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  • 51.
    Anderson, J
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Electrophysiological response of male bumble bees to odors: marking pheromones and volatiles of different chemical classes.1997In: Senior Research Thesis, Whitman College, USA, , p. 1-28Report (Other scientific)
  • 52.
    Anderson, NJ
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Blomqvist, Peter
    Renberg, I
    An experimental and palaeoecological study of algal responses to lake acidification and liming in three central Swedish lakes1997In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYCOLOGY, ISSN 0967-0262, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 35-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary phytoplankton and palaeolimnological studies were made of the algal response to acidification and liming in three lakes in Halsingland, central Sweden (Njupfatet, Sjosjon, Djuptjarn). Surveys and experimental studies of the phytoplankton resp

  • 53. Anderson, Tovi M.
    et al.
    vonHoldt, Bridgett M.
    Candille, Sophie I.
    Musiani, Marco
    Greco, Claudia
    Stahler, Daniel R.
    Smith, Douglas W.
    Padhukasahasram, Badri
    Randi, Ettore
    Leonard, Jennifer A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Bustamante, Carlos D.
    Ostrander, Elaine A.
    Tang, Hua
    Wayne, Robert K.
    Barsh, Gregory S.
    Molecular and Evolutionary History of Melanism in North American Gray Wolves2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 323, no 5919, p. 1339-1343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphological diversity within closely related species is an essential aspect of evolution and adaptation. Mutations in the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) gene contribute to pigmentary diversity in natural populations of fish, birds, and many mammals. However, melanism in the gray wolf, Canis lupus, is caused by a different melanocortin pathway component, the K locus, that encodes a beta-defensin protein that acts as an alternative ligand for Mc1r. We show that the melanistic K locus mutation in North American wolves derives from past hybridization with domestic dogs, has risen to high frequency in forested habitats, and exhibits a molecular signature of positive selection. The same mutation also causes melanism in the coyote, Canis latrans, and in Italian gray wolves, and hence our results demonstrate how traits selected in domesticated species can influence the morphological diversity of their wild relatives.

  • 54.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Differentiation and Pathogenicity within the Saprolegniaceae: Studies on Physiology and Gene Expression Patterns in Saprolegnia parasitica and Aphanomyces astaci2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Saprolegnia parasitica and Aphanomyces astaci are parasitic water moulds belonging to the Oomycetes. Despite their importance as parasites they are very little studied at the molecular level and the work described in this thesis was aimed at increasing the molecular knowledge of these organisms by cloning and characterising genes of potential importance for reproduction and pathogenicity.

    Stage-specific transcripts from Saprolegnia parasitica were isolated by differential display RT-PCR. One of the markers, puf1 encodes a putative mRNA binding protein which may be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. S. parasitica puf1 is expressed exclusively in spore cysts that have not been determined for germination or repeated zoospore emergence indicating that the cyst stage has two phases, of about equal duration, which are physiologically and transcriptionally distinct. A similar expression pattern is observed in Aphanomyces spp. with different regulation of spore development and in the transcript is detected in both primary and secondary cysts.

    A putative chitinase AaChi1, was cloned from the crayfish plague fungus, Aphanomyces astaci. Analysis of chitinase activity and AaChi1 expression showed that chitinase in A. astaci is constitutively expressed in growing and sporulating mycelia, but absent in zoospores, a pattern which reflects the infectious life cycle of A. astaci. This expression pattern is conserved between the four known genotypes of A. astaci, in contrast to saprophytic and fish-pathogenic Aphanomyces spp.

    Genetic and physiological analysis were conducted on five strains of Aphanomyces, isolated from suspected outbreaks of crayfish plague in Spain and Italy. The strains are not virulent against freshwater crayfish, and RAPD PCR and ITS sequence analysis show that they are unrelated to the crayfish plague fungus, A. astaci.

