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  • 51.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lind, Lennart
    Stockholm University.
    The Coins in the Grave of King Childeric2015In: Journal of Archaeology and Ancient History (JAAH), E-ISSN 2001-1199, no 14, p. 1-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contextualizes some one hundred mid- to late 5th century solidi and two hundred silver coins found in the grave of King Childeric in Tournai, Belgium. We argue that the coins in the grave must have been assembled for the specific purpose of the burial rite and that some of the participants in the burial rite were allowed to look at the coins before the grave was sealed. We argue that they were capable of identifying the various coins because they were literate and familiar with Roman iconography. It follows that the solidus hoard together with the other coins is a meaningful composition that has been manipulated for ideological purposes by Clovis himself. The coins must hence be explained in a manner that considers Clovis’ ideological motives, as the grave and its contents run contrary to all usual explanations.

  • 52.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Fernando
    Univ Oxford Wolfson Coll, Linton Rd, Oxford OX2 6UD, England..
    Subsidies for the Roman West?: The flow of Constantinopolitan solidi to the Western Empire and Barbaricum2016In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 9, p. 249-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the presence of solidi struck in Constantinople found in 5th and early to mid-6th century solidus hoards in the Western Empire, Italy in particular. Some 112 different solidus hoards in eleven regions are compared and evaluated. It is suggested that solidi from Constantinople in most of these hoards may be interpreted as the evidence of subsidies for the Western Empire. A possible cause for the uneven but lengthy supply of gold from Constantinople to the Western emperor could have been the fear of Western insolvency and ultimately a state bankruptcy.

  • 53.
    Fischer, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Soulat, Jean
    Fischer, Teodora Linton
    Sword parts and their depositional contexts - Symbols in Migration and Merovingian Period martial society2013In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 109-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key feature of swords from the Migration and Merovingian Periods is that they consist of many different parts, as recently highlighted by the discovery of the Staffordshire hoard. This paper seeks to understand sword parts and their depositional contexts by interpreting them as symbols of kleptocracy, animated by their object biographies in a martial society. This is done by evaluating four important finds from Sweden: a stray intact sword from Scania, a cremation grave from Heberg in Halland, a wetland deposit from Snosback in Vastergotland, and the settlement finds from Uppakra in Scania. The presence of the various different parts varies substantially in the different kinds of contexts. In particular, the Uppakra settlement is missing hundreds of sword parts that ought to have been there given the professional excavations and systematic metal-detecting over many years there. This allows for the interpretation of the Uppakra sword parts as the remains of a battlefield of about AD 600 where most of the sword parts were removed from the site shortly after the battle.

  • 54.
    Flygare, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Den norrländska jakt- och fångstkulturens hällmålningar och deras lokalisation.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rock paintings of the hunter-gatherers in the province of Norrland, and their localisation.

    The aim of this thesis is to find a couple of distinguishing features for the localisation of the rock paintings of the hunter-gatherers in Norrland. This will be done through studies of Swedish and international literature, about ancient rock-art and the belief system of the hunter-gatherers. I will make comparisons  with other groups of hunter-gatherers and try to find analogies. My belief is that there must be a large number of undetected rock paintings in Norrland. They are hard to find because of overgrowth by lichen and damages due to wethering. Theretoo I feel that there hasn´t been enough of structured surveys. I hope that my resulting short list of practical clues of where to find them will help:

    • seek for them in the boreal forest area from 200 meters above the sea level to the present alpine tree line zone
    • in close vicinity to neolithic winter dwellings
    • in close vicinity to pitfall traps
    • on vertical rock walls of cliffs or boulders
    • in close vicinity to standing water/ alternatively in a hillside in the forest
    • the rock faces to the south
    • on imposing natural formations
    • try to find them in cloudy, humid weather

  • 55. Forsberg, Lars
    et al.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Converging conclusions from different archaeological perspectives: The early settlement of northern Sweden1999In: L'Europe des dernier chasseurs: Èpipaléolithique et `Mesolithique / [ed] André Thévenin, 1999, p. 313-319Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The startingpoint for this paper is two separate but contemporaneous investigations dealing with the Early Stone Age of Northern Sweden. In the first study, Forsberg attempted to study the economic and social aspect of the Mesolithic in Northern Sweden on a macrolevel. In the other, Knutsson on a microlevel, started his research by a source critical evalustaion of a stratified site with early mesolithic components in the same area. The two studies were initiated independently at roughly the same time some years agoand, although different in scope and source material, they shared among other things a chronological interest.

