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  • 51.
    Axelsson, Anton
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    A. Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    On the importance of mental time frames: A case for the need of empirical methods to investigate adaptive expertise2018In: Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, ISSN 2211-3681, E-ISSN 2211-369X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Axelsson, Anton
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Andersson, Richard
    IT Univ Copenhagen, Eye Informat Grp, Copenhagen, Denmark; Lund Univ, Lund Univ Cognit Sci, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Lund Univ, Lund Univ Cognit Sci, S-22100 Lund, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Dept Comp & Informat Sci, Cognit & Interact Res Grp, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Scaffolding executive function capabilities via play-&-learn software for preschoolers2016In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 108, no 7, p. 969-981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational software in the form of games or so called "computer assisted intervention" for young children has become increasingly common receiving a growing interest and support. Currently there are, for instance, more than 1,000 iPad apps tagged for preschool. Thus, it has become increasingly important to empirically investigate whether these kinds of software actually provide educational benefits for such young children. The study presented in the present article investigated whether preschoolers have the cognitive capabilities necessary to benefit from a teachable-agent-based game of which pedagogical benefits have been shown for older children. The role of executive functions in children's attention was explored by letting 36 preschoolers (3;9-6;3 years) play a teachable-agent-based educational game and measure their capabilities to maintain focus on pedagogically relevant screen events in the presence of competing visual stimuli. Even though the participants did not succeed very well in an inhibition pretest, results showed that they nonetheless managed to inhibit distractions during game-play. It is suggested that the game context acts as a motivator that scaffolds more mature cognitive capabilities in young children than they exhibit during a noncontextual standardized test. The results further indicate gender differences in the development of these capabilities.

  • 53. Aydin, N.
    et al.
    Yilmaz, O.
    Deveci, M.
    Lv, Z.
    Heuristics Based Optimization for Multidepot Drone Location and Routing Problem to Detect Post-Earthquake Damages2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to detect the post-disaster damage by drones as soon as possible so that decision makers can assign search and rescue teams effectively and efficiently. The main differences of this research from the others, which use drones in literature, are as: First, the regions are divided into grids and different importance values are assigned according to the number of buildings that are likely to be damaged and are vital for the response stage, such as hospitals, schools, and fire stations. Second, these importance levels are updated based on the day and time, which helps ordering the grids in a more realistic manner. Third, the depots are selected among the pre-determined candidate locations in accordance with the purpose of objective function. Fourth, detection times at grids are considered as uncertain. Fifth, two versions of Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) are developed as alternatives to exact solution tools. Last, sensitivity analyzes are performed by reducing the number of sorties, reducing the number of drones, and comparing day and night importance values for each instance. According to the results, only for very small-scale instances, exact solution tool was able to reach the optimal while both versions of ACO reached to similar results within a very less CPU times. Additionally, these ACO algorithms also found good results for the larger scaled problems. Then the performance of these ACO algorithms and the exact solution method are compared based on the CPU time and solution quality. IEEE

  • 54.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing an Audience in the StreetsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis sets out to explore why people engage in, and how to design for, play in a public setting. It does this by separating design for play from design of games, describing play as a socially and mentally understood activity, and a playful approach to engaging in that activity. It emphasises that while play is voluntary, design can help shape the players’ mode of engagement.

    The thesis uses a qualitative and inductive approach to research, with an understanding of knowledge as being constructed in the individual. The research is grounded in human computer interaction and interaction design, and closely related to game studies and design science.

    The research question concerns how design can influence the player activity in order to create a desired player experience in public, by harnessing playful engagement. It’s foundation is a theory of play which describes play as a framed, or hedged-off, activity with a fragile border; where knowledge and feelings can leak both in and out of the activity, and affect the play as well as what is around it. The theory of enjoyment of play is discussed, and the problem of treating this as ‘fun’ is addressed, concluding in a presentation of how playful engagement can be harnessed through design.

    The theory is applied in five design cases: I’m Your Body, a locative storytelling app; Codename Heroes, a pervasive game of personal empowerment; Passing On, a slow-paced game about communication; Busking Studies, which involves observing street performers and their shows; and DigiFys, an architectural design exploration of playgrounds and play paths.

    Finally, three concepts, or design tools, are presented, which address: 1) a structure for understanding a design through three layers, constructs designed by the designer, inspiring play activity with the player, leading to experience; 2) an approach to designing invitations to play; and finally 3), a four faceted structure for understanding play engagement when players engage in non intended ways.

    List of papers
    1. Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative Play
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268059 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    2. Designing an Audience in the Streets
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing an Audience in the Streets
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268058 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    3. Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Children's Outdoor Play
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings Of The 2016 ACM Conference On Designing Interactive Systems, 2016, p. 28-38Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to fuse their knowledge into working solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. We report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of a schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment that was partly natural forest and partly constructed playground. We highlight in particular the importance of the adaptability of the natural environment, how the combination of interactive technology and natural environment can contribute to the versatility of play activities, and how the interactive technology can both be useful for presenting invitations to play in such adaptable places, and enhance the adaptability for play in otherwise impoverished places.

    Keywords
    outdoor play, playscape, interactive play technology, landscape architecture
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268057 (URN)10.1145/2901790.2901875 (DOI)000390478300006 ()
    Conference
    11th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS), Queensland Univ Technol, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA, JUN 04-08, 2016
    Note

    The manuscript version of this article is part of the thesis: "Designing Public Play: Playful Engagement, Constructed Activity, and Player Experience" by Jon Back. http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:876519

    Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2022-01-29
    4. ‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On
    2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the design, implementation and testing of the Location-Based game Passing On is explored. It is a multi-player game for mobile phones, with a focus on asymmetric and limited communication. While one player can communicate by talking, the other can answer only by knocking. This limited and asymmetric communication became one of the central gameplay resources in the game, shaping much of the experience for the players.

    Using observations and interviews, the knocking and the experience it created is analyzed and discussed. It is shown how this made the game emphasize social interaction, moving the focus from the phone to the environment, and how the knocking helped create a sense of presence for the player feeling them.

    Keywords
    Location-based, asymmetric gameplay, negotiating language, physical feedback, player behavior
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Research subject
    Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239070 (URN)978-0-9913982-2-5 (ISBN)
    Conference
    9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG), 2014, April 3-7, 2014, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    5. "We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"We are two strong women": Designing Empowerment in a Pervasive Game
    2013 (English)In: Defragging game studies: Proceedings of DIGRA 2013, DIGRA , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender-aware design is important in computer games in general, and perhaps even more so in the design of pervasive games, as these are played in the ordinary world. As pervasive games blur the distinction between game and non-game situations, they influence the everyday lives of their players.

