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  • 51.
    Robles, Erica
    et al.
    New York University.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    From materials to materiality: thinking of computation from within an Icehotel2011In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, ACM Interactions, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Sagala, Ramadhan Kurniawan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Visualization of Vehicle Usage Based on Position Data for Root-Cause Analysis: A Case Study in Scania CV AB2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Root cause analysis (RCA) is a process in Scania carried out to understand the root cause of vehicle breakdowns. It is commonly done by studying vehicle warranty claims and failure reports, identifying patterns that are correlated to the breakdowns, and then analyzing the root cause based on those findings. Vehicle usage is believed to be one of the factors that may contribute towards the breakdowns, but the data on vehicle usage is not commonly utilized in RCA.

    This thesis investigates a way to help RCA process by introducing a dataset of vehicle usage based on position data gathered in project FUMA (Fleet telematics big data analytics for vehicle Usage Modeling and Analysis). A user-centered design process of a visualization tool which presents FUMA data for people working in RCA process was carried out. Interviews were conducted to gain insights about the RCA process and generate design ideas. PACT framework was used to organize the ideas, and Use Cases were developed to project a conceptual scenario. A low fidelity prototype was developed as design artifact for the visualization, and a formative test was done to validate the design and gather feedback for future prototyping iterations.

    In each design phase, more insights about how visualization of vehicle usage should be used in RCA were obtained. Based on this study, the prototype design showed a promising start in visualizing vehicle usage for RCA purpose. Improvement on data presentation, however, still needs to be addressed to reach the level of practicality required in RCA.

  • 53.
    Sahab, Abolghasem Sohail
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Remote User-Centered System Design: Case Study: Redesign of Uppsala Kommun International Website2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Building a useful and usable website for international users requires more than translating the content of an existing site to other languages. It should be designed in a way to meet the needs of these users. In order to build a usable website, we need to use a methodology that has a focus on usability. One methodology that is considered essential for designing and developing usable systems is “User-Centered System Design” (UCSD). UCSD has the focus on understanding users’ goals and needs, involving them in participatory design, and evaluating the design with them. However, how can we use UCSD while the users are geographically spread out?

    To address this question I have studied and employed different approaches to perform UCSD remotely. As a case study, I have used these approaches to design a new international website for Uppsala Kommun (Municipality).

    The results show that it is possible to perform the UCSD remotely. However, special consideration should be taken for finding representative users. Remote UCSD is not a substitute for UCSD. It can be considered as a methodology for situations where users are geographically spread out. It can also be used as a complementary approach to UCSD.

  • 54.
    Saleem, Rabiah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Preservation of Heritage Sites through Virtual Museums: User Study of Stonehenge Virtual Tour2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 55.
    Sarker, Biswajit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Organized Chaos!: Untangling multigenerational group interactions in a gamified science center.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This inductive study investigates interactions within groups of visitors during a science center visit. Using simplified interaction analysis of recorded videos; I explore the group dynamics in terms of what determines who takes the lead while multigenerational groups interact with different types of experiments. From the observations, I suggest that the age of different group members and specific design aspects of the experiments play the most important roles in the emergence of leadership. Teenagers in a group tend to take the leadership and dominate during a group interaction, while young children like to explore freely leading the group from one experiment to the next without focusing on finishing them properly. As for the design aspects, if an experiment requires cognitive skills then adults and teenagers take the lead but if an experiment requires physical skills and provides immediate feedback then young children take the lead. I also suggest, instead of guiding the young children in the group, adults tend to become observers during engagements. This study will be useful for researchers and interaction designers who are focusing their work on the behavior of multigenerational groups in science center or museum settings.

  • 56.
    Shrestha, Suman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Evaluation of Shape's Influence on User's Performance in Shape Replication Task2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents experimental results of shape’s influence on user’s performance in terms of time and accuracy in shape replication task. The shapes are drawn with mouse, pen and touch input devices. For this purpose, two non-meaningful, semi- randomly generated shapes have been used. The first shape has a combination of straight lines and curves whereas the second shape has curves only. Each of these shapes is presented in four versions namely contour, polygon, narrow tunnel and wide tunnel. A method to compare versions of these shapes with the corresponding versions of user drawn shapes is presented. In general, the results showed that the replication of second shape takes less time and the replicated shape is more accurate when compared to the first shape. In addition, performance of the input devices was found to be dependent upon the shapes and their versions they were used to draw.

  • 57.
    Spak, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Change Detection of the Unexpected: Enhancing change detection of the unexpected in a complex and high risk context – guiding visual attention in a digital display environment2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Change detection of objects and events in our visual surroundings is sometimes severely difficult, especially if these changes are unexpected. Such failures in change detection may cause huge malicious outcomes in contexts characterized by high levels of complexity and risk. For operators within organizations active in such contexts, effective change detection is a necessary step for functional feedback control in the pursuit of achieving specified goals. This thesis demonstrates examples of change detection failures from aviation, defence, healthcare, and road traffic.

