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  • 51.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Gastric Bypass Surgery Elevates NT-ProBNP Levels2013In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 1421-1426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is produced in the heart in response to stretching of the myocardium. BNP levels are negatively correlated to obesity, and in obese subjects, a reduced BNP responsiveness has been described. Diet-induced weight loss has been found to lower or to have no effect on BNP levels, whereas gastric banding and gastric bypass have reported divergent results. We studied obese patients undergoing gastric bypass (GBP) surgery during follow-up of 1 year.

    Methods

    Twenty patients, 18 women, mean 41 (SD 9.5) years old, with a mean preoperative BMI of 44.6 (SD 5.5) kg/m2 were examined. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), glucose and insulin were measured preoperatively, at day 6 and months 1, 6 and 12. In 14 of the patients, samples were also taken at days 1, 2 and 4.

    Results

    The NT-ProBNP levels showed a marked increase during the postoperative week (from 54 pg/mL preop to 359 pg/mL on day 2 and fell to 155 on day 6). At 1 year, NT-ProBNP was 122 pg/mL (125 % increase, p = 0.01). Glucose, insulin and HOMA indices decreased shortly after surgery without correlation to NT-ProBNP change. Mean BMI was reduced from 44.6 to 30.5 kg/m2 at 1 year and was not related to NT-ProBNP change.

    Conclusions

    The data indicate that GBP surgery rapidly alters the tone of BNP release, by a mechanism not related to weight loss or to changes in glucometabolic parameters. The GBP-induced conversion of obese subjects, from low to high NT-ProBNP responders, is likely to influence the evaluation of cardiac function in GBP operated individuals.

  • 52.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    GLP1 analogs as treatment of postprandial hypoglycemia following gastric bypass surgery: a potential new indication?2013In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 169, no 6, p. 885-889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The number of morbidly obese subjects submitted to bariatric surgery is rising worldwide. In a fraction of patients undergoing gastric bypass (GBP), episodes with late postprandial hypoglycemia (PPHG) develop 1-3 years after surgery. The pathogenesis of this phenomenon is not fully understood; meal-induced rapid and exaggerated increases of circulating incretins and insulin appear to be at least partially responsible. Current treatments include low-carbohydrate diets, inhibition of glucose intestinal uptake, reduction of insulin secretion with calcium channel blockers, somatostatin analogs, or diazoxide, a KATP channel opener. Even partial pancreatectomy has been advocated. In type 2 diabetes, GLP1 analogs have a well-documented effect of stabilizing glucose levels without causing hypoglycemia. Design: We explored GLP1 analogs as open treatment in five consecutive GBP cases seeking medical attention because of late postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms. Results: Glucose measured in connection with the episodes in four of the cases had been 2.7, 2.5, 1.8, and 1.6 mmol/l respectively. The patients consistently described that the analogs eliminated their symptoms, which relapsed in four of the five patients when treatment was reduced/discontinued. The drug effect was further documented in one case by repeated 24-h continuous glucose measurements. Conclusion: These open, uncontrolled observations suggest that GLP1 analogs might provide a new treatment option in patients with problems of late PPHG.

  • 53.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Hypoglycemia in everyday life after gastric bypass and duodenal switch2015In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design: Gastric bypass (GBP) and duodenal switch (DS) in morbid obesity are accompanied by marked metabolic improvements, particularly in glucose control. In recent years, episodes of severe late postprandial hypoglycemia have been increasingly described in GBP patients; data in DS patients are scarce. We recruited three groups of subjects; 15 GBP, 15 DS, and 15 non-operated overweight controls to examine to what extent hypoglycemia occurs in daily life. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used during 3 days of normal activity. The glycemic variability was measured by mean amplitude of glycemic excursion and continuous overall net glycemic action. Fasting blood samples were drawn, and the patients kept a food and symptom log throughout the study. Results: The GBP group displayed highly variable CGM curves, and 2.9% of their time was spent in hypoglycemia (< 3.3 mmol/l, or 60 mg/dl). The DS group had twice as much time in hypoglycemia (5.9%) and displayed CGM curves with little variation as well as lower HbA1c levels (29.3 vs 35.9 mmol/mol, P < 0.05). Out of a total of 72 hypoglycemic episodes registered over the 3-day period, 70 (97%) occurred in the postprandial state and only about one-fifth of the hypoglycemic episodes in the GBP and DS groups were accompanied by symptoms. No hypoglycemias were seen in controls during the 3-day period. Conclusion: Both types of bariatric surgery induce marked, but different, changes in glucose balance accompanied by frequent, but mainly unnoticed, hypoglycemic episodes. The impact and mechanism of hypoglycemic unawareness after weight-reduction surgery deserves to be clarified.

  • 54.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Lau Börjesson, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umea Univ, Biomed Engn, Dept Radiat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Gastric bypass reduces symptoms and hormonal responses to hypoglycemia2016In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 2667-2675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

  • 55. Abrahamsson, P
    et al.
    Andersen, K
    Grip, L
    Wallentin, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Dellborg, M
    Early assessment of long-term risk with continuous ST-segment monitoringamong patients with unstable coronary syndromes. Results from 1-yearfollow-up in the TRIM study.2001In: J Electrocardiol, Vol. 34, p. 103-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Abramov, Sergei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Kazan Fed Univ, Inst Fundamental Med & Biol, Kazan, Russia.
    Kozyrev, Sergey V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Farias, Fabiana H. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Washington Univ, Genome Inst, Sch Med, St Louis, MO USA.
    Dahlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wilbe, Maria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hansson-Hamlin, H.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ronnblom, L.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The risk allele A of rs200395694 associated with SLE in Swedish patients affects on MEF2D gene regulation and alternative splicing2018In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 29, no 12, p. A44-A44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 57. Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    et al.
    Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    The synthetic food colouring agent Allura Red AC (E129) is not genotoxic in a flow cytometry-based micronucleus assay in vivo2013In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 59, p. 86-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The safety of several azo colouring agents, used as food additives, has during the years been questioned. Allura Red AC (E129) has in some publications been classified as genotoxic. In fact, in the European Union, Allura Red is permitted as a food additive in human food, but, surprisingly, it was not acceptable as an additive for use in animal feed. In this study we have evaluated whether Allura Red is genotoxic using a flow cytometer-based micronucleus assay in peripheral blood of mice. Male FVB mice were given a single intra-peritoneal injection of various doses of Allura Red and sacrificed at 46 h after treatment. The tested doses were 0, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Each dose group constituted three mice, except for in the dose group of 1000 mg/kg b.w., which constituted four mice. Blood samples were collected and the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (fMNPCE) and the cell proliferation (%PCE) was determined. The analyses did not show any significant difference in the %PCE or in the fMNPCE. Consequently, under the testing circumstances one can conclude that Allura Red is not genotoxic.

  • 58. Abrink, M
    et al.
    Gobl, Anders
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Huang, R
    Nilsson, K
    Hellman, L
    The human cell lines U-937, THP-1 and MonoMac 6, represent relatively immature cells of the monocyte cell lineage1994In: Leukemia, Vol. 8, p. 1579-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Abrink, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Larsson, Erik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gobl, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hellman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Expression of lactoferrin in the kidney:implications for innate immunity and iron metabolism2000In: Kidney Int, Vol. 57, p. 2004-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 60. Abtan, Jeremie
    et al.
    Bhatt, Deepak L
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Simon, Tabassome
    Fox, Kim
    Mehta, Shamir R
    Harrington, Robert A
    Gao, Qi
    Leiter, Lawrence A
    Steg, Ph Gabriel
    Incidence of Myocardial Infarction Types in Patients Treated With Ticagrelor in the THEMIS Trial2021In: Circulation. Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1941-7640, E-ISSN 1941-7632, Vol. 14, no 12, article id 011035Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Emami Khoonsari, Payam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Shevchenko, Ganna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Ericson, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Increased CSF Levels of Apolipoproteins and Complement Factors in Trigeminal Neuralgia Patients-In Depth Proteomic Analysis Using Mass Spectrometry2020In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 21, no 9-10, p. 1075-1084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main cause of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is compression of a blood vessel at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve. However, a neurovascular conflict does not seem to be the only etiology and other mechanisms are implicated in the development of the disease. We hypothesized that TN patients may have distinct protein expression in the CSF. In this study, lumbar CSF from TN patients (n = 17), scheduled to undergo microvascular decompression, and from controls (n = 20) was analyzed and compared with in depth mass spectrometry TMTbased quantitative proteomics. We identified 2552 unique proteins, of which 46 were significantly altered (26 increased, and 20 decreased, q-value < .05) in TN patients compared with controls. An over-representation analysis showed proteins involved in high-density lipoprotein, such as Apolipoprotein A4, Apolipoprotein M, and Apolipoprotein A1, and the extracellular region, including proteins involved in the complement cascade to be over-represented. We conclude that TN patients have distinct protein expression in the CSF compared to controls. The pathophysiological background of the protein alterations found in this study warrants further investigation in future studies. Perspective: In this article, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with trigeminal neuralgia was analyzed using in depth shotgun proteomics, revealing 46 differentially expressed proteins compared to controls. Among these, apolipoproteins and proteins involved in the complement system were elevated and signif-icantly over-represented, implying an inflammatory component in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  • 62.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lytsy, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Surgical site infections in standard neurosurgery procedures-a study of incidence, impact and potential risk factors2014In: British Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0268-8697, E-ISSN 1360-046X, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 270-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Surgical site infections (SSIs) may be devastating for the patient and they carry high economic costs. Studies of SSI after neurosurgery report an incidence of 1 - 11%. However, patient material, follow-up time and definition of SSI have varied. In the present study we prospectively recorded the prevalence of SSI 3 months after standard intracranial neurosurgical procedures. The incidence, impact and risk factors of SSI were analysed. Methods. We included patients admitted during 2010 to our unit for postoperative care after standard neurosurgical procedures. SSI was defined as evident with positive cultures from surgical samples or CSF, and/or purulent discharge during reoperation. Follow-up was done after 3 and 12 months and statistics was obtained after 3 months. The predictive values on the outcome of demographic and clinical factors describing the surgical procedure were evaluated using linear regression. Results. A total of 448 patients were included in the study and underwent a total of 466 procedures. Within 3 and 12 months, 33 and 88 patients, respectively, had died. Of the surviving patients, 20 (4.3% of procedures) developed infections within 3 months and another 3 (4.9% of procedures) within 12 months. Risk factors for SSI were meningioma, longer operation time, craniotomy, dural substitute, and staples in wound closure. Patients with SSI had significantly longer hospital stay. Multivariate analysis showed that factors found significant in univariate analysis frequently occur together. Discussion. We studied the prevalence of SSI after 3 and 12 months in a prospective 1-year material with standard neurosurgical procedures and found it to be 4.3% and 4.9%, respectively. The analysis of the results showed that a combination of parameters indicating a longer and more complicated procedure predicted the development of SSI. Our conclusion is that the prevention of SSI has to be done at many levels, especially with patients undergoing long surgical procedures.

  • 63.
    Abu Sabaa, Amal
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Mörth, Charlott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Hashemi, Jamileh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular Tools and Functional Genomics.
    Robelius, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    T-cell Leukaemia/Lymphoma Protein 1A (TCL1A) In Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Abu Sabaa, Amal
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Mörth, Charlott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Molin, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular Tools and Functional Genomics.
    Robelius, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Plasma Protein Profiling using Multiplex Extension Assay in Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with R-CHOP: A descriptive studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Abujrais, Sandy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Ahnoff, Martin
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Carl Skottbergs gata 22B, SE-41319 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rasmusson, Annica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    A sensitive method detecting trace levels of levonorgestrel using LC-HRMS.2019In: Contraception, ISSN 0010-7824, E-ISSN 1879-0518, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 247-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) method to quantify levonorgestrel (LNG) in serum.

