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  • 51.
    Hosseini, Ayat
    The University of Tokyo.
    The Prosodization of Function Words in Persian2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 126-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the prosodic structure of weak (stressless) function words in Persian within the framework of Prosodic Phonology. Weak function words in Persian are prosodic clitics that form phrases with the material following them (proclitics) or preceding them (enclitics). So far, only the prosody of enclitics has been studied in the literature. The present study proposes that, in Persian, enclitics are affixalclitics, while proclitics are free clitics. These proposals contribute to the findings in Prosodic Phonologythat prosodic categories can in fact be recursive and non-exhaustive.

  • 52.
    Hvidberg-Hansen, Finn Ove
    Aarhus Universitet.
    Et Tammuz-relief i Mar Jacob-klostret nær Edessa2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the mountains ca. 7 km southwest of Edessa (Sanliurfa), there is a complex of ruins called Deir Yakup, containing a mausoleum and a monastery of Mar Jacob. Among the ruins, there is a relief showing the shape of a lying person flanked by a woman of the well-known Phoenician-Syrian motif: "The Mourning Venus." According to Syriac literature the cult of Balti (Venus)-Tammuz continued long into the Christian era and the motif of the relief clearly suggests that the ruins at Deir Yakup were a scene of a local Tammuz cult.

  • 53.
    Høgel, Christian
    University of Southern Denmark.
    The Greek Qur’an: Scholarship and evaluations2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 173-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early Greek translation of the Qur’an has received little notice, not least due to the many claims that it was a faulty and inadequate attempt of rendering the Qur’an into Greek. This article argues that the faults are very few and minor, and that the early translation (from before 870 CE) should instead be read as a serious example of early Qur’anic interpretation as well as a documentation of early Greek readership of the Qur’an.

  • 54.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Asian and African Languages.
    Arabic Dialectology: The State of the Art: Review of Dialectologia Arabica: A Collection of Articles in Honour of the Sixtieth Birthday of Professor Heikki Palva1996In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 43-44, p. 115-132Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Concerning two arguments of H. Bauer for a priority of the so-called imperfect (the ‘Aorist’)1986In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 33-35, p. 181-187Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Semitic circumstantial qualifiers in the Book of Judges: a pilot study on the infinitive2007In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 56, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The notion of diachrony and the modern Arabic dialects2003In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 51-52, p. 211-219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The personal markers in the modern Arabic dialects of the Arabian peninsula1991In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 40, p. 117-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The personal morphological space and a notion of distance in Semitic grammar1993In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 41-42, p. 96-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The position of Ugaritic among the Semitic languages1989In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 38-39, p. 54-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Isaksson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Towards a corpus-based syntax of the Arabic language. Review article2004In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 53, p. 165-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    korpus, korpusbaserad grammatik

  • 62.
    Isaksson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Lahdo, Ablahad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Review of Arabische Texte aus Kinderib, by Otto Jastrow2005In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 54, p. 222-223Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Isaksson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Asian and African Languages.
    Riad, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Asian and African Languages.
    Frithiof Rundgren’s Published Works 1986–1997: A Bibliography in Honour of Professor Frithiof Rundgren on the Occasion of his 75th Birthday the 25 December 19961996In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 45-46, p. 217-220Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Jahani, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Barjasteh Delforooz, Behrooz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Axenov, Serge
    St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Nourzaei, Maryam
    University of Olum va Tahqiqat, Fars, Iran.
    Impersonal Constructions in Balochi2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 168-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impersonal constructions are interesting from a typological perspective. Siewierska (2008: 3-4) finds that "[t]he semantic characterizations of impersonality centre on two notions", either "the lack of a human agent controlling the depicted situation or event" or "situations or events which may be brought about by a human agent but rucially one which is not specified." The present article focuses on grammatical constructions for situations or events brought about by a non-specified agent in one Iranian language, namely Balochi. It draws upon four Balochi corpuses available to the authors, comprising four different dialects of Balochi and consisting of altogether approximately 130,000 words.

    There are three constructions for a non-specific agent found in the corpus, those with the verb in 3PL, those with the verb in 2SG, and those with a passive verb. It seems that the 3PL construction allows the speaker to distance himself/herself from the event somehow in narrative texts, where the speaker and addressee are not included in the referential framework of this construction. The 2SG construction, on the contrary, allows an unrestricted impersonal interpretation in narrative texts. However, in procedural texts, the 2SG and 3PL constructions are used interchangeably to include the speaker, and probably also the addressee. The 2SG construction in narrative texts and the 2SG and 3PL constructions in procedural texts are open to a truly impersonal interpretation. Thus, the 3PL construction does follow the referential properties described by Siewierska (2008: 14–17) in narrative texts but has wider referential properties in procedural texts. In Balochi, the referential properties of the passive construction seem, on the contrary, not to be as unrestricted as Siewierska (2008: 23) suggests.