    The purpose of the thesis is to present a support concept for enhanced change detection in complex and high risk contexts. The design requirements are primarily provided by the field of command and control. The main mechanisms behind the problems of change detection are identified as the psychological phenomena of change blindness and inattentional blindness. A theoretical foundation is presented regarding these phenomena, complemented with a review concerning orientation and capture of visual attention. The solution space for enhanced change detection is explored and a gap in the literature is identified; there is a need for a support concept which considers both blindness phenomena simultaneously. The thesis elaborates on a conceptual design; an adaptive attention aware system (A3S), based on cuing of visual attention.

    The thesis includes four experimental studies. The first examines the effects of instruction on change detection performance. The remaining studies evaluate the possibilities to orient visual attention by a non-obtrusive flash cue in a radar-like display, to compensate for inadequate expectations in a situation characterized by high levels of uncertainty. The participants’ performance is measured in accuracy (hit frequencies) and response times.

    The results indicate that; (a) instructions can affect change detection performance, (b) the bottom-up flash cue enhance change detection independent of perceptual load, (c) the flash cue enhance change detection in both static and dynamic environments, and (d) the flash cue is beneficial for change detection even when its position is outside foveal vision in relation to the changed target object. Design propositions for an A3S are presented, derived from the results of the thesis.

  • 58.
    Stensson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction. Swedish Defence College, Department of Military Technology.
    Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Automous Technology - Sources of Confusion: A Model for Explanation and Prediction of Conceptual Shifts2014In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 455-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, autonomous is often used for technology with a more intelligent self-management capability than common automation. This concept usage is maladaptive, ignoring both the distinction between autonomy and heteronomy according to Kant’s categorical imperative and that the meaning of autonomy implies qualities technology cannot have. Being autonomous is about having the right to be wrong, a right justified by accountability and insightful understanding of real-life values, and it is about being externally uncontrollable. The contemporary use of autonomy as well as similar concepts is discussed and a model is presented showing how six sources of confusion interact in a vicious circle that impede human authority and autonomy. Our goal is to sort out these confusions and contribute to a development in which the different roles of machines and people, and human responsibilities, are explicated rather than blurred, which should facilitate the forming of truly beneficial and complementary systems.

  • 59.
    Stensson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction. Försvarshögskolan.
    Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Edge awareness: A dynamic safety perspective on four accidents/incidents2014In: Advances in Human Factors, Software and Systems Engineering: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, 2014, p. -179Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Turmo, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Understanding the design space of an instructed physical activity in a co-located, social setting: Inspiring the digital by looking at the physical2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the past years, gaming and sports in HCI have experienced an increase in design that rely on movement-based interactions. Nonetheless, some of these designs constrain the users and disregard the richness of the social and physical context around them. When designing (took away something here) an activity, we believe that a good previous understanding of it can help designers to create richer and less limiting interventions. On our study, we turn to Pilates in order to study (took away something here) the elements involved in the accomplishment of a working, co-located, social and instructed physical activity, as well as which are their roles and their characteristics. In order to do so, we record a Pilates' class and gather information on the perceptions of the instructor and the practitioners, through questionnaires. An analysis of the video, inspired by the Grounded Theory methodology and Sequential analysis; and also an analysis of the questionnaires, through a simplified version of Content analysis, reveal which (took away something here) elements are involved in such an activity (instructor, practitioners and artifacts ) and the interaction that exists among them, as well as which are their roles (what do these elements perform) and the characteristics of those roles (in which way they are performed). Here we illustrate the different results with examples from the data and, in basis to this data, we review some relevant findings and provide some inspirations for future design interventions.

  • 61.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Parrilla Bel, Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    BalBoa: A Balancing Board for Handstand Training2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balance is an essential physical skill to master, but a challenging one given that it requires a heightened body awareness to control, maintain and develop. In HCI physical training research, the design space of technology support for developing such body awareness remains narrow. Here, we introduce BalBoa, a balancing board to support balance training during handstands. We describe key highlights of the design process behind the Balboa, and present a work-in-progress prototype, which we tested with handstand beginners and experts. We discuss feedback from our users, preliminary insights, and sketch the future steps towards a fully developed prototype.

  • 62.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Parrilla Bel, Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Exteriorizing Body Alignment in Collocated Physical Training2018In: Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Móntreal, Canada: ACM Digital Library, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proprioceptive awareness is an essential but challenging skill to master. In HCI physical training research, the design space of how technology can help people to develop such awareness remains narrow. Here, we present a technological device that exteriorizes misalignments of different body parts by translating them to haptic feedback. We present preliminary insights gained during the design process and device testing, and trace the future steps of its technological development.

