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  • 51.
    Husain, Safa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Online communication between home and school: Case study: Improving the usability of the Unikum e-service in the primary schools of Tierp municipality2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project, focus on the use of Internet and new media as an online communication to improve the caregiver-pupil-school partnership. In particular the usability of the e-service is investigated by studying a real example: the Unikum system as it is used in Tierps municipality.

    The Unikum e-service is used in many primary schools in different municipalities in Sweden for communication and cooperation between caregivers-pupils and school.

    The aim is to assess the usability of the Unikum e-service in the particular context of Tierps municipality, find out about the benefits of using it, finding the problems that are there, and also to try to design solutions to improve the usability for the e-service.

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    Safa Naser HCI Thesis 2012
  • 52.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Information Studies, Åbo Akademi University.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computing Education Research.
    Moll, Jonas
    Örebro universitet.
    Enwald, Heidi
    Uleåborgs universitet.
    Eriksson-Backa, Kristina
    Åbo Akademi.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Technological and informational frames: explaining age-related variation in the use of patient accessible electronic health records as technology and information2021In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Data from a national patient survey (N = 1,155) of the Swedish PAEHR "Journalen" users were analysed, and an extended version of the theory of technological frames was developed to explain the variation in the technological and informational framing of information technologies found in the data.Design/methodology/approach Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHRs) are implemented globally to address challenges with an ageing population. However, firstly, little is known about age-related variation in PAEHR use, and secondly, user perceptions of the PAEHR technology and the health record information and how the technology and information-related perceptions are linked to each other. The purpose of this study is to investigate these two under-studied aspects of PAEHRs and propose a framework based on the theory of technological frames to support studying the second aspect, i.e. the interplay of information and technology-related perceptions.Findings The results suggest that younger respondents were more likely to be interested in PAEHR contents for general interest. However, they did not value online access to the information as high as older ones. Older respondents were instead inclined to use medical records information to understand their health condition, prepare for visits, become involved in their own healthcare and think that technology has a much potential. Moreover, the oldest respondents were more likely to consider the information in PAEHRs useful and aimed for them but to experience the technology as inherently difficult to use.Research limitations/implications The sample excludes non-users and is not a representative sample of the population of Sweden. However, although the data contain an unknown bias, there are no specific reasons to believe that it would differently affect the survey’s age groups.Practical implications Age should be taken into account as a key factor that influences perceptions of the usefulness of PAEHRs. It is also crucial to consider separately patients’ views of PAEHRs as a technology and of the information contained in the EHR when developing and evaluating existing and future systems and information provision for patients.Social implications This study contributes to bridging the gap between information behaviour and systems design research by showing how the theory of technological frames complemented with parallel informational frames to provide a potentially powerful framework for elucidating distinct conceptualisations of (information) technologies and the information they mediate. The empirical findings show how information and information technology needs relating to PAEHRs vary according to age. In contrast to the assumptions in much of the earlier work, they need to be addressed separately.Originality/value Few earlier studies focus on (1) age-related variation in PAEHR use and (2) user perceptions of the PAEHR technology and the health record information and how the technology and information-related perceptions are linked to each other.

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    fulltext
  • 53. Ioannidis, Petros
    et al.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sundnes Løvlie, Anders
    We Dare You: A Lifecycle Study of a Substitutional Reality Installation in a Museum Space2021In: ACM Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage, ISSN 1556-4673, E-ISSN 1556-4711, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 1-21, article id https://doi.org/10.1145/3439862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present a lifecycle study of We Dare You, a substitutional reality installation that combines visual and tactile stimuli. The installation is set up in a center for architecture, and invites visitors to explore its facade while playing with vertigo, in a visual virtual reality environment that replicates the surrounding physical space of the installation. Drawing on an ethnographic approach, including observations and interviews, we researched the exhibit from its opening, through the initial months plagued by technical problems, its subsequent success as a social and playful installation, on to its closure, due to COVID-19, and its subsequent reopening. Our findings explore the challenges caused by both the hybrid nature of the installation and the visitors’ playful use of the installation which made the experience social and performative—but also caused some problems. We also discuss the problems We Dare You faced in light of hygiene demands due to COVID-19. The analysis contrasts the design processes and expectations of stakeholders with the audience’s playful appropriation, which led the stakeholders to see the installation as both a success and a failure. Evaluating the design and redesign through use on behalf of visitors, we argue that an approach that further opens up the post-production experience to a process of continuous redesign based on the user input—what has been termed design-after-design—could facilitate the design of similar experiences in the museum and heritage sector, supporting a participatory agenda in the design process, and helping to resolve the tension between stakeholders’ expectations and visitors’ playful appropriations.

  • 54. Islam, Nazrul
    et al.
    Tétard, Franck
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Exploring the Impact of Interface Signs' Interpretation Accuracy, Design, and Evaluation on Web Usability: A Semiotic Perspective2014In: Journal of Systems and Information Technology, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 250-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this empirical study was to address two important concerns of Web usability: how user-intuitive interface signs affect Web usability and how applying semiotics (i.e. the doctrine of signs) in user interface (UI) design and evaluation helps to improve usability.

    Design/methodology/approach– An empirical research approach is followed here to conduct three user tests. These tests were conducted on a Web application with 17 test participants. Data were gathered through laboratory-based think-aloud usability test, questionnaires and interviews. Following an empirical research approach, statistics and user behavior analysis were used to analyze the data.

    Findings– This study explores two important concerns of UI design and evaluation. First, users’ interpretation accuracy of interface signs impact on Web usability. The study found that users’ interpretation of signs might be accurate, moderate, conflicting, erroneous or incapable; user-intuitive interface signs led participants to interpret signs’ meaning accurately; and users’ inaccurate interpretation of one or a few task-related interface sign(s) led users to usability problems, resulting in participants performing tasks with lower task-completion performance. Second, considering semiotics perception in UI design and evaluation is important to improve Web usability. This study showed that interface signs, when re-designed considering the semiotics guidelines, have increased the end-users’ interpretation accuracy and the interface signs’ intuitiveness. This study also provides a small set of semiotics guidelines for sign design and evaluation.