    List of papers
    1. Pumilio homologue from Saprolegnia parasitica specifically expressed in undifferentiated spore cysts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pumilio homologue from Saprolegnia parasitica specifically expressed in undifferentiated spore cysts
    2002 In: Eukaryotic Cell, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89574 (URN)
    Available from: 2001-12-20 Created: 2001-12-20Bibliographically approved
    2. Comparison of pufI expression in Aphanomyces spp. with different regulation of germination
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of pufI expression in Aphanomyces spp. with different regulation of germination
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89575 (URN)
    Available from: 2001-12-20 Created: 2001-12-20 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Analysis of chitinase expression in the crayfish plague fungus, Aphanomyces astaci
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of chitinase expression in the crayfish plague fungus, Aphanomyces astaci
    Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89576 (URN)
    Available from: 2001-12-20 Created: 2001-12-20Bibliographically approved
    4. Physiological and Genetic Characterisation of some Aphanomyces Strains Isolated from Freshwater Crayfish
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiological and Genetic Characterisation of some Aphanomyces Strains Isolated from Freshwater Crayfish
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89577 (URN)
    Available from: 2001-12-20 Created: 2001-12-20 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 55.
    Andersson, Hans Ola
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Structure-aided design of antiviral drugs: Application of the method on HIV-1 protease and SIV reverse transcriptase1999Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many efforts have been made to control the AIDS epidemic. Extensive studies have been done on the biology, biochemistry, and structural biology of HIV in the search for antiviral drugs. The viral-encoded enzymes reverse transcriptase and protease have been main targets for drug design.

    Our study on the HIV-1 protease involves the X-ray structure determination of ten complexes with C-terminally duplicated linear inhibitors and two complexes with C2-symmetric cyclic inhibitors. The structural study of the HIV-1 protease/linear inhibitors revealed several interesting properties of the protease, such as the flexibility of S2/S2' subsites, and the presence of coupled and symmetry restricted adaptation of the inhibitor binding subsites. We also found that the inhibitors adopted specific asymmetric conformation of their central parts, where only one of the gemdiol-hydroxyls is pointing toward the catalytic aspartates. The study of the C2-symmetric cyclic inhibitors showed that despite our efforts to promote a symmetric binding of the sulfamide compound, it seems prone to bind non-symmetrically. Our research has resulted in several highly competent inhibitor compounds.

    The work on sooty mangabey SIV reverse transcriptase (SIVsm RT) involves the expression,purification, characterization and studies of inhibition. A simple and efficient large-scalepreparation method was developed for SIVsm RT, in which processing of the p65/p65homodimer to the p65/p51 heterodimer was done with HIV-1 protease. The catalyticproperties of SIVsm RT were characterized. The sensitivity toward non-nucleoside inhibitorsNNI's) of SIVsm RT was distinct from HIV-1. By screening an inhibitor-library, two leadcompounds, MSK-046 and MSK-076 (IC50-values of ~10 µ), belonging to the PETT-serieswere identified.

  • 56.
    Andersson, Jan O.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Molecular evolutionary studies of genome degradation in bacteria1999Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Rickettsia belongs to the α-proteobacteria and consists of obligate intracellular bacteria, which often are pathogenic for humans. All Rickettsia have small genomes, highly adapted to an intracellular lifestyle. However, the ancestors of Rickettsia were most likely free-living organisms with substantially larger genomes, This thesis is a study of the reductive evolutionary processes by which Rickettsia has adapted to a life inside eukaryotic cells.

    The Rickettsia prowazekii genome sequence confirmed the close phylogenetic relationship between the genus Rickettsia and the mitochondria. In addition, 12 putative pseudogenes and an unusually large fraction of non-coding DNA (24%) were identified. Analysis of the metK genomic region in different Rickettsia species identified metK as a pseudogene in all but two lineages. The pattern of mutations indicated that the pseudogenes are no longer under purfying selection, and that metK was inactivated several times independently in different lineages. Similar patterns were found in many other Rickettsia pseudogenes, revealing an ongoing genome degradation process in the Rickettsia.

    Analysis of neutrally evolving pseudogenes showed that deletions dominate over insertions, and that there is a mutational bias towards A+T nucleotides, in the Rickettsia genomes. In agreement, the long intergenic regions in the R. prowazekii genome have a decreased G+C content. Several of these regions showed sequence homology to genes in orthologous positions in other Rickettsia genomes, which indicated that the long intergenic regions represent old genes that are disappearing from the genome.