    STUDY DESIGN: Levonorgestrel was extracted using solid phase extraction and measured using liquid chromatography (LC) HRMS.

    RESULTS: Low limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 25pg/mL and low limit of detection (LLOD) was 12.5pg/mL. Precision and accuracy bias were<10%. LNG in serum samples from Mirena® users ranged between 37 to 219pg/mL (n=12). In eight out of 22 patients with suspected intrauterine device (IUD) expulsion LNG was detected (26 to 1272pg/mL).

    CONCLUSION: A sensitive, fast and simple LC-HRMS method was developed to detect trace levels of LNG.

  • 66.
    Abu-Sultan, Arezou
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Safa, Mozhdeh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hur personer med substansbrukssyndrom upplever och erfar att vårdas inom somatisk vård2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Personer med substansbrukssyndrom är en stadigt ökande patientgrupp inom somatisk vård. Forskning som finns belyser främst vårdpersonals upplevelser av att vårda patienter med substansbrukssyndrom. Tidigare forskning visar att personer med substansbrukssyndrom har en rädsla för att utsättas för stigmatisering vid hälso- och sjukvårdsbesök. Att vården i hög grad är specialiserad och tydligt avgränsad medför att de riskerar att få sämre vård vid somatisk samsjuklighet. Specialistsjuksköterskor inom psykiatrisk vård möter personer med substansbruk i sitt arbete och ansvarar för att främja hälsa utifrån den enskildes behov genom ett holistiskt förhållningssätt.

    Syfte: Syftet med studien var att sammanställa aktuell kunskap om hur personer med substansbrukssyndrom upplever och erfar att vårdas inom somatisk vård.  Metod: En litteraturöversikt genomfördes och resultatet baserades på 16 vetenskapliga artiklar som inhämtats genom systematisk sökning i databaser. Data analyserades i enlighet med Granheim och Lundmans kvalitativa innehållsanalys (2017) på en manifest nivå med induktiv ansats.

    Resultat: Analysen resulterade i tre huvudkategorier med sju tillhörande subkategorier. Huvudkategorierna är: Upplevelse av stigmatisering, Upplevelse av brister i vårdpersonalens yrkesfärdigheter och Upplevelse av vårdande relation.

    Slutsats: Personer med substansbrukssyndrom upplever stigmatisering utifrån hur vårdpersonal bemöter och behandlar dem när de söker vård. De upplever att de inte tas på allvar, att de blir diskriminerade och upplever att de får sämre vård än andra patienter på grund av bristande kunskap hos vårdpersonal. Tidigare negativa erfarenheter bidrar till att de undviker kontakt med sjukvården. Genom ökad kunskap hos vårdpersonal, medvetenhet om egna fördomar, fortsatt implementering av personcentrerad omvårdnad och samverkan mellan somatisk respektive psykiatrisk vård är förhoppningen att detta kan förebyggas. Ytterligare forskning behövs för att klarlägga vilka omvårdnadsåtgärder specialistsjuksköterskan inom psykiatrisk vård kan tillämpa för att förbättra vårdupplevelsen för personer med substansbrukssyndrom.

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  • 67.
    Abzhandadze, Tamar
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Rehabil Med, Dubbsgatan 14,fl 3, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lundström, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurology.
    Buvarp, Dongni
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå Univ, Dept Stat, USBE, Umeå, Sweden..
    Quinn, Terence J.
    Univ Glasgow, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Glasgow, Scotland..
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Neurocare, Rehabil Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Development of a Swedish short version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment for cognitive screening in patients with stroke2023In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 55, article id jrm4442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The primary objective was to develop a Swedish short version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (s-MoCA-SWE) for use with patients with stroke. Secondary objectives were to iden-tify an optimal cut-off value for the s-MoCA-SWE to screen for cognitive impairment and to compare its sensitivity with that of previously developed short forms of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.

    Design: Cross-sectional study.

    Subjects/patients: Patients admitted to stroke and rehabilitation units in hospitals across Sweden.

    Methods: Cognition was screened using the Mont-real Cognitive Assessment. Working versions of the s-MoCA-SWE were developed using supervised and unsupervised algorithms.

    Results: Data from 3,276 patients were analysed (40% female, mean age 71.5 years, 56% minor stroke at admission). The suggested s-MoCA-SWE compri-sed delayed recall, visuospatial/executive function, serial 7, fluency, and abstraction. The aggregated scores ranged from 0 to 16. A threshold for impai-red cognition & LE; 12 had a sensitivity of 97.41 (95% confidence interval, 96.64-98.03) and positive pre-dictive value of 90.30 (95% confidence interval 89.23-91.27). The s-MoCA-SWE had a higher abso-lute sensitivity than that of other short forms.

    Conclusion: The s-MoCA-SWE (threshold & LE; 12) can detect post-stroke cognitive issues. The high sensitivity makes it a potentially useful "rule-out" tool that may eliminate severe cognitive impair-ment in people with stoke.

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  • 68.
    Acar-Denizli, N.
    et al.
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Dept Stat & Opera tions Res, Barcelona, Spain..
    Horvath, I. -F
    Mandl, T.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp Malmö, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Priori, R.
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Rheumatol Clin, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rome, Italy..
    Vissink, A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hernandez-Molina, G.
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Immunol & Rheumatol Dept, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Armagan, B.
    Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Internal Med, Ankara, Turkey..
    Praprotnik, S.
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Sebastian, A.
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Dept Rheumatol & Internal Med, Wroclaw, Poland..
    Bartoloni, E.
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Perugia, Italy..
    Rischmueller, M.
    Univ Adelaide, Queen Elizabeth Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Discipline Med, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Pasoto, S. G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Med, Hosp Clin HCFMUSP, Rheumatol Div, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Nakamura, H.
    Nagasaki Univ, Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Div Adv Prevent Med Sci, Dept Immunol & Rheumatol, Nagasaki, Japan..
    Fernandes Moca Trevisani, V.
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Retamozo, S.
    Inst Modelo Cardiol Privado SRL, Cordoba, Argentina.;Inst Univ Ciencias Biomed Cordoba IUCBC, Cordoba, Argentina..
    Carsons, S. E.
    NYU Long Isl Sch Med, Div Rheumatol Allergy & Immunol, Mineola, NY USA..
    Maure-Noia, B.
    Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Dept Autoimmune Dis, Vigo, Spain..
    Sanchez-Berna, I.
    Hosp Rey Juan Carlos de Mostoles, Dept Internal Med, Madrid, Spain..
    Lopez-Dupla, M.
    Hosp Joan 23, Dept Internal Med, Tarragona, Spain..
    Fonseca-Aizpuru, E.
    Hosp Cabuenes, Dept Internal Med, Gijon, Spain..
    Melchor Diaz, S.
    Hosp 12 Octubre, Dept Rheumatol, Madrid, Spain..
    Vazquez, M.
    Hosp Clin, Dept Rheumatol, San Lorenzo, Paraguay..
    Diaz Cuiza, P. E.
    Seguro Social Univ, Dept Reumatol, Sucre, Bolivia.;Consultorio Privado Reumatol, Sucre, Bolivia..
    de Miguel Campo, B.
    Hosp 12 Octubre, Dept Internal Med, Madrid, Spain..
    Ng, W. -F
    Rasmussen, A.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Genes & Human Dis Res Program, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA..
    Dong, X.
    Peking Union Med Coll Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Li, X.
    Anhui Prov Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Baldini, C.
    Univ Pisa, Rheumatol Unit, Pisa, Italy..
    Seror, R.
    Univ Paris Sud, Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis,INSERM, Paris, France..
    Gottenberg, J. -E
    Kruize, A. A.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Sandhya, P.
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India..
    Gandolfo, S.
    Univ Hosp Santa Maria della Misericordia, Dept Med & Biol Sci, Clin Rheumatol, Udine, Italy..
    Kwok, S. -K
    Kvarnstrom, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Expt Rheumatol, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Solans, R.
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Dept Internal Med, Barcelona, Spain..
    Sene, D.
    Univ Paris VII, Hop Lariboisiere, AP HP, Serv Med Interne 2, Paris, France..
    Suzuki, Y.
    Kanazawa Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan..
    Isenberg, D. A.
    UCL, Div Med, Ctr Rheumatol, London, England..
    Valim, V.
    Univ Fed Espirito Santo, Dept Med, Vitoria, Brazil..
    Hofauer, B.
    Tech Univ Munich, Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Munich, Germany..
    Giacomelli, R.
    Univ Aquila, Sch Med, Clin Unit Rheumatol, Laquila, Italy..
    Devauchelle-Pensec, V.
    Brest Univ, Rheumatol Dept, INSERM 1227, Brest, France..
    Atzeni, F.
    Univ Messina, IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopaed Inst, Milan & Rheumatol Unit, Messina, Italy..
    Gheita, T. A.
    Cairo Univ, Kasr Al Ainy Sch Med, Rheumatol Dept, Cairo, Egypt..
    Morel, J.
    Teaching Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Montpellier, France.;Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France..
    Izzo, R.
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Rheumatol Clin, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rome, Italy..
    Kalyoncu, U.
    Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Internal Med, Ankara, Turkey..
    Szanto, A.
    Univ Debrecen, Div Clin Immunol, Fac Med, Debrecen, Hungary..
    Olsson, P.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp Malmö, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Bootsma, H.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Ramos-Casals, M.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Cli, Barcelona, Spain..
    Kostov, B.
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Dept Stat & Opera tions Res, Barcelona, Spain.;Consorci Atencio Primaria Salut Barcelona Esquerr, Primary Care Ctr Corts, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS, Primary Healthcare Transversal Res Grp, Barcelona, Spain..
    Brito-Zeron, P.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Cli, Barcelona, Spain.;Hosp CIMA Sanitas, Dept Med, Autoimmune Dis Unit, Barcelona, Spain..
    Systemic phenotype related to primary Sjögren's syndrome in 279 patients carrying isolated anti-La/SSB antibodies2020In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 38, no 4; Suppl. 126, p. S85-S94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the systemic phenotype associated with the presence of isolated anti-La/SSB antibodies in a large international registry of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) fulfilling the 2002 classification criteria.

    Methods: The Big Data Sjogren Project Consortium is an international, multicentre registry created in 2014. Baseline clinical information from leading centres on clinical research in SS of the 5 continents was collected. Combination patterns of anti-Ro/SSA-La/SSB antibodies at the time of diagnosis defined the following four immunological phenotypes: double positive (combined Ro/SSA and La/SSB,) isolated anti-Ro/SSA, isolated anti-La/SSB, and immunonegative.

    Results: The cohort included 12,084 patients (11,293 females, mean 52.4 years) with recorded ESSDAI scores available. Among them, 279 (2.3%) had isolated anti-La/SSB antibodies. The mean total ESSDAI score at diagnosis of patients with pSS carrying isolated anti-La/SSB was 6.0, and 80.4% of patients had systemic activity (global ESSDAI score >= 1) at diagnosis. The domains with the highest frequency of active patients were the biological (42.8%), glandular (36.8%) and articular (31.2%) domains. Patients with isolated anti-La/ SSB showed a higher frequency of active patients in all ESSDAI domains but two (articular and peripheral nerve) in comparison with immune-negative patients, and even a higher absolute frequency in six clinical ESSDAI domains in comparison with patients with isolated anti-Ro/SSA. In addition, patients with isolated anti-La/SSB showed a higher frequency of active patients in two ESSDAI domains (pulmonary and glandular) with respect to the most active immunological subset (double-positive antibodies). Meanwhile, systemic activity detected in patients with isolated anti-La/SSB was overwhelmingly low. Even in ESSDAI domains where patients with isolated anti-La/SSB had the highest frequencies of systemic activity (lymphadenopathy and muscular), the percentage of patients with moderate or high activity was lower in comparison with the combined Ro/SSA and La/SSB group.

