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  • 51.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Aesthetics of Violence: Art, Fiction, Drama and Film2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence at an aesthetic remove from the spectator or reader has been a key element of narrative and visual arts since Greek antiquity. Here Robert Appelbaum explores the nature of mimesis, aggression, the affects of antagonism and victimization and the political uses of art throughout history. He examines how violence in art is formed, contextualised and used by its audiences and readers. Bringing traditional German aesthetic and social theory to bear on the modern problem of violence in art, Appelbaum engages theorists including Kant, Schiller, Hegel, Adorno and Gadamer. The book takes the reader from Homer and Shakespeare to slasher films and performance art, showing how violence becomes at once a language, a motive, and an idea in the experience of art. It addresses the controversies head on, taking a nuanced view of the subject, understanding that art can damage as well as redeem. But it concludes by showing that violence (in the real world) is a necessary condition of art (in the world of mimetic play).

  • 52.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Canon: Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism2010In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929, Vol. November 4Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    'The Civility of Eating’2008In: Food and Morality / [ed] Susan Friedland, Devon: Prospect Books , 2008, p. 29-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘The Comestible Commodity, Subject of History’2010In: Clio - A Journal of Literature History & the Philosophy of History, ISSN 0884-2043, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 213-226Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Gunpowder Plot (1605)2014In: Oxford Bibliographies: British and Irish Literature / [ed] Andrew Hadfield, Oxford: Oxford Bibliographies, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Italian Way: Food and Social Life2009In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929, Vol. November 5Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Looking Glass2016Other (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Meaning of Cooking2010In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Opera of Bartolomeo Scappi2009In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929, Vol. March 13Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Rhetoric of Terror: Reflections on 9/11 and the War on Terror2010In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929, Vol. 4 FebruaryArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Value of the Novel2016In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 240-246Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Values of Literary Studies: Critical Institutions, Scholarly Agenda2016In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 240-246Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Treacherous Faith: The Specter of Heresy in Early Modern Literature and Culture2015In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 236-243Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Utopia and Utopianism2013In: The Oxford Handbook of English Prose 1500-1640 / [ed] Andrew Hadfield, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 253-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Utopia and Utopianism2013In: The Oxford Handbook to English Prose, 1500-1640 / [ed] Andrew Hadfield, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 253-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    'War and Peace in The Lepanto of James VI and I’2000In: Modern philology, ISSN 0026-8232, E-ISSN 1545-6951, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 333-365Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    What Is a Classic? Postcolonial Rewriting and Invention of the Canon. Times Higher Education, 23 January 20142014In: The Times Higher Education Supplement, ISSN 0049-3929Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘What Masterchef Says’2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Working the Aisles: A Life in Consumption2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Working the Aisles takes the reader on tumultuous driving trips across the United States and France, on phone sex escapades in San Francisco, on banking battles in Sweden, and many other adventures – including, of course, on trips to supermarkets, where the author has had to ‘work the aisles’. Moving back and forth through time, like a novelist, indeed in something of a memoirist tour de force, the book develops the story of struggle, of poverty and depression, but also of gaiety and desire, of a will to live in spite of it all, and to keep working the aisles. It moves the reader through highs and lows, through episodes of ecstasy and thoughts about suicide, and tells how this particular Everyman ended up sane but sorry.

  • 70.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Paknadel, Alexis
    Terrorism and the Novel, 1970-20012008In: Poetics today, ISSN 0333-5372, E-ISSN 1527-5507, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 387-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey of fictional representations of terrorism in English from 1970 to 2001, which finds that most novels are concerned less with understanding terrorism than with constructing positions of innocence from which terrorism may be witnessed and understood.