    The separate analyses showed that the previously anticipated cultural and chronological framework of the Norrland Mesolithic had to be abandoned. The two phase periodization with the handle core tradition as the initial phase had to be changed int a three period structure with the handle core tradition in the middle. The fact that this discovery came as a total surprise to the authors, that it was made contemporaneous, independently and with different means, promoted an epistemological discussion on the current opposition between an objectivist and relativist position. In the paper, the authors want to reach beyond this constructed opposition. It is stated that, without having to turn to a passive reflection of how it once was, a meningful study of the past is possible and that the archaeological material itself does not allow that all interpretations are seen as equivalent.

  • 56.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    People of the Dolmens and Stone Cists: An archaeogenetic Investigation of Megalithic Graves from the Neolithic Period on Gotland2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of ancient genomics of pre-historic human remains has in recent years offered unprecedented knowledge regarding pre-historic migration and population structure on the European continent which has fundamentally altered the current views in the archaeological community. However, the merging of the two fields, archaeology and genetics, is still in its infancy and much work is still needed in order for these fields to integrate. In this thesis I explore how genetic analyses, in combination with contextual radiocarbon dating and isotopic analyses for diet and mobility can be used to investigate demographic events on a local and regional level. This is done through the investigation of people buried in five previously excavated megalithic tombs on the Island of Gotland dated to the Neolithic period. I present the genomic population structure and archaeological background for the pre-historic European reference data and show how this is used to investigate population continuity, demographic shifts, cultural duality, and admixture for local and regional contexts. I present new data and explore the Strontium-baseline for the Gotland biosphere which is used for the mobility analyses. I show that mitochondrial haplogroup data is especially useful in combination with isotopic data, and radiocarbon dating for investigation of demographic shifts on a larger scale. I also show that genomic data gives unique insights into the individuals’ life history which, together with the established demographic background allows for fine scale investigation of population demographic events within and between different archaeological contexts. Finally I show that the different Neolithic contexts on Gotland to a large extent involves immigration of new groups to the island, and that the contextual breaks seen in the archaeological record during the Neolithic period are connected with cultural and population demographic shifts. This dissertation demonstrates that genomic analyses, in combination with archaeology and isotopic analyses, as well as contextual osteological analyses and radiocarbon dating, present unique insights into the life history of the actual people who lived the lives we try to understand.

    List of papers
    1. New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 17, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

    The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    National Category
    Archaeology
    Research subject
    Molecular Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343835 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2017.09.002 (DOI)000429561000031 ()
    Funder
    Berit Wallenberg FoundationGunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelseHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
    Available from: 2018-03-01 Created: 2018-03-01 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
    2. The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 20, p. 324-337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

    National Category
    Archaeology
    Research subject
    Molecular Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343836 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2018.02.045 (DOI)000444281500030 ()
    Funder
    Berit Wallenberg Foundation, BWS 2011.0090Gunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelseHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, RJ M13-0904:1
    Available from: 2018-03-01 Created: 2018-03-01 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
    3. The genetic history of the people buried in the Ansarve Dolmen on Gotland and the northeastern most expansion of the Funnel Beaker Culture
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genetic history of the people buried in the Ansarve Dolmen on Gotland and the northeastern most expansion of the Funnel Beaker Culture
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Archaeology
    Research subject
    Molecular Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347066 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-03-25 Created: 2018-03-25 Last updated: 2018-04-08
  • 57.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Evans, Jane
    Natural Environment Research Council, Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK.
    Storå, Jan
    Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Götherström, Anders
    Archaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 17, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

    The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

  • 58.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Sjödin, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Evans, Jane
    Natural Environment Research Council, Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK.
    Svedjemo, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Götherström, Anders
    Archaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Storå, Jan
    Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 20, p. 324-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

