedics Medical Image Processing
    Research subject
    Computerized Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297776 (URN)10.1007/s00256-016-2350-6 (DOI)000374476200003 ()26922189 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-02-27 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Increased precision in the measurement of dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures using the dorsal-ulnar cornaer as the reference point versus Lister’s tubercle
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased precision in the measurement of dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures using the dorsal-ulnar cornaer as the reference point versus Lister’s tubercle
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312929 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    3. Radiographic results after plaster cast fixation for 10 days versus 1 month in reduced distal radius fractures: a prospective randomised study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiographic results after plaster cast fixation for 10 days versus 1 month in reduced distal radius fractures: a prospective randomised study
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, ISSN 1749-799X, E-ISSN 1749-799X, Vol. 11, article id 145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine whether reduced distal radius fractures can be treated with early mobilisation without affecting the radiographic results.

    METHODS: In a prospective randomised study, 109 patients (mean age 65.8 (range 50-92)) with moderately displaced distal radius fractures were treated with closed reduction and plaster cast fixation for about 10 days (range 8-13 days) followed by randomisation to one of two groups: early mobilisation (n = 54, active group) or continued plaster cast fixation for another 3 weeks (n = 55, control group).

    RESULTS: For three patients in the active group (6%), treatment proved unsuccessful because of severe displacement of the fracture (n = 2) or perceived instability (n = 1). From 10 days to 1 month, i.e. the only period when the treatment differed between the two groups, the active group displaced significantly more in dorsal angulation (4.5°, p < 0.001), radial angulation (2.0°, p < 0.001) and axial compression (0.5 mm, p = 0.01) compared with the control group. However, during the entire study period (i.e. from admission to 12 months), the active group displaced significantly more than the controls only in radial angulation (3.2°, p = 0.002) and axial compression (0.7 mm, p = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: Early mobilisation 10 days after reduction of moderately displaced distal radius fractures resulted in both an increased number of treatment failures and increased displacement in radial angulation and axial compression as compared with the control group. Mobilisation 10 days after reduction cannot be recommended for the routine treatment of reduced distal radius fractures.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrail.gov, NCT02798614 . Retrospectively registered 16 June 2016.

    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312927 (URN)10.1186/s13018-016-0478-7 (DOI)000391332600001 ()27871284 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Clinical outcome after plaster cast fixation for 10 days versus 1 month in reduced distal radius fractures: A prospective randomized study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical outcome after plaster cast fixation for 10 days versus 1 month in reduced distal radius fractures: A prospective randomized study.
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312928 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    5. Prospective randomized feasibility trial to assess the use of rhPDGF-BB in treatment of distal radius fractures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospective randomized feasibility trial to assess the use of rhPDGF-BB in treatment of distal radius fractures
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, ISSN 1749-799X, E-ISSN 1749-799X, Vol. 10, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB (rhPDGF-BB) combined with an osteoconductive scaffold (β-TCP) has been demonstrated to increase bone formation, but rhPDGF-BB has not been studied in human fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and potential use of locally administered rhPDGF-BB/β-TCP (Augment®) in acute wrist fractures.

    METHODS: Forty patients with unstable distal radial fracture were randomized to closed reduction and external fixation alone (n = 20) or combined with injection of rhPDGF-BB/β-TCP (Augment®) into the fracture (n = 20). All patients were followed for 24 weeks. Outcome was based on adverse events, fracture displacement on radiographs, fracture healing, range of motion, grip strength, pain, and the disability of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score.

    RESULTS: There were no serious adverse events in the study, but the pin tract infection rate was significantly lower in the Augment® group. There was no difference between the groups in fracture healing time, based on number of healed cortices or fracture displacement. The Augment® group had an early temporary significant decrease in wrist flexion, but no difference in range of motion at 24 weeks. There were no differences between the two treatment groups for any other outcome variables.

    CONCLUSION: rhPDGF-BB/β-TCP (Augment®) is safe and convenient for local administration into wrist fractures. In this pilot study, we could not detect any reduced healing time in the Augment® group although potential efficacy should be addressed in larger studies.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: The clinical trial registration number for the study protocol is BMPI-2014-02-E.

    Keywords
    Distal radius fracture; External fixation; PDGF; Calcium phosphate; Radiographic evaluation; Clinical evaluation; Prospective; Randomized
    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-266609 (URN)10.1186/s13018-015-0174-z (DOI)000369737900001 ()25888774 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
  • 86.
    Christersson, Albert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Increased precision in the measurement of dorsal