    Conclusion: Patients carrying isolated La/SSB antibodies represent a very small subset of patients with a systemic SS phenotype characterised by a significant frequency of active patients in most clinical ESSDAI domains but with a relative low frequency of the highest severe organ-specific involvements. Primary SS still remains the best clinical diagnosis for this subset of patients.

  • 69. Accinelli, Cesare
    et al.
    Saccà, Maria Ludovica
    Fick, Jerker
    Mencarelli, Mariangela
    Lindberg, Richard
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Dissipation and removal of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in different aquatic environments2010In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 79, no 8, p. 891-897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu) has received recent attention due to the potential use as a first-line defense against H5N1 and H1N1 influenza viruses. Research has shown that oseltamivir is not removed during conventional wastewater treatments, thus having the potential to enter surface water bodies. A series of laboratory experiments investigated the fate and the removal of oseltamivir in two surface water ecosystems of Japan and in a municipal wastewater treatment plant located in Northern Italy. Persistence of oseltamivir in surface water ranged from non-detectable degradation to a half-life of 53 d. After 40 d, <3% of radiolabeled oseltamivir evolved as (CO2)-C-14. The presence of sediments (5%) led to a significant increase of oseltamivir degradation and mineralization rates. A more intense mineralization was observed in samples of the wastewater treatment plant when applying a long incubation period (40 d). More precisely, 76% and 37% of the initial radioactivity applied as C-14-oseltamivir was recovered as (CO2)-C-14 from samples of the biological tank and effluent water, respectively. Two bacterial strains growing on oseltamivir as sole carbon source were isolated and used for its removal from synthetic medium and environmental samples, including surface water and wastewater. Inoculation of water and wastewater samples with the two oseltamivir-degrading strains showed that mineralization of oseltamivir was significantly higher in both inoculated water and wastewater, than in uninoculated controls. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR analysis showed that Tamiflu would not affect the microbial population of surface water and wastewater.

  • 70. Accordini, S
    et al.
    Corsico, A
    Cerveri, I
    Gislason, D
    Gulsvik, A
    Janson, C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Jarvis, D
    Marcon, A
    Pin, I
    Vermeire, P
    Almar, E
    Bugiani, M
    Cazzoletti, L
    Duran-Tauleria, E
    Jõgi, R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Marinoni, A
    Martínez-Moratalla, J
    Leynaert, B
    de Marco, R
    The socio-economic burden of asthma is substantial in Europe2008In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 116-124Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few data are available on the asthma burden in the general population. We evaluated the level and the factors associated with the asthma burden in Europe. METHODS: In 1999-2002, 1152 adult asthmatics were identified in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS)-II and the socio-economic burden (reduced activity days and hospital services utilization in the past 12 months) was assessed. RESULTS: The asthmatics with a light burden (only a few reduced activity days) were 13.2% (95% CI: 11.4-15.3%), whereas those with a heavy burden (many reduced activity days and/or hospital services utilization) were 14.0% (95% CI: 12.1-16.1%). The burden was strongly associated with disease severity and a lower quality of life. Obese asthmatics had a significantly increased risk of a light [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.17; 95% CI: 1.18-4.00] or a heavy burden (RRR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.52-5.05) compared with normal/underweight subjects. The asthmatics with frequent respiratory symptoms showed a threefold (RRR = 2.74; 95% CI: 1.63-4.61) and sixfold (RRR = 5.76; 95% CI: 3.25-10.20) increased risk of a light or a heavy burden compared with asymptomatic asthmatics, respectively. Moreover, the lower the forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted, the higher the risk of a heavy burden. The coexistence with chronic cough/phlegm only increased the risk of a heavy burden (RRR = 1.88; 95% CI: 1.16-3.06). An interaction was found between gender and IgE sensitization, with nonatopic asthmatic females showing the highest risk of a heavy burden (21.6%; 95% CI: 16.9-27.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The asthma burden is substantial in Europe. A heavy burden is more common in asthmatics with obesity, frequent respiratory symptoms, low lung function, chronic cough/phlegm and in nonatopic females.

  • 71.
    Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Calciano, Lucia
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Johannessen, Ane
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway..
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.;Oral Hlth Ctr Expertise Western Norway Vestland, Bergen, Norway..
    Braback, Lennart
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Dharmage, Shyamali C.
    Univ Melbourne, Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Allergy & Lung Hlth Unit, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Real, Francisco Gomez
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Bergen, Norway..
    Holloway, John W.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Human Dev & Hlth, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Holm, Mathias
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Sch Publ Hlth & Community Med, Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Jogi, Nils O.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.;Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia..
    Jogi, Rain
    Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia..
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Rovira, Jesus Martinez-Moratalla
    Complejo Hosp Univ Albacete CHUA, Serv Neurol, Serv Salud Castilla La Mancha SESCAM, Albacete, Spain..
    Sanchez-Ramos, Jose Luis
    Univ Huelva, Dept Nursing, Huelva, Spain..
    Schlunssen, Vivi
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Toren, Kjell
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Sch Publ Hlth & Community Med, Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Imperial Coll London, Fac Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway..
    Prenatal and prepubertal exposures to tobacco smoke in men may cause lower lung function in future offspring: a three-generation study using a causal modelling approach2021In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 58, no 4, article id 2002791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanistic research suggests that lifestyle and environmental factors impact respiratory health across generations by epigenetic changes transmitted through male germ cells. Evidence from studies on humans is very limited. We investigated multigeneration causal associations to estimate the causal effects of tobacco smoking on lung function within the paternal line. We analysed data from 383 adult offspring (age 18-47 years; 52.0% female) and their 274 fathers, who had participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS)/Respiratory Health in Northern Europe, Spain and Australia (RHINESSA) generation study and had provided valid measures of pre-bronchodilator lung function. Two counterfactual-based, multilevel mediation models were developed with: paternal grandmothers' smoking in pregnancy and fathers' smoking initiation in prepuberty as exposures; fathers' forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC), or FEV1/FVC z-scores as potential mediators (proxies of unobserved biological mechanisms that are true mediators); and offspring's FEV1 and FVC, or FEV1/FVC z-scores as outcomes. All effects were summarised as differences (Delta) in expected z-scores related to fathers' and grandmothers' smoking history. Fathers' smoking initiation in prepuberty had a negative direct effect on both offspring's FEV1 (Delta z-score -0.36, 95% CI -0.63--0.10) and FVC (-0.50, 95% CI -0.80--0.20) compared with fathers' never smoking. Paternal grandmothers' smoking in pregnancy had a negative direct effect on fathers' FEV1/FVC -0.57, 95% CI -1.09--0.05) and a negative indirect effect on offspring's FEV1/FVC (-0.12, 95% CI -0.21--0.03) compared with grandmothers' not smoking before fathers' birth nor during fathers' childhood. Fathers' smoking in prepuberty and paternal grandmothers' smoking in pregnancy may cause lower lung function in offspring. Our results support the concept that lifestyle-related exposures during these susceptibility periods influence the health of future generations.

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  • 72.
    Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Calciano, Lucia
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Johannessen, Ane
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway.
    Portas, Laura
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway.
    Braback, Lennart
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Carsin, Anne-Elie
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain;UPF, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud PUbl CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain.
    Dharmage, Shyamali C.
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy;Univ Melbourne, Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Dratva, Julia
    ZHAW Sch Hlth Profess, Inst Hlth Sci, Winterthur, Switzerland;Basel Univ, Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Real, Francisco Gomez
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp Munich, Inner City Clin, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat,Social & Environm, Munich, Germany.
    Holloway, John W.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Human Dev & Hlth, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Holm, Mathias
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Jogi, Rain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia.
    Leynaert, Benedicte
    INSERM, Pathophysiol & Epidemiol Resp Dis, UMR 1152, Paris, France.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Martinez-Moratalla Rovira, Jesus
    CHUA, Hlth Serv Castilla La Mancha SESCAM, Pneumol Serv, Albacete, Spain;Univ Castilla La Mancha, Sch Med, Albacete, Spain.
    Raherison, Chantal
    Bordeaux Univ, INSERM, U1219, Bordeaux, France.
    Luis Sanchez-Ramos, Jose
    Univ Huelva, Dept Nursing, Huelva, Spain.
    Schlunssen, Vivi
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark;Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bono, Roberto
    Univ Turin, Dept Publ Hlth & Pediat, Turin, Italy.
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Univ Pavia, IRCCS San Matteo Hosp Fdn, Div Resp Dis, Pavia, Italy.
    Demoly, Pascal
    Univ Montpellier, Hop Arnaud Villeneuve, Dept Pneumol & Addictol, Montpellier, France;Sorbonne Univ, INSERM, IPLESP, Paris, France.
    Dorado Arenas, Sandra
    Galdakao Usansolo Hosp, Pulmonol Dept, Biscay, Spain.
    Nowak, Dennis
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp Munich, Inner City Clin, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat,Social & Environm, Munich, Germany;Comprehens Pneumol Ctr Munich, German Ctr Lung Res, Munich, Germany.
    Pin, Isabelle
    CHU Grenoble Alpes, Pediat, Grenoble, France;Inst Adv Biosci, INSERM 1209, Grenoble, France;Univ Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France.
    Weyler, Joost
    Univ Antwerp, Dept Epidemiol & Social Med, Antwerp, Belgium;Univ Antwerp, StatUA Stat Ctr, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England;Imperial Coll, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England.
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway.
    Ageing, Lungs European Cohorts A. L. E. C. Study
    A three-generation study on the association of tobacco smoking with asthma2018In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 1106-1117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mothers' smoking during pregnancy increases asthma risk in their offspring. There is some evidence that grandmothers' smoking may have a similar effect, and biological plausibility that fathers' smoking during adolescence may influence offspring's health through transmittable epigenetic changes in sperm precursor cells. We evaluated the three-generation associations of tobacco smoking with asthma. Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, at the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III clinical interview, 2233 mothers and 1964 fathers from 26 centres reported whether their offspring (aged <= 51 years) had ever had asthma and whether it had coexisted with nasal allergies or not. Mothers and fathers also provided information on their parents' (grandparents) and their own asthma, education and smoking history. Multilevel mediation models within a multicentre three-generation framework were fitted separately within the maternal (4666 offspring) and paternal (4192 offspring) lines. Results: Fathers' smoking before they were 15 [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-2.01] and mothers' smoking during pregnancy (RRR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.01-1.59) were associated with asthma without nasal allergies in their offspring. Grandmothers' smoking during pregnancy was associated with asthma in their daughters [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.17-2.06] and with asthma with nasal allergies in their grandchildren within the maternal line (RRR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02-1.55). Conclusions: Fathers' smoking during early adolescence and grandmothers' and mothers' smoking during pregnancy may independently increase asthma risk in offspring. Thus, risk factors for asthma should be sought in both parents and before conception.