    The ancestor of the two major Rickettsia groups may have encoded 200-300 additional genes compared to R. prowazekii. Differential loss of mostly genus specific genes during the evolution resulted in the present-day Rickettsia genomes. Currently, Rickettsia inactivates genes at a higher than they are eliminated from the genome by fixation of deletions.

  • 57.
    Andersson, Jan O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Andersson, Siv GE
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Pseudogenes, junk DNA, and the dynamics of Rickettsia genomes2001In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 829-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of neutrally evolving sequences suggest that differences in eukaryotic genome sizes result from different rates of DNA loss. However, very few pseudogenes have been identified in microbial species, and the processes whereby genes and genomes deteriorate in bacteria remain largely unresolved. The typhus-causing agent, Rickettsia prowazekii, is exceptional in that as much as 24% of its 1.1-Mb genome consists of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes. To test the hypothesis that the noncoding DNA in the R. prowazekii genome represents degraded remnants of ancestral genes, we systematically examined all of the identified pseudogenes and their flanking sequences in three additional Rickettsia species. Consistent with the hypothesis, we observe sequence similarities between genes and pseudogenes in one species and intergenic DNA in another species. We show that the frequencies and average sizes of deletions are larger than insertions in neutrally evolving pseudogene sequences. Our results suggest that inactivated genetic material in the Rickettsia genomes deteriorates spontaneously due to a mutation bias for deletions and that the noncoding sequences represent DNA in the final stages of this degenerative process.

  • 58.
    Andersson, M. G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Cerenius, L.
    Analysis of chitinase expression in the crayfish plague fungus, Aphanomyces astaciArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Andersson, M. G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Cerenius, L.
    Comparison of pufI expression in Aphanomyces spp. with different regulation of germinationManuscript (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Andersson, M. G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Comparative Physiology.
    Cerenius, L.
    Pumilio homologue from Saprolegnia parasitica specifically expressed in undifferentiated spore cysts2002In: Eukaryotic Cell, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Andersson, M., Van Nieuwerburgh, L. and Snoeijs, P.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Plant Ecology. PLANT ECOLGY.
    Pigment transfer from phytoplankton to zooplankton with emphasis on astaxanthin production in the Baltic Sea food web2003In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 254, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62. Andersson, Markus
    et al.
    Van Nieuwerburgh, Lies
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Biology.
    Snoeijs, Pauli
    Pigment transfer from phytoplankton to zooplankton with emphasis on astaxanthin production in the Baltic Sea food web2003In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 254, p. 312-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Andersson, Måns S.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Physiological trade-offs in reproduction and condition dependence of a secondary sexual trait2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines parental condition, how it is traded off against reproduction and how it is displayed in a secondary sexual trait. The studies were performed on nest-box breeding collared flycatchers Ficedula albicollis on the island of Gotland, in the Baltic Sea. Early breeding and high fitness were found to be associated with high levels of glycosylated haemoglobin possibly governed by migratory exertion and infectious disease. In order to test if immune function is expressed in secondary sexual traits and how it is traded off against reproductive effort a series of experiments were performed, in which birds were challenged with an antigen, via a vaccine containing neutralised paramyxovirus. The forehead patch of the male collared flycatcher serves as a badge of status and is under sexual selection. Good condition, as reflected in strong immune response and low levels of blood parasites was found to be associated with bigger patch size. Patch size was also found to vary in size within the same breeding season in a pattern predictable from immune response data. Immune response, in itself, was found to be costly in terms of reduced survival, confirming that trade-offs involving suppression of immune response may increase fitness. Mating effort was found to be traded off against immune function and moult. Experimental brood size manipulations revealed a trade-off females between number of offspring and immune function. Thus I suggest a set of parameters useful for condition estimation. I also show that immune response is costly and, second, that pathogen resistance probably plays an important role in the shaping of secondary sexual traits and life-history decisions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 64.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Differences in the genetic basis of leaf dissectin between two populations of Crepis tectorum (Asteraceae).1995In: Heredity, Vol. 75, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Floral reduction in Crepis tectorum (Asteraceae): tradeoffs and dominance relationships.1996In: Biol J Linnean Soc, Vol. 57, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Flower-fruit size allometry at three taxonomic levels in Crepis (Asteraceae).1996In: Biol J Linnean Soc, Vol. 58, p. 401-407Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Geographical differentiation in Crepis tectorum (Asteraceae): past and current patterns of selection.1995In: Genecology and Ecogeographic Races, AAAS , 1995, p. 115-132Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 68.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Phenotypic selection on plant height in a segregating hybrid population of Crepis tectorum (Asteraceae).1996In: Int J Plant Sci, Vol. 157, p. 488-492Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Quantitative genetics of leaf morphology in Crepis tectorum ssp. pumila (Asteraceae).1999In: J Hered, Vol. 90, p. 556-561Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Andersson, S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Seed size as a determinant of germination rate in Crepis tectorum (Asteraceae): evidence from a seed burial experiment.1996In: Can J Bot, Vol. 74, p. 568-572Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Andersson, SGE
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    The genomics gamble2000In: NATURE GENETICS, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 134-135Other (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Pair-wise genome comparisons offer new sources of information about the patterns and processes that influence genomic designs. Replication-dependent rearrangements, as indicated by the symmetric gene organization pattern in the genomes of Chlamydia pneumo