    We discuss the design process for the game ‘Codename Heroes’ from a gender-aware perspective. The focus is on how players reacted to the experience of playing the game during a sequence of design workshops. We found that playing the game made people less sensitive to ‘fear of the outside’. The participants were aware they ‘should’ feel unsafe in unknown neighbourhoods, but mostly did not. Furthermore, a combination of collaboration with internal competition fostered a sense of empowerment. Finally, we could confirm what previous researchers have seen, that women participants tended to blame themselves, rather than the technology or the situation, for errors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    DIGRA, 2013
    Keywords
    Game, Design, Gender, Pervasive game
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212715 (URN)
    Conference
    The sixth international conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DIGRA); 26-29 August 2013; Atlanta, GA, USA
    Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2016-01-28Bibliographically approved
    6. Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places
    2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268055 (URN)
    Conference
    NordiCHI 2012
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    7. Experimental Game Design
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Game Design
    2015 (English)In: Game Research Methods: An Overview / [ed] Lankoski, Petri; Björk, Staffan, ETC press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ETC press, 2015
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268056 (URN)9781312884731 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
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  • 56.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    ‘Knock Once for Yes’ – Knocking as Feedback in the Location-Based Game Passing On2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the design, implementation and testing of the Location-Based game Passing On is explored. It is a multi-player game for mobile phones, with a focus on asymmetric and limited communication. While one player can communicate by talking, the other can answer only by knocking. This limited and asymmetric communication became one of the central gameplay resources in the game, shaping much of the experience for the players.

    Using observations and interviews, the knocking and the experience it created is analyzed and discussed. It is shown how this made the game emphasize social interaction, moving the focus from the phone to the environment, and how the knocking helped create a sense of presence for the player feeling them.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 57.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Back, Svante
    Bombina Bombast, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bexell, Emma
    Bombina Bombast, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stanisic, Stefan
    Bombina Bombast, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rosqvist, Daniel
    National Museum of Science and Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    the Quest: An Escape Room Inspired Interactive Museum Exhibition2019In: CHI PLAY '19 Extended Abstracts: Extended Abstracts of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts, ACM Digital Library, 2019, p. 81-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this project, we report on designing an interactive museum exhibit in a technology museum, inspired by escape room game mechanics and technology. The project aims to create a deeper more immersed engagement with and interest in the exhibition, and thereby increase the interest in the exhibit's subject. In the game, the players take on the role of grandchildren to a known (fictitious) turn-of-the-century explorer and set out to find the treasures she hid around the world during her years of adventure. Clues to the treasures are hidden within the museum exhibition and by using knowledge found around the exhibition the players can solve the riddles and find the treasure, while also picking up some knowledge along the way.

  • 58.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Bedwell, Benjamin
    Benford, Steve
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Sundnes Løvlie, Anders
    Preston, William
    Rajkowska, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ryding, Karin
    Spence, Jocelyn
    Thorn, Emily-Clare
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Wray, Tim
    GIFT: Hybrid Museum Experiences through Gifting and Play2018In: Proceedings of the Workshop on Cultural Informatics / [ed] Angeliki Antoniou, Manolis Wallace, 2018, Vol. 2235, p. 31-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he GIFT project develops new approaches to creating hybrid physi-cal-digital visitor experiences in museums. Through design exploration of two concepts focusing on gifting and playful appropriation, the project charts how museums can create a deeper and more meaningful experience by giving visitors the tools to tell their own stories. The project is highly cross-disciplinary com-bining HCI research, artist-led exploration, technology explorations, and experi-ence design in collaboration with museums. Furthermore, the project gathers 10 prominent museums from Europe and the US in an action research project that both serves to ground the prototypes and framework in the needs of museums, while also facilitating the museum sector's need to become 'digital-ready', under-standing and capitalising on digital technology. As the project has progressed through half of its duration, we report on initial findings and how these have shaped our direction of progress.

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  • 59.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Heeffer, Caspar
    Paget, Susan
    Rau, Andreas
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing Children’s Digital-Physical Play in Natural Outdoors Settings2016In: CHI Extended Abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to develop solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. Here we report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of the schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment. We highlight in particular how the interactive technology contributed to the versatility of play activities, but also how the nature setting and the availability of natural materials contributed to the play activities around the interactive artefacts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 60.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Heeffer, Caspar
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Paget, Susan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Urban and Rural Development.
    Rau, Andreas
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Children's Outdoor Play2016In: Proceedings Of The 2016 ACM Conference On Designing Interactive Systems, 2016, p. 28-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's outdoor play is fluent and fluctuating, shaped by environmental features and conditions. The article reports on a project where interaction designers and landscape architects work together to fuse their knowledge into working solutions for integrating interactive play in outdoor environments. We report on a schoolyard trial, where interactive play technology was installed as an integral part of a schoolyard environment, and discuss the interplay between technology and the environment that was partly natural forest and partly constructed playground. We highlight in particular the importance of the adaptability of the natural environment, how the combination of interactive technology and natural environment can contribute to the versatility of play activities, and how the interactive technology can both be useful for presenting invitations to play in such adaptable places, and enhance the adaptability for play in otherwise impoverished places.

  • 61.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Karin B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Playing Cool - Winter Weather’s Influence on Location-Based Gaming2021In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, E-ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 5, no 242, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Location-based games are highly dependent on the physical environment. One important but often overlooked factor is weather. In this paper we focus on winter weather, as this is a common weather that is often not designed for specifically. By performing a qualitative observation, interview, and questionnaire study of families during and after playing a GPS-based mobile game in a winter setting, this paper studies how winter conditions affected the gaming experience. Three main factors were observed to have a big impact on the gaming experience: snow, ice and cold. We outline ways these weather conditions were found to be both obstacles, and adding value to the game. Finally, we suggest design implications for winter weather, mainly; the need for short games due to cold, adaption of gameplay for movement in snow, to avoid interactions based on handling the phone, and to adapt maps to the effects of snow and ice. By explaining how winter conditions affect the gaming experience, location-based games can be better adapted for these weather conditions, and thereby help in making better design decisions.

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  • 62.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Hangvar, Jonas
    Drakryggen, Sweden.
    Let’s Play Something New!: Designing for Digital Malleability in Outdoor Playgrounds2023In: Mindtrek '23: Proceedings of the 26th International Academic Mindtrek Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 233-244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor playground design has traditionally involved building installations that after inauguration remain stationary and rigid. New technologies open possibilities to reinvent playground design, but also provide new challenges. This paper focuses on how an outdoor playground can be made malleable through digital technology, and how such a design can increase play values and provide more flexible possibilities for an iterative design process, also after inauguration. During a total period of 5 years, using a Research-through-Design, and more specifically Reflective Design, approach researchers participated in a co-design project where a hybrid Internet of Things-enhanced permanent outdoor playground was developed and studied. The installations have been up and running around the clock, and used daily, for 2.5 years. The study suggests ways to design digitally malleable playground installations in permanent playgrounds. Further it points to areas where malleability functions may be restricted, due to reasons such as municipality policy, security and resources. It shows that the malleability functions were mainly used to increase usability, for educational purposes, to enhance play values, and to allow for appropriation and co-creation. The malleability features enabled an interactive design after design approach, and those possibilities were utilised in several ways, adding values to the playground, compared to rigid playground designs.