    Originality/value– This study empirically demonstrated that signs’ intuitiveness impact on Web usability and that considering the semiotics perception in sign design and evaluation is important to improve Web usability. These outcomes are valuable in a number of ways to HCI researchers and practitioners: the results provide awareness of the importance of user-intuitive interface signs in UI design; practitioners can easily adopt the concept of interpretation accuracy classification to conduct a sign test to obtain an “overall impression of interface signs’ intuitiveness”; practitioners can easily adopt the methodological approach followed in this study to conduct usability test without additional resources; and the results raised important fundamental questions for future research such as “what does a practitioner need to be aware of when designing or evaluating interface signs?”

  • 55.
    Ivanova, Vita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Open acess to customer product information? A case study of Ericsson Radio Base Station CPIs.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ericsson is a Swedish technology company that provides and operates telecommunication networks,television and video systems and related services in the world.A Case study of Ericsson Radio Base Station CPIs is a research work about technical informationavailability problems on Internet.According to customer product information standards, specific company’s divisions are responsible formeaningful technical information content creation and diffusion to the end user.The main research question is what information related to Ericsson RBS can be found on the Internetand what possible solutions should Ericsson offer to these groups in terms of technical informationavailability?An Internet analysis showed that on Internet appears user generated content about RBS 6000 in a wayof video instructions, manuals selling and consultation giving.This situation shows that users are interested and need information related to technical equipment, buton the other hand it is essentially illegal to spread information this way, and it might have seriousconsequences in terms of misuse or misinterpretation of information.This thesis is investigating Ericsson information sharing traditions in relation to the situation of openinformation on the Internet. Some recommendations for further work are given.

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    Open acess to customer product information - Ericsson case
  • 56.
    Jonsson, Fatima
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Eklund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Narrative and Mechanical Integration: Playing with Interpersonal Conflicts in Life is Strange2022In: Representing Conflicts in Games: Antagonism, Rivalry, and Competition / [ed] Björn Sjöblom, Jonas Linderoth, Anders Frank, Routledge, 2022Chapter in book (Other academic)
    The full text will be freely available from 2024-07-01 11:23
  • 57.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Assessing and acquiring ethical leadership competence2012In: Leadership through the Classics: leadership and management in a changing world - lessons from ancient eastern and western philosophy / [ed] Gregory P. Prastacos, Fuming Wang, Klas Eric Soderquist, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 389-400Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaders need the ability to handle any moral problem that may arise 5during their professional activities; they need ethical competence. Ethical skill is, in 6psychology and in accordance to the classical philosophical position, understood as 7the basis and the aim of ethical competence of leaders. Based on that, we can 8construct valid assessment tools and training programs that support the acquisition 9and use of ethical competence and skills.

  • 58.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Assessing usability of IT systems2012In: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Hägg, Göran M., Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal skills and group processes are necessary in the production of knowledge to design and manage usable systems. AvI is a questionnaire that correlates these parameters of usability to utility and work environment. The main goal of AvI is to create a description of the processes that are necessary to achieve good usability: user participation, knowledge support, networking for coordination and cooperation etc, defined as philosophizing processes at personal and group levels. AvI’s ambition is to indicate whether the preconditions for these processes are present in an organization, to allow these to arise and to function in a satisfying and fruitful way. The evaluation of AvI showed that reliability coefficients and correlations to independent criteria were high, supporting the original hypothesis: AvI can be used to acquire information about the above parameters of an IT system’s usability in an easy and quick way. Although AvI only provides an indicative value, such a diagnosis of the usability of an organization’s IT infrastructure is valuable as an alert and to determine the extent of further initiatives.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 59.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    How to handle issues of security and privacy2013In: ICT-ethics: Sweden and Japan, Linköping: LiU Tryck , 2013, p. 54-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different ways to approach privacy and security are critically examined. The main question is how definitions may help us in our efforts to handle these issues in real life and allow us to create suitable and working system designs and policies. Given the controversial nature of privacy and security, and based on philosophical theory and psychological research, we have to focus on the ways, skills, methods and tools we adopt in order to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, designs, rules and principles.

  • 60.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT and sustainability: skills and methods for dialogue and policy making2015In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, ISSN 1477-996X, E-ISSN 1758-8871, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 13-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an overview and to discuss the following issues: most often, discussions about Information and communication technology (ICT) sustainability focus on environmental issues; however, there are other aspects referring to ICT internal sustainability and to its role as a tool in managing general sustainability issues. The way to handle ICT sustainability issues is also significant.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses and investigates various aspects of ICT sustainability, and of methods to handle these issues and make decisions.

    Findings: Classical philosophy and psychological empirical research on decision-making demonstrate the way to take care of ICT sustainability issues. This way is philosophizing, which has to be trained and supported for people and organizations involved to acquire the necessary skills and to use suitable methods.

    Originality/value: The paper highlights other significant aspects of ICT sustainability rather than the environmental impact alone. It also proposes focus on the way ICT sustainability issues are handled rather than focus on normative or ideological aspects of it.