  • 65.
    Jahani, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Paul, Daniel
    University of Manchester.
    Fronting of the voiceless velar plosive in Persian2008In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 57, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fronting of the voiceless velar plosive /k/1 in Persian2 has been described in several grammars. However, no complete study has been made of this phenomenon in different phonological environments. This article is an attempt to make a complete survey of the /k/ phoneme in Persian in different environments in order to establish allophonic rules for its pronunciation.Several linguistic consultants were recorded and their pronunciation of /k/ was analysed by means of the software Praat in order to determine the burst frequencies of /k/ in different phonetic environments. Palatographic analysis was conducted with one consultant. This investigation shows that the fronting of /k/ in Persian occurs word-finally, and when preceding a front vowel or a consonant. When followed by a back vowel /k/ is not fronted.

  • 66.
    Jahani, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Viberg, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Impersonal Constructions — A Brief Introduction2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 119-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Jügel, Thomas
    Vergleichende Sprachwissenschaft, Universität Frankfurt, Germany.
    Ergative Remnants in Sorani Kurdish?2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 142-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Korn, Agnes
    Vergleichende Sprachwissenschaft, Universität Frankfurt.
    Iranian Minority Languages. Introduction2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 117-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Korn, Agnes
    Vergleichende Sprachwissenschaft, Universität Frankfurt, Germany.
    Western Iranian Pronominal Clitics2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 159-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Károly, László
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Memores acti prudentes futuri2019In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 62-68, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 71.
    Kümmel, Martin Joachim
    Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena.
    The Iranian Reflexes of Proto-Iranian *ns2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 138-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The obvious cognates of Avestan tąθra- ‘darkness’ in the other Iranian languages generally show no trace of the consonant θ; they all look like reflexes of *tār°. Instead of assuming a different word formation forthe non-Avestan words, I propose a solution uniting the obviously corresponding words under a common preform, starting from Proto-Iranian *taNsra-: Before a sonorant *ns was preserved as ns in Avestan (feedingthe change of tautosyllabic *sr > *θr) but changed to *nh elsewhere, followed by *anhr > *ã(h)r. Aparallel case of apparent variation can be explained similarly, namely Avestan pąsnu- ‘ashes’ and its cognates.Finally, the general development of Proto-Indo-Iranian *ns in Iranian and its relative chronology is discussed, including word-final *ns, where it is argued that the Avestan accusative plural of a-stems can be derived from *-āns.

  • 72.
    Lahdo, Ablahad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Review of Seeger, Ulrich, Der arabische Dialekt der Dörfer um Ramallah. Teil 1: Texte. (Semitica viva 44), Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2009, 479 pp.2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 199-200Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Lahdo, Ablahad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Some Remarks on Language Use and Arabic Dialects in Eastern Turkey2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 105-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Lahdo, Ablahad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Text Sample from Dērīk (al-Malikiyah)2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 61-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Levinsohn, Stephen H.
    SIL International.
    Introducing Reported Speeches in Balochi of Sistan with ki2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Balochi conjunction of general subordination, ki, sometimes introduces complement clauses that report speeches. Barjasteh Delforooz (2010a: 224) suggested that, when so used, ki “has a highlighting function.… The marked speeches push the story forward to its goal.” The current paper argues that, in fact, ki highlights not the speech itself, but its consequences. When ki precedes a reported question, for example,the answer is more important than the question. The presence of ki may also indicate that the words in a speech were not said on a particular occasion, but represent the substance of what someone else said or used to say, is to say or could have said. In other words, ki is a “linguistic indicator of interpretive use”(Blass 1990: 104; Farrell 2005: 1). The paper ends by discussing how the above motivations for using ki before a reported speech in Balochi can be reconciled.

  • 76.
    Lidén, Johanna
    Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Stockholms Universitet.
    Buddhist and Daoist influences on Neo-Confucian thinkers and their claim of orthodoxy2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 163-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to describe the Buddhist and Daoist influences on the formation of Neo-Confucianism in particular regarding its selection and exegesis of Confucian Classics and its view of the cosmos and the nature of man, as well as the quest for a certain mental state. The Buddhist and Daoist influences on Neo-Confucianism and the syncretistic tendencies during the Song and Ming dynasties made the question of heresy and orthodoxy acute. Thinkers who borrowed many alien elements are especially prone to strongly defend themselves with claims to orthodoxy, and at the same time are highly critical of the other traditions they often have forsaken at an earlier stage in their development. It is impossible to determine who was most influenced by Buddhism, Zhu Xi or Wang Yangming. The difference between them is not a difference in degree but that they adopted different parts of Buddhism, Zhu Xi more of its philosophy, whereas Wang Yangming more of its praxis.