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  • 63.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Johansson, Karin
    Ecorado, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wireband, Joacim
    Drakryggen, Linköping, Sweden.
    Value Driven Design for Playful Technology Enhanced Installations in Public Settings2021In: C&C '21: Creativity and Cognition, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, article id 34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Art and installations in public settings are often created on commission from a municipality or similar public sector. Within the public sector there are many values that the community strives to enhance. Values related to democracy, inclusion, and aesthetics are but a few. When designing for public environments, the design process might be affected by the need to strive for those values in addition to, or even rather than, the more common considerations focused on user experience or commercial aspects. In this pictorial we present how identified core values influenced a design process aimed at designing innovative IoT-enhanced playground installations in a public setting. Inspired by annotated portfolios, we explicate how these core values influenced the final design.

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  • 64.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative PlayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    University of Nottingham..
    Evaluation2022In: Hybrid Museum Experiences: Theory and Design / [ed] Annika Waern; Anders Sundnes Løvlie, Amsterdam University Press, 2022, p. 177-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter gives an overview of methods and tools for evaluating hybrid experiences in a museum context, and in general, what is gained by doing studies of visitor experiences. It of fers strategies for the why, what, who, where, when, and how of conducting evaluations. This includes goal-setting for multiple stakeholders, formative studies, analyses, and ethics. The strategies cover both quick-and-dirty methods as well as in-depth studies.

  • 66.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Codename Heroes – Designing for Experience in Public Places in a Long Term Pervasive Game2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: Society for the Advancement of the Science of Digital Games, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Codename Heroes is a persistent, multiplayer, crowd-sourced pervasive game that uses Bluetooth, GPS and the phone camera. It plays in the world around you and is always active. Players take the roles of secret superheroes, fighting for their rights and their beliefs. The game also makes use of physical objects and places in the environment.

    The game targets teenagers with a specific focus on young women. The purpose of the game is to engage and empower players. The design is informed by ethnographic studies of young women as well as by gender studies. The goal is to create an incitement for young people to appropriate spaces they do not usually move in, and try things they would not otherwise do.

    Codename Heroes is part of a project investigating pervasive games, games that are played in the physical world with the aid of mobile technology. The current research is focused at exploring large scale, long term, non-location-specific pervasive games, while still keeping the physical aspect of game-specific objects, to understand how this physicality affects the experience of the game.

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  • 67.
    Bang, GiHoon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Human-Telepresence Robot Proxemics Interaction: An ethnographic approach to non-verbal communication2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to find distinct and crucial factors needed in order to design a better robot through exploring the meaning of movement. The researcher conducted six-weeks of iterative work to collect data via an ethnographic method. The researcher examined the interactions between a telepresence robot and human beings in an authentic environment through the collected data and analyzed it based on proxemics theory. The research observed that the robot was given social space when it approached the participants with pauses in between movements. Furthermore, the research introduces proxemics pivot and its notion. Proxemics pivot refers to the part of the robot that people perceive as a standard point when they adjust the proximity between the robot and themselves. The proxemics pivot was considered “a face” and was attributed social properties; the other parts of the robot did not receive the same consideration.

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  • 68.
    Bates, Oliver
    et al.
    Lancaster University.
    Hazas, Mike
    Lancaster University.
    Exploring the hidden impacts of HomeSys: Energy and emissions of home sensing and automation2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 ACM Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing Adjunct Publication (UbiComp '13 Adjunct), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 809-814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Home sensing and automation systems are rarely discussed with reference to their direct energy demand, much less other environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas (GhG) emissions arising from their manufacture and transport. It is imperative that designers of such systems understand the impacts of the technologies they introduce, particularly where intended to save energy and promote sustainability. Using four case studies drawn from recent Ubicomp and HCI literature, this reflective paper quantifies the direct energy and estimates the embodied emissions arising from specific installations of home sensing. We contextualise this by comparing with typical impacts arising from existing ICT devices commonly found in the home, and highlight a number of ways in which designers can reduce the impacts of the systems they introduce into the home.

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  • 69.
    Bates, Oliver
    et al.
    Lancaster University.
    Hazas, Mike
    Lancaster University.
    Friday, Adrian
    Lancaster University.
    Morley, Janine
    Lancaster University.
    Clear, Adrian K.
    Lancaster University.
    Towards an holistic view of the energy and environmental impacts of domestic media and IT2014In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1173-1182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, research in sustainable HCI has dealt with eco-feedback, usage and recycling of appliances within the home, and longevity of portable electronics such as mobile phones. However, there seems to be less awareness of the energy and greenhouse emissions impacts of domestic consumer electronics and information technology. Such awareness is needed to inform HCI sustainability researchers on how best to prioritise efforts around digital media and IT. Grounded in inventories, interview and plug energy data from 33 undergraduate student participants, our findings provide the context for assessing approaches to reducing the energy and carbon emissions of media and IT in the home. In the paper, we use the findings to discuss and inform more fruitful directions that sustainable HCI research might take, and we quantify how various strategies might have modified the energy and emissions impacts for our participants.

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  • 70.
    Bates, Oliver
    et al.
    Lancaster University.
    Thomas, Vanessa
    Lancaster University.
    Remy, Christian
    Aarhus University.
    Friday, Adrian
    Lancaster University.
    Nathan, Lisa
    University of British Columbia.
    Hazas, Mike
    Lancaster University.
    Mann, Samuel
    Otago Polytechnic.
    Championing environmental and social justice: embracing, embedding, and promoting broader notions of sustainability in HCI2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 60-67Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 71.
    Benford, Steve
    et al.
    Univ Nottingham, Mixed Real Lab, Nottingham, England..
    Sundnes Lovlie, Anders
    IT Univ Copenhagen, Digital Design Dept, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ryding, Karin
    IT Univ, Digital Design Dept, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Rajkowska, Paulina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Bodiaj, Edgar
    Univ Nottingham, Mixed Real Lab, Nottingham, England..
    Darzentas, Dimitrios Paris
    Univ Nottingham, Mixed Real Lab, Nottingham, England..
    Cameron, Harriet R.
    Univ Nottingham, Mixed Real Lab, Nottingham, England..
    Spence, Jocelyn
    Univ Nottingham, Mixed Real Lab, Nottingham, England..
    Egede, Joy
    Univ Nottingham, Mixed Real Lab, Nottingham, England..
    Spanjevic, Bogdan
    NextGame, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Sensitive Pictures: Emotional Interpretation in the Museum2022In: CHI '22: Proceedings of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] Simone Barbosa, Cliff Lampe, Caroline Appert, David A. Shamma, Steven Drucker, Julie Williamson, Koji Yatani, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, article id 455Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Museums are interested in designing emotional visitor experiences to complement traditional interpretations. HCI is interested in the relationship between Affective Computing and Affective Interaction. We describe Sensitive Pictures, an emotional visitor experience co-created with the Munch art museum. Visitors choose emotions, locate associated paintings in the museum, experience an emotional story while viewing them, and self-report their response. A subsequent interview with a portrayal of the artist employs computer vision to estimate emotional responses from facial expressions. Visitors are given a souvenir postcard visualizing their emotional data. A study of 132 members of the public (39 interviewed) illuminates key themes: designing emotional provocations; capturing emotional responses; engaging visitors with their data; a tendency for them to align their views with the system's interpretation; and integrating these elements into emotional trajectories. We consider how Affective Computing can hold up a mirror to our emotions during Affective Interaction