  • 61.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT as a horsefly2012In: Critique, Democracy and Philosophy in 21st Century Information Society: Towards Critical Theories of Social Media / [ed] Christian Fuchs, 2012, p. 38-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way we solve problems and make decisions has been at the focus of philosophy. Since ancient times the issue has been how to think in the right way. Skills, abilities, methods and processes have been investigated. According to Platon philosophers do not have the right answers but they can find the right answers. They have the skills and they can use the right tools to discard false ideas (aporia). Philosophers think and act in a democratic way among themselves. But anybody who has the ability to philosophize, to think self-critically, systematically, scientifically, i.e. has the Aristotelian virtue of phronesis or the Kantian skill of autonomy, and acts according to this, belongs to a democracy together with other like people. Unfortunately, this is not the only definition of democracy. Although democracy itself is a process, the common sense definition is either result oriented or focused on formalistic aspects, or a combination of both. The first means that societies providing high living standards, security, tolerance, good environment and other goods are called democratic. The second definition is based on the existence of certain procedures, institutions, roles and processes, like elections. The presence of formal procedures is sufficient for a democracy definition. But if democracy is a process neither the result of it nor its formal surface characteristics should have the highest significance. Maintaining and running the democratic process is the important aspect as well as the conditions supporting it. By saying this we are back to the philosophical discussion. In essence democracy is dialog between people. That means that people search for solutions to their problems by thinking together with others. But that presupposes that each person has a dialog with himself and that each person starts with the position that own ideas and beliefs need to be better (aporia). This makes it possible to listen to others. Each participant in a democratic process, or a dialog, feels always the need of other participants because he is expecting them to help him and together with other able people find a better idea (phronesis, autonomy).ICT can contribute to this process by making information accessible and therefore facilitating citizens’ participation in political decision making. It can support openness and by that invite people to be more aware and active. Furthermore, it can support horizontal communication among citizens. Issues that are of interest to few people or to people that for some reason have difficulties to contact each other by traditional means may be neglected in the political process even though they are important. ICT can easily overcome such difficulties and provide a powerful tool to connect, inform and coordinate people’s actions. Most important, ICT can support self-critical and systematic thinking, which is the base for successful democratic dialog. ICT systems are currently used to create aporia and to stimulate autonomy during a process of problem solving and decision making. Advanced games simulate the complexity of reality in micro worlds, broadening the spectrum of opportunities and possibilities to support dialog.

  • 62.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Leaders as philosophers2011In: EBEN Annual Conference 2011 / [ed] L. Van Liedekerke, Antwerp: Universiteit Antwerpen , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A leader has to be a philosopher able to make decisions that other people trust. Leaders need ethical competence, which is the ability of a decision maker to use the right way to think in front of a moral problem. This approach is based on classical philosophy as well as on the findings of psychological research on moral problem solving and decision making. Building on that a training program was developed containing four blocks of seventeen exercises. Participants coming from different organizations used the exercises on their own professional problems. After training, participants showed higher scores on ethical autonomy up to two and a half years later. The results showed clearly that the participants used their new skills in their real professional life and that they were very satisfied.

  • 63.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Philosophizing as a usability method2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature / [ed] E. Buchanan, P. B. de Laat, H. T. Tavani and J. Klucarich, Lisbon: The International Society of Ethics and Information Technology , 2013, p. 194-201Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ways of handling problems of IT systems usability and problems of ethics are similar to each other. Working with usability leads most often to the need of discussing problems of ethics, and today’s issues of ethics are mostly related to IT. The nature of IT and ethics seems to be very close to each other. Ready-made answers cannot be found and any solution proposed is easily contested. IT design and use have a strong connection to values. With classical and modern philosophy as a foundation, and based on psychological research on ethical decision making, it is suggested to focus on the way to take care of issues rather than on normative aspects or on the construction and application of usability standards and guidelines. It appears that the method used to handle problems in these areas is of crucial importance; and this is also common to both of them.

  • 64.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots and systems as autonomous ethical agents2010In: INTECH 2010: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Intelligent Technologies / [ed] V. Kreinovich, J. Daengdej and T. Yeophantong, Bangkok: Assumption University , 2010, p. 5-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT systems and robots can help us to solve many problems caused by the quantity, variation and complexity of information; because we need to handle dangerous and risky situations; or because of our social and emotional needs like elderly care. In helping us, these systems have to make decisions and act accordingly to achieve the goals for which they were built. Ethical decision support tools can be integrated into robots and other decision making systems to secure that decisions are made according to the basic theories of philosophy and to the findings of psychological research.  This can be done, in non-independent systems, as a way for the system to report to its operator, and to support the operator's ethical decision making. On the other hand, fully independent systems should be able to regulate their own decision making strategies and processes. However, this cannot be based on normative predefined criteria, or on the ability to make choices, or on having own control, or on ability of rational processing.  It seems that it is necessary for an independent robot or decision system to have "emotions." That is, a kind of ultimate purposes that can lead the decision process, and depending on the circumstances, guide the adoption of a decision strategy, whatever it may be, rational, heuristic or automatic.

  • 65.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Can machines make ethical decisions?2013In: Artificial Intelligence Applications and Innovations, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 693-699Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Methods for IT security and privacy2013In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] P. Kommers and C. Gauzente, Prague: IADIS Press, 2013, p. 155-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The similar nature of IT security, privacy and ethics, and the difficulty to find ready-made answers, put the focus on theway one handles the problems in these areas. Philosophy has analyzed this issue in depth and it has given us thephilosophical method as the means to find satisfying solutions. Psychology has shown in empirical research what skillsare necessary for this purpose. Since the issues of IT security, privacy and ethics are very important for us today, we needto create and use tools and methods to take care of them.

  • 67.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Adams, Andrew A.
    Meiji University, Centre for Business Ethics.
    Murata, Kiyoshi
    Meiji University, School of Commerce.
    Snowden’s revelations and the attitudes of students at Swedish universities2017In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, ISSN 1477-996X, E-ISSN 1758-8871, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 247-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to map Swedish students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their effects in the political and socio-cultural environment of Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was answered by 190 Swedish university students. The quantitative responses to the survey and qualitative considerations of free text answers were statistically analysed.

    Findings – Swedish students had a high level of knowledge about the Snowden revelations; they actively searched for information, gave a positive judgement of Snowden’s actions and were willing to follow his example in Sweden, although not in the USA. They trusted their country and most of its institutions and authorities except for secret service agencies and the internet and computer software companies.

    Practical implications – This study could be used as a design of education for university students, especially in information technology programmes.

    Social implications – The study can be used for developing and applying policies on privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing.

    Originality/value – This study is part of a bigger international study to map students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their opinions about privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing opening up for cross-cultural analyses.

  • 68.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tools and methods for security: Stimulating the skill to philosophize2013In: European Intelligence and Security Informatics Conference: 2013, IEEE Computer Society, 2013, p. 163-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding optimal solutions to security issues is verydifficult or impossible. Conflicting interests and values decidewhat has to be done. Every thinkable answer contains both risksand possibilities. I our effort to find solutions we have always tonegotiate and make compromises. A dialectic process is necessaryin security in order to identify significant interests and values,and to formulate principles and policies. Handling security issuesand working for secure IT systems demand continuousadjustment to relevant values as well as the necessary personalskills and suitable group processes. Focusing on the method andmaking sure that the right way of proceeding has been adopted isthe way to get satisfactory answers to the problems of IT security.The philosophical method of deliberative thinking seems to be thebasis of such methods.