  • 72.
    Andersson, S.G.E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. MOLECULAR EVOLUTION.
    Alsmark, C.M.
    Canbäck, B.
    Davids, W.
    Frank, C.
    Karlberg, E.O.
    Klasson, L.
    Antoine-Legault, B.
    Mira, A.
    Tamas, I.
    Comparative genomics of microbial pathogens and symbionts.2002In: Bioinformatics, 2002, Vol. S2, p. 17-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Andersson, SGE
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Dehio, C
    Rickettsia prowazekii and Bartonella henselae: Differences in the intracellular life styles revisited2000In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY, ISSN 1438-4221, Vol. 290, no 2, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the alpha subdivision of proteobacteria, the arthropod-borne human pathogens Rickettsia prowazekii and Bartonella henselae provide examples of bacteria with obligate and facultative intracellular life styles, respectively. The complete genome seque

  • 74.
    Andersson, S.G.E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. MOLECULAR EVOLUTION.
    Karlberg, O.
    Canbäck, B.
    Kurland, C.G.
    On the origin of mitochondria: a genomics perspective.2003In: Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., Vol. 358, p. 165-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Andreasen, K.
    SYSTEMATISK BOTANIK. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Phylogeny of the Ixoroideae (Rubiaceae)1996Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Andreasen, K.
    et al.
    SYSTEMATIC BOTANY. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Baldwin, B. G.
    Nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence polymorphism and hybridization in checker mallows (Sidalcea, Malvaceae)2003In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Vol. 29, p. 563-581Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Andreasen, K.
    et al.
    SYSTEMATIC BOTANY. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Baldwin, B. G.
    Reexamination of relationships, habital evolution, and phylogeography of checker mallows (Sidalcea, Malvaceae) based on molecular phylogenetic data2003In: American Journal of Botany, Vol. 90, p. 436-444Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Andreasen, K., Baldwin, B. G., and Bremer, B.
    SYSTEMATIC BOTANY. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Phylogenetic utility of the nuclear rDNA ITS region in subfamily Ixoroideae (Rubiaceae): Comparisons with cpDNA rbcL sequence data1999In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, Vol. 217, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Andreasen, K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Baldwin, BG
    Unequal evolutionary rates between annual and perennial lineages of checker mallows (Sidalcea, Malvaceae): Evidence from 18S-26S rDNA internal and external transcribed spacers2001In: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, ISSN 0737-4038, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 936-944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterogeneous DNA substitution rates were found in the 18S-26S nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and external transcribed spacer (ETS) regions of Sidalcea (Malvaceae), a putatively young genus of annuals and perennials. The majo

