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  • 51.
    Holmqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Cross, Michael J
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rolny, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Hägerkvist, Robert
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Rahimi, Nader
    Matsumoto, Taro
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    The adaptor protein Shb binds to tyrosine 1175 in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 and regulates VEGF-dependent cellular migration.2004In: J Biological chemistry, Vol. 279, no 21, p. 22267-22275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Honkura, Naoki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Richards, Mark
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Laviña, Bàrbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sainz-Jaspeado, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Betsholtz, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Intravital imaging-based analysis tools for vessel identification and assessment of concurrent dynamic vascular events2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 2746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vasculature undergoes changes in diameter, permeability and blood flow in response to specific stimuli. The dynamics and interdependence of these responses in different vessels are largely unknown. Here we report a non-invasive technique to study dynamic events in different vessel categories by multi-photon microscopy and an image analysis tool, RVDM (relative velocity, direction, and morphology) allowing the identification of vessel categories by their red blood cell (RBC) parameters. Moreover, Claudin5 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression is used to distinguish capillary subtypes. Intradermal injection of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is shown to induce leakage of circulating dextran, with vessel-type-dependent kinetics, from capillaries and venules devoid of GFP expression. VEGFA-induced leakage in capillaries coincides with vessel dilation and reduced flow velocity. Thus, intravital imaging of non-invasive stimulation combined with RVDM analysis allows for recording and quantification of very rapid events in the vasculature.

  • 53.
    Hooshmand-Rad, Roya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Lu, Lingge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Mediated Signaling through the Shb Adaptor Protein: Effects on Cytoskeletal Organization2000In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 257, no 2, p. 245-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Src homology (SH) 2 domain adaptor protein Shb has previously been shown to interact with the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-β receptor. In this study we show an association between Shb and the PDGF-α receptor which is mediated by the SH2 domain of Shb and involves tyrosine residue 720 in the kinase insert domain of the receptor. To assess the role of Shb in PDGF-mediated signaling, we have overexpressed wild-type Shb or Shb carrying a mutation (R522K) which renders the SH2 domain inactive, in Patch mouse (PhB) fibroblasts expressing both PDGF receptors (PhB/Rα). Overexpression of wild-type Shb, but not the R522K Shb mutant, affected PDGF-mediated reorganization of the cytoskeleton by decreasing membrane ruffle formation and stimulating the generation of filopodia relative the parental control cells. In addition, the PDGF-induced receptor-associated phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase activity and phosphorylation of Akt was similar in both PhB/Rα/Shb and PhB/Rα/ShbR522K cells compared with the parental control, whereas the activation of Rac in response to PDGF-BB was diminished only in the PhB/Rα/Shb cells. We conclude that Shb plays a role in PDGF-dependent regulation of certain cytoskeletal changes by modulating the ability of PDGF to activate Rac.

  • 54. Jakobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Vascular basement membrane components in angiogenesis: an act of balance2008In: Scientific World Journal, ISSN 1537-744X, E-ISSN 1537-744X, Vol. 8, p. 1246-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis is crucial in the progression of a number of pathological conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer. In contrast to vessels in healthy tissues, the vasculature in these pathologies is highly unstable, constantly dissolving and renewing. Characteristically, vessels in pathologies have discontinuous basement membrane (BM) coverage. The consequences of shifts in BM density and composition are still relatively unknown. Several studies have illustrated that partial loss of the vascular BM during development results in the widening of vessels. This has been suggested to be a result of reduced mechanical resistance to the force inflicted by the blood pressure. However, recent data indicate that depletion of BM laminins (LMs) leads to enlarged vessels even in the absence of cardiac activity and blood pressure. A key question is whether single BM components or fragments thereof play distinct roles in the angiogenic process, or if it is the balance between the different components of the BM that guides the morphology of the new vessel.

  • 55.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Domogatskaya, Anna
    Tryggvason, Karl
    Edgar, David
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Laminin deposition is dispensable for vasculogenesis but regulates blood vessel diameter independent of flow2008In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1530-1539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Basement membranes (BMs) consisting of laminins, collagens, and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are vital for proper endothelial cell function, but many aspects of their role in vascular development remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that vascular structures within differentiating embryoid bodies are wrapped in a BM composed of alpha 4- and alpha 5-chain laminins, fibronectin, collagen IV, and HSPGs. In sprouting angiogenesis, laminins were produced by stalk cells, as well as the leading tip cell, and deposited along the sprout length, including tip cell filopodia. In embryonic stem cells deficient in laminins, due to lamc1 (laminin gamma 1) deletion, vascular development and organization were largely unaffected. However, the frequency of vessels with wide lumens was increased 4-fold. Laminin-deficient vessels were moreover characterized by increased fibronectin levels and enhanced endothelial cell proliferation. We conclude that laminins are dispensable for vascular development but that they regulate lumen formation in the absence of flow and vascular tone.