  • 63.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Movement Correction in Instructed Fitness Training:: Design Recommendations and Opportunities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sensory bodystorming for collocated physical training desig2018In: NordiCHI '18 Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Oslo, Norway: ACM Publications, 2018, p. 247-259Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the use of technology to support physical training has been gaining traction in HCI, the design space of sensory augmentations to improve and support physical training remains narrow. To help open this design space in the domain of collocated instructed physical training, we first present Sensory Bodystorming, a hybrid ideation method influenced by material and embodied approaches to ideation. Sensory Bodystorming targets the generation of ideas that support, and are underpinned by, a rich and nuanced sensorial experience. Ideas are generated through physically engaging with evocative sensorial stimuli elicited by ideation probes featuring diverse material qualities. Secondly, we present ideas resulting from three Sensory Bodystorming sessions that extend prior sensory augmentation works in the domain. Lastly, we identify interesting research and design directions based on prior works and our own.

  • 65.
    Usman, Muhammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    The “Educator” User interface for Smartphone Educational Software2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The “Educator” a Smartphone application which helps in gaining knowledge easily and italso helps in being more productive during the time spent in waiting for buses and train.This broken time can be used extensively by making use of the Educator. This educationalapplication brings learning possibilities at peoples fingertips. It provides various optionsto people with a variety of learning skills which include multiple choice questions, puzzles,language cards, and online home exams for students.

  • 66.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    I’m in love with someone who doesn’t exist!: Bleed in the context of a computer game.2015In: Game Love: Essays on play and affection / [ed] Jessica Enevold and Esther MacCallum-Stewart, McFarland, 2015, p. 25-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Play, Participation and Empowerment: Design strategies and dilemmas2016In: CHI PLAY 2016: Proceedings Of The 2016 Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, 2016, p. 3-3Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Activity as the Ultimate Particular of Interaction Design2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 3390-3402Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the turn towards practice-oriented research in interaction design, one of the most important proposals has been the emphasis on the 'ultimate particulars' produced by design, as embodiments of design knowledge. In current HCI research, those particulars are almost always taken to be ‘things’ – artefacts or singular systems. We argue that this emphasis may have come at a cost that can be described as a loss of identity; interaction design research was never primarily concerned with the design of artefacts, but with how humans act and interact with each other with and through artefacts. We propose a complementary perspective by looking at design projects and traditions where the ‘ultimate particulars’ can be considered to be activities rather than things. The article is concerned with how knowledge needs to be articulated in the scholarly engagement with such design practices. We argue that engagement with activitycentric design gets design research one step closer towards understanding salient contemporary design practices and what Buchanan calls ‘environmental design’.

  • 69.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Experimental Game Design2015In: Game Research Methods: An Overview / [ed] Lankoski, Petri; Björk, Staffan, ETC press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Experimental game design2017In: Game design research: an introduction to theory and practice / [ed] Petri Lankoski and Jussi Holopainen, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA: ETC Press, 2017, p. 157-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to understand games better is to experiment with their design. While experimental game design is part of most game design, this chapter focuses on ways in which it can become a method to perform academic enquiry, eliciting deeper principles for game design.

  • 71.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva-Lotta
    Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heefer, Jasper
    Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rau, Andreas
    Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paget, Susan
    Ultuna Lantbruksuniv, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Petterson, Linda
    URBIO, Stockholm, Sweden.
    DigiFys: The interactive play landscape2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DigiFys project explores the design of interactive landscapes for children's outdoor play. The project combines landscape architecture with design of interactive technology, working towards designs that support children in their everyday play activity, close to home. In the creative lab session, we want to co-design the play landscape together with local children. The focus is on acquiring a perspective on similarities and differences between the children’s play culture in Sweden where the project originates, and Malaysia.

  • 72.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Bohné, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Affective and bodily involvement in children’s tablet play2015In: Diversity of play: DiGRA 2015 / [ed] Mathias Fuchs, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of tablet applications targeting pre-school children presents us with challenging questions concerning how this age group engages with the applications. We performed a study with a tablet game designed to teach pre-school children about emotions, studying their mode of engagement and their understanding of the game. The purpose of the study was to provide insights into what play activities are encouraged by tablet play. The study showed clearly that even though the interactivity of the game was very limited, the children understood the social and emotional aspects of the game content very well. We also found that the children would sometimes engage affectively and dramatically with the game content; we highlight in particular instances of bodily involvement with the game. We argue that tablet games offer design opportunities for children in this age range that may be less relevant for older children, by taking corporeal play around the tablet into account.

    While none of the models for computer game-based learning and persuasion that have been proposed in literature constitutes a perfect fit to the behavior observed in our study, we find some resonance in the concept of procedural rhetorics in the way the players' interaction with the game serves to complete a rhetorical argument; in this case the storyline of the game. The children's dramatic involvement may potentially serve to strengthen such arguments.