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  • 73.
    Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Calciano, Lucia
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Pesce, Giancarlo
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.;Sorbonne Univ, INSERM, UMR S 1136, IPLESP,Team EPAR, F-75012 Paris, France..
    Ant, Josep M.
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.;Hosp del Mar Med Res Inst IMIM, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Pompeu Fabra UPF, Barcelona, Spain..
    Beckmeyer-Borowko, Anna B.
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Carsin, Anne-Elie
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Pompeu Fabra UPF, Barcelona, Spain..
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Univ Pavia, San Matteo Hosp Fdn, IRCCS, Div Resp Dis, Pavia, Italy..
    Imboden, Medea
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Keidel, Dirk
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Locatelli, Francesca
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Burney, Peter G. J.
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Minelli, Cosetta
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England..
    Incidence trends of airflow obstruction among European adults without asthma: a 20-year cohort study2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 3452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigating COPD trends may help healthcare providers to forecast future disease burden. We estimated sex- and smoking-specific incidence trends of pre-bronchodilator airflow obstruction (AO) among adults without asthma from 11 European countries within a 20-year follow-up (ECRHS and SAPALDIA cohorts). We also quantified the extent of misclassification in the definition based on pre-bronchodilator spirometry (using post-bronchodilator measurements from a subsample of subjects) and we used this information to estimate the incidence of post-bronchodilator AO (AO(post-BD)), which is the primary characteristic of COPD. AO incidence was 4.4 (95% CI: 3.5-5.3) male and 3.8 (3.1-4.6) female cases/1,000/year. Among ever smokers (median pack-years: 20, males; 12, females), AO incidence significantly increased with ageing in men only [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 1-year increase: 1.05 (1.03-1.07)]. A strong exposure-response relationship with smoking was found both in males [IRR, 1-pack-year increase: 1.03 (1.02-1.04)] and females [1.03 (1.02-1.05)]. The positive predictive value of AO for AO(post-BD) was 59.1% (52.0-66.2%) in men and 42.6% (35.1-50.1%) in women. AO(post-BD) incidence was 2.6 (1.7-3.4) male and 1.6 (1.0-2.2) female cases/1,000/year. AO incidence was considerable in Europe and the sex-specific ageing-related increase among ever smokers was strongly related to cumulative tobacco exposure. AO(post-BD) incidence is expected to be half of AO incidence.

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  • 74.
    Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Calciano, Lucia
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Pesce, Giancarlo
    INSERM, UMR 1152, Pathophysiol & Epidemiol Resp Dis, Paris, France.
    Anto, Josep
    Inst Global Hlth, Barcelona, Spain.
    Beckmeyer-Borowko, Anna
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Basel, Switzerland.
    Corsico, Angelo
    Univ Pavia, IRCCS San Matteo Hosp Fdn, Div Resp Dis, Pavia, Italy.
    Imboden, Medea
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Basel, Switzerland.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Keidel, Dirk
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Basel, Switzerland.
    Locatelli, Francesca
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway.
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Fac Med, London, England.
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Basel, Switzerland.
    Minelli, Cosetta
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Fac Med, London, England.
    Incidence of airflow obstruction over 20 years in Europe2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Cazzoletti, Lucia
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Anto, Josep
    Inst Global Hlth, Barcelona, Spain.
    Cerveri, Isa
    Univ Pavia, IRCCS San Matteo Hosp Fdn, Div Resp Dis, Pavia, Italy.
    Corsico, Angelo
    Univ Pavia, IRCCS San Matteo Hosp Fdn, Div Resp Dis, Pavia, Italy.
    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith
    Inst Global Hlth, Barcelona, Spain.
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp Munich, Inner City Clin, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Munich, Germany.
    Gislason, David
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Allergy Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Jogi, Rain
    Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia.
    Johannessen, Ane
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway.
    Leynaert, Benedicte
    INSERM, UMR 1152, Pathophysiol & Epidemiol Resp Dis, Paris, France.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Pin, Isabelle
    CHU Grenoble Alpes, Pediat, Grenoble, France.
    Portas, Laura
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Weyler, Joost
    Univ Antwerp, Epidemiol & Social Med, Antwerp, France;Univ Antwerp, StatUA Stat Ctr, Antwerp, France.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Fac Med, London, England.
    Asthma control and decline in FEV1/FVC ratio over 10 years in adults2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 76. Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Braggion, Marco
    Gerbase, Margaret W.
    Gislason, David
    Gulsvik, Amund
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Jõgi, Rain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Pin, Isabelle
    Schoefer, Yvonne
    Bugiani, Massimiliano
    Cazzoletti, Lucia
    Cerveri, Isa
    Marcon, Alessandro
    de Marco, Roberto
    The Cost of Persistent Asthma in Europe: An International Population-Based Study in Adults2013In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 1018-2438, E-ISSN 1423-0097, Vol. 160, no 1, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study is aimed at providing a real-world evaluation of the economic cost of persistent asthma among European adults according to the degree of disease control [as defined by the 2006 Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines]. Methods: A prevalence-based cost-of-illness study was carried out on 462 patients aged 30-54 years with persistent asthma (according to the 2002 GINA definition), who were identified in general population samples from 11 European countries and examined in clinical settings in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II between 1999 and 2002. The cost estimates were computed from the societal perspective following the bottom-up approach on the basis of rates, wages and prices in 2004 (obtained at the national level from official sources), and were then converted to the 2010 values. Results: The mean total cost per patient was EUR 1,583 and was largely driven by indirect costs (i.e. lost working days and days with limited, not work-related activities 62.5%). The expected total cost in the population aged 30-54 years of the 11 European countries was EUR 4.3 billion (EUR 19.3 billion when extended to the whole European population aged from 15 to 64 years). The mean total cost per patient ranged from EUR 509 (controlled asthma) to EUR 2,281 (uncontrolled disease). Chronic cough or phlegm and having a high BMI significantly increased the individual total cost. Conclusions: Among European adults, the cost of persistent asthma drastically increases as disease control decreases. Therefore, substantial cost savings could be obtained through the proper management of adult patients in Europe.

  • 77. Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Jarvis, Deborah
    The Role of Smoking in Allergy and Asthma: Lessons from the ECRHS2012In: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports, ISSN 1529-7322, E-ISSN 1534-6315, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 185-191Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Community Respiratory Health Survey is an international multicenter cohort study of asthma, allergy, and lung function that began in the early-1990s with recruitment of population-based samples of 20- to 44-year-old adults, mainly in Europe. The aims of the study are broad ranging but include assessment of the role of in utero exposure to tobacco smoke, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and active smoking on the incidence, prevalence, and prognosis of allergy and asthma. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses looking at these associations have been conducted, sometimes only using information collected in one country, and on other occasions using information collected in all the participating centers. This article summarizes the results from these various publications from this large epidemiologic study.

  • 78. Achenbach, Stephan
    et al.
    Friedrich, Matthias G.
    Nagel, Eike
    Kramer, Christopher M.
    Kaufmann, Philip A.
    Farkhooy, Amir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Dilsizian, Vasken
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    CV Imaging: What Was New in 2012?2013In: JACC Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1936-878X, E-ISSN 1876-7591, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 714-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Echocardiography, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography can be used for anatomic and functional imaging of the heart. All 4 methods are subject to continuous improvement. Echocardiography benefits from the more widespread availability of 3-dimensional imaging, strain and strain rate analysis, and contrast applications. SPECT imaging continues to provide very valuable prognostic data, and PET imaging, on the one hand, permits quantification of coronary flow reserve, a strong prognostic predictor, and, on the other hand, can be used for molecular imaging, allowing the analysis of extremely small-scale functional alterations in the heart. Magnetic resonance is gaining increasing importance as a stress test, mainly through perfusion imaging, and continues to provide very valuable prognostic information based on late gadolinium enhancement. Magnetic resonance coronary angiography does not substantially contribute to clinical cardiology at this point in time. Computed tomography imaging of the heart mainly concentrates on the imaging of coronary artery lumen and plaque and has made substantial progress regarding outcome data. In this review, the current status of the 5 imaging techniques is illustrated by reviewing pertinent publications of the year 2012. 

  • 79.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Båtelsson, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Onkamo, Elina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Split Renal Function after Treatment of Small Renal Masses: Comparison between Radiofrequency Ablation and Laparoscopic Partial NephrectomyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Båtelsson, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Onkamo, Elina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Split renal function after treatment of small renal masses: comparison between radiofrequency ablation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.2021In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 62, no 9, p. 1248-1256, article id 284185120956281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) are used to treat small renal masses (SRM; ≤4 cm), although there are conflicting results in the changes in creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after treatment. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) images, the quantity and quality of renal function can be evaluated by calculating the split renal function (SRF).

    PURPOSE: To compare renal function after RFA or LPN treatment of SRMs through evaluation of the SRF in the affected kidney.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Single T1a renal tumors successfully treated with RFA (n = 60) or LPN (n = 31) were retrospectively compared. The SRF was calculated on pre-treatment CE-CT images and the first follow-up exam after completed treatment. Serum creatinine and eGFR values were collected simultaneously. To compare renal function outcomes, Student's t-test and multivariable linear regression models (adjusted to RFA/LPN treatment, pre-treatment SRF/eGFR, BMI, age, tumor characteristics, and Charlson Comorbidity Index) were used.

    RESULTS: SRF was reduced in both groups, although reduction was greater in the LPN group (LPN -5.7%) than in the RFA group (RFA -3.5%; P = 0.013). After adjusted analysis, the LPN group still had greater SRF reduction (difference 3.2%, 95% confidence interval 1.3-1.5; P = 0.001). There was no difference between groups in the change of creatinine/eGFR after treatment.

    CONCLUSION: Both RFA and LPN are nephron-sparing when treating SRMs. However, in this series, reduction of SRF in the affected kidney was smaller after RFA, having a more favorable preservation of renal function than LPN.

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  • 81.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ladjevardi, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University Hospital, Urology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Periprocedural outcome after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus radiofrequency ablation for T1 renal tumors: A modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score adjusted comparison2019In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comparable oncological outcomes have been seen after surgical nephrectomy and thermal ablation of renal tumors recently. However, periprocedural outcome needs to be assessed for aiding treatment decision.

    Purpose: To compare efficacy rates and periprocedural outcome (technical success, session time, hospitalization time, and complications) after renal tumor treatment with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA).

    Material and Methods: The initial experience with 49 (treated with LPN) and 84 (treated with RFA) consecutive patients for a single renal tumor (diameter ≤ 5 cm, limited to the kidney) during 2007-2014 was evaluated. Patient and tumor characteristics, efficacy rates, and periprocedural outcome were collected retrospectively. The stratified Mantel Haenzel and Van Elteren tests, adjusted for tumor complexity (with the modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score [m-RNS]), were used to assess differences in treatment outcomes.

    Results: Primary efficacy rate was 98% for LPN and 85.7% for RFA; secondary efficacy rate was 93.9% for LPN and 95.2% for RFA; and technical success rate was 87.8% for LPN and 100% for RFA. Median session (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 215 min, RFA 137 min) and median hospitalization time were longer after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 5 days, RFA 2 days). Side effects were uncommon (LPN 2%, RFA 4.8%). Complications were more frequent after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 42.9%, RFA 10.7%).

    Conclusion: Both methods achieved equivalent secondary efficacy rates. RFA included several treatment sessions, but session and hospitalization times were shorter, and complications were less frequent than for LPN. The differences remained after adjustment for renal tumor complexity.