  • 59.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Sánchez-Quinto, Federico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Svensson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Malmström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Šumberová, Radka
    Institute of Archaeology of Czech Academy of Sciences, Letenská 4, CZ-11801 Prague, Czech Republic.
    Hana, Brzobohatá
    Institute of Archaeology of Czech Academy of Sciences, Letenská 4, CZ-11801 Prague, Czech Republic.
    Götherström, Anders
    Archaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Storå, Jan
    Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    The genetic history of the people buried in the Ansarve Dolmen on Gotland and the northeastern most expansion of the Funnel Beaker CultureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Frigård, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Försvaret som glömdes bort: en studie av Per-Albin linjen/Skånelinjen och potentialen i modern arkeologi.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish memory is often strong about things that happened during the Second World War where the Atlantic Wall is often an remembered example. But many parts of our own history surrounding this conflict is more or less forgotten. One such part is the Per-Albin line in Skåne and Blekinge that was Swedens first line of defence against the Third Reich. The remains of these fortifications have today can still be found in the Swedish terrain. But when the Per-Albin line have been described it has been out of a historical perspective but not from an archaeological perspective. Because of this we miss the information that the remains of these once important structures made of concrete meant for Sweden during a dark time of the 20th-century. Remains from the Per-Albin line will be analyzed with archaeological methods and maps to find removed and forgotten defensives made of concrete and other materials to see the preservation conditions of the defensive line today. The background material consists of the history of the defensive line and the men and women that inhabited places in the Per-Albin linje and. The material that is presented in the text is from different places in Blekinge,Vägga Udde,Boön and Kärringaberget. The text attempts to incorporate the use of using maps to find the remnants of the the constructions. This work also takes up the methods that the government uses to preserve parts the line for the future and also the methods the government uses to handle the structures in other ways. The main point of this paper is to bring the practices of battlefield archaeology into light by showing how it can be used and the gains of using it on modern remnants of war.

  • 61.
    Gallego-Sala, Angela V.
    et al.
    Geography Department, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Charman, Dan J.
    Geography Department, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Brewer, Simon
    Page, Susan E.
    Prentice, I. Colin
    Friedlingstein, Pierre
    Moreton, Steve
    Amesbury, Matthew J.
    Beilman, David W.
    Björck, Svante
    Blyakharchuk, Tatiana
    Bochicchio, Christopher
    Booth, Robert K.
    Bunbury, Joan
    Camill, Philip
    Carless, Donna
    Chimner, Rodney A.
    Clifford, Michael
    Cressey, Elizabeth
    Courtney Mustaphi, Colin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Environment Department, University of York, York, UK.
    De Vleeschouwer, François
    de Jong, Rixt
    Fialkiewicz-Koziel, Barbara
    Finkelstein, Sarah A.
    Garneau, Michelle
    Githumbi, Esther
    Hribjlan, John
    Holmquist, James
    Hughes, Paul D. M.
    Jones, Chris
    Jones, Miriam C.
    Karofeld, Edgar
    Klein, Eric S.
    Kokfelt, Ulla
    Korhola, Atte
    Lacourse, Terri
    Le Roux, Gael
    Lamentowicz, Mariusz
    Large, David
    Lavoie, Martin
    Loisel, Julie
    Mackay, Helen
    MacDonald, Glen M.
    Makila, Markku
    Magnan, Gabriel
    Marchant, Robert
    Marcisz, Katarzyna
    Martínez Cortizas, Antonio
    Massa, Charly
    Mathijssen, Paul
    Mauquoy, Dmitri
    Mighall, Timothy
    Mitchell, Fraser J. G.
    Moss, Patrick
    Nichols, Jonathan
    Oksanen, Pirita O.
    Orme, Lisa
    Packalen, Maara S.
    Robinson, Stephen
    Roland, Thomas P.
    Sanderson, Nicole K.
    Sannel, A. Britta K.
    Silva-Sánchez, Noemí
    Steinberg, Natascha
    Swindles, Graeme T.
    Turner, T. Edward
    Uglow, Joanna
    Väliranta, Minna
    van Bellen, Simon
    van der Linden, Marjolein
    van Geel, Bas
    Wang, Guoping
    Yu, Zicheng
    Zaragoza-Castells, Joana
    Zhao, Yan
    Institute of Geographical Science and Natural Resources, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China.
    Latitudinal limits to the predicted increase of the peatland carbon sink with warming2018In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 907-913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The carbon sink potential of peatlands depends on the balance of carbon uptake by plants and microbial decomposition. The rates of both these processes will increase with warming but it remains unclear which will dominate the global peatland response. Here we examine the global relationship between peatland carbon accumulation rates during the last millennium and planetary-scale climate space. A positive relationship is found between carbon accumulation and cumulative photosynthetically active radiation during the growing season for mid- to high-latitude peatlands in both hemispheres. However, this relationship reverses at lower latitudes, suggesting that carbon accumulation is lower under the warmest climate regimes. Projections under Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP)2.6 and RCP8.5 scenarios indicate that the present-day global sink will increase slightly until around ad 2100 but decline thereafter. Peatlands will remain a carbon sink in the future, but their response to warming switches from a negative to a positive climate feedback (decreased carbon sink with warming) at the end of the twenty-first century.