  • 73.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Deterding, Sebastian
    Lucero, Andrés
    Holopainen, Jussi
    Min, Chulhong
    Cheok, Adrian
    Walz, Steffen
    Embarrassing Interactions2015In: CHI extended abstracts, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 2365-2368Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stenros, Jaakko
    University of Tampere.
    Trust and Intimate Interaction in Nordic Larp2015In: CHI workshop on embarrassing interactions, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Intimate play can be perceived as embarrassing or intrusive, it can violate personal boundaries, or make players feel unsafe. At the same time, intimate play can be fun, exhilarating, and trust-building. We look into intimate interactions in Nordic larp to get deeper insights into what triggers one reaction, or the other.

  • 75.
    WANG, BIWEI
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing a graphical userinterface of an easy-to-usevideophone for people withmild dementia2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Alzheimer association’s clinique practice, there was a need to communicate with people with mild dementia. Videophone is considered as one of the best assistive communication tool for these people since video communication is not only a tool to break an isolation caused by the disease, but also a powerful way to help people demonstrate their ideas and understand what is said in a conversation with pictures, signs and body language. Therefore, an easy-to-use videophone for people with mild dementia is needed.

    The goal of this master thesis is to design a graphical user interface (GUI) of an easy-to-use videophone for people with mild dementia according to their characteristics and difficulties of using everyday technology. User centered design (UCD) was used in the design. To get familiar with the user, literature research was conducted before design.

    Low-fidelity prototype was created. With the help of Karolinska institute’ research group on people with dementia, the prototype was refined twice. Based on the refined low-fidelity prototype, an interactive prototype with navigation, sound and animation effect was created. A usability testing was conducted on older adults with this interactive prototype.

    In addition to the GUI of functions for people with mild dementia, GUI of functions for other care givers was also created and presented in this master thesis.

  • 76.
    Wecksell, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Are you making an impression?: The visual aesthetics of career websites2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The field of HCI has begun to realize the importance of visual aesthetics. Recent studies have investigated visual aesthetics related to first impressions and found that judgments can be made almost instantaneously. This thesis builds upon previous research related to visual aesthetics and first impressions. Two different approaches were used to investigate university student’s subjective impressions of career websites of organizations. The first approach investigated first impressions, were users rated the websites on their visual appeal, after viewing a screenshot of the website for only 500 milliseconds. In the second approach, the viewing time was not restricted, and the users rated the screenshots on four statements of the VisAWI-S questionnaire. The subjective ratings collected in the two studies were compared objective characteristics such as number of images, number of visual objects and the average RGB-value of the screenshots. Strong correlations was found between the subjective ratings given in the two studies. Both methods was found useful for evaluating the visual aesthetics of websites, and the context of the study should also guide the choice of method. No correlations were found between the objective characteristics and the subjective ratings, with the exception to the average RGB-values. There was an indication that the students preferred websites with darker colors.

  • 77.
    Winkler Pettersson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kjellin, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Lind, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Seipel, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis.
    On the role of visual references in collaborative visualization2010In: Information Visualization, ISSN 1473-8716, E-ISSN 1473-8724, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 98-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    XIAO, DAXIN
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Enhancing audience experience on Live music2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Increasingly, people attend live music event for diversified experiences that they could not have from listening to music at home or watching a broadcast on TV. Some seek to interact with their idol on site; others enjoy the collective action with audience members who share with them the same music preference. Enhancing audience experiences on live events, therefore, gains popularity. Research focus on crowd behaviors and the possibility of how implementing new technologies into this area. However, few studies have investigated have investigated the impact of individual promotion in the crowds by offering them a particular moment enabling them to feel more connected to the event. To deeply understand requirements from different stakeholders, audiences, and performers, a participatory workshop was conducted through which they acted as co-creators in the development process. Additionally, three qualitative evaluations were carried out to collect feedback on how the design system “HeartBeat” could enhance the audience’s experience. The research found that promoting individual impact and collective action are not conflicting with each other. Instead, they complement one another throughout the live session. “HeartBeat” is not only a design prototype that aims to increase audience experience but also a starting point for future design explorations in live music settings. 

  • 79.
    YAHEFU, GULIZHAER
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Humanitarianism on social media: Rethinking post-humanitarianism in the context of social media logic2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 80.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Hindrance or an Aid?: The Impact of User Interface on Ideation in Computer-Mediated Drawing2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Users’ performance in ideation during computer-mediated creative drawing can be affected by the design of a computer’s User Interface (UI). This paper presents results from a series of empirical comparative studies in which participants were presented with a creative drawing task and their ideation performance was measured in terms of the number and quality of ideas created with the use of three different input methods (mouse, stylus-, and touch-input), or two graphical UIs (GUIs). The results showed no significant differences between the different computer input methods, or between the simple and more complex GUI. However, when present in combination, these test conditions can be expected to create cumulative effects, which might explain the substantial differences observed in previous research on computerized creative drawing tasks. Quality-quantity trade-off and a new form of operational bias were observed and their effects on user satisfaction and ideation performance are discussed.