  • 77.
    Mahmoudzahi, Mousa
    et al.
    Velayat University, Iranshahr, Iran.
    Korn, Agnes
    CNRS; Mondes iranien et indien.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Synchronically unexpected /n/ in the Balochi dialect of Iranshahr2019In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 62-68, p. 20-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the passage of time, changes take place in any language. Balochi has experienced historical changes in different layers of its structure. The aim of this article is to describe cases of /n/ in a specific Balochi dialect that are synchronically unexpected because, for instance, the equivalent word in Persian or in other Balochi dialects does not have an /n/, or there are certain forms in the paradigm of a lexeme that do not contain /n/. The focus is on the dialect spoken in and around the regions of Bompur and Iranshahr in Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran.

    The insertion of unetymological /n/ in words with more than one syllable often causes a change of syllable structure from an open to a closed syllable. It is possible that a preference for closed syllables has got the process of /n/ insertion underway. The reason why /n/ is chosen could be that /n/ is available for nasalization of a vowel. This nasal vowel can then be re-interpreted as VC.

  • 78.
    Miller, Corey
    University of Maryland.
    Variation in Persian Vowel Systems2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 156-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vowel systems employed by different varieties of Persian across time and space exhibit a great deal of variation. This study attempts to describe that variation diachronically, in the spirit of Pisowicz (1985),and synchronically by examining the three major national varieties: Farsi, Dari and Tajik. We interpret the variation encountered through general principles of vowel shifting, as described by Labov (1994), from an Early New Persian baseline. We thus trace the historical development of the vowel systems in the major varieties of Persian spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, clarifying the relationships among the varieties and the extent of their adherence to such principles.

  • 79.
    Moestrup, Elisabeth
    University of Aarhus.
    Diglossia and the ideology of language. The use of the vernacular in a work by Youssef Fadel2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 139-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the use of the standard and the vernacular in the Moroccan novel Qiṣṣat ḥadīqat al-ḥayawān (The Zoo Story) by Youssef Fadel. It demonstrates that the writer uses the vernacular as an ideological stance, and to comment on political predicaments, domestic and global. I argue that the use of the two varieties are used along ideological lines, not as each other’s opposite, but to put each other into relief, and that they are competing for hegemony rather than being in a static relationship.

  • 80.
    Montaut, Annie
    National Institute of Oriental Languages and Civilizations, Paris, France.
    Parody as positive dissent in Hindi theatre2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 20-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parody (etymologically a voice alongside another voice) involves imitation, but what is crucial is the co-presence of these two voices, the parodying and the parodied. It is the dialogue between two enunciative spheres, two utterances, hence its preeminent position in the Bakhtinian concept of dialogism. The two points of view, set against each other dialogically, represent two utterances, speakers, styles, languages, and axiological systems, even if they issue from a single speaker. As a reflexive device and critical manipulation of canonized forms, parody has often been considered as the epitome of postmodernism in European and North American literature and artistic expression. The paper aims to show that, in Hindi theatre, parody is politically significant. The article focuses on Bhartendu Hariścandra (1850—1885) and Habīb Tanvīr (1923—2009). It argues that the use of the quotes of Nazīr Akbarābādīin Tanvīr’s most famous play Āgrā Bāzār, a poet who himself parodies the traditional poetical canons, enhances a literary reflexivity that is one of the deepest creative devices of Indian culture.

  • 81.
    Månsson, Anette
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Reuven Snir: Religion, Mysticism and Modern Arabic Literature2008In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. LVI(2007)Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Nielsen, Helle Lykke
    University of Southern Denmark.
    E-learning and the dilemma of learner autonomy: A case study of first year university students of Arabic2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 89-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article reports on a study where e-learning tools in the form of online tests, individual learning plans and portfolios were included into the teaching of Arabic as a second language at university level with the aim of promoting learner autonomy. The results indicate (i) that compulsory use of the e-learning tools might be necessary if all students are to participate; (ii) that gender and ethnic background seem to play a role in the use of the e-learning tools; and (iii) that the students who might benefit most from using e-learning tools to promote learner autonomy, are the ones who use them the least.