  • 62.
    Gottberg, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Djurens kulturella betydelse i den gropkeramiska kulturen2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As humans we function with a biological side and a psychological side. Both of these sides have their needs. We need to put food in our stomach to stop feeling hungry and we need to give things meaning. In a Human Behavioral Archaeological perspective, which focuses a lot on the economical aspect of the animal and the human, the animal was killed for food. But, how was the animal perceived in a cultural perspective, what was the meaning of this animal? This is the question that will have its answer in this thesis. The animal handling of the Pitted Ware culture  will be analyzed from an animistic point of view - meaning, that human, animals and object can have a soul or a personality. This makes the world seem more fluent. The sharp lines between culture and nature, life and death, human and animal get wiped out and we see a world view the modern Western human is not used to. As much as the animal was a prey, it also was a being with a purpose in the Pitted Ware culture. On the Pitted Ware sites at Jettböle on the Aland Island and at Ajvide on Gotland, the seal was the most prominent animal in both the economic and cultural sphere. The clay figurines of Jettböle show some sort of worship of the seal. Among many of the anatomical parts of the animal and human body, the head seems to be of most importance. Even differences within the same culture appear. At Ajvide, there is a clear burial tradition of the deceased humans, whereas at Jettböle, there is not. And as much as the seal is of dominance at Ajvide, the swine comes in at a close second, whereas at Jettböle, there is almost no swine at all.

  • 63.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Bunbury, Judith M.
    University of Cambridge.
    Migrating Nile: Augering in Egypt2016In: Science in the Study of Ancient Egypt / [ed] S. Zakrzewski, A. Shortland, and J. Rowland, New York and London: Routledge, 2016, p. 93-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Strutt, Kristian D.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Peeters, Jan
    Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    Aberystwyth Univ, Aberystwyth, Dyfed, Wales..
    Pennington, Benjamin T.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Emery, Virginia L.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    Johansson, Carolin
    Medelhavsmuseet Natl Museums World Culture, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Theban Harbours And Waterscapes Survey, Spring 20162016In: Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, ISSN 0307-5133, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Report on the 2016 spring season of the Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey (THaWS). The article discusses the geoarchaeological and geophysical survey along a 3.2 km-long transect starting close to the front of the Temple of Millions of Years of Ay and Horemheb and stretching to the village of Geziret el-Bairat on the West Bank of the Nile.