  • 81.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Careless touch: a comparative evaluation of mouse, pen, and touch input in shape tracing task2011In: Proceedings of the 23rd Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference (OzCHI '11) / [ed] Cécile Paris, Nathalie Colineau, Vivienne Farrell, Graham Farrell and Weidong Huang, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2011, p. 329-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short paper is a work-in-progress report on an experimental, exploratory comparison and evaluation of three input methods (mouse, pen, and touch-input) in a line-tracing task. A method to compare the original shape and user-generated version is presented. Measurements of user efficiency and accuracy showed that participants replicating a particular shape using touch-input performed the worst in terms of accuracy but were the fastest in comparison to the remaining input methods. No effect of controlled visual feedback was observed. Additionally, subjective operational biases were observed that, together with input method and expected shape related issues, might strongly affect the results.

  • 82.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Creating Digital Traces of Ideas: Evaluation of Computer Input Methods in Creative and Non-Creative Drawing2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideas are formed in a process of idea generation that includes creation, development, and communication of new ideas. Drawing has been used as a support for ideation for centuries. Today, computerized tools are commonly used for drawing. Such tools form a user interface between the human and the resulting drawing presented on the screen. The interface may come between the user and the drawing in a disruptive way also affecting the ideation process.

    Using controlled laboratory studies, this thesis investigates the consequences of drawing with different user interfaces in two types of tasks: creative drawing tasks (based on a standardized test of creativity) and non-creative drawing tasks (i.e. shape-tracing tasks where no new idea is created). The goal was to identify and evaluate the consequences of the several issues originating from the use of different input devices, the functionality of the graphical user interfaces, the formulation of the drawing task, and the user’s previous experience.

    The results showed that drawing tasks are oriented toward quality of outcomes and that higher input accuracy led to higher quality of outcomes of both creative and non-creative drawing tasks. This came with a trade-off between the quantity and quality. In ideation, less accurate input devices facilitated significantly more ideas but these were of lower quality. In non-creative tracing, higher speeds caused lower quality of outcomes.

    The users subjectively preferred higher accuracy, also when an inaccurate user interface offered an eraser function. However, using the eraser allowed avoiding reinterpretations of ideas and led to ideation strategies characterized by laborious drawing that negatively affected the quality and quantity of the ideas produced. For non-creative drawing, the more difficult the shapes were, the lower the tracing accuracy.

    In the thesis a new framework for interaction analysis is introduced that improves the theoretical and practical understanding of computerized drawing tasks and the phenomena resulting from different aspects of the user interface design of computerized drawing tools.

    This thesis demonstrates that the inaccuracy of computerized tools cannot only make our drawings less aesthetically pleasing but also negatively affect ideas that are created in the process.