  • 82.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

  • 83.
    Adams, Hieab H. H.
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hibar, Derrek P.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Chouraki, Vincent
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Univ Lille, RID AGE Risk Factors & Mol Determinants Aging Rel, CHU Lille, Inserm,Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Stein, Jason L.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC USA.;Univ N Carolina, UNC Neurosci Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Nyquist, Paul A.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Neurol, Dept Anesthesia Crit Care Med, Dept Neurosurg, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA..
    Renteria, Miguel E.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Trompet, Stella
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Seshadri, Sudha
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Desrivieres, Sylvane
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Beecham, Ashley H.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Dr John T Macdonald Fdn, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Jahanshad, Neda
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Wittfeld, Katharine
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE Rostock Greifs, Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Van der Lee, Sven J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Abramovic, Lucija
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Alhusaini, Saud
    McGill Univ, Montreal Neurol Inst, Dept Neurol & Neurosurg, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Amin, Najaf
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Andersson, Micael
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Arfanakis, Konstantinos
    IIT, Dept Biomed Engn, Chicago, IL 60616 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Diagnost Radiol & Nucl Med, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Aribisala, Benjamin S.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Lagos State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Lagos, Nigeria.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Armstrong, Nicola J.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Murdoch Univ, Math & Stat, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Athanasiu, Lavinia
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Beiser, Alexa
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA.;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA..
    Bernard, Manon
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA USA..
    Blanken, Laura M. E.
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Blanton, Susan H.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Dr John T Macdonald Fdn, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Bohlken, Marc M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Boks, Marco P.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Bralten, Janita
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Brickman, Adam M.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, GH Sergievsky Ctr, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Dept Neurol, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Carmichael, Owen
    Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA..
    Chakravarty, M. Mallar
    Douglas Mental Hlth Univ Inst, Cerebral Imaging Ctr, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Psychiat & Biomed Engn, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Chauhan, Ganesh
    Univ Bordeaux, INSERM Unit U1219, Bordeaux, France..
    Chen, Qiang
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Ching, Christopher R. K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Sch Med, Interdept Neurosci Grad Program, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Den Braber, Anouk
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Doan, Nhat Trung
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Ehrlich, Stefan
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Div Psychol & Social Med & Dev Neurosci, Dresden, Germany.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA..
    Filippi, Irina
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Ge, Tian
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Goldman, Aaron L.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Gottesman, Rebecca F.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Greven, Corina U.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Kings Coll London, Med Res Council Social, Genet & Dev Psychiat Ctr, Inst Psychol Psychiat & Neurosci, London, England..
    Grimm, Oliver
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Griswold, Michael E.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Ctr Biostat & Bioinformat, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Guadalupe, Tulio
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Int Max Planck Res Sch Language Sci, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Hass, Johanna
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dresden, Germany..
    Haukvik, Unn K.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Dept Res & Dev, Oslo, Norway..
    Hilal, Saima
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Hofer, Edith
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria.;Med Univ Graz, Inst Med Informat Stat & Documentat, Graz, Austria..
    Hoehn, David
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Holmes, Avram J.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Yale Univ, Dept Psychol, New Haven, CT USA..
    Hoogman, Martine
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Janowitz, Deborah
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Jia, Tianye
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Kasperaviciute, Dalia
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England.;Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, London, England..
    Kim, Sungeun
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Klein, Marieke
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Kraemer, Bernd
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Gen Psychiat, Sect Expt Psychopathol & Neuroimaging, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Lee, Phil H.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Lurie Ctr Autism, Lexington, MA USA..
    Liao, Jiemin
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore..
    Liewald, David C. M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Lopez, Lorna M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Luciano, Michelle
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Macare, Christine
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Marquand, Andre
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Matarin, Mar
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Mather, Karen A.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Mattheisen, Manuel
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biomed, Aarhus, Denmark.;iPSYCH, Lundbeck Fdn Initiat Integrat Psychiat Res, Aarhus, Denmark.;iPSYCH, Lundbeck Fdn Initiat Integrat Psychiat Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, iSEQ, Ctr Integrated Sequencing, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Mazoyer, Bernard
    UMR5296 Univ Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, Bordeaux, France..
    Mckay, David R.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA..
    McWhirter, Rebekah
    Univ Tasmania, Menzies Inst Med Res, Hobart, Tas, Australia..
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    VU Univ Med Ctr GGZ Geest, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, Dept Psychiat, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;VU Univ Med Ctr GGZ Geest, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Muetzel, Ryan L.
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Maniega, Susana Munoz
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Nho, Kwangsik
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Nugent, Allison C.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Loohuis, Loes M. Olde
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Ctr Neurobehav Genet, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Oosterlaan, Jaap
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Clin Neuropsychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Papmeyer, Martina
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Bern, Univ Hosp Psychiat, Translat Res Ctr, Div Syst Neurosci Psychopathol, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland..
    Pappa, Irene
    Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus Univ, Sch Pedag & Educ Sci, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Pirpamer, Lukas
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria..
    Pudas, Sara
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Puetz, Benno
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Rajan, Kumar B.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England.;Univ Oxford, Jenner Inst Labs, Oxford, England..
    Richards, Jennifer S.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Risacher, Shannon L.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Roiz-Santianez, Roberto
    Univ Cantabria IDIVAL, Sch Med, Dept Med & Psychiat, Univ Hosp Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.;CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain..
    Rommelse, Nanda
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Rose, Emma J.
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Psychosis Res Grp, Dept Psychiat, Dublin, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Trinity Translat Med Inst, Dublin, Ireland..
    Royle, Natalie A.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Rundek, Tatjana
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Saemann, Philipp G.
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Satizabal, Claudia L.
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA..
    Schmaal, Lianne
    Orygen, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Youth Mental Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Schork, Andrew J.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Neurosci, Multimodal Imaging Lab, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Cognit Sci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA..
    Shen, Li
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Shin, Jean
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Shumskaya, Elena
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Smith, Albert V.
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Sprooten, Emma
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA.;Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Strike, Lachlan T.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Teumer, Alexander
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Thomson, Russell
    Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana
    CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain.;Valdecilla Biomed Res Inst IDIVAL, Neuroimaging Unit, Technol Facil, Santander, Cantabria, Spain..
    Toro, Roberto
    Inst Pasteur, Paris, France..
    Trabzuni, Daniah
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Dept Genet, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Vaidya, Dhananjay
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Van der Grond, Jeroen
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    van der Meer, Dennis
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Van Eijk, Kristel R.
    UMC Utrecht, Human Neurogenet Unit, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Van Erp, Theo G. M.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Psychiat & Human Behav, Irvine, CA 92717 USA..
    Van Rooij, Daan
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Walton, Esther
    Tech Univ Dresden, Fac Med, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dresden, Germany..
    Westlye, Lars T.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Psychol, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Whelan, Christopher D.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Windham, Beverly G.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Winkler, Anderson M.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Woldehawariat, Girma
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Wolf, Christiane
    Univ Wurzburg, Dept Psychiat Psychosomat & Psychotherapy, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Wolfers, Thomas
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Xu, Bing
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Yanek, Lisa R.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Yang, Jingyun
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Zijdenbos, Alex
    Biospect Inc, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Zwiers, Marcel P.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Ctr Cognit Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Agartz, Ingrid
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Dept Res & Dev, Oslo, Norway.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Aggarwal, Neelum T.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Almasy, Laura
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ Penn, Dept Genet, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.;Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, Dept Biomed & Hlth Informat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Ames, David
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Natl Ageing Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Acad Unit Psychiat Old Age, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Univ Lille, RID AGE Risk Factors & Mol Determinants Aging Rel, CHU Lille, Inserm,Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France..
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Arepalli, Sampath
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Assareh, Amelia A.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Barral, Sandra
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA..
    Bastin, Mark E.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Becker, Diane M.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, GeneSTAR Res Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Becker, James T.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychiat, Pittsburgh, PA USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Neurol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA..
    Bennett, David A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Blangero, John
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    van Bokhoven, Hans
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Brodaty, Henry
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Dementia Collaborat Res Ctr Assessment & Better, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Brouwer, Rachel M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Brunner, Han G.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Buckner, Randy L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Univ, Dept Psychol, Ctr Brain Sci, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Buitelaar, Jan K.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Karakter Child & Adolescent Psychiat Univ Ctr, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Bulayeva, Kazima B.
    Dagestan State Univ, Dept Evolut & Genet, Makhachkala, Dagestan, Russia..
    Cahn, Wiepke
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Calhoun, Vince D.
    Mind Res Network, Albuquerque, NM USA.;LBERI, Albuquerque, NM USA.;Univ New Mexico, Dept ECE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA..
    Cannon, Dara M.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland..
    Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Chen, Christopher
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Cheng, Ching -Yu
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Acad Med Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Cichon, Sven
    Univ Basel, Dept Biomed, Div Med Genet, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Bonn, Inst Human Genet, Bonn, Germany.;Res Ctr Julich, Inst Neurosci & Med INM1, Julich, Germany..
    Cookson, Mark R.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Corvin, Aiden
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Psychosis Res Grp, Dept Psychiat, Dublin, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Trinity Translat Med Inst, Dublin, Ireland..
    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto
    Univ Cantabria IDIVAL, Sch Med, Dept Med & Psychiat, Univ Hosp Marques de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain.;CIBERSAM Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Med, Santander, Spain..
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Czisch, Michael
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany..
    Dale, Anders M.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Ctr Multimodal Imaging & Genet, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Neurosci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Radiol, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92103 USA.;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Cognit Sci, San Diego, CA 92103 USA..
    Davies, Gareth E.
    Avera Inst Human Genet, Sioux Falls, SD USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Neurol, Program Translat NeuroPsychiat Gen, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Psychiat, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    De Geus, Eco J. C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    De Jager, Philip L.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA..
    de Zubicaray, Greig I.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Fac Hlth, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Delanty, Norman
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland.;Beaumont Hosp, Div Neurol, Dublin 9, Ireland..
    Depondt, Chantal
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Hop Erasme, Dept Neurol, Brussels, Belgium..
    DeStefano, Anita L.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA USA.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Dillman, Allissa
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Oslo, Norway..
    Donohoe, Gary
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Cognit Genet & Cognit Therapy Grp, Neuroimaging Cognit & Genom Ctr NICOG, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Sch Psychol, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Discipline Biochem, Galway, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Psychiat, Neuropsychiat Genet Res Grp, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Inst Psychiat, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Janssen Res & Dev LLC, Titusville, NJ USA..
    Duggirala, Ravi
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Dyer, Thomas D.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Erk, Susanne
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Psychol, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Evans, Denis A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Inst Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Fedko, Iryna
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Fernandez, Guillen
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Cognit Neurosci, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    NIA, Intramural Res Program, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Fisher, Simon E.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Fleischman, Debra A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.;Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Behav Sci, Chicago, IL 60612 USA..
    Ford, Ian
    Univ Glasgow, Robertson Ctr Biostat, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Foroud, Tatiana M.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Computat Biol & Bioinformat, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Fox, Peter T.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 USA..
    Francks, Clyde
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Language & Genet Dept, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Fukunaga, Masaki
    Natl Inst Physiol Sci, Div Cerebral Integrat, Aichi, Japan..
    Gibbs, J. Raphael
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Glahn, David C.
    Yale Univ, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Olin Neuropsychiat Res Ctr, Hartford, CT USA..
    Gollub, Randy L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Martinos Ctr Biomed Imaging, Charlestown, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Goring, Harald H. H.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Edinburg, TX USA.;Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sch Med, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Grabe, Hans J.
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat, Greifswald, Germany..
    Green, Robert C.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Div Genet, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Gruber, Oliver
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Gen Psychiat, Sect Expt Psychopathol & Neuroimaging, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Guelfi, Sebastian
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Hansell, Narelle K.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Hardy, John
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England..
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hashimoto, Ryota
    Osaka Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Osaka, Japan.;Osaka Univ, United Grad Sch Child Dev, Mol Res Ctr Childrens Mental Dev, Osaka, Japan..
    Hegenscheid, Katrin
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Diagnost Radiol & Neuroradiol, Greifswald, Germany..
    Heinz, Andreas
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Hernandez, Dena G.
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE, Tubingen, Germany..
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Ho, Beng-Choon
    Univ Iowa, Dept Psychiat, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Hoekstra, Pieter J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Psychiat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hoffmann, Wolfgang
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE Rostock Greifs, Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Holsboer, Florian
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany.;HMNC Brain Hlth, Munich, Germany..
    Homuth, Georg
    Univ Med Greifswald, Interfac Inst Genet & Funct Gen, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hosten, Norbert
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Diagnost Radiol & Neuroradiol, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Ikeda, Masashi
    Fujita Hlth Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan..
    Ikram, M. Kamran
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Pharmacol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Mem Aging & Cognit Ctr, Singapore, Singapore.;Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Acad Med Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore..
    Jack, Clifford R., Jr.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Radiol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Jenldnson, Mark
    Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Johnson, Robert
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, NICHD Brain & Tissue Bank Dev Disorders, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Jonsson, Erik G.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Kahn, Rene S.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Kanai, Ryota
    Univ Sussex, Sch Psychol, Brighton, E Sussex, England.;UCL, Inst Cognit Neurosci, London, England.;Araya Brain Imaging, Dept Neuroinformat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Kloszewska, Iwona
    Med Univ Lodz, Lodz, Poland..
    Knopman, David S.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Neurol, Rochester, MN USA..
    Kochunov, Peter
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Maryland Psychiat Res Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Kwok, John B.
    Neurosci Res Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Sch Med Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Lawrie, Stephen M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Lemaitre, Herve
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Liu, Xinmin
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA..
    Longo, Dan L.
    NIA, Genet Lab, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Longstreth, W. T., Jr.
    Univ Washington, Dept Neurol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Lopez, Oscar L.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Neurol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Psychiat, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Lovestone, Simon
    Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford, England.;Kings Coll London, NIHR Dementia Biomed Res Unit, London, England..
    Martinez, Oliver
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Neurol, Imaging Dementia & Aging IDeA Lab, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Ctr Neurosci, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA..
    Martinot, Jean-Luc
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Descartes, NSERM Unit Neuroimaging & Psychiat 1000, Paris, France.;Hosp Cochin, AP HP, Maison Solenn Adolescent Psychopathol & Med Dept, Paris, France..
    Mattay, Venkata S.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Radiol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    McDonald, Colm
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland..
    McIntosh, Andrew M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    McMahon, Katie L.
    Univ Queensland, Ctr Adv Imaging, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    McMahon, Francis J.
    NIMH, Exp Therapeut & Pathophysiol Branch, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Mecocci, Patrizia
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Sect Gerontol & Geriatr, Perugia, Italy..
    Melle, Ingrid
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Mental Hlth & Addict, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Mohnke, Sebastian
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Morris, Derek W.
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Cognit Genet & Cognit Therapy Grp, Neuroimaging Cognit & Genom Ctr NICOG, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Sch Psychol, Galway, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Discipline Biochem, Galway, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Psychiat, Neuropsychiat Genet Res Grp, Dublin 8, Ireland.;Trinity Coll Dublin, Inst Psychiat, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Mosley, Thomas H.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Muhleisen, Thomas W.
    Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Ctr Neuroimaging & Cognit Genom NICOG, NCBES Galway Neurosci Ctr, Coll Med Nursing & Hlth Sci,Clin Neuroimaging Lab, Galway, Ireland.;Res Ctr Julich, Inst Neurosci & Med INM1, Julich, Germany..
    Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Dept Translat Res Psychiat, Munich, Germany.;Munich Cluster Syst Neurol SyNergy, Munich, Germany.;Univ Liverpool, Inst Translat Med, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Nalls, Michael A.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Nauck, Matthias
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Clin Chem & Lab Med, Greifswald, Germany.;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK eV, Partner Site Greifswald, Berlin, Germany..
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Univ Oxford, FMRIB Ctr, Oxford, England.;Univ Warwick, Dept Stat, Coventry, W Midlands, England.;Univ Warwick, Warwick Mfg Grp, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Niessen, Wiro J.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Med Informat, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Delft Univ Technol, Fac Sci Appl, Delft, Netherlands..
    Noethen, Markus M.
    Univ Bonn, Inst Human Genet, Bonn, Germany.;Univ Bonn, Life & Brain Ctr, Dept Genom, Bonn, Germany..
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umea Univ, Dept Integrat Med Biol, Umea, Sweden.;Umea Univ, Umea Ctr Funct Brain Imaging, Umea, Sweden..
    Ohi, Kazutaka
    Osaka Univ, Grad Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Osaka, Japan..
    Olvera, Rene L.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 USA..
    Ophoff, Roel A.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Ctr Neurobehav Genet, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Pandolfo, Massimo
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Hop Erasme, Dept Neurol, Brussels, Belgium..
    Paus, Tomas
    Univ Toronto, Rotman Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Psychol, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Psychiat, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.;Child Mind Inst, New York, NY USA..
    Pausova, Zdenka
    Univ Toronto, Hosp Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Phys, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Nutr Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Pike, G. Bruce
    Univ Calgary, Dept Radiol, Calgary, AB, Canada.;Univ Calgary, Dept Clin Neurosci, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Potkin, Steven G.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Psychiat & Human Behav, Irvine, CA 92717 USA..
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Grp Hlth Res Inst, Grp Hlth, Seattle, WA USA..
    Reppermund, Simone
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW Med, Sch Psychiat, Dept Dev Disabil Neuropsychiat, Kensington, NSW, Australia..
    Rietschel, Marcella
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, Mannheim, Germany..
    Roffman, Joshua L.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Med Ctr, Ilnst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst & Pediat Harbor, Torrance, CA 90509 USA..
    Ryten, Mina
    UCL Inst Neurol, Reta Lila Weston Inst, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England..
    Sacco, Ralph L.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, John P Hussman Inst Human Gen, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Inst, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Sachdev, Perminder S.
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Prince Wales Hosp, Neuropsychiat Inst, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Saykin, Andrew J.
    Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Neuroimaging Radiol & Imaging Sci, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Indiana Alzheimer Dis Ctr, Indianapolis, IN USA.;Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN USA..
    Schmidt, Reinhold
    Med Univ Graz, Clin Div Neurogeriatr, Dept Neurol, Graz, Austria..
    Schofield, Peter R.
    Neurosci Res Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW, Sch Med Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland..
    Simmons, Andy
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat, Dept Neuroimaging, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Biomed Res Ctr Mental Hlth, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Biomed Res Unit Dementia, London, England..
    Singleton, Andrew
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Sisodiya, Sanjay M.
    UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England.;Epilepsy Soc, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, England..
    Smith, Colin
    Univ Edinburgh, Acad Dept Neuropathol, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, MRC Edinburgh Brain Bank, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Smoller, Jordan W.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Psychiat & Neurodev Genet Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Soininen, Hindu.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Neurol, Kuopio, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Neuroctr Neurol, Kuopio, Finland..
    Srikanth, Velandai
    Peninsula Hlth & Monash Univ, Dept Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, NORMENT KG Jebsen Ctr Psychosis Res, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Med Genet & Mol Med, Dr Einar Martens Res Grp Biol Psychiat, Bergen, Norway..
    Stott, David J.
    Univ Glasgow, Fac Med, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Sussmann, Jessika E.
    Univ Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh Hosp, Div Psychiat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Toga, Arthur W.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Inst Neuroimaging & Informat, Lab Neuro Imaging, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Traynor, Bryan J.
    NIA, Neurogenet Lab, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Troncoso, Juan
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Brain Resource Ctr, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Turner, Jessica A.
    Georgia State Univ, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA..
    Tzourio, Christophe
    Univ Bordeaux, Institute Neurodegenerat Disorders, CEA, CNRS,UMR 5293, Bordeaux, France..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Van der Brug, Marcel
    Genentech Inc, San Francisco, CA 94080 USA..
    Van der Lugt, Aad
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Van der Wee, Nic J. A.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Leiden, Netherlands.;Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Leiden Inst Brain & Cognit, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Psychiat, Brain Ctr Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Van't Ent, Dennis
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Biol Psychol, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Van Tol, Marie Jose
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Neuroimaging Ctr, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Vardarajan, Badri N.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Taub Inst Res Alzheimers Dis & Aging Brain, New York, NY USA..
    Veltman, Dick J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Vernooij, Meike W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Voelzke, Henry
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Walter, Henrik
    Charite, CCM, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany..
    Wardlaw, Joanna M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Brain Res Imaging Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Dept Neuroimaging Sci, Scottish Imaging Network, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Clin Brain Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Wassink, Thomas H.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Psychiat, Carver Coll Med, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA..
    Weale, Michael E.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England..
    Weinberger, Daniel R.
    Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurosci, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Inst Med Genet, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Weiner, Michael W.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, San Francisco VA Med Ctr, Ctr Imaging Neurodegenerat Dis, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Wen, Wei
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Psychiat, Ctr Hlth Brain Ageing, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Westman, Eric
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    White, Tonya
    Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC Sophia Childrens Hosp, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Wong, Tien Y.
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Dagestan State Univ, Dept Evolut & Genet, Makhachkala, Dagestan, Russia.;Natl Univ Singapore, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Wright, Clinton B.
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Sci, Miami, FL 33136 USA.;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Inst, Miami, FL 33136 USA..
    Zielke, H. Ronald
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, NICHD Brain & Tissue Bank Dev Disorders, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Deary, Ian J.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol Psychol, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    DeCarli, Charles
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Neurol, Imaging Dementia & Aging IDeA Lab, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Ctr Neurosci, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA..
    Schmidt, Helena
    Med Univ Graz, Inst Mol Biol & Biochem, Graz, Austria..
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    De Craen, Anton J. M.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Gerontol & Geriatr, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Wright, Margaret J.
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Ctr Adv Imaging, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Launer, Lenore J.
    NIA, Intramural Res Program, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Schumann, Gunter
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, MRC SGDP Ctr, London, England..
    Fornage, Myriam
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, Inst Mol Med & Human Genet Ctr, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Franke, Barbara
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Donders Inst Brain Cognit & Behav, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Debette, Stephanie
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Lieber Inst Brain Dev, Baltimore, MD USA.;Bordeaux Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Bordeaux, France..
    Medland, Sarah E.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Neurol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Thompson, Paul M.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, USC Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informat I, Imaging Genet Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Western Sydney, Sch Comp Engn & Math, Parramatta, NSW, Australia..
    Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association2016In: Nature Neuroscience, ISSN 1097-6256, E-ISSN 1546-1726, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 1569-1582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (rho(genetic) = 0.748), which indicates a similar genetic background and allowed us to identify four additional loci through meta-analysis (N-combined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, and Parkinson's disease, and were enriched near genes involved in growth pathways, including PI3K-AKT signaling. These findings identify the biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and their link to physiological and pathological traits.