  • 80.
    Andreasen, K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Bremer, B
    Combined phylogenetic analysis in the Rubiaceae-Ixoroideae: Morphology, nuclear and chloroplast DNA data2000In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY, ISSN 0002-9122, Vol. 87, no 11, p. 1731-1748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parsimony analyses of morphology, restriction sites of the cpDNA, sequences from the nuclear. ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS), and the chloroplast gene rbcL were performed to asses tribal and generic relationships in the subfamily Ixoroideae (

  • 81. Andres, JA
    et al.
    Morrow, EH
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology. Zooekologi.
    The origin of interlocus sexual conflict: is sex-linkage important2003In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 16, p. 219-223Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Andres JA, Morrow EH
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Animal Ecology. Zooekologi.
    The origin of interlocus sexual conflict: is sex-linkage important?2003In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 16, p. 219-223Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Andrén, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Nilson, G
    Höggren, M
    Tegelstrom, H
    Reproductive strategies and sperm competition in the adder, Vipera berus.1997In: Symposia of the Zoological Society of London, "Venomous Snakes:Ecology, Evolution and Snakebite", Clarendon Press , 1997, Vol. 70, p. 129-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Andrén, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Andersson, Paul
    Fröberg, Elisabeth
    Temporal variations of aluminum fractions in streams in the Delsbo area, central Sweden2001In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, Vol. 130, no 1-4, p. 1715-1720Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Anesio, Alexandre M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Denward, C Måns T
    Tranvik, Lars J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Graneli, Wilhelm
    Decreased bacterial growth on vascular plant detritus due to photochemical modification1999In: AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY, ISSN 0948-3055, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the effects of UV radiation on abiotic decomposition and dissolution of leaf Litter from the aquatic macrophyte Phragmites australis. Dead leaves were autoclaved and incubated in quartz tubes with autoclaved Milli-Q water, in darkness, und

  • 86.
    Anesio, Alexandre M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Tranvik, Lars J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Granéli, Wilhelm
    Production of inorganic carbon from aquatic macrophytes by solar radiation1999In: Ecology, Vol. 80, no 6, p. 1852-1859Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Anim, Behav
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Variation in aggressive behavior among migration forms and populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta).2001Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Ankarberg, Emma
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Environmental Toxicology.
    Neurotoxic Effects of Nicotine During Neonatal Brain Development: Critical Period and Adult Susceptibility2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examined neurotoxic effects of nicotine exposure during a defined critical period of neonatal brain development in mice.

    In our environment there are numerous hazardous contaminants that an individual can be exposed to during its entire lifetime. In many mammalian species the neonatal period is characterised by a rapid development of the brain. The present studies have identified a defined critical period during the neonatal brain development in mice, where exposure to low doses of nicotine causes permanent disturbances in the cholinergic nicotinic receptors and altered behaviour response to nicotine at adult age. This adult reaction to nicotine, a hypoactive response, was the opposite of that observed in control animals and animals exposed to nicotine before or after this period. Animals showing a hypoactive response to nicotine lacked nicotinic low affinity binding sites in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, neonatal exposure to nicotine affected learning and memory in adult animals, an effect that was time-dependent. This thesis also showed that neonatal exposure to nicotine increased adult susceptibility to a repeated exposure of nicotine, manifested as an even more pronounced effect in spontaneous behaviour after challenging doses of nicotine. In these animals the nicotinic receptors in the cerebral cortex, assayed by a-bungarotoxin, was decreased.

    Neonatal exposure to nicotine was also shown to increase adult susceptibility to the organophosphate paraoxon, a known cholinergic agent, and to the brominated flame retardant 2,2´,4,4´,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether, a novel environmental agent, at adult age. This was seen at doses that did not affect behaviour in control animals, and was manifested as deranged spontaneous behaviour and reduced habituation, aberrations that also worsened with age.

    The results indicate that differences in adult susceptibility to environmental pollutants are not necessarily an inherited condition. Rather they may well be acquired by low dose exposure to toxic agents during early life.