  • 69.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Informal learning in IT-use: Cognitive support as an operational strategy1999In: Human Centered Processes / [ed] P. Lenca, Brest: ENST Bretagne and Centre Universitaire , 1999, p. 29-35Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Computerized support of personal and group skills for sustainability2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a collaborative tool to facilitate and structure dialogue about concrete issues in sustainability, We have experienced that the tool is remarkably powerful in stimulating the inquiry in complex issues by constantly forcing the user to shift focus between the particular and the holistic. The design of the tool is theoretically founded in philosophy and knowledge about the psychological mechanisms, like cognitive biases, that are involved in decision making. It is based on the assumption that people are not making judgments in isolation, but rather in social settings. Problems that involve many people, a trait that questions of sustainability share with ethics, can only be solved by answering questions about how these are affecting the problem situation and how these are affected by any proposed solution. The main advantage with such a tool is that it supplies a shared platform in which an analysis can evolve organically, even in collaboration with competing parties. Policy makers can get help to understand how arguments have been applied in concrete situations and how people and values can be affected by different courses of action. The structure of the tool invites to a proactive, concrete, solution-oriented dialogue where premises are made explicit and thus possible to address.

  • 71.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Training and supporting education in sustainability by the use of an ICT tool2012In: New technologies, education for sustainable development and critical pedagogy / [ed] Vassilios Makrakis and Nelly Kostoulas-Makrakis, Rethymnon, Greece: ICTeESD, University of Crete , 2012, p. 225-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will present ColLab, a collaborative computerized tool to facilitate dialogue about concrete issues in sustainability. The tool is powerful in stimulating the inquiry in complex issues by constantly forcing the user to shift focus between the particular and the holistic. The design of the tool is theoretically founded in philosophy and knowledge about the psychological mechanisms, like cognitive biases, that are involved in decision making. It is based on the assumption that people are not making judgments in isolation, but rather in social settings. The main advantage with such a tool is that it supplies a shared platform in which an analysis can evolve organically, even in collaboration with competing parties. It is suitable for using in learning environments and for educational purposes as well as for formulation of sustainability policies.

  • 72.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    What are ethical agents and how can we make them work properly?2011In: The computational turn: Past, presetns, futures? / [ed] Charles Ess and Ruth Hagengruber, Münster: MV-Wissenschaft , 2011, p. 151-153Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support ethical decision making in autonomous agents, we suggest to implement decision tools based on classical philosophy and psychological research. As one possible avenue, we present EthXpert, which supports the process of structuring and assembling information about situations with possible moral implications.

  • 73.
    Khamran, Nur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University.
    How do I play this?: A case study Looking into information overload within the grand-strategy game genre2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the project is to explore the issue of information overload in grand-strategy games, specifically focusing on Paradox games,and utilizing Victoria 3 as the primary case study. The research delves into the background and theory of grand strategy games, includingthe user experience, tooltip design, tutorials, and think-aloud interviews.To accomplish this, the research methodology involves conducting preliminary interviews via the think-aloud method, as well as a surveybased study. In the survey, participants will be asked to share their understanding of tutorial information and their experience with tooltips.Data analysis will be conducted using both quantitative and qualitative methods.This study discusses information overload for players within the tutorial section and tooltips within, analyzing issues from playersperspective and discussing and highlighting these issues and the challenges of overcoming them.

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  • 74.
    Kilicbay, Can
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Taking a step forward: Operator Oriented Solutions for the Future of the Assembly Industry2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study targets assembly industry, which deals with varying businesses that require any product assembly. It reflects on the challenges of the current production lines at assembly industry regarding the trends of both the consumer and the industrial developments on technology investigated which aspects can be improved or re-designed under the given delimitations. Moreover further consideration is done on human operators’ role in the assembly line and their future role in correlation with their current challenges and expectations. Results and further analysis are done from the drift of the R&D on future assembly environment by considering interconnected software-hardware-human sides of the interaction, the change in the balance of products and also to point out new areas of research to Marketing and R&D Departments.

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    Kalicbay new thesis
  • 75.
    Kjellqvist, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Förbättring av den internt bristande kommunikationen inom Anticimex med fokus på kundtjänstavdelningen i Sollentuna2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s market condition gives us new opportunities for continuous change. The key to successful change is to adapt the business to the new conditions, where change is seen as opportunities instead of risks. A continuous pursuit of improvement in combination with will can create additional facilities regarding quality development.

    Anticimex is an international service company that handles pest controls, food safety, fire protection, house inspections etc. The customer service department in Sollentuna, north of Stockholm, emphasizes that the company today suffer from an internal communication failure. The purpose of the thesis of this work is to focus on root causes of the communication failure and how relevant elements can be streamlined. Based on a quality perspective, the case study will describe improvement and implementation proposals regarding the described problem area. Performed case study has been carried out together with all the employees at the customer service department as respondents. Follow the respondents’ statements, theory related to offensive quality management, communication, improvement work and motivation have been reported to develop the meaning of the thesis analysis. The results show that the overwhelming flow of information depends management’s way of communicating information mainly through the intranet which is connected to internal forums and mail. The intrinsic structure of the intranet also contributes to the loss of important information, where significant changes can affect employees’ duties and the overall customer satisfaction.

    The case study concludes that Anticimex is in need of change regarding the overwhelming information flow in connection with the intranet’s design. To delimit the information sent to only the parties concerned can create greater perspicuity for employees in the customer service department in Sollentuna. A good start to the problem may also be to introduce departmental meetings at local level. Employees in the customer service section can then jointly discuss issues related to ambiguities or change in which information becomes clearer. For a complete solution, it is suggested to introduce a change on management-level where the information is delimited or the intranet is restructured.