  • 71.
    Archer, Dawn
    et al.
    Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Kytö, Merja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Baron, Alistair
    Lancaster University.
    Rayson, Paul
    Lancaster University.
    Guidelines for normalising Early Modern English corpora: Decisions and justifications2015In: ICAME Journal, ISSN 1502-5462, Vol. 39, p. 5-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72. Archer, Dawn
    et al.
    Kytö, Merja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Baron, Alistair
    Rayson, Paul
    Normalising the Corpus of English Dialogues (1560–1760) using VARD2: Decisions and Justifications2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Axelsson, Margareta Westergren
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Contracted forms in newspaper language: Inter- and intra-textual variation1996In: ICAME-Journal, no 20, p. 5-21Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 74.
    Axelsson, Margareta Westergren
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Projektet USE (Uppsala Student English)1999In: ASLA Information, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 25-27p. 25-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Axelsson, Margareta Westergren
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    "Refined" or "relaxed" English pronunciation: usage and attitudes among Swedish university students.2002In: Studies in Mid-Atlantic English., p. 132–146-Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 76.
    Axelsson, Margareta Westergren
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The use of a corpus of students' written production in university English teaching.2000In: Korpusar i forskning och undervisning., Vol. 13, p. 293-303Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 77.
    Axelsson, Margareta Westergren
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    USE–The Uppsala Student English Corpus: an instrument for needs analysis2000In: ICAME Journal, Vol. 24, p. 155-157Report (Other scientific)
  • 78.
    Axelsson, Margareta Westergren and Ylva Berglund
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Uppsala Student English Corpus (USE): A multi-faceted resource for research and course development2002In: Parallel corpora, parallel worlds. Selected papers from a symposium on parallel and comparable corpora at Uppsala University, Sweden, 22-23 April 1999, ISSN 90-420-1530-6, p. 79-90Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 79.
    Beckman, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Double Exposure: Rethinking the Event in David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive2007In: Actual Virtual: Deleuze Studies, ISSN 1752-5624, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Beckman, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Tensions in Deleuzian Desire2010In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Beckman, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The Theater of History: Carnivàle, Deleuze, and the Possibility of New Beginnings2011In: SubStance, ISSN 0049-2426, E-ISSN 1527-2095, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 3-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Beckman, Frida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Blake, Charlie
    Visions of Cruelty: gender, sexuality,and inscription in thetransformation of self2010In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 149-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Berglind Söderqvist, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Evidentiality across age and gender: A corpus-based study of variation in spoken British English2017In: Research in Corpus Linguistics (RiCL), ISSN 1064-4857, E-ISSN 2243-4712, ISSN 2243-4712, Vol. 5, p. 17-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the effects of age and gender on the frequency of the evidentiality categories 'sensory', 'hearsay', and 'inferential' in spontaneous spoken British English. The findings from the main data sample from the British National Corpus (BNC) are also compared to patterns in a smaller data set from the Diachronic Corpus of Present-day Spoken English (DCPSE) in order to estimate the relative effects of age-grading versus historical change. The results confirm statistically significant differences between men and women in their use of evidentiality, but show no significant effect of age or the interaction of age and gender. The comparison of the findings from the BNC data and the DCPSE data suggests that age-related patterns in evidentiality use are more diachronically stable than gender-related patterns.

  • 84.
    Berglind Söderqvist, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Gender differences and similarities in the use of inferential evidentiality in spoken British English: A corpus-based study2017In: Evidentiality and Modality in European Languages: Discourse-Pragmatic Perspectives / [ed] Juana I. Marín-Arrese, Julia Lavid-López, Marta Carretero, Elena Domínguez Romero, Ma Victoria Martín de la Rosa, María Pérez Blanco, Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 371-399Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates differences between men and women in their preference for inferential evidentiality markers. Using spoken language data from the British National Corpus, a number of potential markers of inferential evidentiality (for example believe, imagine, must, obviously) have been analyzed for their evidential value as well as for pragmatic dimensions such as degree of certainty and (inter)subjectivity. The findings of the study show statistically significant variation between the male and the female respondents, and the subsequent analysis indicates, among other things, that the markers preferred by males are those that produce intersubjective assessments, whereas the markers preferred by female speakers are those that produce subjective assessments.

  • 85.
    Berglind Söderqvist, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Ursula Lutzky: Discourse Markers in Early Modern English. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012. ISBN 9789027256324. 293 pp.2017In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 318-321Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Berglund, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Exploiting a large spoken corpus: An end-user's way to the BNC1999In: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 29-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Berglund, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Expressions of Future in Present-day English: A Corpus-based Approach2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This corpus-based study of the use of expressions of future in English has two aims: to examine how certain expressions of future are used in Present-day English, and to explore how electronic corpora can be exploited for linguistic study.