    List of papers
    1. Exposure to nicotine during a defined period in neonatal life induces permanent changes in brain nicotinic receptors and in behaviour of adult mice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure to nicotine during a defined period in neonatal life induces permanent changes in brain nicotinic receptors and in behaviour of adult mice
    2000 In: Brain Research, Vol. 853, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91050 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-11-11 Created: 2003-11-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Neurobehavioural defects in adult mice neonatally exposed to nicotine: changes in nicotine-induced behaviour and maze learning performance
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurobehavioural defects in adult mice neonatally exposed to nicotine: changes in nicotine-induced behaviour and maze learning performance
    2001 (English)In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 185-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Neonatal exposure to low doses of nicotine has been shown to disturb the development of low-affinity nicotinic binding sites in the cerebral cortex and to elicit a deviant behavioural response to nicotine in adult mice. In this study, 10-day-old male NMRI mice were exposed to one of three different doses of nicotine (3.3, 33, or 66 μg nicotine-base/kg body wt.) s.c. twice daily on 5 consecutive days to study dose–response effects of nicotine on adult spontaneous and nicotine-induced motor behaviour. The nicotine-induced behaviour test revealed a hypoactive response to nicotine in 4-month-old mice neonatally exposed to 33 or 66 μg nicotine-base, whereas the response to nicotine in control animals and mice exposed to 3.3 μg nicotine-base was an increased activity. Learning and memory functions were also investigated in adult animals neonatally exposed to 66 μg nicotine-base/kg body wt. in the same manner, in the Morris water maze and in the Radial arm maze. In the swim maze and the Radial arm maze tests, no significant differences were observed between nicotine-treated and control animals at the age of 4 months. At 7 months, however, a significant difference in performance was evident, indicating a time-response/time-dependent effect. Furthermore, it was shown that in mice exposed neonatally to a nicotine dose known to inhibit the development of the nicotinic low affinity-binding site (LA), the response to nicotine could not cause any increase in spontaneous motor activity as seen in controls.

    Keywords
    nicotine, neonatal, development, spontaneous behaviour, adult, maze
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91051 (URN)10.1016/S0166-4328(01)00207-8 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-11-11 Created: 2003-11-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Increased susceptibility to adult paraoxon exposure in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased susceptibility to adult paraoxon exposure in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine
    2004 (English)In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 555-561Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Low-dose exposure of neonatal mice to nicotine has earlier been shown to induce an altered behavioral response to nicotine in adulthood. Organophosphorus insecticides are known to affect the cholinergic system by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. This study was undertaken to investigate whether neonatal exposure to nicotine makes mice more susceptible to a known cholinergic agent. Neonatal, 10-day-old, male mice were exposed to nicotine-base (33 microg/kg body weight) or saline s.c. twice daily on five consecutive days. At 5 months of age the animals were exposed to paraoxon (0.17 or 0.25 mg/kg body weight [29% and 37% inhibition of cholinesterase, respectively]) or saline sc every second day for 7 days. Before the first paraoxon injection, the animals were observed for spontaneous motor behavior. The spontaneous motor behavior test did not reveal any differences in behavior between the treatment groups. Immediately after the spontaneous behavior test, the animals received the first injection of paraoxon and were observed for acute effects of paraoxon on spontaneous motor behavior. The acute response to paraoxon in the spontaneous motor behavior test was a decreased level of activity in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine. Control animals showed no change in activity. Two months after the paraoxon treatment, the animals were again tested for spontaneous motor behavior. Animals neonatally exposed to nicotine and exposed to paraoxon as adults showed a deranged spontaneous motor behavior, including hyperactivity and lack of habituation.