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    Examensarbete - Oliver Kjellqvist
  • 76.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Universität Zürich.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Network Media Logic and the Strucural Changes of Political Communication. : Some Conceptual Considerations2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    et al.
    Universität Zürich.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Network Media Logic: Some Conceptual Considerations2016In: Routledge Companion to Social Media and Politics / [ed] A. Bruns, G. Enli, E. Skogerbö, A. Larsson & C. Christensen, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we revisit our concept of network media logic and further develop it in relation with political logics. The perspective of network media logic is useful to explain how social media platforms change political communication without resorting to technological determinism or normalization. By relating network media logic to both mass media logics as well as political logics we are able outline how these are distinctly different, while still overlapping in terms of how political communication is produced, distributed and used. In this chapter we pay particular attention to how ideals, commercial imperatives, and technological affordances differ in news mass media and on social media platforms in terms of media production, media distribution and media usage.

  • 78.
    Kumar, Vikas
    Asia Pacific institute.
    Promoting social change through InformationTechnology2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Kumar, Vikas
    et al.
    Society for Education and Research Development.
    Svensson, JakobKarlstads universitet, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Proceedings of M4D 2012 28-29 February 2012 New Delhi, India2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Democracy, human fallibility and ICT2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, p. 295-301Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation of citizens in matters of policy is important for a well-functioning democracy. Many scholars have suggested deliberative democracy as a suitable model for this. However, concern for groups with weak interest in participating raise some doubt whether this really will be more democratic in the end. In this essay we outline a theoretical model for designing ICT systems so that they stimulate and train democratic dialogue. The model is based on psychological research on decision making and a definition of democracy as a dialectic process, and can be applied to practically any forum where ideas are exchanged.

  • 81.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tools for ethical and sustainable IT systems2012In: Creating and applying socially, ethically and professionally acceptable ICT systems: Current challenges and what is next? / [ed] Diane Whitehouse, 2012, p. 4-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we will discuss four different avenues to increase ethical awareness in individual organizations: stimulation, regulation, manipulation, and social pressure. Although all of these strategies are well known to induce behavioral change, some have naturally been more recurring in the discourse on ethics than others. We will present an overview over the possibilities and risks in each one of them and discuss their presence in a sample of methods: Enid Mumford’s ETHICS method, in which ethical dimensions are incorporated in common practise; ACM’s Codes of Ethics, which is aiming at creating norms in the community of computing professionals; Ambra Trotto’s Rights Through Making and Batya Friedman,s Value Sensitive Design, which have the ambition to enhance ethical awareness by embedding values in artifacts; and our own social media project ColLab, which turns ethical decision making into a collaborative, social enterprise. We will discuss and compare tools and methods reagrding their practical value in the light of philosophical theory and empirical research.

  • 82.
    Lagerkvist, Amanda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    "Existential Media Studies is a new Humanism”2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Lidéri, Felix
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Ågren, Agnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    The Cookie Monster: En studie över journalistikstudenters samt medie- och kommunikationsstudenters kunskaper, åsikter och ställningstagande gällande webbsidors användning av cookies2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since the introduction of online HTTP-cookies, the technology has been widely discussed, both in terms of its actual function, as well as what it can do to users’ behaviors on the Internet. Cookies are small unique text files found within websites on the Internet that can collect and store personal information in order to enhance the users’ experience, as well as to provide the website with essential information about the user.

    By a literature review that was conducted on the subject, an unawareness among Internet users of how websites use cookies was found. Most users do not know what kind of information a cookie can store and how their privacy today can be violated.

    With this in mind, we conducted a internet based survey and a focus group interview to study journalism students and media and communication students knowledge about websites usage of cookies and furthermore, how the students opine the technology. This, since they are expected to have a higher knowledge than the general student about the subject since they are studying to assumably work within branches where they may have important parts regarding ICT in the future.

    By applying Michel Foucault theory Panopticon, Jürgen Habermas The Public Sphere and Sandra Petronio’s Communication Privacy Management Theory to the result of the study, we could see that there is a general unawareness among the students about what kind of information a cookie can collect. Also, the students express negative opinions regarding this harvesting of information, yet little effort is made to obstruct or deny web sites’ use of cookies.

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    The Cookie Monster - En studie över journalistikstudenters samt medie- och kommunikationsstudenters kunskaper, åsikter och ställningstagande gällande webbsidors användning av cookies.
  • 84.
    Lilja Bermlid, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    How do we form trust online?: Guidelines for designing e-commerce websites to be trust-inducing2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Online trust has been cited as one of the most important reasons as to why someone choose to participate in e-commerce. The main research goal in this thesis is to explore the concept of online trust in e-commerce, how it is formed and by extension how it can be designed for. This thesis considers the research question “How can e-commerce websites be designed to be trust-inducing?”. First a literature study on the background of trust research was performed and the underlying factors of trust and the design elements that affect the formation of trust mapped out. Then popular Swedish e-commerce websites were investigated and design patterns were mapped out based on those websites. Based on previous research and the experience gained from these websites, 13 guidelines with focus on trust-inducing e-commerce design were created. To test the usefulness of the guidelines, analyses of websites using the guidelines were performed, as well as expert evaluations of websites by six of the authors peers. Overall this study found that the design of the websites that were investigated was lacking in customer service, third-party certifications and social-cue design in general. The thesis contributes to better website trust design by putting forth guidelines. The knowledge gained from the analyses of websites is a contribution in itself since it provides an understanding of how well e-commerce websites design for trust and which are the most common design issues. 

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    fulltext
  • 85.
    Lind, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Evaluation of the Uppsala University ROLE Prototype2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents an evaluation of a prototype of a personal learning environment, the ROLE prototype testbed at Uppsala University. The foci of the evaluation was the usability of the system and providing feedback to the ROLE project on the users’ impression of how well the system functioned as a personal learning environment. Two HCI researchers conducted the usability evaluation in the spring of 2012. The context of the evaluation was a course in Social Media and Web 2.0 at Uppsala University, and a survey was used for the assessment. The survey consisted of 28 questions and was answered by 16 of approximately 20 students attending the course (~80%). The report contains results from the analysis of data and some interesting results are that the students felt like they were part of a team while working with the system, and that the advanced inter-widget communication introduced in the system did not create conceptual difficulties for them. Furthermore, the best predictor for the value of the system seem to be how well it supports collaboration between peers. This implies that in online education it is important to focus on supporting collaboration.