  • 65.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Strutt, Kristian David
    University of Southampton.
    Hunter, Morag Ann
    University of Cambridge.
    Pennington, Benjamin Thomas
    University of Southampton.
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    Aberystwyth University.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    University of Southampton.
    Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey, 20142015In: Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, ISSN 0307-5133, Vol. 100, p. 41-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Graham, Angus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Strutt, Kristian David
    University of Southampton.
    Toonen, Willem H. J.
    Aberystwyth University.
    Pennington, Benjamin Thomas
    University of Southampton.
    Löwenborg, Daniel J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Masson-Berghoff, Aurélia
    British Museum.
    Emery, Virginia Leigh
    American University in Dubai.
    Barker, Dominic S.
    University of Southampton.
    Hunter, Morag Ann
    University of Cambridge.
    Lindholm, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Johansson, Carolin
    Medelhavsmuseet, Museums of World Culture, Stockholm.
    Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey, 20152016In: Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, ISSN 0307-5133, Vol. 101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Försvunnen värld framträder: Rec. av Maja Hagerman Försvunnen värld. Om den stärsta arkeologiska utgrävningen någonsin i Sverige.2011In: Signum : katolsk orientering om kyrka, kultur, samhälle, ISSN 0347-0423, ISSN 0347-0423, Vol. sept, no 5, p. 48-51Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Goats in Swedish prehistory and early Middle Ages2017In: Tiere und Tierdarstellungen in der Archäologie: Beiträge zum Kolloquium in Gedenken an Torsten Capelle, 30.-31. Oktober in Herne / [ed] Vera Brieske, Aurelia Dickers, Michael M. Rind, Münster: Aschendorff Verlag , 2017, p. 201-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Les chiens de la Tapisserie de Bayeux: Quelques éléments de réflection2009In: La Tapisserie de Bayeux: Une cronique des temps vikings? / [ed] Sylvette Lemagnen, Bayeux: Editions Point de Vues Bonsecours , 2009, p. 132-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Missionat the Ends of the World: Was Old Uppsala Really an Outpost of Paganism in the Late 11th century?2017In: Life on the Edge: social, Political and Religious Frontiers in Early Medieval Europe / [ed] Sarah Semple, Celia Orsini, Sian Mui, Wendeburg: Verlag Uwe Krebs , 2017, p. 345-351Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Runstensbroar i ett kvinnoperspektiv2010In: Bro till evigheten: Brons rumsliga, sociala och religiösa dimension under vikingatid och tidig medeltid / [ed] Andreas Nordberg & Lars Andersson, Stockholm: Stockholms Läns Museum , 2010, p. 24-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Similarities or Differences? Rune Stones as a Starting Point for Some Reflections on Viking Age Identity2011In: Viking Settlements & Viking Society: Papers from the Proceedings of the Sixteenth Viking Congress, Reykjavík and Reykholt, 16th-23rd August 2009 / [ed] Svavar Sigmundsson, Reykjavík: Hid Íslenzka Fornleifafélag & University of Iceland Press , 2011, utkom mars 2012, p. 147-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of identity is discussed and the Scandinavian Late Viking Age rune stones are pointed out as a field of research where we can discover how identity was perceived. The famous Jarlabanke of Täby, who raised several stones in memory of himself is mentioned as an example of a man who obviously had excellent selfconfidence and who was certainly aware of his personal identity. It is argued that the reason for using very similar design of runic carvings could be due to a political system comparable to the goði-institution of the Icelandic Commonwealth, as a wish from the raiser to show his loyalty to the local chieftain who may have erected the first rune stone with a specific design. The distribution of rune sones of great similarity may thus be an expression of such a social organisation.

  • 73.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The material culture of Old Norse religion2009In: The Viking World / [ed] Stefan Brink in collaboration with Neil Price, London and New York: Routledge , 2009, p. 249-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The material culture of Old Norse religion2008In: The Viking World, Abingdon: Routledge , 2008, p. 249-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The material culture of the Christianisation2009In: The Viking world / [ed] Stefan Brink in collaboration with Neil Price, London and New York: Routledge , 2009, p. 639-644Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The Material Culture of the Christianisation2008In: The Viking World, Abingdon: Routledge , 2008, p. 639-644Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Tors bockar och andra getter: Om geten i Sverige under forntid och medeltid2017In: Geten i Sverige. Kulturhistoriska och samtida perspektiv: Föredrag vid ett symposium i Uppsala den 20 november 2015 / [ed] Katharina Leibring, Ingvar Svanberg, Uppsala: Institutet för språk och folkminnen, 2017, p. 23-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Valsgärde Studies: the Place and its People, Past and Present2008In: Valsgärde Studies: the Place and its People, Past and Present, Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University , 2008, p. 65-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the impressive mound Valsgärde 57, containing a female cremation grave from c. 700 AD, as the starting point, two richly furnished female cremation graves from the first half of the 10th century AD, Valsgärde 85 and 94, are discussed. An analysis of the find assemblages leads to the conclusion that the two vomen represent both social and religious power.