    The expressions focused on in this thesis are five auxiliary or semi-auxiliary verb phrases frequently discussed in studies of future reference in English: will, ’ll, shall, going to and gonna. The study examines the patterned ways in which the expressions are used in association with various linguistic and non-linguistic (or extra-linguistic) factors. The linguistic factors investigated are co-occurrence with particular words and co-occurrence with items of particular grammatical classes. The non-linguistic factors examined are medium (written vs. spoken), text category, speaker characteristics (age, sex, social class, etc.), region and time. The data for the study are exclusively drawn from computer-readable corpora of Present-day English. Corpus analyses are performed with automatic and interactive methods, and exploit both quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques.

    The study finds that the use of these expressions of future varies with a number of factors. Differences between spoken and written language are particularly prominent and usage also varies between different types of text, both within spoken and written corpora. Variation between groups of speakers is also attested. Although the linguistic co-occurrence patterns are similar to some degree, there are nonetheless differences in the collocational patterns in which the expressions are used.

    Methodological issues related to corpus-based studies in general are discussed in the light of the insights gained from this study of expressions of future.

    List of papers
    1. Future in Present-day English: corpus-based evidence on the rivalry of expressions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future in Present-day English: corpus-based evidence on the rivalry of expressions
    1997 In: ICAME Journal, ISSN 0801-5775, Vol. 21, p. 7-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93040 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-05-17 Created: 2005-05-17Bibliographically approved
    2. Exploiting a large spoken corpus: an end-user's way to the BNC
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploiting a large spoken corpus: an end-user's way to the BNC
    1999 In: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, ISSN 1384-6655, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 29-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93041 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-05-17 Created: 2005-05-17Bibliographically approved
    3. "You're gonna, you're not going to": a corpus-based study of colligation and collocation patterns of the (BE) going to construction in Present-day spoken British English
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"You're gonna, you're not going to": a corpus-based study of colligation and collocation patterns of the (BE) going to construction in Present-day spoken British English
    2000 In: PALC'99: Practical Applications in Language Corpora: Papers from the International Conference at the University of Lódz, 15-18 April 1999, 2000, p. 161-192Chapter in book (Other academic) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93042 (URN)3-631-36317-6 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2005-05-17 Created: 2005-05-17Bibliographically approved
    4. Utilising Present-day English corpora: a case-study concerning expressions of future
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utilising Present-day English corpora: a case-study concerning expressions of future
    2000 In: ICAME Journal, ISSN 0801-5775, Vol. 24, p. 25-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93043 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-05-17 Created: 2005-05-17Bibliographically approved
    5. Gonna and going to in the spoken component of the British National Corpus
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gonna and going to in the spoken component of the British National Corpus
    2000 In: Corpus linguistics and linguistic theory: Papers from the twentieth international conference on English language research on computerized corpora (ICAME 20) Freiburg im Breisgau 1999, 2000, p. 35-49Chapter in book (Other academic) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-93044 (URN)90-420-1493-8 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2005-05-17 Created: 2005-05-17Bibliographically approved
  • 88.
    Berglund, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Future in present-day English: Corpus-based evidence on the rivalry of expressions1997In: ICAME Journal, no 21, p. 7-19Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 89.
    Blanck, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Amerikabild och emigration2008In: Signums svenska kulturhistoria : Det moderna genombrottet, Stockholm: Signum , 2008, p. 264-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Blanck, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    “Om identitet och konserveringsmedel”2010In: The Story of Storage. I. Kompendium, Stockholm: Kungl Biblioteket , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Blanck, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Railroading and Labor Migration. Class and Ethnicity in Expanding Capitalism in Northern Minnesota, the 1880s to the Mid 1920s2009In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 121-122Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Blanck, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Television, education and the Vietnam War: Sweden and the United States during the post-war era2006In: The Americanization of Europe.: culture, diplomacy, and anti-Americanism after 1945, New York: Berghahn Books , 2006, p. 91-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Blanck, Dag
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Börjesson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Studies in Education, Culture and Media.
    Transnational Strategies in Higher Education and Cultural Fields: The Case of the United States and Sweden in the 20th Century2008In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 40, no 1-2, p. 80-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Blanck, Dag
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Tredway, Thomas
    Interpretiing One Hundred Years of Augustana History: Friotiof Ander, Contad Bergemdoff and the 1960 Centennial2010In: Swedish-American Historical Quarterly, ISSN 0730-028X, Vol. 61, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Blom, Mattias Bolkéus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    American Studies in a Moment of Danger, George Lipsitz2003In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, American Studies in Scandinavia, Vol. 35, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Blom, Mattias Bolkéus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Stories of Old: The Imagined West and the Crisis of Historical Symbology in the 1970s1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For all the criticism that has been leveled against cultural representations of the American West, ideas of the westward expansion and its significance have remained powerful impulses for the negotiation of history and identity. Such notions of the past, and the cultural symbology with which they can be expressed, are more or less available to writers and other cultural agents for employment in political, cultural, or literary discourse. Understood in this way, the imagined West, to use Richard White's term, has continued to supply material that affirms or contests political and ideological change. The rejection of the conventionally imagined past in the 1970s provided writers with an opportunity to re-formulate historical representation and to make sense of history anew. Thus the imagined West reinforced its paradoxical status in American culture as a symbolic resource that signifies both historical inertia and constant change.