    List of papers
    1. Activity or Product?: Drawing and HCI
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity or Product?: Drawing and HCI
    2013 (English)In: Proceedings of MIDI '13: Proceedings of the International Conference on Multimedia, Interaction, Design and Innovation, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 29-38Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing tasks are rarely addressed experimentally by the HCI community, and even then pointing, steering, or gesturing is promoted as an approach towards drawing. We critically analyze the status quo, propose an improved framework for task analysis, and give suggestions on how to perceive drawing task at a meta-level.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013
    Keywords
    Pointing, steering, gesturing, tracing, drawing, W6
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207259 (URN)10.1145/2500342.2500346 (DOI)978-1-4503-2303-1 (ISBN)
    Conference
    International Conference on Multimedia, Interaction, Design and Innovation MIDI '13, 24-25 June, 2013, Warsaw, Poland
    Available from: 2013-09-11 Created: 2013-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Careless touch: a comparative evaluation of mouse, pen, and touch input in shape tracing task
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Careless touch: a comparative evaluation of mouse, pen, and touch input in shape tracing task
    2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the 23rd Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference (OzCHI '11) / [ed] Cécile Paris, Nathalie Colineau, Vivienne Farrell, Graham Farrell and Weidong Huang, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2011, p. 329-332Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short paper is a work-in-progress report on an experimental, exploratory comparison and evaluation of three input methods (mouse, pen, and touch-input) in a line-tracing task. A method to compare the original shape and user-generated version is presented. Measurements of user efficiency and accuracy showed that participants replicating a particular shape using touch-input performed the worst in terms of accuracy but were the fastest in comparison to the remaining input methods. No effect of controlled visual feedback was observed. Additionally, subjective operational biases were observed that, together with input method and expected shape related issues, might strongly affect the results.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2011
    Keywords
    Shape, tracing, drawing, freehand, mouse, pen, touch, evaluation, comparison, method
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-163289 (URN)10.1145/2071536.2071588 (DOI)978-1-4503-1090-1 (ISBN)
    Conference
    OzCHI '11 The Annual Meeting of the Australian Special Interest Group for Computer Human Interaction, Canberra, Australia, November 28 - December 02, 2011
    Note
    © ACM, 2011. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the 23rd Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference (OzCHI'11). http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2071536.2071588Available from: 2011-12-12 Created: 2011-12-09 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    3. The Effect of Shape Properties on Ad-hoc Shape Replication with Mouse, Pen, and Touch Input
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Shape Properties on Ad-hoc Shape Replication with Mouse, Pen, and Touch Input
    2012 (English)In: MindTrek '12 Proceeding of the 16th International Academic MindTrek Conference / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2012, p. 275-278Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes observations from four empirical studies focusing on shape replication with three input methods. The aim was to identify and assess how the components of several semirandomly generated shapes influence how accurately untrained users can replicate each of these components. We found that the pen is the least and touch the most error-prone method when used for drawing. Additionally, the distribution of errors was analyzed. The results may be used to predict which shape properties make shape replication more difficult. Additionally, the results may be used to design shapes that are easy to replicate.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2012
    Keywords
    Mouse, stylus, pen, touch, shape, replication, tracing, drawing
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-184676 (URN)10.1145/2393132.2393192 (DOI)978-1-4503-1637-8 (ISBN)
    Conference
    Academic MindTrek 2012 International Conference on Media of the Future, October 03-05, 2012, Tampere, Finland
    Available from: 2012-11-12 Created: 2012-11-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Easy vs. Tricky: The Shape Effect in Tracing, Selecting, and Steering With Mouse, Stylus, and Touch
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Easy vs. Tricky: The Shape Effect in Tracing, Selecting, and Steering With Mouse, Stylus, and Touch
    2013 (English)In: Academic MindTrek '13: Proceedings of International Conference on Making Sense of Converging Media / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 99-103Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a work-in-progress report on an experimental comparison and evaluation of users' performance in four line-tracing tasks based on two shapes and performed with three input methods (mouse, stylus, and touch-input). The shapes' properties used in the study created the two classes of shapes: easy and hard to replicate. As expected these two classes had different impact on user's performance in each task tested (tracing, lasso selection, steering through narrow and wide tunnel). The results show that participants replicating the shapes using touch-input were the least accurate but were the fastest in comparison to the remaining input methods. The stylus was the least error-prone method and the mouse was the slowest device in drawing tasks (tracing and selection). The differences in error distances between the input methods were less pronounced in steering tasks but timing data showed that mouse was still the slowest one. While the time of replication did not differ between the two shapes tested, the differences between the errors participants made were significant for all tasks and input devices, and patterns of these differences were consistent between the shapes. These results confirm predictions from a previous study and show which shapes' properties can make their replication more difficult. The results can be used to design shapes that are easy to replicate, e.g., in surface-based gestural interaction.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013
    Keywords
    Mouse, stylus, pen, touch, shape, tracing, drawing, steering
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212409 (URN)10.1145/2523429.2523444 (DOI)978-1-4503-1992-8 (ISBN)
    Conference
    the 17th International Academic MindTrek Conference, Tampere, Finland; October 01 - 04, 2013.
    Available from: 2013-12-10 Created: 2013-12-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    5. A Hindrance or an Aid?: The Impact of User Interface on Ideation in Computer-Mediated Drawing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Hindrance or an Aid?: The Impact of User Interface on Ideation in Computer-Mediated Drawing
    2014 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Users’ performance in ideation during computer-mediated creative drawing can be affected by the design of a computer’s User Interface (UI). This paper presents results from a series of empirical comparative studies in which participants were presented with a creative drawing task and their ideation performance was measured in terms of the number and quality of ideas created with the use of three different input methods (mouse, stylus-, and touch-input), or two graphical UIs (GUIs). The results showed no significant differences between the different computer input methods, or between the simple and more complex GUI. However, when present in combination, these test conditions can be expected to create cumulative effects, which might explain the substantial differences observed in previous research on computerized creative drawing tasks. Quality-quantity trade-off and a new form of operational bias were observed and their effects on user satisfaction and ideation performance are discussed.