  • 79.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, CharlotteUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.Lamm, Jan PederEdberg, Rune
    Fynden från "Svarta jorden" på Björkö: från Hjalmar Stolpes undersökningar. Studier. Äldre uppgifter.2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lager, Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Runestones and the Christian mission2009In: The Viking World / [ed] Stefan Brink in collaboration with Neil Price, London and New York: Routledge , 2009, p. 629-638Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lager, Linn
    Runestones and the Christian Mission2008In: The Viking World, Abingdon: Routledge , 2008, p. 629-638Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lager, Linn
    Kitzler Åhfeldt, Laila
    Runstenar runt Vallentunasjön2008In: Hem till Jarlabanke: Jord, makt och evigt liv i östra Mälardalen under järnålder och medeltid, Lund: Historiska Media , 2008, p. 335-359Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Gräslund, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Valsgärde revisited2011In: Det 61. Internationale Sachsensymposion 2010 Haderslev, Danmark / [ed] Linda Boye, Per Ethelberg, Lene Heidemann Lutz, Pernille Kruse, Anne Birgitte Sörensen, Neumünster: Wachholtz , 2011, p. 123-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Att leva i gård och by under järnåldern2009In: Folkkultur i fokus: tretton jubileumsföreläsningar / [ed] Maj Reinhammar, Uppsala: Kungl Gustav Adolfs Akademien för svensk folkkultur , 2009, p. 21-32Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 85.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Early Humans and Their World2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 86.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ekki nýtr sólar: När himlen färgades röd av gudarnas blod2009In: á austrvega. Saga and East Scandinavia: The 14th International Saga Conference. Uppsala 9th - 15th August 2009, Vol. 1. / [ed] Agneta Ney, Henrik Williams & Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist, 2009, p. 318-326Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    En mästare förklädd: Sven Delblanc som Bo Balderson2009Book (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    For kind dissertations?2019In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 139, no 2, p. 325-327Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Förod; Introduktion2009In: Ingolf Kaiser / [ed] Bo Gräslund, Uppsala: Balderson Förlag , 2009, 1200Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ingolf Kaiser2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ingolf Kaiser´s art2009In: Ingolf Kaiser / [ed] Bo Gräslund, Uppsala: Balderson Förlag , 2009, 1200, p. 160-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Människans utveckling2017In: En samtidig världshistoria / [ed] Maria Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 2:1, p. 82-93Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Referee comment on Daniel Löwenborg: "An Iron Age Shock Doctrine: Did th3e AD 536-7 event trigger large-scale social changes in the Mälaren valley area"2012In: Journal of Archaeology and Ancient History, no 4, p. 3-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Gräslund, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Relativ datering.: Om kronologisk metod i nordisk arkeologi1974In: TOR, ISSN 91-7222-057-0, Vol. 16, p. 7-248Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Gräslund, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Price, Neil
    Twilight of the gods?: The 'dust veil event' of AD 536 in critical perspective2012In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 86, no 332, p. 428-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The popular notion of social collapse consequent on natural catastrophe is here elegantly disentangled in a study of the dark summer of AD 536 Leaving aside the question of its cause, the authors show there is good scientific evidence for a climatic downturn, contemporary with good archaeological evidence for widespread disruption of settlement and population displacement in the northern latitudes. They then navigate through the shifting shadows of myth, and emerge with a welcome prize: strong circumstantial reasons for recognising that this widespread horror, like so many others, did leave its imprint on Scandinavian poetry and sculpture.

  • 96.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sundberg, Rolf
    Stockholm University, Department of Mathematics, Division of Mathematical Statistics.
    Knutsson, Helena
    Stoneslab, Uppsala.
    Zetterlund, Peter
    National Historical Museums, Linköping.
    Molin, Fredrik
    National Historical Museums, Linköping.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lithic Raw Material Economy in the Mesolithic: An Experimental Test of Edged Tool Efficiency and Durability in Bone Tool Production2017In: LITHIC TECHNOLOGY, ISSN 0197-7261, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 140-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The foundation of this paper is lithic economy with a focus on the actual use of different lithic raw materials for tasks at hand. Our specific focus is on the production of bone tools during the Mesolithic. The lithic and osseous assemblages from Strandvagen, Motala, in east-central Sweden provide the archaeological background for the study. Based on a series of experiments we evaluate the efficiency and durability of different tool edges of five lithic raw materials: Cambrian flint, Cretaceous flint, mylonitic quartz, quartz, and porphyry, each used to whittle bone. The results show that flint is the most efficient of the raw materials assessed. Thus, a non-local raw material offers complements of functional characteristics for bone working compared to locally available quartz and mylonitic quartz. This finding provides a new insight into lithic raw material distribution in the region, specifically for bone tool production on site.

  • 97.
    Gustavsson, Linnéa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ansiktsrekonstruktion: Mannen från den medeltida kyrkoruinen S:t Hans, Visby2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Facial reconstructions, like archaeology, consists of many layers that one must get through to

    understand the whole picture. The development of the methods that reconstructions rely on,

    occurred during the 20th century. By focusing on the various elements such as studies of

    tissue depth, chemical processes (DNA and isotope analysis), solid craftsmanship and the

    development of computer technology, researchers around the world have been able to build a

    method that can give us an extended understanding of history. However, a lot of opinions

    have risen for the subject, people begin to question it ́s accuracy and what the real purpose

    really is. Besides the reliability of facial reconstruction, the experience of how a facial

    reconstruction is perceived by another person is equally important, the ethical principles have

    been brought up to discussion because it involves human remains. Discussions may occur

    during cases when facial reconstructions are inevitable, one example could be with minority

    groups that have a different view on how a body should be handled and treated after death.