  • 72.
    Bengtsson Bernander, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Improving Training of Deep Learning for Biomedical Image Analysis and Computational Physics2021Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The previous decade has seen breakthroughs in image analysis and computer vision, mainly due to machine learning methods known as deep learning. These methods have since spread to other fields. This thesis aims to survey the progress, highlight problems related to data and computations, and show techniques to mitigate them.

    In Paper I, we show how to modify the VGG16 classifier architecture to be equivariant to transformations in the p4 group, consisting of translations and specific rotations. We conduct experiments to investigate if baseline architectures, using data augmentation, can be replaced with these rotation-equivariant networks. We train and test on the Oral cancer dataset, used to automate cancer diagnostics.

    In Paper III, we use a similar methodology as in Paper I to modify the U-net architecture combined with a discriminative loss, for semantic instance segmentation. We test the method on the BBBC038 dataset consisting of highly varied images of cell nuclei.

    In Paper II, we look at the UCluster method, used to group sub- atomic particles in particle physics. We show how to distribute the training over multiple GPUs using distributed deep learning in a cloud environment.

    The papers show how to use limited training data more efficiently, using group-equivariant convolutions, to reduce the prob- lems of overfitting. They also demonstrate how to distribute training over multiple nodes in computational centers, which is needed to handle growing data sizes.

    List of papers
    1. Replacing data augmentation with rotation-equivariant CNNs in image-based classification of oral cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Replacing data augmentation with rotation-equivariant CNNs in image-based classification of oral cancer
    2021 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-460520 (URN)
    Conference
    25th Iberoamerican Congress on Pattern Recognition, Porto, Portugal, 10 - 13 May 2021
    Funder
    Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP)
    Available from: 2021-12-07 Created: 2021-12-07 Last updated: 2024-01-09Bibliographically approved
    2. Distributed training and scalability for the particle clustering method UCluster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distributed training and scalability for the particle clustering method UCluster
    Show others...
    2021 (English)In: EPJ Web of Conferences, E-ISSN 2100-014X, Vol. 251, p. 02054-02054Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, machine-learning methods have become increasingly important for the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are utilised in everything from trigger systems to reconstruction and data analysis. The recent UCluster method is a general model providing unsupervised clustering of particle physics data, that can be easily modified to provide solutions for a variety of different decision problems. In the current paper, we improve on the UCluster method by adding the option of training the model in a scalable and distributed fashion, and thereby extending its utility to learn from arbitrarily large data sets. UCluster combines a graph-based neural network called ABCnet with a clustering step, using a combined loss function in the training phase. The original code is publicly available in TensorFlow v1.14 and has previously been trained on a single GPU. It shows a clustering accuracy of 81% when applied to the problem of multi-class classification of simulated jet events. Our implementation adds the distributed training functionality by utilising the Horovod distributed training framework, which necessitated a migration of the code to TensorFlow v2. Together with using parquet files for splitting data up between different compute nodes, the distributed training makes the model scalable to any amount of input data, something that will be essential for use with real LHC data sets. We find that the model is well suited for distributed training, with the training time decreasing in direct relation to the number of GPU’s used. However, further improvements by a more exhaustive and possibly distributed hyper-parameter search is required in order to achieve the reported accuracy of the original UCluster method.

    National Category
    Infrastructure Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-484291 (URN)10.1051/epjconf/202125102054 (DOI)
    Available from: 2022-09-09 Created: 2022-09-09 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Rotation-Equivariant Semantic Instance Segmentation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rotation-Equivariant Semantic Instance Segmentation
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-484292 (URN)
    Available from: 2022-09-09 Created: 2022-09-09 Last updated: 2023-01-09Bibliographically approved
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  • 73.
    Bengtsson, Fia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology.
    Forssén, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology.
    Modell för användbarhetsutvärdering: Anpassad till ComAround Zero - ett webbaserat självbetjäningssystem2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Usability and quality in use are subjects well discussed when it comes to product development, especially system development. The objective of this report is to create a model for how ComAround Scandinavia AB, a company which provides a zero-level support system called ComAround Zero, can further develop their system by integrating the user in a usability evaluation. The result is an evaluation model that evaluates a number of factors that are important for the quality in use of ComAround ZeroTM; trustfulness, effectiveness, learnability, universality, ease of use, efficiency, satisfaction and usefulness. The factors are defined by a couple of criterions, which are measured by a complementing method consisting of three parts, a usability evaluation survey, a checklist for web usability guidelines and statistical metrics concerning the usage and usability of the system. The usability evaluation survey builds on a standardized survey for usability evaluation and consists of 25 claims where the user should answer how well these claim correlate with their opinions. The checklist is compiled from a variety of checklists on useful web design and contains 42 demands divided into seven categories; user guidance, navigation, simplicity, design and layout, readability and compability. The statistical metrics measure the usefulness of the product through a number of different metrics concerning the use of the product. The usability evaluation model has been tested and the results from the testing indicated a few usability issues, for example regarding the user guidance, which ComAround Scandinavia AB ought to look into.

  • 74.
    Berglin, Rebecka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    System-Assisted Pharmaceutical Validation2022Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A large part of the injuries that occur in healthcare are medication-related injuries. This mainlyaffects individual patients, but it also constitutes a major cost to society. At the UppsalaUniversity Hospital, there is currently a warning system in connection with the prescription ofmedicines. However, this system does not work optimally. The Uppsala Region therefore wantsto develop and implement a more advanced warning system, with the hope of reducing risksrelated to the use of medicines.In this thesis, a prototype for the new warning system is presented. It is based on the users'needs which have been identified by conducting interviews and observations in line with usercentered design. The prototype has been developed as part of an iterative process wheredifferent stages have been continuously evaluated for optimal user experience. The project hasalso identified many challenges, primarily related to current IT systems that are used at thehospital, but also laws and regulations that need to be considered when continuing to developthe system in the future.