    Keywords
    Animals, Animals; Newborn/*physiology, Behavior; Animal/drug effects, Cholinesterase Inhibitors/*toxicity, Cholinesterases/metabolism, Habituation (Psychophysiology)/drug effects, Insecticides/*toxicity, Male, Mice, Motor Activity/drug effects, Nicotine/*pharmacology, Nicotinic Agonists/*pharmacology, Paraoxon/*toxicity, Receptors; Muscarinic/drug effects, Receptors; Nicotinic/drug effects, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91052 (URN)10.1093/toxsci/kfh274 (DOI)15356346 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2003-11-11 Created: 2003-11-11 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Increased adult susceptibility to paraoxon in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased adult susceptibility to paraoxon in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91053 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-11-11 Created: 2003-11-11 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Increased adult susceptibility to a brominated flame retardant, 2,2´4,4´,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 99) in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased adult susceptibility to a brominated flame retardant, 2,2´4,4´,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 99) in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91054 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-11-11 Created: 2003-11-11 Last updated: 2010-01-13Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 89.
    Ankarberg, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Environmental Toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Eriksson, Per
    Increased adult susceptibility to paraoxon in mice neonatally exposed to nicotineManuscript (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Ankarberg, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Increased susceptibility to adult paraoxon exposure in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine2004In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 555-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-dose exposure of neonatal mice to nicotine has earlier been shown to induce an altered behavioral response to nicotine in adulthood. Organophosphorus insecticides are known to affect the cholinergic system by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. This study was undertaken to investigate whether neonatal exposure to nicotine makes mice more susceptible to a known cholinergic agent. Neonatal, 10-day-old, male mice were exposed to nicotine-base (33 microg/kg body weight) or saline s.c. twice daily on five consecutive days. At 5 months of age the animals were exposed to paraoxon (0.17 or 0.25 mg/kg body weight [29% and 37% inhibition of cholinesterase, respectively]) or saline sc every second day for 7 days. Before the first paraoxon injection, the animals were observed for spontaneous motor behavior. The spontaneous motor behavior test did not reveal any differences in behavior between the treatment groups. Immediately after the spontaneous behavior test, the animals received the first injection of paraoxon and were observed for acute effects of paraoxon on spontaneous motor behavior. The acute response to paraoxon in the spontaneous motor behavior test was a decreased level of activity in mice neonatally exposed to nicotine. Control animals showed no change in activity. Two months after the paraoxon treatment, the animals were again tested for spontaneous motor behavior. Animals neonatally exposed to nicotine and exposed to paraoxon as adults showed a deranged spontaneous motor behavior, including hyperactivity and lack of habituation.

  • 91.
    Ankarberg, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Neurobehavioural defects in adult mice neonatally exposed to nicotine: changes in nicotine-induced behaviour and maze learning performance2001In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 185-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neonatal exposure to low doses of nicotine has been shown to disturb the development of low-affinity nicotinic binding sites in the cerebral cortex and to elicit a deviant behavioural response to nicotine in adult mice. In this study, 10-day-old male NMRI mice were exposed to one of three different doses of nicotine (3.3, 33, or 66 μg nicotine-base/kg body wt.) s.c. twice daily on 5 consecutive days to study dose–response effects of nicotine on adult spontaneous and nicotine-induced motor behaviour. The nicotine-induced behaviour test revealed a hypoactive response to nicotine in 4-month-old mice neonatally exposed to 33 or 66 μg nicotine-base, whereas the response to nicotine in control animals and mice exposed to 3.3 μg nicotine-base was an increased activity. Learning and memory functions were also investigated in adult animals neonatally exposed to 66 μg nicotine-base/kg body wt. in the same manner, in the Morris water maze and in the Radial arm maze. In the swim maze and the Radial arm maze tests, no significant differences were observed between nicotine-treated and control animals at the age of 4 months. At 7 months, however, a significant difference in performance was evident, indicating a time-response/time-dependent effect. Furthermore, it was shown that in mice exposed neonatally to a nicotine dose known to inhibit the development of the nicotinic low affinity-binding site (LA), the response to nicotine could not cause any increase in spontaneous motor activity as seen in controls.