  • 84.
    Adamsson, I
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Edlund, C
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Seensalu, R
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Engstrand, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    The use of AP-PCR and flaA-RFLP typing to investigate treatment failure in Helicobacter pylori infection2000In: Clin Microbiol Infect, Vol. 6, p. 265-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Lantmännen.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized controlled trialArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    Methods: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels. In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

    Results: No differences were found in LDL-C, blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 were lower during PB compared with controls (p<0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and b-glucan compared with controls (p<0.05).

    Conclusions: Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation.

     

  • 86.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Marklund, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: A randomized controlled trial2015In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS:

    It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels.

    METHODS:

    In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The primary outcome was plasma LDL-C. Secondary outcomes were other blood lipids, body weight, sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD), glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and inflammation markers (C-reactive protein [CRP] and tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 [TNF-R2]), and blood pressure. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

    RESULTS:

    No differences were found in LDL-C, other blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 decreased more during PB compared with controls (p < 0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and β-glucan compared with controls (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation. The trial was registered in the Current Controlled Trials database (http://www.controlled-trials.com); International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 84550872.

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  • 87.
    Adde, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Laurell , Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Department of oncology Lund University Hospital.
    Hagberg , Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Carlson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Superior outcome in transformed follicular lymphoma compared to de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma treated with high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell supportManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of high–dose therapy with autologous stem cell support (HDT) in patients with transformed follicular lymphoma compared to patients with de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma, in a retrospective analysis of patients treated at two Swedish university hospitals.