    The full text will be freely available from 2024-06-30 08:00
  • 75.
    Bergman, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology.
    Evaluating the user experience of different representations of organizational structures2023Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Information overload is a widely recognized problem in the workplace, with an overwhelmingamount of information being presented from several sources constantly. By being able tovisually represent organizational structures in an efficient way, it can significantly aid in makingthe data easier to consume, utilize and incorporate in future decision making. This master’sthesis aims to contribute to research regarding information visualization, specifically in regardsto visually representing organizational structures in an efficient way. The research questionsthat will be explored during this thesis are whether the hierarchical list or the vertical tree is amore efficient method for representing organizational structures, as well as whether thehierarchical list or the vertical tree present information in a more useful way that is easier tounderstand, according to users’ personal preference. These questions are explored byconducting an empirical study measuring the users’ efficiency in both models, as well asrecording which model the users preferred in terms of ease of use and usefulness. The resultsindicate an overall higher efficiency of the vertical tree, of statistical significance, as well as anoverall favoring of the same model by users. Thus, for representing organizational structuressimilar to ones used in this thesis, there is evidence to suggest that a vertical tree wouldperform better than a hierarchical list. However, future research would be of interest for testingdifferent types and sizes of organizational structures, as well as analyzing whether familiaritycould have an effect on the results.

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  • 76.
    Bergqvist, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    When Code Becomes Play: Appropriation in the Programming of Outdoor Play Spaces2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Children get fewer opportunities to create and shape the places they play in due to the urbanization of society. Meanwhile, society has begun expecting them to begin learning to code at earlier ages. As more children play in designed playgrounds, they have fewer chances to build their own treehouses and hideouts. This study attempts to explore how programmable props in playgrounds afford appropriation by children, in an attempt to give them more power over the playgrounds and their play. A set of programmable playground props were designed and developed into a prototype. A prototype consisting of three artefacts shaped like insects, a programming language, and a development environment was designed. The prototype was tested and evaluated by 20 children in the ages eight to ten divided into five groups. The study took place outside close to where the participants normally played. A thematic analysis was done on the observations of the prototype being used and the recorded conversations from group interviews with the participants. The analysis resulted in five themes; control over the prototype, focus on self, focus on supporting others, social hierarchy around the device, and usages of the prototype. The result of the study suggests that programming languages and development tools are not just tools in the appropriation of play spaces, but also structures that can frame play. Through this, the programming becomes part of the play. Additionally, the design process and study generated insights on how you can work with and study programmable playgrounds.

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  • 77.
    Bergström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Berg, Ivan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Mobilapplikationsutveckling för människor med kognitiv funktionsnedsättning2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Många människor lider av kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar. Det kan försämraförmågan att använda teknik och leda till att människor går miste om många verktyg och funktionersom andra tar för givet. Att ta hänsyn till kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar i utvecklingen avmobilapplikationer är utmanande då vissa gränssnitt och funktioner kan upplevas som för kompliceradeeller ostrukturerade. I denna uppsats presenteras designmönster som kan bidra till en inkluderandedesign enligt konceptet Design för alla. Design för alla innebär design som möjliggör användande föralla människor. Designmönstren har nåtts genom kvalitativ metod. Intervjuer med sakkunniga inomkognitiva funktionsnedsättningar och tekniska hjälpmedel har varit den huvudsakligadatainsamlingsmetodiken.

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    Inkluderande mobilapplikationsdesign för människor med kognitiv funktionsnedsättning
  • 78.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA.
    Duval, Jared
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA.
    Isbister, Katherine
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 USA.
    Panella, Oscar Garcia
    Univ Barcelona, ENTI, Barcelona, Spain.
    Wilde, Danielle
    Univ Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Badal Leon, Laia
    Fundacio Alicia, Sant Fruitos De Bages, Spain.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Chasing Play Potentials in Food Culture to Inspire Technology Design2019In: CHI PLAY'19: Extended Abstracts Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 829-834Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a Situated Play Design (SPD) workshop aimed at exploring how culture and traditions can guide playful design. Using food as an accessible starting point, we invite scholars from diverse communities to share, analyze, and make creative use of playful traditions, and prototype new and interesting eating experiences. Through hands-on engagement with traditions, play and technology, we will discuss strategies to make designerly use of forms of play that are embedded in culture. The outcomes of the workshop will be twofold: First, in response to recent calls for increasingly situated and emergent play design methods, we explore strategies to chase culturally-grounded play. Second, we produce an annotated portfolio of "play potentials" to inspire the design of future food-related technologies. The workshop will contribute to enriching the set of tools available for designers interested in play and technologies for everyday-use, in and beyond the food domain.

  • 79.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Kim, Soomin
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Commun, Seoul, South Korea..
    Chang, Minsuk
    Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, Sch Comp, Naver AI Lab, Seoul, South Korea..
    Dagan, Ella
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Duval, Jared
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Isbister, Katherine
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Social Emot Technol Lab, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media as a Design and Research Site in HCI: Mapping Out Opportunities and Envisioning Future Uses2021In: Extended abstracts of the 2021 CHI conference on human factors in computing systems  (CHI'21), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop, we will explore the emergent methodological space of social media based HCI design and research. We will gather scholars and practitioners from different areas within HCI to discuss how social media platforms might support their practice. Through short presentations, open discussions, and design-led activities, we will examine the affordances of existing social media platforms and speculate future developments in this methodological space. The outcome of the workshop will be an interactive data visualization of existing social media platforms, their main characteristics, and their affordances for HCI design and research. Overall, we will begin to characterize the methodological space of social media based HCI design and research, setting the foundation for future developments in this space.

  • 80.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Duval, Jared
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Isbister, Katherine
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Chasing Play Potentials: Towards an Increasingly Situated and Emergent Approach to Everyday Play Design2019In: DIS '19: Proceedings of the 2019 on Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2019, p. 1265-1277Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    User involvement is well established in game and play design. But in a time when play design is becoming relevant in domains beyond pure entertainment, and play blends into everyday activity in diverse ways, we need to revisit old, and develop new, user involvement methods. Using a situated perspective and Research through Design, we present Situated Play Design (SPD), a novel approach for the design of playful interventions aimed at open-ended, everyday activities that are non-entertainment based. Like user-centered game and play design methods, our contribution leverages user engagement; like Participatory Design methods, our method acknowledges the co-creating role of end users. SPD extends those approaches by focusing on uncovering existing manifestations of contextual playful engagement and using them as design material. Through two case studies, we illustrate our approach and the design value of using existing and emergent playful interactions of users in context as inspirations for future designs. This allows us to provide actionable strategies to design for in-context playful engagement.