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    Evaluation_of_the_Uppsala_University_ROLE_Prototype
  • 86.
    Lindner, Rebecca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Lärande genom spelande: Om spel och spelifiering i det moderna klassrummet2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 87.
    Liu, Ying-Hsang
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Chemnitz University of Technology.
    Nürnberger, Andreas
    Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg.
    Rettstatt, Jenny
    Chemnitz University of Technology.
    Ragni, Marco
    Chemnitz University of Technology.
    Saccadic Eye Movements and Search Task Difficulty as Basis of Modelling User Knowledge in Information Seeking2024In: Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, The Cognitive Science Society , 2024, Vol. 46, p. 2112-2120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing user-adaptive search systems necessitates modelling the user’s knowledge state during information seeking. Gazedata offers insights into cognitive processes during task-based reading. Despite its potential, cognitive perspectives have been insufficiently explored in the representation of the user’s knowledge state when designing search systems. We reanalyzed an eye-tracking dataset and constructed mixed-effects user models to identify which measurements of gaze activities (i.e., gaze metrics captured by eye trackers) are reflective of the user. Our study’s findings indicate that there are statistically significant correlations between gaze metrics that measure the variability of saccadic eye movement and search performance. The accuracy of answers has been significantly influenced by the interaction between the control of saccade trajectories, measured by the standard deviation of absolute saccadic directions and the difficulty of the search task. We discuss the implications of these findings for the design of search systems adaptable to the user’s state of knowledge.

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  • 88.
    Lundgren, Ellen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Björn, Sally
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    To Be or not to BeReal: En fallstudie av användares identitetskonstruktion på den sociala plattformen BeReal2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Social platforms are in many ways integrated into people's everyday lives. Since the emergence of the most common social platforms, the way in which people present themselves online has changed. From sharing unfiltered everyday images, a strong culture characterized by surface and perfection has come to influence the content of these platforms. However, this culture has shown to affect people negatively in the form of mental illness and an increased appearance fixation. As a response to this, more transparency is requested regarding the content of these platforms. Based on this background, this essay has investigated how people present themselves on platforms with the purpose to portray an authentic reality. A case study on the platform BeReal has therefore been carried out. The question that the study has intended to answer is: How do people construct their identity through technology whose stated purpose is to enable an authentic representation of the self? To answer the question, nine participants have been given the task of keeping a diary about their use of BeReal. A follow-up interview was then conducted with each participant. The empirical work has been analyzed based on Jean Baudrillard's (1981) theoretical framework Logic of Signification and also Social Network Affordances formulated by Jeffrey Treem & Paul M. Leonardi (2013). The results show that users highlight desirable activities with the aim of portraying themselves in a certain way. These activities are often highly ranked based on a cultural and societal context, which is made visible through the Logic of Signification. Social Network Affordances sheds light on the way in which technology limits and enables users to use the platform. This shows how users sometimes bypass the technical aspects with the aim of constructing themselves in a desirable way. Therefore, a discussion has been held about how it seems difficult to escape the polished image that characterizes many social platforms. An explanation for this could be that recognition in others, rather than authenticity, is what gives the best positive outcome for identity construction. Another finding, the authenticity paradox, highlights how an authentic presentation in some cases contributes to even more negative feelings. This is based on the fact that the constant comparison with others affects the view of the self. 

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    To Be or not to BeReal
  • 89.
    Lutz, Peter A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Tinkering Care Moves: Senior Home Care in Practice2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation builds on the current anthropological studies of care relations in practice. It draws inspiration from science and technology studies (STS) and postfeminist technoscience. A qualitative ethnographic approach grounds the empirical data collection and analysis. This entails ethnographic fieldwork with senior home care in the United States and Sweden during 2007–2008 and 2011–2012. Analytical attention centers on how movements situate various tensions of senior home care in practice. Four interrelated published works comprise the main thematic chapters. Each article exemplifies how human and nonhuman relations move and mediate care. They develop several heuristic terms that advance ideas about how older people, aging bodies, technologies, spaces, and times that tinker each other through movements of care in practice. The comprehensive summary frames these articles with an overview of the primary thematic orientations and methodological concerns. A discussion of the main contributions and implications of the dissertation concludes the work.

    List of papers
    1. Clutter Moves in Old Age Homecare
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clutter Moves in Old Age Homecare
    2010 (English)In: New Technologies and Emerging Spaces of Care / [ed] Michael Schillmeier, Farnham: Ashgate, 2010, p. 77-94Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter introduces the notion of 'clutter moves' as an experimental heuristic for tracing how movement threads together a range of messy entities in old age homecare ecologies including older people and their technical arrangements. It is based on empirical data originating from an ethnographic study of old age homecare in the United States. Here the category of home clutter was revealed as more complex than it is commonly portrayed in popular or scholarly accounts, especially gerontology and geriatric–related literature on risk. This literature frequently cites general household clutter as a hazard in the domestic environment. In such reports moving around with cluttered things tends to threaten a dangerous outcome for older people. But what other possibilities emerge when analytical attention focuses on relational movements between older people and their cluttered collections of homely things? The chapter suggests that the moves between collecting and distributing clutter must be considered. For instance, it highlights how home clutter can afford older people additional movements that are not readily apparent. The chapter ends with reflections on the notion of clutter technology to extend the heuristic of clutter moves and help rethink conceptual assumptions about new technologies for home care.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Farnham: Ashgate, 2010
    Keywords
    United States, elderly, home care, technology
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Social Anthropology Information Systems, Social aspects
    Research subject
    Cultural Anthropology; Health Care Research; Human-Computer Interaction; Caring Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292762 (URN)9780754678649 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    2. Surfacing Moves: Spatial-Timings of Senior Home Care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surfacing Moves: Spatial-Timings of Senior Home Care
    2013 (English)In: Social Analysis: Journal of Cultural and Social Practice, ISSN 0155-977X, E-ISSN 1558-5727, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 80-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Like many countries, Sweden faces the challenge of population aging and senior care. Compared with institutionalized health care, senior home care offers a viable option, promising familiar surroundings and lower costs. However, those performing senior home care sometimes resist time management policies that pressure such care in practice. Some scholars analyze this situation as opposition between ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ time. This article takes a different route. It explores how time surfaces in Swedish senior home care through relational movements of care. These enlist things such as schedules, machines, and aging bodies. To this end, the article also experiments with ‘surfacing’ as an ethnographic heuristic for figuring the coming togeher of different times and spaces of care. The article concludes that surfacing matters not only in senior home care but also in the field-desk of ethnographic analysis.