    Patients and Methods: 117 patients, mean age 48 years (21-65), 79 with de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma and 38 with transformed follicular lymphoma, were treated with high-dose-therapy (HDT) as consolidation. Thirteen patients with transformed follicular lymphoma had been treated with a single alkylating agent and 25 were chemonaive at transformation. After transformation, nine patients had HDT as part of first line aggressive therapy, and a further eight failed to obtain CR and had HDT upfront. Twenty-one patients received more than one treatment regimen before HDT. In the de novo aggressive lymphoma group five patients with high risk criteria, and 16 patients who failed to obtain CR, received HDT upfront (CR1), Fifty-eight patients received more than one regimen before HDT because of relapse. Rituximab was given as a single dose to five patients for in vivo purging of the stem cell graft.

    Results: With a median follow up of 11.5 years (8-20), event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 35% and 44% respectively. When comparing the two groups, the ten- year EFS rates were 27% in the de novo group and 55% in the transformed group and the ten-year OS was 33 % and 67% respectively. Treatment related mortality was acceptable with 4% early and 3.5% late mortality. In a multivariate analysis, “transformed vs de novo aggressive” histopathology was the only factor significantly related to outcome.

    Conclusion: Both EFS and OS were much better in patients with transformed follicular lymphoma compared to patients with de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma Although the introduction of rituximab certainly has improved the outcome in both groups, HDT should still be considered as a salvage strategy not only in cases of de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma and especially in transformed follicular lymphoma relapsing after first line treatment..

  • 88.
    Adde, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Laurell, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Hagberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Åström, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Little usefullness of mid-treatment FDG-PET and biopsy for treatment intensification in patients with aggressive lymphomaManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the experiences of introducing mid-treatment FDG-PET in patients with aggressive lymphoma, in a population based program with decentralized examinations, with emphasis on finding patients who would benefit from dose-escalation.

    Patients and Methods: Twenty-five patients with aggressive lymphoma were included. Twenty-four (95%) of these having an aggressive B-cell lymphoma (84% diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) were treated with CHOP-like treatment given at two week intervals + rituximab. One patient having an anaplastic T-cell lymphoma was treated with CHOEP-14. Mid-treatment FDG-PET was performed and assessed as positive, uncertain or negative for remaining lymphoma. The intention was to perform a biopsy in those with a positive FDG-PET, and, to change to a platina-containing therapy and consolidate with high-dose therapy if viable lymphoma was found. Retrospective review of the PET investigations was done. Living patients were followed for a median of 22 months.

    Results: At primary analysis five patients (20%) had positive uptake on FDG-PET. Two of them had biopsy-proven viable tumor but did not complete the planned salvage treatment, one due to chemotherapy toxicity and one due to progressive disease during salvage therapy. Two patients had a negative biopsy and one patient had no biopsy due to technical difficulties at diagnosis. These three patients remain in remission after standard treatment. Out of seven patients (28%) having “uncertain” uptake two relapsed. Thirteen patients (52%) were negative,two of whom relapsed giving a negative predictive value of 85%.

    Conclusion: Mid-treatment FDG PET-CT in order to find patients with biopsy-proven aggressive lymphoma, who can be salvaged with dose escalation, was not feasible in clinical routine.

  • 89.
    Adel, Amany
    et al.
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Abdelmagid, Marwa A.
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Mohamed, Ahmed Abd-Elhalem
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Wasberg, Anishia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Mosaad, Zienab
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Selim, Karim
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Shaaban, Asmaa
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Tarek, Mohamed
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Hagag, Naglaa M.
    Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Ellström, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Naguib, Mahmoud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Anim Hlth Res Inst, Agr Res Ctr, Reference Lab Vet Qual Control Poultry Prod, Giza 12618, Egypt..
    Genetic Variations among Different Variants of G1-like Avian Influenza H9N2 Viruses and Their Pathogenicity in Chickens2022In: Viruses, E-ISSN 1999-4915, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 1030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since it was first discovered, the low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 subtype has established linages infecting the poultry population globally and has become one of the most prevalent influenza subtypes in domestic poultry. Several different variants and genotypes of LPAI H9N2 viruses have been reported in Egypt, but little is known about their pathogenicity and how they have evolved. In this study, four different Egyptian LPAI H9N2 viruses were genetically and antigenically characterized and compared to representative H9N2 viruses from G1 lineage. Furthermore, the pathogenicity of three genetically distinct Egyptian LPAI H9N2 viruses was assessed by experimental infection in chickens. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that the H9N2 virus of the Egy-2 G1-B lineage (pigeon-like) has become the dominant circulating H9N2 genotype in Egypt since 2016. Considerable variation in virus shedding at day 7 post-infections was detected in infected chickens, but no significant difference in pathogenicity was found between the infected groups. The rapid spread and emergence of new genotypes of the influenza viruses pinpoint the importance of continuous surveillance for the detection of novel reassortant viruses, as well as monitoring the viral evolution.

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  • 90.
    Adhikari, Tara Ballav
    et al.
    Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal.;Aarhus Univ, Ctr Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark..
    Acharya, Pawan
    Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal.;Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Hudson Coll Publ Hlth, Oklahoma City, OK USA..
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Neupane, Dinesh
    Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Welch Ctr Prevent Epidemiol & Clin Res, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Karki, Arjun
    HAMS Hosp, Dept Pulm Crit Care & Sleep Med, Kathmandu, Nepal..
    Drews, Arne
    Nepalmed, Leipzig, Germany..
    Cooper, Brendan G.
    Univ Hosp Birmingham, Lung Funct & Sleep, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Sigsgaard, Torben
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Kallestrup, Per
    Aarhus Univ, Ctr Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark..
    Prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and its Associated Factors in Nepal: Findings from a Community-based Household Survey2020In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 15, p. 2319-2331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) being the commonest non-communicable disease in Nepal, there is limited research evidence estimating the spirometry-based burden of COPD. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of COPD and its correlates through a community-based survey in Pokhara Metropolitan City, a semiurban area of Western Nepal. Methods: A cross-sectional household survey was conducted among 1459 adults >= 40 years. COPD was defined according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria as a post-bronchodilator ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1st second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity (FVC) <0.70 with the presence of symptoms. COPD was also defined by the lower limit of normal (LLN) threshold - FEV1/FVC < LLN cut-off values with the presence of symptoms. Study participants were interviewed about sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics and respiratory symptoms. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were applied. Results: Spirometry reports were acceptable in 1438 participants. The mean age of the participants was 55 (+/- 10) years, and, 54% were female. The prevalence of GOLD-defined COPD was 8.5% (95% CI: 7.1-10.0) and based on the LLN threshold of 5.4% (95% CI: 4.2-6.6). The multivariate logistic regression showed that increasing age, low body mass index, illiterate, current or former smoker, and biomass fuel smoke increased the odds of COPD in both the definitions. Conclusion: COPD is highly prevalent at community level and often underdiagnosed. Strategies aiming at early diagnosis and treatment of COPD, especially for the elderly, illiterate, and reducing exposure to smoking and biomass fuel smoke and childhood lung infection could be effective.

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  • 91.
    Adhikari, Tara Ballav
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal..
    Neupane, Dinesh
    Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Welch Ctr Prevent Epidemiol & Clin Res, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Karki, Arjun
    HAMS Hosp, Dept Pulm Crit Care & Sleep Med, Kathmandu, Nepal..
    Drews, Arne
    Nepalmed, Leipzig, Germany..
    Cooper, Brendan
    Univ Hosp Birmingham, Lung Funct & Sleep, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Sigsgaard, Torben
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Kallestrup, Per
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Global Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Community-based intervention for prevention and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Nepal (COBIN-P trial): study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial2021In: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 22, article id 474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the commonest of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Nepal. Risk factors like indoor and outdoor air pollution, a high prevalence of smoking, and the lack of awareness of COPD make it a serious public health concern. However, no attempt has been made in Nepal to estimate its burden and address the disease at the community level.

    Method: This study aims to evaluate the effect of a community-based health educational intervention administered by Female Community Health Volunteers (FCHVs) on the prevention and management of COPD. An open-label, two-group, community-based, cluster-randomized controlled trial will be implemented in the semi-urban area of Pokhara Metropolitan city (former Lekhnath Municipality) located in the Kaski district of Nepal. The estimated sample size of the intervention will be 1143. The unit of randomization is the ward (administrative unit) of the study area. The follow-up survey will be conducted immediately after 12months of FCHVs-led interventions. The difference in the rate of decline of forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) and FEV1/FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio are the primary outcomes and the change in the proportion of modifiable risk factors of COPD, health-related quality of life scores, and change in knowledge of COPD will be secondary outcomes.

    Discussion: This study will estimate the burden of COPD, the magnitude of risk factors and generate evidence to mobilize community health workers for COPD prevention and management at the community level in Nepal.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT03797768. Registered on January 9, 2019.

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  • 92.
    Adhikari, Tara Ballav
    et al.
    Nepal Hlth Frontiers, Tokha 5, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal.;Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Chitwan, Nepal.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Paudel, Kiran
    Nepal Hlth Frontiers, Tokha 5, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal..
    Paudel, Rajan
    Nepal Hlth Frontiers, Tokha 5, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal..
    Bhusal, Sandesh
    Nepal Hlth Frontiers, Tokha 5, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal..
    Rijal, Anupa
    Nepal Hlth Frontiers, Tokha 5, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal.;Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Chitwan, Nepal.;Univ Southern Denmark, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Reg Hlth Res, Odense, Denmark..
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Neupane, Dinesh
    Nepal Dev Soc, COBIN Project, Chitwan, Nepal.;Johns Hopkins Univ, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Int Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Sigsgaard, Torben
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Kallestrup, Per
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Global Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Burden and risk factors of chronic respiratory diseases in Nepal, 1990-2019: An analysis of the global burden of diseases study2023In: Health Science Reports, E-ISSN 2398-8835, Vol. 6, no 2, article id e1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) substantially contribute to morbidity and mortality globally and in Nepal. However, there is a paucity of evidence on the trend and the burden of CRDs in Nepal. This study reports the trend of the burden and contribution of major risk factors to CRDs in Nepal from 1990 to 2019.

    Methods: This study is an observational study using publicly available data from Global Burden of Disease 2019 estimations for Nepal. The age-standardized and age-specific prevalence, incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and risk factors for CRDs in Nepal were extracted to measure the burden and its trend. The data are presented as percentages or as rates per 100,000 population.

    Results: The age-standardized incidence rate of CRDs in Nepal in 2019 was 913.6 per 100,000 (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 828.7-1000.1), which was an increase of 7.7% from 848.6 per 100,000 (95% UI: 780.2-918.2) in 1990. However, the age-standardized prevalence rate [4453/100,000 (4234.2-4671.8) in 1990; 4457.1/100,000 (4255.2-4666.8) in 2019] was almost stagnant. Most CRDs attributed to deaths and DALYs were due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Conclusions: Air pollution and smoking are the main risk factors for DALYs due to CRDs in Nepal. This surging burden of the incidence rate of CRDs in Nepal calls for more effective actions to curb the risk factors and diseases.

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  • 93. Adiyaman, Ahmet
    et al.
    Dechering, Dirk G
    Boggia, José
    Li, Yan
    Hansen, Tine W
    Kikuya, Masahiro
    Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina
    Richart, Tom
    Thijs, Lutgarde
    Torp-Pedersen, Christian
    Ohkubo, Takayoshi
    Dolan, Eamon
    Imai, Yutaka
    Sandoya, Edgardo
    Ibsen, Hans
    Wang, Jiguang
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    O'Brien, Eoin
    Thien, Theo
    Staessen, Jan A
    Determinants of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index in 7604 subjects from 6 populations2008In: Hypertension, ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1038-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure recordings. We investigated whether the goodness-of-fit of the AASI regression line in individual subjects (r(2)) impacts on the association of AASI with established determinants of the relation between diastolic and systolic blood pressures. We constructed the International Database on the Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes (7604 participants from 6 countries). AASI was unity minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic blood pressure in individual 24-hour ambulatory recordings. AASI correlated positively with age and 24-hour mean arterial pressure and negatively with body height and 24-hour heart rate. The single correlation coefficients and the mutually adjusted partial regression coefficients of AASI with age, height, 24-hour mean pressure, and 24-hour heart rate increased from the lowest to the highest quartile of r(2). These findings were consistent in dippers and nondippers (night:day ratio of systolic pressure >or=0.90), women and men, and in Europeans, Asians, and South Americans. The cumulative z score for the association of AASI with these determinants of the relation between diastolic and systolic blood pressures increased curvilinearly with r(2), with most of the improvement in the association occurring above the 20th percentile of r(2) (0.36). In conclusion, a better fit of the AASI regression line enhances the statistical power of analyses involving AASI as marker of arterial stiffness. An r(2) value of 0.36 might be a threshold in sensitivity analyses to improve the stratification of cardiovascular risk.