  • 92.
    Ankarberg, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Environmental Toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Jacobsson, Eva
    Eriksson, Per
    Increased adult susceptibility to a brominated flame retardant, 2,2´4,4´,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 99) in mice neonatally exposed to nicotineManuscript (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Annas, Anita
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brittebo, Eva B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and endothelial activation of the heterocyclic amine Trp-P-1 in bird embryo hearts1998In: Archives of Toxicology, ISSN 0340-5761, E-ISSN 1432-0738, Vol. 72, no 7, p. 402-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The xenobiotic-metabolizing activity of avian heart was investigated in chicken and Eider duck embryos exposed to aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor agonists in ovo. Both beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) induced 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities in chicken embryo hearts whereas Eider duck embryos only responded to BNF. The differential responses of chicken and Eider duck embryos were used to examine the involvement of Ah receptor-mediated enzyme induction in the activation of the environmental and food mutagen 3-amino- 1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1). As determined by light microscopic autoradiography, there was a highly selective binding of non-extractable 3H-Trp-P-1-derived radioactivity in endothelial cells of large vessels and capillaries in hearts of BNF- and PCB 126-treated chicken embryos. No binding occurred at these sites in vehicle-treated controls. There was also a strong endothelial binding of 3H-Trp-P-1 in hearts of BNF-treated Eider duck embryos whereas no binding occurred in hearts of PCB 126-treated Eider duck embryos. A positive correlation between induction of EROD activity and covalent binding of 3H-Trp-P-1 to protein in heart homogenates from BNF- and PCB 126-treated chicken and Eider duck embryos was also observed. The results suggest a cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A)-mediated activation of Trp-P-1 in avian heart endothelial cells although involvement of other Ah receptor-regulated enzymes is also possible. We propose that heart endothelial cells may be targets for bioactivation and toxicity of environmental contaminants in birds exposed to Ah receptor agonists.

  • 94.
    Annas, Anita
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Granberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Strandberg, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Brittebo, Eva B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Toxicology.
    Brunström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Basal and induced EROD activity in the chorioallantoic membrane during chicken embryo development1999In: Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, ISSN 1382-6689, E-ISSN 1872-7077, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 49-52Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a highly vascularized tissue that takes part in the respiratory exchange of gases through the eggshell. Although the CAM may be exposed to environmental contaminants, its response to pollutants has not been studied. We examined the cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A)-catalyzed deethylation of 7-ethoxyresorufin (EROD) in the CAM during chicken embryo development. EROD was constitutively present and was inducible by the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor agonist 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Our results suggest the CAM as a first line of defence of the avian embryo against toxic compounds, but also as a target for CYP1A-activated chemicals.

  • 95.
    Aptroot, A. & Tibell, L.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Chaenotheca papuensis, a new species from huts in a mountain villige in Papua New Guinea.2003In: Australasian Lichenology, Vol. 52, p. 12-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Ardell, DH
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Andersen, SO
    Tentative identification of a resilin gene in Drosophila melanogaster2001In: INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, ISSN 0965-1748, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 965-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search of the Drosophila genome for gene products with similarities to the amino acid sequences of three tryptic peptides from locust (Schistocerca gregaria) resilin gave two positive results: gene products CG15920 and CG9036. In both conceptual transla

  • 97.
    Ardell, DH
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Sella, G
    On the evolution of redundancy in genetic codes2001In: JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR EVOLUTION, ISSN 0022-2844, Vol. 53, no 4-5, p. 269-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We simulate a deterministic population genetic model for the coevolution of genetic codes and protein-coding genes. We use very simple assumptions about translation, mutation, and protein fitness to calculate mutation-selection equilibria of codon frequen

  • 98.
    Arez, A.P., Pinto, J., Pålsson, K., Snounou, G., Jaenson, T.G.T. & do Rosári
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. SYSTEMATIC ZOOLOGY.
    Transmission of mixed Plasmodium species and Plasmodium falciparum genotypes.2003In: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg, Vol. 68, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Arez, A.P., Pinto, J., Pålsson, K., Snounou G., Jaenson, T.G.T and do Rosario V.E.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Transmission of mixed Plasmodium species and Plasmodium falciparum genotypes.2002In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, no 68, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Arnold, KE
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
    Griffith, SC
    Goldizen, AW
    Sex-biased hatching sequences in the cooperatively breeding Noisy Miner2001In: JOURNAL OF AVIAN BIOLOGY, ISSN 0908-8857, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 219-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala (Meliphagidae) is a cooperatively breeding bird species in which sons often remain on their natal home ranges and help one or both of their parents. In a population of Noisy Miners in SE Queensland, Australia, a mole

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