    This study investigates representations of the West as they appear in the literary discourse of the 1970s. In readings of four non-genre texts, Don DeLillo's Americana (1971), Robert Coover's The Public Burning (1977), Joan Didion's The White Album (1979), and Tom Wolfe's The Right Stuff (1979), this study situates the cultural symbology of the West in a historico-political, cultural, and literary context. The study shows how these four writers utilize preconceptions about the meaning of the past, at the same time as they reshape that past to fit their own literary and ideological strategies. They do so by incorporating into the texts elements of historical representation and their ideological constituents, or ideologemes. Taken together, these texts are seen to illustrate the trajectory of the imagined West during a time of critical negotiation of American history.

  • 97.
    Blom, Mattias Bolkéus
    SWEDISH INSTITUTE FOR NORTH AMERICAN STUDIES. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    The conceptualization and construction of a cohort-based inquiry into the US literary field2002In: Poetics (Amsterdam. Print), ISSN 0304-422X, E-ISSN 1872-7514, Vol. 30, no 5-6, p. 311-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines the conceptualization and construction of three cohorts of US prose fiction debut writers. These cohorts were established for the purpose of analyzing the literary field in the United States after 1940 within the research project

  • 98.
    Blom, Mattias Bolkéus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    'The Continent, the Whole Continent, and Nothin' but the Continent': renegotiating the American West in Robert Coover's The Public Burning1996In: The image of the American West in literature, the media, and society: selected papers from the 1996 conference [of the] Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery / [ed] Will Wright and Steven Kaplan, Pueblo, Colo.: The Society , 1996, p. 216-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Bonnevier, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Estranging Cognition: Feminist Science Fiction and the Borders of Reason2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the intersections of three different fields: feminism, science fiction, and epistemology. It argues that as a genre, science fiction is dependent on epistemological discourses that have their roots in the stories and self-images of modern science. Furthermore, it is argued, these discourses are gendered and operate to reinforce patriarchal assumptions about gender and knowledge. Drawing on a tradition of feminist epistemology, works by Suzy McKee Charnas, Ursula Le Guin, and Joanna Russ are analyzed as engaging with and challenging these epistemologically loaded and fundamentally gendered discourses in different ways and in varying degrees.

    The study can be divided into two parts. Chapters one and two examine discourses on science fiction history and identity in the context of the origin stories of science, highlighting the links between reason, progress, authority and gender. They establish the traditional maleness of “reason” and its implications in the idea(l)s of progress, as they appear both in the texts of epistemology and in the texts of science fiction. Texts by Charnas, Le Guin, and Russ are read as challenges to ideologies of reason and progress, and thereby as reinscribing generic conventions as well as displacing traditional epistemological assumptions.

    Critically interrogating the traditional subject of knowledge, chapters three and four read the fiction of Charnas, Le Guin, and Russ as displacing this subject and exploring alternative understandings. The mainstream/malestream epistemological idea(l) of “a view-from-nowhere” is connected to the science fiction convention of “the-idea-as-hero,” and both are critiqued as significantly gendered concepts that serve to obfuscate the social and political dimensions of the subject of knowledge. Finally, (female) experience, emotions, and the body – three areas commonly designated as beyond the scope of epistemology proper – are explored as epistemic resources rather than liabilities.

  • 100.
    Bonnevier, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Sharing Knowledges, Changing Identities: Female Exchanges in Joanna Russ's _The Female Man_2002In: Collusion and Resistance: Women Writing in English, Vol. 1/02Article in journal (Other scientific)
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