  • 94.
    Adman, M. A.
    et al.
    Univ Selangor, Dept Hlth Sci, Shah Alam 40000, Selangor, Malaysia.;United Nat Univ Kuala Lumpur, Int Inst Global Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Hashim, J. H.
    Univ Selangor, Dept Hlth Sci, Shah Alam 40000, Selangor, Malaysia.;United Nat Univ Kuala Lumpur, Int Inst Global Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Manaf, M. R. A.
    Natl Univ Malaysia, Dept Community Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Associations between air pollutants and peak expiratory flow and fractional exhaled nitric oxide in students2020In: The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, ISSN 1027-3719, E-ISSN 1815-7920, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 189-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of students in tropical countries such as Malaysia are limited. OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between outdoor air pollutants and peak expiratory flow (PEF) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). METHOD: PEF and FeNO levels of 487 students recruited in Melaka and Putrajaya, Malaysia, were measured in April and June 2014. Multiple linear regression with mutual adjustment was used to analyse the associations between exposure to air pollution and health. RESULTS: PEF was significantly associated with ozone for 1-day exposure (beta = -13.3 l/min, 95% CI -22.7 to -3.8), carbon monoxide for 2-day exposure (beta =-57.2 l/min, 95% CI -90.7 to -23.7) and particulate matter <= 10 mu m in diameter for 3-day exposure (beta =-6.0 l/min, 95% CI -9.2 to -2.8) and 7-day exposure (beta = -8.6 l/min, 95% CI -13.0 to -4.1). Stratified analysis showed that associations between PEF and outdoor air pollutant exposures were similar in students with and without elevated FeNO levels. CONCLUSION: Outdoor air pollution in Malaysia may cause airway obstruction unrelated to eosinophilic airway inflammation among students as measured using FeNO.

  • 95.
    Adolfsson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gregeby, Ebba
    Fernström, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Implementing empowerment group education in diabetes2004In: Patient Education & counseling, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 319-324Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    The Swedish National Survey of the Quality and Organization of Diabetes Care in Primary Healthcare—Swed-QOP2010In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe the quality and organization of diabetes care in primary healthcare in Sweden regarding resources and ways of working.

    METHOD:

    A questionnaire was used to collect data from all 921 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden. Of these, 74.3% (n=684) responded to the questionnaire covering list size of the PHCCs, number of diabetic patients, personnel resources and ways of working.

    RESULTS:

    The median list size reported from the PHCCs was 9,000 patients, 294 of whom were diabetic patients. The majority (72%) of PHCCs had diabetes-responsible general practitioners (GPs) and almost all (97%) had diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) with some degree of postgraduate education in diabetes. The PHCCs reported that they used regional/local diabetes guidelines (93%), were engaged in call-recall diabetic reviews by GP(s) (66%) and DSN(s) (89%), checked that patients had participated in the reviews by GP(s) (69%) and DSN(s) (78%), arranged group education programmes (23%) and reported data to a National Diabetes Register (82%).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The presence of diabetes-responsible GP(s) and DSN(s) who use guidelines may contribute to good and equal quality of care. It is, however, necessary to improve the call-recall system and there is an urgent need for all diabetic patients to receive patient education.

  • 97.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Starrin, Bengt
    Smide, Bibbi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Type 2 diabetic patients' experiences of two different educational approaches: A qualitative study2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 7, no 45, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to explore patients' experiences of participating in an empowerment group education programme or receiving individual counselling. Method: In total, 28 patients from seven primary care centres were interviewed. Of these, 14 had received individual counselling and the remaining 14 had also participated in 4-5 empowerment group sessions. The semi-structured interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: Three main categories crystallized from the interviews: (I) relationships, (II) learning and (III) controlling the disease. The relationships in the individual counselling seemed vertical, characterized by one-way communication with care providers acting as superiors and patients as subordinates. The relationships in the empowerment group appeared to be horizontal, characterized by trust and mutual communication. Those who had received individual counselling talked about learning by compliance-care providers acted as superiors, giving advice they expected the patients to follow. In the empowerment groups the patients talked more about participatory learning, whereby the facilitators and patients shared their knowledge and experiences. Controlling the disease could be labelled external in individual counselling, which made it difficult for patients to take responsibility for and control of their diabetes self-care. On the contrary, the patients in the empowerment group achieved the insight that diabetes is a serious disease but can be influenced, which contributed to their experience of self-control. Conclusions: The current study indicates that vertical relationships, learning by compliance and external control seem to limit patients' ability to take responsibility for their disease, while horizontal relationships, participatory learning and self-control may contribute to strengthening patients' ability to influence and be actively involved in their own care.

  • 98.
    Adolfsson, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital of Halland, Kungsbacka, Sweden.; Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hartvig, Niels Væver
    Data Science, Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark.
    Kaas, Anne
    Medical & Science, and Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark..
    Møller, Jonas Bech
    Digital Health, Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark.
    Hellman, Jarl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Increased Time in Range and Fewer Missed Bolus Injections After Introduction of a Smart Connected Insulin Pen2020In: Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, ISSN 1520-9156, E-ISSN 1557-8593, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 709-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This observational study investigated whether the connected NovoPen® 6 could influence insulin regimen management and glycemic control in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) using a basal-bolus insulin regimen and continuous glucose monitoring in a real-world setting. Methods: Participants from 12 Swedish diabetes clinics downloaded pen data at each visit (final cohort: n = 94). Outcomes included time in range (TIR; sensor glucose 3.9-10.0 mmol/L), time in hyperglycemia (>10 mmol/L), and hypoglycemia (L1: 3.0- <3.9 mmol/L; L2: <3.0 mmol/L). Missed bolus dose (MBD) injections were meals without bolus injection within -15 and +60 min from the start of a meal. Outcomes were compared between the baseline and follow-up periods (≥5 health care professional visits). Data were analyzed from the first 14 days following each visit. For the TIR and total insulin dose analyses (n = 94), a linear mixed model was used, and for the MBD analysis (n = 81), a mixed Poisson model was used. Results: TIR significantly increased (+1.9 [0.8; 3.0]95% CI h/day; P < 0.001) from baseline to follow-up period, with a corresponding reduction in time in hyperglycemia (-1.8 [-3.0; -0.6]95% CI h/day; P = 0.003) and L2 hypoglycemia (-0.3 [-0.6; -0.1]95% CI h/day; P = 0.005), and no change in time in L1 hypoglycemia. MBD injections decreased by 43% over the study (P = 0.002). Change in MBD injections corresponded to a decrease from 25% to 14% based on the assumption that participants had three main meals per day. Conclusions: Our study highlights the potential benefit on glycemic control and dosing behavior when reliable insulin dose data from a connected pen contribute to insulin management in people with T1D.

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  • 99.
    Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Retzius Lab, Retzius Vag 8, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Retzius Lab, Retzius Vag 8, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vas, Szilvia
    Semmelweis Univ, Dept Pharmacodynam, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary; Hungarian Acad Sci, Neuropsychopharmacol & Neurochem Res Grp, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary.
    Ebner, Karl
    Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, CMBI, Inst Pharm, Dept Pharmacol & Toxicol, Innrain 80-82-3, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Su, Jie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mathé, Aleksander A
    Karolinska Inst, Sect Psychiat, Dept Clin Neurosci, Tomtebodavagen 18A, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Singewald, Nicolas
    Leopold Franzens Univ Innsbruck, CMBI, Inst Pharm, Dept Pharmacol & Toxicol, Innrain 80-82-3, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Reinscheid, Rainer R
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden; Royal Inst Technol, Albanova Univ Ctr, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Bagdy, György
    Semmelweis Univ, Dept Pharmacodynam, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary; Hungarian Acad Sci, Neuropsychopharmacol & Neurochem Res Grp, Nagyvarad Ter 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary.
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Retzius Lab, Retzius Vag 8, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exploring the role of neuropeptide S in the regulation of arousal: a functional anatomical study.2016In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 221, no 7, p. 3521-3546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide expressed by limited number of neurons in the brainstem. The simultaneous anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effect of NPS suggests an involvement in mood control and vigilance, making the NPS-NPS receptor system an interesting potential drug target. Here we examined, in detail, the distribution of NPS-immunoreactive (IR) fiber arborizations in brain regions of rat known to be involved in the regulation of sleep and arousal. Such nerve terminals were frequently apposed to GABAergic/galaninergic neurons in the ventro-lateral preoptic area (VLPO) and to tyrosine hydroxylase-IR neurons in all hypothalamic/thalamic dopamine cell groups. Then we applied the single platform-on-water (mainly REM) sleep deprivation method to study the functional role of NPS in the regulation of arousal. Of the three pontine NPS cell clusters, the NPS transcript levels were increased only in the peri-coerulear group in sleep-deprived animals, but not in stress controls. The density of NPS-IR fibers was significantly decreased in the median preoptic nucleus-VLPO region after the sleep deprivation, while radioimmunoassay and mass spectrometry measurements showed a parallel increase of NPS in the anterior hypothalamus. The expression of the NPS receptor was, however, not altered in the VLPO-region. The present results suggest a selective activation of one of the three NPS-expressing neuron clusters as well as release of NPS in distinct forebrain regions after sleep deprivation. Taken together, our results emphasize a role of the peri-coerulear cluster in the modulation of arousal, and the importance of preoptic area for the action of NPS on arousal and sleep.

  • 100. Adoue, Veronique
    et al.
    Schiavi, Alicia
    Light, Nicholas
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundmark, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ge, Bing
    Kwan, Tony
    Caron, Maxime
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Wang, Chuan
    Chen, Shu-Huang
    Goodall, Alison H
    Cambien, Francois
    Deloukas, Panos
    Ouwehand, Willem H
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pastinen, Tomi
    Allelic expression mapping across cellular lineages to establish impact of non-coding SNPs2014In: Molecular Systems Biology, ISSN 1744-4292, E-ISSN 1744-4292, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 754-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most complex disease-associated genetic variants are located in non-coding regions and are therefore thought to be regulatory in nature. Association mapping of differential allelic expression (AE) is a powerful method to identify SNPs with direct cis-regulatory impact (cis-rSNPs). We used AE mapping to identify cis-rSNPs regulating gene expression in 55 and 63 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines from a Caucasian and an African population, respectively, 70 fibroblast cell lines, and 188 purified monocyte samples and found 40-60% of these cis-rSNPs to be shared across cell types. We uncover a new class of cis-rSNPs, which disrupt footprint-derived de novo motifs that are predominantly bound by repressive factors and are implicated in disease susceptibility through overlaps with GWAS SNPs. Finally, we provide the proof-of-principle for a new approach for genome-wide functional validation of transcription factor-SNP interactions. By perturbing NFκB action in lymphoblasts, we identified 489 cis-regulated transcripts with altered AE after NFκB perturbation. Altogether, we perform a comprehensive analysis of cis-variation in four cell populations and provide new tools for the identification of functional variants associated to complex diseases.

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