    These scenarios are more likely to develop in the identification in forensic contexts, but the

    problem may also increase in archaeological contexts if the remains are from more recent

    times and the individuals as a population group has suffered repression. Therefore, this paper

    aims to discuss such questions but also embark on a mission to perform a facial reconstruction

    of an individual from the medieval church of St. Hans and the challenges that may occur

    during the way. The American method used in this essay shows that you can get a good result

    by following the instructions and guidelines that are displayed in various books and articles.

  • 98. Gustavsson, Rudolf
    et al.
    Hennius, Andreas
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Are many Vendel and Viking Period gaming pieces made of whale bone?2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 51-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Gärdebo, Johan
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol SWE, Hist Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löwenborg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Smallholding Travel in the Agrarian Revolution: Using a Farmer Diary to Map Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Late Nineteenth Century Sweden2016In: The international Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing, ISSN 1753-8548, E-ISSN 1755-1706, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 179-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an exploratory study using a smallholding diaryand GIS to project the spatio-temporal pattern of a smallholding’s travel inlate nineteenth century Sweden. Through time-series of smallholding’s dailydiary notes, we develop an understanding for how smallholders adjusted toand participated in Swedish government policy, which resulted in the processtermed ‘agrarian revolution’. Between 1872–1892, Tomtas Smallholding alteredits spatio-temporal patterns from seasonal travels to production accordingto market demands and along new lines of transportation like railways.While the smallholding also used railways to visit distant places, it wasprimarily their produce that travelled further unto international markets. Thisalso influenced the smallholding demography, from an extended householdtowards a nuclear family. As market demands shifted from subsistence to dairyproducts, the smallholding contracted primarily female farm servants due totheir specialisation in milking.

  • 100.
    Günther, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Malmström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Svensson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Omrak, Ayca
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Kilinc, Gülsah Merve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Stockholm.; Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Ankara.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Stockholm.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Stockholm.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Edlund, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Munters, Arielle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Coutinho, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Simões, Luciana G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Vicente, Mário
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution.
    Sjölander, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Sellevold, Berit Jansen
    Norwegian Inst Cultural Heritage Res, Oslo.
    Jørgensen, Roger
    Arctic Univ Norway, Univ Tromsø, Tromsø Univ Museum, Tromsø.
    Claes, Peter
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Elect Engn, Ctr Proc Speech & Images, Leuven.
    Shriver, Mark D.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Anthropol, State Coll, Pennsylvania.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    La Trobe Univ, Dept Archaeol & Hist, Melbourne.
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Nijmegen; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Radboud Ctr Infect Dis, Nijmegen.
    Apel, Jan
    Lund Univ, Dept Archaeol & Ancient Hist, Lund.
    Liden, Kerstin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Stockholm.
    Skar, Birgitte
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol Univ Museum, Trondheim.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Stockholm.
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Stockholm.; SciLifeLab, Stockholm.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. SciLifeLab, Stockholm.
    Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation2018In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 16, no 1, article id e2003703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavia was one of the last geographic areas in Europe to become habitable for humans after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the routes and genetic composition of these postglacial migrants remain unclear. We sequenced the genomes, up to 57x coverage, of seven hunter-gatherers excavated across Scandinavia and dated from 9,500-6,000 years before present (BP). Surprisingly, among the Scandinavian Mesolithic individuals, the genetic data display an east-west genetic gradient that opposes the pattern seen in other parts of Mesolithic Europe. Our results suggest two different early postglacial migrations into Scandinavia: initially from the south, and later, from the northeast. The latter followed the ice-free Norwegian north Atlantic coast, along which novel and advanced pressure-blade stone-tool techniques may have spread. These two groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a genetically diverse population, which shows patterns of genetic adaptation to high latitude environments. These potential adaptations include high frequencies of low pigmentation variants and a gene region associated with physical performance, which shows strong continuity into modern-day northern Europeans.

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