    Keywords
    idea generation, evaluation, comparison, creativity, TTCT, figural, drawing, quality, quantity, ideas, user interface, mouse, pen, stylus, touch
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-220880 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-03-22 Created: 2014-03-22 Last updated: 2018-01-11
    6. Did We Miss Something? Correspondence Analysis of Usability Data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Did We Miss Something? Correspondence Analysis of Usability Data
    2013 (English)In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013: 14th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, September 2-6, 2013, Proceedings, Part IV / [ed] Paula Kotzé, Gary Marsden, Gitte Lindgaard, Janet Wesson, Marco Winckler, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 272-279Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have applied a multivariate exploratory technique called Correspondence Analysis (CA) to create and analyze a model of the dataset of experiment results. The dataset originates from a comparative usability study of tracing with the use of mouse, pen, and touch input and contains both categorical and continuous data – i.e. results of questionnaires and task measurements. CA allowed to visually and numerically assess the main variables in the dataset and how they interact with each other. In our study, pen input had the best measured performance and was preferred by the users. Touch input was the least accurate of all input methods tested but it was preferred by users over mouse especially in the conditions lacking of visual feedback of drawing. CA helped to detect that secondary effect even though it cannot be explained by the performance results alone. The importance of the influence of user’s previous experience is also noted. We conclude that CA helped to identify all major phenomena known from previous studies but also was sensitive to minor and secondary effects, what makes it a well suited method to quickly evaluate usability data.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013
    Series
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 8120
    Keywords
    shape, freehand, tracing, drawing, mouse, pen, stylus, touch, evaluation, comparison, error, measurement, subjective
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207264 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-40498-6_20 (DOI)000345125400020 ()978-3-642-40497-9 (ISBN)978-3-642-40498-6 (ISBN)
    Conference
    14th IFIP TC 13 International Conference on Designing for Diversity, September 2-6, 2013, Cape Town, South Africa
    Available from: 2013-09-11 Created: 2013-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
  • 83.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Creative drawing with computers2012In: CHI EA '12: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM annual conference extended abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Extended Abstracts, 2012, p. 963-966Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The output of creative drawing is negatively influenced by any constrains imposed on the artist. That may be the case especially in computer-based environments. In my research I focus on the identification and assessment of the influence computer input methods (i.e. mouse, stylus-, and touch-input) might have on the results of free-hand drawing tasks in terms of user's creativity and drawing performance.

  • 84.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Quickly touched: Shape replication with use of mouse, pen- and touch-input2011In: User Interface - Kansei in practice 2011: Interfejs użytkownika - Kansei w praktyce 2011 / [ed] Leonard Bolc, Warsaw, Poland: Wydawnictwo Polsko‐Japońskiej Wyższej Szkoły Technik Komputerowych , 2011, p. 134-141Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results of an experimental study of unconstrained line-tracing task with use of mouse, pen- and touch-input. Our results show that participants using touch input performed as good as with use of mouse in terms of similarity of reproduced shape with pen-input as the best tool for drawing. Touch-input users were also the fastest in comparison to the remaining input methods. Additionally, we have observed subjective operational biases that together with shape-related issues might have an influence on the final scores.

  • 85.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Lind, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A comparative evaluation of mouse, stylus and finger input in shape tracing2011In: Proceedings of the 1st European Workshop on HCI Design and Evaluation: The inuence of domain on Human Computer Interaction design and evaluation / [ed] Georgios Christou, Panayiotis Zaphiris, Ee Lai-Chong Law, Toulouse, France: IRIT Press , 2011, p. 57-61Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparison of the aggregated performance measurements for three input methods in a line-tracing task is presented. Results indicate that users perform best using touch input, both in tasks with and without visual feedback, therefore we recommend touch input as the preferred input method for simple drawing tasks.

  • 86.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ivanova, Vita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Yang, Guo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Gadima, Nur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Leepraphantkul, Rathakan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    The Effects of GUI on Users’ Creative Performance in Computerized Drawing2013In: Proceedings of MIDI '13: Proceedings of the International Conference on Multimedia, Interaction, Design and Innovation, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 142-151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of an empirical comparative study investigating how the outcomes of a computerized figural creativity test are affected when the participants use two different versions of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) on a mouse-operated desktop PC. The results show that participants get insignificantly lower creativity scores with the elaborated GUI, contrary to the GUI that has no visual artifacts available and offers more similar user experience to pen and paper, even though they spend significantly more time on drawing with the elaborated one. That phenomenon is expected to contribute to the cumulative effect of GUI and input method noticed by previous research. That implies that creative drawing and testing should be carefully introduced into computer-based environments.

  • 87.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Shrestha, Suman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Easy vs. Tricky: The Shape Effect in Tracing, Selecting, and Steering With Mouse, Stylus, and Touch2013In: Academic MindTrek '13: Proceedings of International Conference on Making Sense of Converging Media / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 99-103Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a work-in-progress report on an experimental comparison and evaluation of users' performance in four line-tracing tasks based on two shapes and performed with three input methods (mouse, stylus, and touch-input). The shapes' properties used in the study created the two classes of shapes: easy and hard to replicate. As expected these two classes had different impact on user's performance in each task tested (tracing, lasso selection, steering through narrow and wide tunnel). The results show that participants replicating the shapes using touch-input were the least accurate but were the fastest in comparison to the remaining input methods. The stylus was the least error-prone method and the mouse was the slowest device in drawing tasks (tracing and selection). The differences in error distances between the input methods were less pronounced in steering tasks but timing data showed that mouse was still the slowest one. While the time of replication did not differ between the two shapes tested, the differences between the errors participants made were significant for all tasks and input devices, and patterns of these differences were consistent between the shapes. These results confirm predictions from a previous study and show which shapes' properties can make their replication more difficult. The results can be used to design shapes that are easy to replicate, e.g., in surface-based gestural interaction.