  • 81.
    Bertran, Ferran Altarriba
    et al.
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Isbister, Katherine
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Technology for Situated and Emergent Play: A Bridging Concept and Design Agenda2020In: Proceedings Of The 2020 Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems (CHI'20), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2020, article id 730Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the capacity of play to spontaneously emerge in our daily life, the scope of application of play design in HCI is generally narrower, specifically targeting areas of pure leisure, or wholly utilitarian and productive play. Here we focus on the value of play design to respond to and support our natural gravitation towards emergent play that helps to meet our social and emotional needs. We present a bridging concept: Technology for Situated and Emergent Play, i.e. technology design that supports playful engagement that emerges interwoven with our everyday activities outside leisure, and that enriches these activities with socio-emotional value. Our intermediate-level contribution has value as a synthesis piece: it weaves together theories of play and play design and bridges them with concrete design examples. As a bridging concept, it contributes: i) theoretical grounding; ii) inspiring design exemplars that illustrate the theory and foreground its value; and iii) design articulations in the form of valuable experiential qualities and design features. Our work can help to focus design agendas for playful technology and inspire future designs in this space.

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  • 82.
    Betzeki, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    PropTech: Exploring the prerequisites to advance the digital innovation of real estate listings2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With an increasing population and decreasing housing supply, students in large cities get entangled in a societal crisis. Concurrently, the intermediary rental websites are scattered and insufficient. An emerging technology; PropTech is in the nascent phase, aiming to streamline the rental process by assisting target users. Through an exploratory approach, this study thoroughly investigated the sequences which prospective tenants encounter during the rental process. Simultaneously, their challenges and needs got examined. The data collection consisted of a landscape analysis, and semi-structured interviews combined with a focus group. The identified sequences which need to be incorporated into a rental PropTech platform are (1) Finding the listings, (2) Filtering the listings, (3) Contact with landlord, (4) Viewing the property, (5) Closing a deal, (6) Moving in, and (7) Post moving feedback. Throughout such a platform, it is essential to implement functions that support transparency, reliability, privacy, and feedback.

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    PropTech:Exploring the prerequisites to advance the digital innovation of real estate listings
  • 83. Bian, Zengxue
    et al.
    Liu, Yuqi
    Guo, Jinkang
    Lv, Zhihan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    The Digital Twins of Thor's Hammer Based on Motion Sensing2022In: 2022 IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality and 3D User Interfaces Abstracts and Workshops (VRW), IEEE, 2022, p. 894-895Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ancient humans attribute the phenomenon of thunder and lightning to divine power. The power of Thor that can lift Thor's Hammer, the body not be hurt by thunder and lightning. It's not impossible for us to control thunder and lightning like Thor. The Digital Twins system of the robotic arm designed in this paper integrates the physical device of the robotic arm, the digital model of robotic arm, the body sense interaction, and the virtual-reality mapping module. It can digitally control the robotic arm. With this system, we can all lift Thor's hammer in the future.

  • 84.
    Biehl, Marten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sketching Movement-based Interactions: Defining Guidelines for Tool Support in Interdisciplinary Teams2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Interaction Design there is an increased interest in designing for leisure and fun in contrast to an understanding of technology primarily as part of the workplace. Along with this, the relevance of experiential aspects of design is heightened compared to usability in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. At the same time, this created an interest in the relationship between the human body and technology use in research and industry.

    The starting point for this thesis is the perceived difficulty to combine exploration and technology in early stages of the design process without becoming technology-focused. Instead of picking a technology early in the process and therefore letting the design process be shaped by it, this thesis advocates introducing technology in a way that designers can explore different technologies similar to sketching with different materials.

    This thesis aims to identify the needs of designers in inter- disciplinary teams when designing with movement-based interactions. This is done by first summarizing important aspects of sketching from the literature. Secondly, the tools that are currently available are reviewed. Finally, an observational study of a design situation is conducted to complete this investigation.

    The main outcome of this thesis is a set of guidelines for designing a sketching tool for movement-based interactions in interdisciplinary teams. The most important are low transaction costs, overview over sketches, integration into the existing ecosystem, optimization for the team setting and clear articulation of material qualities. 

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    Biehl-SketchingMovementbasedIx.pdf
  • 85.
    Bilius, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Larsson, Julius
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Persuasiv teknik i praktiken: en studie av två tjänsters tillvägagångssätt för att förändra användares attityder och beteenden.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 86.
    Billing, Erik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Rosén, Julia
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Expectations of robot technology in welfare2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report findings from a survey on expectations of robot technology in welfare, within the coming 20 years. 34 assistant nurses answered a questionnaire on which tasks, from their daily work, that they believe robots can perform, already today or in the near future. Additionally, the Negative attitudes toward robots scale (NARS) was used to estimate participants' attitudes towards robots in general. Results reveal high expectations of robots, where at least half of the participants answered Already today or Within 10 years to 9 out of 10 investigated tasks. Participants were also fairly positive towards robots, reporting low scores on NARS. The obtained results can be interpreted as a serious over-estimation of what robots will be able to do in the near future, but also large varieties in participants' interpretation of what robots are. We identify challenges in communicating both excitement towards a technology in rapid development and realistic limitations of this technology.

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  • 87.
    Bishehsari, Taraneh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Wearable Device for Physiotherapeutic Home Training2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Wearable for physiotherapy
  • 88. Björk, Ingrid
    et al.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Language and teaching ethics2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All problems with learning are increased when using English to teach non-English native students because of the culturally-sensitive nature of the subject of ethics. Coming to teaching ethics we are confronted with more difficulties. What is right and wrong is often affected by the culture, and different cultures often have different languages. Ethics theories are also expressed in language terms and they can be more easily misunderstood or misinterpreted compared to natural science theories. The feelings and every-day life encounters with “right” and “wrong” are linguistically experienced, described, and mediated. Therefore, language has a strong impact on whether something is ethical or whether it makes sense as an ethical issue at all.

  • 89.
    Björk, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots, ethics and language2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 268-273Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the classical philosophical definition of ethics and the psychological research on problem solving and decision making, the issue of ethics becomes concrete and opens up the way for the creation of IT systems that can support handling of moral problems. Also in a sense that is similar to the way humans handle their moral problems. The processes of communicating information and receiving instructions are linguistic by nature. Moreover, autonomous and heteronomous ethical thinking is expressed by way of language use. Indeed, the way we think ethically is not only linguistically mediated but linguistically construed – whether we think for example in terms of conviction and certainty (meaning heteronomy) or in terms of questioning and inquiry (meaning autonomy). A thorough analysis of the language that is used in these processes is therefore of vital importance for the development of the above mentioned tools and methods. Given that we have a clear definition based on philosophical theories and on research on human decision-making and linguistics, we can create and apply systems that can handle ethical issues. Such systems will help us to design robots and to prescribe their actions, to communicate and cooperate with them, to control the moral aspects of robots’ actions in real life applications, and to create embedded systems that allow continuous learning and adaptation.