    Keywords
    ethnography, elderly, home care, socio-material relations, spatial-timings, surfacing, Sweden, time management
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects Social Anthropology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Research subject
    Cultural Anthropology; Human-Computer Interaction; Caring Sciences; Health Care Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292766 (URN)10.3167/sa.2013.570106 (DOI)
    Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    3. Multivalent moves in senior home care: From surveillance to care-valence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multivalent moves in senior home care: From surveillance to care-valence
    2015 (English)In: Anthropology & Aging, ISSN 2374-2267, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 145-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies of care argue that it is a relational phenomenon, whereby human and nonhuman entities enter into transformative relations. In this light, different entities of care potentially mediate one another in practice, sometimes with surprising and unforeseen effects. In this article, I trace a similar argument. Drawing on ethnographic material from Sweden and the United States, I proffer that careful attentions to older people at home produce multivalent moves with transformative effects. Increasingly, such attentions encompass new technologies to monitor and observe aging bodies. On this topic, the healthcare literature often invokes the idea of care surveillance. Certainly, surveillance can offer a valuable analytical purchase in the study of care. Yet, care attentions are not always straightforward. Rather, the moving around of aging bodies with technologies can obstruct and transform care and its attentions. At the same time, care attentions can also obstruct and transform aging bodies and their technologies. I argue that the existence of these multivalent, somatechnic moves challenges the notion of surveillance in care. To strengthen this argument, I draw on STS-inspired anthropological studies of care. In turn, I also develop the heuristic term “care-valence”. The key advantage with this term, I proffer, is that it offers an analytical compliment to the notion of care surveillance and helps refocus the analysis on multivalent moves in care. 

    Keywords
    Aging Bodies, Care Technology, Home Care, Surveillance, Sweden, United States
    National Category
    Social Anthropology Information Systems, Social aspects Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292800 (URN)10.5195/aa.2015.105 (DOI)
    Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2020-03-02
    4. Comparative Tinkering with Care Moves
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative Tinkering with Care Moves
    2016 (English)In: Practicing Comparison. Revitalizing the Comparative Act / [ed] Deville, J. et al., Manchester: Mattering Press , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter stems from ethnographic fieldwork in the United States and Sweden. This work traces relations between people and technology as they come together in gatherings or socio-technical collectives for care. These hetergenious collectives situate interrelated consequences for the human and nonhuman actors concerned, but these are rarely smooth. Instead, they comprise ongoing tensions or frictions, which situate multiple acts of negotiation or tinkering. In this way, 'care moves' offers a conceptual-empirical figure for fine-tuning ethnographic attention to care as a rough and tinkered process. It denotes an analytical emphasis on care as a mediating phenomenon interwoven with collective relations on the move, empirically and conceptually, that entai both effects and affects. At the same time, the chapter does not seek a standardised social scientific comparison of two national healthcare systems. Rather than rely on established categories, it focuses on how to ethnographically tinker together - and thus care with - transnational comparisons in a more fluid manner. As such, it seeks an experimental and ethnographic approach sensitive to the specific ways care moves with its collective relations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Manchester: Mattering Press, 2016
    Keywords
    research methods, comparison, ethnography, senior home care, Sweden, United States
    National Category
    Social Anthropology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292803 (URN)978-0-9931449-0-5 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2020-03-10
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    Download (jpg)
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  • 90.
    Lv, Zhihan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Mauri, Jaime Lloret
    Univ Politecn Valencia, Valencia, Spain..
    Song, Houbing
    Univ Maryland, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Wang, Jingyan
    Pegasus FZ LLC, Sharjah, U Arab Emirates..
    Digital Twins: The Confluence of Virtual Reality With IoT2023In: IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine, ISSN 2162-2248, E-ISSN 2162-2256, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 27-28Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual reality (VR) and the Internet of Things (IoT) are two of the most important technologies to arise in the past decade or more. Taken individually, each technology represents a real sea change. VR has the potential to truly change the world in some surprising ways, while the IoT has already transformed the way we live our lives. Digital Twins is the confluence of these two developments, though, that offers the most promise and opportunity of all. VR applications promise to be the next mainstream business. They are used by companies in a wide range of industries, from product design to healthcare and employee training. At the same time, IoT platforms and related devices are much in demand in today's tech and business world. These smart devices connected to the Internet are capable of collecting, interpreting, and relaying data without human intervention or supervision.

  • 91.
    Löfström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    "Det är ett verktyg vi ska arbeta med": En studie av arbetet med Vision 2030 och Tillsammansmodulerna, delrapport 22011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är skriven i en populärvetenskaplig form. Syftet med den är att återkoppla forskningsresultat på ett lättillgängligt sätt till berörda personer i forskningsfältet. Forskningsprocessen har följt vetenskapliga krav och vetenskaplig etik.

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    fulltext
  • 92.
    Löfström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Det är pedagoger som bryr sig om vårt barn: En studie av påverkande faktorer vid föräldrars val av förskola2012Report (Other academic)
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  • 93.
    Löfström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Virtuella Samarbeten: Studie av uppfattningar kring webbaserade moduler inom ramen för Vision 2030 i Stockholms Stad, delrapport 12010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 94.
    Melander Bowden, Helen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Svahn, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Collaborative work on an online platform in the context of video-mediated homework support2020In: Social Interaction Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality, ISSN 2446-3620, Vol. 3, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study concerns the interactional work involved in the accomplishment of video-mediated homework support and is based on a single case analysis of an instructional encounter between a tutor and an upper-secondary student working together on mathematical assignments. In addition to communicating through vidoe, the participants use an online digital platform that constitutes a shared workspace and interface between the participants, who are situated in geographically disparate locations. A crucial feature of the setting is the unequal distribution of epistemically rich artefacts, such as the maths book, to which the tutee has sole access. Drawing on ethnomethodology and multimodal interaction analysis, the analyses show how the participants work together to establish shared points of reference from which they embark on collaborative problem-solving trajectories while establishing the problem to be worked upon and its interpretation, as well as negotiating proper presentations of solutions. Additionally, the way in which the participants overcome the interactional and epistemic challenges implicated by the unequal access to crucial epistemic resources is shown.