  • 88.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Activity or Product?: Drawing and HCI2013In: Proceedings of MIDI '13: Proceedings of the International Conference on Multimedia, Interaction, Design and Innovation, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 29-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing tasks are rarely addressed experimentally by the HCI community, and even then pointing, steering, or gesturing is promoted as an approach towards drawing. We critically analyze the status quo, propose an improved framework for task analysis, and give suggestions on how to perceive drawing task at a meta-level.

  • 89.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Did We Miss Something? Correspondence Analysis of Usability Data2013In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013: 14th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, September 2-6, 2013, Proceedings, Part IV / [ed] Paula Kotzé, Gary Marsden, Gitte Lindgaard, Janet Wesson, Marco Winckler, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 272-279Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have applied a multivariate exploratory technique called Correspondence Analysis (CA) to create and analyze a model of the dataset of experiment results. The dataset originates from a comparative usability study of tracing with the use of mouse, pen, and touch input and contains both categorical and continuous data – i.e. results of questionnaires and task measurements. CA allowed to visually and numerically assess the main variables in the dataset and how they interact with each other. In our study, pen input had the best measured performance and was preferred by the users. Touch input was the least accurate of all input methods tested but it was preferred by users over mouse especially in the conditions lacking of visual feedback of drawing. CA helped to detect that secondary effect even though it cannot be explained by the performance results alone. The importance of the influence of user’s previous experience is also noted. We conclude that CA helped to identify all major phenomena known from previous studies but also was sensitive to minor and secondary effects, what makes it a well suited method to quickly evaluate usability data.

  • 90.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    The Effect of Shape Properties on Ad-hoc Shape Replication with Mouse, Pen, and Touch Input2012In: MindTrek '12 Proceeding of the 16th International Academic MindTrek Conference / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2012, p. 275-278Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes observations from four empirical studies focusing on shape replication with three input methods. The aim was to identify and assess how the components of several semirandomly generated shapes influence how accurately untrained users can replicate each of these components. We found that the pen is the least and touch the most error-prone method when used for drawing. Additionally, the distribution of errors was analyzed. The results may be used to predict which shape properties make shape replication more difficult. Additionally, the results may be used to design shapes that are easy to replicate.

  • 91.
    Zhang, Qi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Theoretical Review on a 3D Based Air Traffic Control System2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 92.
    Zhong, Jinyun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Case Study: The Impact on Usability of PRINCE2 Project Management Method2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In order to take a look at the relationship between PRINCE2 (one of the most popular project management methods) and the degree of usability of the produced system, a case study was conducted in a company.

    During the case study, participants were recruited for a brainstorming section, during which they brainstormed some issues and features regarding PRINCE2 framework. These ideas were later summarized by the researcher as the preparation of a Card Sorting section. The same participants were invited again for a Card Sorting, during which they sorted the summarized issues and features into different categories labeled with different aspect of PRINCE2. An analysis was then carried out to find the most commonly agreed issues/features in a certain aspect of PRINCE2.

    The result of the study shows some strength that PRINCE2 has such as clear definition of authority and accountability, good support for planning, but there’re some concerns in tailoring/embedding of the method and etc.

  • 93.
    Åhman, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Frameworks for studying social media interaction: A discussion on phenomenology and poststructuralism2019In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2019 / [ed] David Lamas, Fernando Loizides, Lennart Nacke, Helen Petrie, Marco Winckler, Panayiotis Zaphiris, Cham, Switzerland, 2019, Vol. 3, p. 701-718Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade or so, much HCI research has, according to many researchers, become increasingly phenomenologically oriented. Some have gone so far as to argue that HCI is now in a phenomenological paradigm. But how does such a paradigmatic view work for understanding interaction in the ever growing sphere of social media? Prima facie it may look as it would work only well since social media has become increasingly richer in terms of the sheer range of phenomenologically possible user experiences provided by new and emerging interaction technologies. However, through a critical reading of three major phenomenological works in HCI, we argue that phenomenology as traditionally applied in HCI points indirectly to alternative approaches for engaging in much of contemporary social media research due to its associated semiotic and relationally oriented contents. One possible family of approaches for analyzing such content can be found, as we will argue, in poststructuralist theory. We propose an increased engagement with poststructuralist semiotics grounded in Jacques Derrida’s philosophy and exemplify how this could contribute to the study of social media in the context of HCI.

12 51 - 93 of 93
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