  • 90. Björk, Ingrid
    et al.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The importance of language in teaching and learning ethics2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of English as the teaching language at University courses for non-native English-speaking students is spreading more and more. Certain learning problems and difficulties have been reported already. However, in ethics courses, language has a greater impact. Concepts like right, wrong, values, etc., are complex. The meaning of such concepts is culturally embedded and they are constantly created and re-created in contexts of communication. The notions of, and every-day life encounters with “right” and “wrong” are linguistically experienced, described, and mediated, and therefore much more dependent on language than for example technical terms. In teaching, cognitive coordination between teacher and students is necessary in order for learning to take place. This is a kind of negotiation between instruction and the cognitive needs of the students, which, in order to be successful, has to be mediated through a shared language regarding the meanings of ethical and value terms and concepts. Using a language that is foreign to the students or the teacher or both, creates a need to re-create these meanings in class. This is clearly a burden that should be considered.

  • 91. Björklin, Hampus
    et al.
    Abrahamsson, Tim
    Widenfalk, Oscar
    A retrieval-based chatbot ́s opinion on the trolley problem2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this project was to create a chatbot capable of debating a user using limited resources including a discussion thread from the online debate forum Kialo. A retrieval based bot was designed and the discussion thread was converted into a database which the bot could interpret and choose an appropriate answer from. Which answer is appropriate is decided by the bot using a few key features in a given input sentence. The main features are word similarity, sentiment distance and BERT-encoding (a model for vector representation of text created by Google). The similarity of these features where then used to score claims from the dataset. Combining and weighting the scores was then used to find the correct response to a given input sentence. The most successful of the features was BERT-encoding. Once the bot had been refined it was brought online and tested using the communication platform Discord.

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    fulltext
  • 92.
    Björktomta, Siv-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR.
    Hansen, Heidi
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Social Work, Children and the Digital Knowledge Landscape: New Possibilities and Challenges2021In: Navigating Digital Health Landscapes: A Multidisciplinary Analysis / [ed] Anna Lydia Svalastog, Srećko Gajović, Andrew Webster, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, p. 223-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social work is a profession in movement within the surrounding society and political and policy decisions. Digitalization is ongoing and grows apace. We know that children use the Internet on a daily basis with a greater knowledge of and familiarity than many of the adults who are part of the children’s social networks. The Internet creates new opportunities for children to form and develop identities on a global level and at a distance from the adult world’s norms. Children’s use of the Internet can be empowering but may also be creating new vulnerabilities. This is a challenge for parents, social welfare services and society as a whole. However, when it comes to digitalization, in particular concerning children, welfare services in Nordic countries have been characterized by a certain inertia. Using interviews with social workers in Norway as a starting point, this chapter outlines, with a theoretical framing of the children/social media relation, the ways in which welfare state services in Nordic countries have become increasingly digitalized. It illustrates the tension between professional practice, governance and accountability when mediated by social workers’ engagement with digital systems. The findings show a contrast between the professional landscape and its controls and the digital one and its short-circuiting of these controls. The crucial question is how child welfare services will be able to cope with this in order to fulfil its societal mandate.

  • 93.
    Björnsdotter, Matilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Designing functions aimed at users experiencing endometriosis or polycystic ovary syndrome within a reproductive health application2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    People who are diagnosed with or suspect endometriosis or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are rarely included in the design of reproductive health applications, leading to a lack of functions useful to this user group. Non-normative user groups in general, including those experiencing endometriosis or PCOS, are also rarely mentioned in research of reproductive health applications or Human-Computer Interaction. Based on user requests, the aim of this thesis was to design new functions within the application Read Your Body aimed at their users experiencing endometriosis or PCOS. The project consisted of an iterative design process including research for design, sketching, prototyping, and user tests. It was found that this user group mainly wanted to track their symptoms and cycle to gain health insight, and a large number of tracking options and easy customisation was requested. The design process resulted in a design prototype that includes the ability to track symptoms, triggers, self-care practices and treatments as well as visualising and exporting data for personal health insight or to communicate with others. Knowledge created on the non-normative user group, their goals for tracking, and how to design reproductive health tracking applications for non-normative users could be useful in future research and design projects. The functions designed could improve understanding of self and communication with healthcare professionals, and inform diagnosis, treatment plans and self-care practices. 

  • 94.
    Blomkvist, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    User-centred design and agile development of IT systems2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the knowledge on the interaction between humans and computers, too many IT systems show great deficits when it comes to usability. Every day we run into technology that makes our every day life and our work unnecessarily complex and difficult because of the IT systems that are not designed to support our tasks in a usable way. This thesis deals with different aspects of usability and the process of how to develop usable IT systems effectively. Primarily, the systems concerned are used in professional work, such as case handling systems in large government organisations.

    The main objective of this research is to understand which essential factors in the system development process that facilitate the development of usable IT systems. Another key subject is how human-computer interaction (HCI) knowledge can be integrated into systems development, in particular the integration of user-centred design (UCD) and agile software development. The research is based on a qualitative approach and on reflections from my own experience in development projects. It also includes exploratory studies and design cases.

    The attempts of bridging the gap between HCI and software engineering have not been notably successful in practice. To address some of these problems, there is a need for a more precise definition of user-centred design, which is proposed in the thesis. Also, the complicated reality of systems development is not considered enough by HCI researchers and practitioner. To reach better results, UCD has to be integrated as a natural part of the development process. In the thesis, I argue that the agile approach together with UCD can be a good starting point for this integration. The agile approach emphasises that responding to change in development is more important than strictly adhering to a plan. Also, it prioritises regular deliveries of working software over extensive models and documentation. However, from an HCI perspective, agile processes do not inherently provide the required support for user-centred design. Nevertheless, the basic values and specific methods of agile development may have the potential to work very well together with UCD. For instance, iterative development is fundamental to both user-centred design and agile development.

    Finally, the research addresses how iterative methods can be used to find design solutions that support the users to cope with the problems of overview and control in case handling work.

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    fulltext
  • 95.
    Bodin, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Cognitive work analysis in practice: Adaptation to project scope and industrial context2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) framework is widely used by researchers for the analysis of complex systems. It, however, lacks the same impact amongst industrial practitioners. This thesis investigates possible adaptations of the framework to project and industrial constraints, and the consequences associated with such adaptations. Long haul heavy vehicle transportation is the application domain for the work presented in the thesis. The CWA framework has been applied within the Methods for Designing Future Autonomous Systems (MODAS) project. Adaptations have been made to fit the framework within the project constraints and the industrial contexts. Interviews with stakeholders in an industrial organization regarding possible use of models from the CWA framework have been made. The CWA was scaled to available resources when applied within the MODAS project. From this we realized that prioritization of work activity can have consequences on the resulting systems ability to handle unforeseen events. Further, a focus on the current system probed a rapid out-dating of the analysis due to technical development. The conclusion is that even if advantages are lost during adaptation due to practical constraints, the CWA framework could add value to practitioners within industry if adapted to the industrial context.