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  • 95.
    Messina Dahlberg, Giulia
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Billing, Erik
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Negotiating epistemic spaces for dialogue across disciplines in higher education: The case of the Pepper experiment2018In: EARLI, Joint SIG10-21 Conference, 2018, Luxembourg, 2018, Luxembourg, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Messina Dahlberg, Giulia
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Billing, Erik
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Negotiating epistemic spaces for dialogue across disciplines in higher education: The case of the Pepper experiment2018In: EARLI, Joint SIG10-21 Conference, 2018, Luxembourg, 2018, Luxembourg, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Mindus, Patricia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy, Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Greppi, AndreaFaculdad de derecho, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid.Cuono, MassimoDepartment of Economics, University of Sassari, Italy.
    LEGITIMACY 2.0: E-DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC OPINION IN THE DIGITAL AGE2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital democracy has been cutting the edge in fields connected to legal, political and social theory over the last two decades but cross- fertilization and transdisciplinary approaches are still scarce. The impact of ICTs on political and governance processes seem elusive to traditional theoretical settings and mainstream conceptualizations. This is a selection of peer-reviewed conference papers originally presented at the workshop Legitimacy 2.0: E-democracy and Public Opinion in the Digital Age, at the IVR World Congress held in Frankfurt, August 18th 2011. They are also being published in the Law, Technology and Society - Proceedings XXV World Congress of IVR Special Workshop on "Legitimacy 2.0: E-democracy and Public Opinion in the Digital Age", Paper series B, ed. by Ulfrid Neumann, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main 2012. These papers offer different approaches to findings in the field, the purpose being to go beyond the polarization between the apologists that hold the web to overcome the one-to-many architecture of opinion-building in traditional democratic legitimacy, and the critics that warn cyberoptimism entails authoritarian technocracy.

  • 98.
    Mohammedsalih, Salah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Mobile Journalism: Using smartphone in journalistic work2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile phones have had a drastic influence on media production, by providing a ubiquitous connection. This revolution has come about when smartphone turned into a powerful tool to do almost all the production-related work that was done previously by specialized equipment and computers. This has encouraged ordinary individuals to involve in media work and emerging the phenomenon of mobile journalism, where citizens and individuals can engage in journalism work carry out a job that was supposed to be done only by journalists for a long time ago. We are talking about hundreds of thousands of prosumers and amateurs who are making and covering news by their smartphones and contributing to journalism work. This has become particularly apparent in relation to reporting from remote and risky areas, where journalists cannot reach easily or may not arrive on time while important events occur. This was obvious during the Arab-spring - The role of smartphones in feeding both social media and traditional media with instant photos and videos taken by protesters themselves. This thesis focuses on the role of the smartphone in facilitating the work of journalists.

    As a part of the literature review, the author has gone through many texts, watched videos and listened to radio shows with journalists and workers in media spheres, in which journalists talk about their own experience with practicing mobile journalism. Then from a phenomenological perspective and framework the experience of technology and user aspects of mobile journalism are investigated. As the aim of this thesis is not to validate a hypothesis or a theory, a qualitative research method is used to come to an evaluation and explanation of the phenomenon of using mobile in journalism. For that purpose, several qualitative methods have been used to collect data such as auto-ethnography, observation, interviews and focus groups. The data are collected mainly from Kurdistan region in northern Iraq where journalists were covering news of war in dangerous and risky battle fields.  

    The findings from the results showed that the main factors that make smartphones powerful tools for journalists are: the low budget required for acquiring a smartphone compared to expensive equipment used in traditional media, the freedom and independence that a mobile can give to a journalist, the design aspects which provide a pocket-size tool with unsuspiciousness feature that make it possible to be carried and used even in areas where journalistic work is not allowed. The ubiquity feature of mobile has helped to cover news in areas where traditional media cannot be existing or cannot reach easily. The ability of individuals to obtain a smartphone in one hand and the universal design of mobile in another hand have helped to be used in journalism work by many people with no necessary training courses. This situation has created a good opportunity for media institutions and TV stations to expand their correspondents’ network all over the countries.

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    Mobile Journalism
  • 99.
    Molavi Arabshahi, Amir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Elderly users & Mobile Phones: An explorative Study on Designing for Emotion & Aesthetic Experience: 2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to examine the role that non-instrumental aspects such as aesthetic and emotion play in elderly user interaction with mobile phones. It presents an analysis of the results from in-depth interviews with a selected group of Swedish elderly users, and discusses how the aesthetic experience which they yield in interacting with mobile phones could impact their preference, and their perceived usability of the devices.  A set of mobile phones, different in usability and aesthetic levels were presented to the group of elderly user in order to investigate how they perceive phones attributes, including appearance and general features, and different facets of their user experience, including their motivations of use, the involved emotions, desires, and concerns. The analyses revealed a possible existing correlation between non-instrumental aspects of elderly users’ interaction with mobile phones, and their preference to use those devices. While negative aesthetic experience as a result of social concerns had a strong negative influence on elderly’s perceived usability, and could consequently alter their preference, certain symbolic meanings in interaction such as the tendency to be modern, contributed to perceived ease-of-use & perceived usefulness of the mobile phones. Elderly user’s familiarity or earlier experience with a device or with the technology was found to be a confounding variable. However, in the presence of usability concerns, traditional factors of aesthetic went into the shadow, and therefore had no direct impact on users’ perceived usability of the device. A set of design solutions that would address elderly user’ both instrumental and non-instrumental concern, were proposed. 

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    AmirMolavi - MaserThesis
  • 100.
    Moll, Jonas
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Cancerpatienter positiva till journal på webben2021In: Onkologi i Sverige, no 4, p. 78-84Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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