  • 83.
    Nielsen, Helle Lykke
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Perho, Irmeli
    University of Helsinki.
    Forord2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. vii-xiArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Nourzaei, Maryam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Distribution and Role of the Verb Clitic =a/a=in Different Balochi Dialects2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 170-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the distribution and role of the verb clitic =a/a= in a variety of Balochi dialects.We summarize earlier findings, argue for the interpretation of this morpheme as a clitic, and present new data for four Balochi dialects spoken in Iran. In these four dialects, the verb clitic is variously consistently proclitic (one dialect), restricted proclitic (two dialects), and restricted enclitic (one dialect). We also find that there is a stronger tendency for enclitic attachment of the verb clitic =a/a= the further eastwards a certain Balochi dialect is spoken.The basic semantic component of the verb clitic =a/a= is one of imperfectivity, and it is used with the non-past indicative and the past imperfective indicative verb forms. It can be linked to the homophonous verb clitic found in several other Western Iranian languages.

  • 85.
    Oesterheld, Christina
    Universität Heidelberg, Germany.
    Wie viel Lachen verträgt der Glaube? Urdu-Satiren in Pakistan2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 60, p. 33-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before turning towards Pakistan, the Urdu tradition of a playful, humorous, or satirical treatment of attitudes toward religion is demonstrated with examples from ’Nazī̤r’ Akbarābādī(1740‒1830), Mirzā Asadullāh Khān ’Ġālib’ (1797‒1869), Akbar Illāhābādī(1846‒1921), and Muhammad Iqbāl (1877‒1938), after which follows a brief discussion of three satirical authors whose texts were published in Pakistan between 1956 and 2001.

    Nasīm Hijāzī(1914‒1996), who is best known for his “Islamic” historical novels, wrote a satirical play on the futile attempts of secular, westernized urban intellectuals to wean simple country people off their religious and moral values. The background of his play S̤aqāfat kī talāś (In search of culture, 1956/1959) was formed by discussions about the cultural identity of Pakistan in which he represented the stance of an exclusive reliance on religious unity, denying cultural, ethnic, and social differentiations. His urban intellectuals are ridiculed throughout. Sayyid Ẕamīr Jacfrī(1916‒1999), on the other hand, in his poems and columns, criticises religious hypocrisy, sectarian strife, and the use of religious rhetoric to mask corruption and misgovernment. Muśtāq Ahmad Yūsufī (born 1923), in his mock-autobiography Zarguzaśt (The fate of money, 1976), deals with aspects of urban life in the early years of Pakistan. The characters in his book display an attitude of “live and let live” in which respect for religious feelings is coupled with a mild disregard for ritualistic aspects of religious practice. Hence much of his writing is ironic rather than satirical. Similar attitudes prevail in later novels by a variety of Pakistani authors, but at the same time one can discern a growing tendency to ascertain and redefine Muslim identity, which seems to be a reaction to the Islamophobia rampant in Western media since 2001 as well as to the conflicts that are undermining the unity and legitimacy of the Pakistani state.

  • 86.
    Okati, Farideh
    et al.
    Dept. of English Language and Linguistics, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan, Iran.
    Ahangar, Abbas Ali
    Dept. of English Language and Linguistics, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan, Iran.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Fronting of /u/ in Iranian Sistani2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 120-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Okati, Farideh
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. University of Zabol.
    Helgason, Pétur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Jahani, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Diphthongization in Five Iranian Balochi Dialects2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 107-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the phenomenon of diphthongization, eː> ie and oː > ue, in different varieties of Iranian Balochi dialects spoken in the five regions of Sistan, Saravan, Khash, Iranshahr and Chabahar in the southeast corner of Iran. The study reveals that diphthongized production of these vowels is predominant in the Khash dialect, suggesting that they should be represented as the diphthongs ie and ue in the vowel inventory of this dialect. In the Iranshahr and Chabahar dialects, which show the second and third highest degrees of diphthongization among the dialects under study, the data indicate a diphthongization tendency rather than a shift to predominantly diphthongized productions. Sistan and Saravan show only sporadic tendencies toward diphthongization. Balochi, in general, has eight vowels i, i:, u, u:, a, a:, e:, o: (also called the Common Balochi vowel system), as well as the speech sounds ay and aw, which are referred to as diphthongs by some scholars and are believed to be sequences of V+C by others. The occurrence of diphthongization in the dialects under study seems to be system-internal rather than due to external influence. Factors such as age, education, or language contact with surrounding languages such as Persian, do not appear to contribute to the occurrence of diphthongized vowel production.

  • 88.
    Olafsson, Sverrir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Pedersén, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Cuneiform Texts from Neo-Babylonian Sippar in the Gothenburg City Museum2001In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 50, p. 75-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complete publication of all the 32 Neo-Babylonian clay tablets with cuneiform text from the Shamash-temple in Sippar now in the Gothenburg City Museum. Introduction, transliteration, translation and commentary.