    List of papers
    1. Developing a 1st Iteration Concept HMI for Supervising and Controlling a Self-Driving Truck
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing a 1st Iteration Concept HMI for Supervising and Controlling a Self-Driving Truck
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335442 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    2. Development and Assessment of Concept HMI for Supervising and Controlling a SelfDriving Truck
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and Assessment of Concept HMI for Supervising and Controlling a SelfDriving Truck
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335451 (URN)
    Note

    Title in thesis list of papers: "Developing and Assessing a 2nd and 3rd Iteration Concept HMI for Supervising and Controlling a Self-Driving Truck"

    Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    3. Activity prioritization to focus the control task analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity prioritization to focus the control task analysis
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, ISSN 1555-3434, E-ISSN 2169-5032, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 91-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298003 (URN)10.1177/1555343416629307 (DOI)000374661200006 ()
    Projects
    MODAS
    Available from: 2016-03-01 Created: 2016-06-29 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Rebuttal to Burns and Naikar
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rebuttal to Burns and Naikar
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, ISSN 1555-3434, E-ISSN 2169-5032, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 109-110Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299392 (URN)10.1177/1555343416629179 (DOI)000374661200008 ()
    Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-07-18 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
    5. Eliciting strategies in revolutionary design: exploring the hypothesis of predefined strategy categories
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eliciting strategies in revolutionary design: exploring the hypothesis of predefined strategy categories
    2018 (English)In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 101-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introducing automation in a human-machine system changes the tasks performed by human operators. It is difficult to analyse systems for which there are no experienced operators. This issue emerged within a project with the aim to develop a human–machine interface for a highly automated long-haul vehicle. To handle the problem, a formative strategies analysis method with promises to enable desktop analyses through predefined strategy categories was adopted. The method was used to investigate strategies for controlling the future long haul vehicle by conducting workshops with today's drivers. The method was shown to be a valuable asset in eliciting strategies for revolutionary design.

    Keywords
    Cognitive work analysis, strategies analysis, automation, revolutionary systems design, long haul trucks
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292799 (URN)10.1080/1463922X.2017.1278805 (DOI)000428728900006 ()
    Projects
    MODAS
    Funder
    VINNOVA, 2012-03678
    Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
    6. Supporting industrial uptake of cognitive work analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting industrial uptake of cognitive work analysis
    2015 (English)In: Proc. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2015, p. 170-174Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a broader industrial project, the first two stages of a Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA, Work Domain Analysis [WDA] and Control Task Analysis [ConTA]) were completed for Long Haul Commercial Road Transport. To support the potential uptake of CWA by different stakeholders within the industrial organization, parts of the ConTA Contextual Activity Template (CAT) were truncated. The goal of the current, exploratory study, was to identify which stakeholders within the industrial organization could benefit from using the WDA or CAT for either their Strategic (Research) or Product (Development) planning, and over what time horizon. We observed differences in the perceived usefulness of the WDA and the CAT between the different stakeholders. Innovative solutions to the issues raised should significantly enhance the industrial use of Cognitive Work Analysis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2015
    National Category
    Human Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268730 (URN)978-0-945289-47-0 (ISBN)
    Conference
    HFES 2015, October 26–30, Los Angeles, CA
    Available from: 2015-10-30 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 96.
    Bodin, Ida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Arweström Jansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Work domain analysis of an intensive care unit: An Abstraction Hierarchy based on a bed-side approach2016In: Proc. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter 2015 Annual Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work in intensive care units requires interaction with several medical devices and interpretation of dynamic information from several sources. The aim of the current study was to gain understanding of the work domain to support the development of a holistic information environment and further analyses of risky situations. A total of 18 hours of bed-side observations at an intensive care unit and interviews with three experienced intensive care unit nurses were conducted in order to receive input data for the modelling of the work domain. The domain was modelled in an abstraction hierarchy, as according to the first phase of the cognitive work analysis framework. The results show that the ultimate purpose of the work carried out in an intensive care unit is keeping patients alive while gaining time for treatment, but also to perform treatment and relieve symptoms. The purpose is represented at the top level of the model, and lower levels include functions as supporting the patients’ vital functions and avoiding secondary complications. With this work domain analysis as a basis, three different design challenges identified can be dealt with systematically.

  • 97.
    Bodin, Ida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Supporting industrial uptake of cognitive work analysis2015In: Proc. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2015, p. 170-174Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a broader industrial project, the first two stages of a Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA, Work Domain Analysis [WDA] and Control Task Analysis [ConTA]) were completed for Long Haul Commercial Road Transport. To support the potential uptake of CWA by different stakeholders within the industrial organization, parts of the ConTA Contextual Activity Template (CAT) were truncated. The goal of the current, exploratory study, was to identify which stakeholders within the industrial organization could benefit from using the WDA or CAT for either their Strategic (Research) or Product (Development) planning, and over what time horizon. We observed differences in the perceived usefulness of the WDA and the CAT between the different stakeholders. Innovative solutions to the issues raised should significantly enhance the industrial use of Cognitive Work Analysis.

  • 98.
    Bodin, Ida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Krupenia, Stas S.
    Activity prioritization to focus the control task analysis2016In: Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, ISSN 1555-3434, E-ISSN 2169-5032, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 91-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Bodin, Ida
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Krupenia, Stas S.
    Rebuttal to Burns and Naikar2016In: Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, ISSN 1555-3434, E-ISSN 2169-5032, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 109-110Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Bohné, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Emotions at play: gaining emotional knowledge using a video game2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The use of video games for teaching children different subjects is commonly believed to be a good  approach. In  general  has  learning  theme  for  these  games  focused  on  traditionally subject, such as math or biology. Important as they can be for education, other softer aspects can also be considered important for the children and education. One such aspect is emotions and the role it has on a social level. However, it is not much research showing how to use emotions  in  a  learning  game. In  this  thesis, I  examine  how  children  perceive  and  use emotions as they play a game specially designed for teaching emotions. The game utilises emotions  in  a  new  design  that  let  the  player  interact  with  cartoon  animals  in  different scenarios. I report findings based on a sample of thirty-three (33) preschool children, and six (6) parents who took part in the study. Data was collected using a qualitative method in a two step procedure with observation of play and follow up interviews in the first step, followed by video recordings of play and demonstrations using cuddly pets in the second step. Using an ecological framework for analysis and theory from the field of emotional intelligence, I show that children playing this game can perceive emotions expressed in the game. I also show that it is possible to play this particular game without the need to involve emotions. Children do not learn emotions from playing the game. These results carries important implication for the design of learning games as it illuminates that learning can come from possible sources other than the gameplay.

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    fulltext
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