  • 89.
    Ottosson al-Bitar, Astrid
    Department of Oriental Languages, University of Stockholm.
    Giving Voice to Silenced Stories in the Novel Kamā yanbaghī li-nahr [As is appropriate for a river] by Manhal al-Sarrāj2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Palva, Heikki
    University of Helsinki.
    Tale of the magic scarf2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The motif of the tale is how the innocence of the bride brought from a distant village and the honesty of the servant who fetched her, are proven. In the plot, the magic scarf plays a central role. Linguistically, the text is an example of the use of two different types of dialectal Arabic in Jordan. In the narrative, a conservative form of the local rural dialect is used, whereas the poetic passages display a variety of the Bedouin-type language of the so-called Nabaṭi poetry.

  • 91.
    Pedersén, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Reading of the Neo-Assyrian Logogram U.U1986In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 33-35, p. 313-315Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Pedersén, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Written and Oral Tradition: Mesopotamia compared with some other Cultures1990In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 38-39, p. 120-124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Perho, Irmeli
    University of Helsinki.
    Magic in the ḥadīths 2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 183-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ḥadīths reporting on the incident where the Prophet was bewitched vary significantly in detail. An analysis of the details reveals varying attitudes towards magic in the Muslim community portrayed in the ḥadīths. The efficacy of magic was recognised but according to some ḥadīths, God’s power was sufficient to counter the power of magic whereas according to other ḥadīths, protective spells were necessary tools to ensure that an act of witchcraft lost its power to do harm. In the ḥadīths magic is seen as a power distinct from God, whereas in the Qurʾān magic is a power that is ultimately subject to God’s will.

  • 94.
    Ramsay, Gail
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Confining the Guest-Laborers to the Realm of the Subaltern in Modern Literature from the Persian Gulf2004In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 53, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Ramsay, Gail
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Semitic languages.
    Understanding Near Eastern Literatures: A Spectrum of Interdisciplinary Approaches2001In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 50, p. 134-136Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Ramsay, Gail
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    What kind of Arabic and why? Language in Egyptian blogs2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 49-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article strives to set in motion comprehensive research on the ways in which Arabic is evolving in Arabic blogs and computer mediated communication (CMC). By combining media studies, sociolinguistics and literature it examines code choice, content and mode of representation in five top ranked Egyptian blogs. We distinguish between MSA, ECA and mixed varieties and establish that all three codes may be employed. We argue that bloggers make deliberate choices regarding code, and that code-switching in CMC may function as frames for familiarizing or officialdom. We conclude that bloggers with an activist agenda tend to use ECA and a mixed variety, and educational blogs tend to use MSA and a mixed variety. Both activist and educational bloggers may employ a Bakhtinian carnivalesque mode of representation.

  • 97.
    Retsö, Jan
    Department of Languages and Literatures, University of Gothenburg.
    Nebes, Norbert: Der Tatenbericht des Yiṯaʿʾamar Watar bin Yakrubmalik aus Ṣirwāḥ (Jemen). Zur Geschichte Südarabiens im frühen 1. Jahrtausend vor Christus. Mit einem archäologischen Beitrag von Iris Gerlach und Mike Schnelle. Tübingen: Wasmuth 2016. 148S., 74 meist farb. Abb., 1 CD. Lex. 8° = Epigraphische Forschungen auf der Arabischen Halbinsel. Band 7. Hartb. € 25,00. ISBN 978-3-8030-2203-52019In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 62-68, p. 9-12Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Rooke, Tetz
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Adonis på svenska: en översättningskritik2012In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, no Supplement, p. 153-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a case study of how the Arab poet Adonis has been translated into Swedish. The theoretical framework is the old issue of "untranslatability". The method applied is a close reading of selected poems by Adonis and their published Swedish translations. What kind of translation losses have occurred in the transposition of the complex originals? The study examines this question through four critical focuses: 1) grammar and semantics, 2) intertextuality and culture, 3) poetic form, and 4) editing and selection. The analysis shows that "Adonis in Swedish" is a very different poet from "Adonis in Arabic" due to the combined effect of manipulations occurring in all these fields. Overall the result supports the claim that translation of Arabic literature in the Nordic countries is still on the experimental stage.

  • 99.
    Rydholm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Theories of Genre and Style in China in the Late 20th Century2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. LIX, p. 85-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Rydholm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Theories of Genre and Style in China in the Late 20th Century2010In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 59, p. 85-116Article in journal (Refereed)
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