  • 56.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Building blood vessels- Stem cell models in vascular biology2007In: Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0021-9525, E-ISSN 1540-8140, Vol. 177, no 5, p. 751-755Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spheroids of differentiating embryonic stem cells, denoted embryoid bodies, constitute a high-quality model for vascular development, particularly well suited for loss-of-function analysis of genes required for early embryogenesis. This review examines vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in murine embryoid bodies and discusses the promise of stem cell–based models for the study of human vascular development.

  • 57.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Holmborn, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Lundin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Heparan sulfate in trans potentiates VEGFR-mediated angiogenesis2006In: Developmental Cell, ISSN 1534-5807, E-ISSN 1878-1551, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 625-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several receptor tyrosine kinases require heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) as coreceptors for efficient signal transduction. We have studied the role of HSPGs in the development of blood capillary structures from embryonic stem cells, a process strictly dependent on signaling via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). We show, by using chimeric cultures of embryonic stem cells defective in either HS production or VEGFR-2 synthesis, that VEGF signaling in endothelial cells is fully supported by HS expressed in trans by adjacent perivascular smooth muscle cells. Transactivation of VEGFR-2 leads to prolonged and enhanced signal transduction due to HS-dependent trapping of the active VEGFR-2 signaling complex. Our data imply that direct signaling via HSPG core proteins is dispensable for a functional VEGF response in endothelial cells. We propose that transactivation of tyrosine kinase receptors by HSPGs constitutes a mechanism for crosstalk between adjacent cells.

  • 58.
    Karlsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Songyang, Z
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Landgren, E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lavergne, C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Di Fiore, P P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Anafi, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Pawson, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Cantley, L C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Molecular interactions of the Src homology 2 domain protein Shb with phosphotyrosine residues, tyrosine kinase receptors and Src homology 3 domain proteins1995In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1475-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular interactions of the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and the N-terminal proline-rich sequence motifs (pro-1 to pro-5) of the SH2 protein Shb with other components were presently characterised. Using a degenerate phosphopeptide library the preferred binding site for the Shb SH2 domain was determined to pTyr-Thr/Val/Ile-X-Leu at positions +1 to +3 relative the phosphotyrosine residue. Experiments with competing peptides and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptor mutants with Y to F substitutions in autophosphorylation sites revealed multiple binding sites for the Shb SH2 domain in the receptor. The Shb SH2 domain also binds to in vitro phosphorylated fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR-1) mainly through position Y776. The receptor experiments suggest that other residues besides the +1 to +3 positions may also be of significance for Shb binding. The pro-4/pro-5 motif of Shb binds in vitro particularly well to the Src, p85 alpha PI3-kinase and Eps8 SH3 domains expressed as GST fusion proteins. However, the GST-SH3 domain fusion proteins tested bind in vitro to peptides corresponding to the pro-1 to pro-5 motifs of Shb with low affinity and selectivity, suggesting that sequences outside the core proline motif may also be important for Shb-SH3 domain interactions. In vivo association between Shb-SH3 domain proteins v-Src and Eps8 was detected by coimmunoprecipitation. PDGF treatment did not affect the association between Eps8 and Shb. The data suggest that Shb is an adaptor protein linking SH3 domain proteins to tyrosine kinases or other tyrosine phosphorylated proteins.

  • 59.
    Kawamura, Harukiyo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Li, Xiujuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Harper, Steven J
    Bates, David O
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A165b is a weak in vitro agonist for VEGF receptor-2 due to lack of coreceptor binding and deficient regulation of kinase activity2008In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 68, no 12, p. 4683-4692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A165b is a COOH-terminal splice variant of VEGF-A that has been implicated in negative regulation of angiogenesis. We compared the properties of VEGF-A165b with those of VEGF-A121, VEGF-A145, and VEGF-A165. Induction of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in VEGFR-2 differed between the VEGF ligands as determined by tryptic phosphopeptide mapping and by use of phosphosite-specific antibodies. VEGF-A165b was considerably poorer in inducing phosphorylation of the positive regulatory site Y1052 in VEGFR-2. Whereas this did not affect activation of VEGFR-2 in vitro, we show that VEGF-A165b failed to induce vasculogenesis and sprouting angiogenesis in differentiating embryonic stem cells and vascularization of s.c. Matrigel plugs. In addition, the ability of the different VEGF ligands to induce angiogenesis correlated with their abilities to bind the VEGF coreceptor neuropilin 1 (NRP1). Our data indicate that loss of VEGFR-2/NRP1 complex formation and Y1052 phosphorylation contribute to the lack of angingenic properties of VEGF-A165b.

  • 60.
    Klint, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hellman, Ulf
    Ludwiginstitutet för Cancerforskning.
    Wernstedt, Christer
    Ludwiginstitutet för Cancerforskning.
    Aman, Pierre
    Ron, David
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Translocated in liposarcoma (TLS) is a substrate for fibroblast growth factor receptor-1.2004In: Cell Signal, ISSN 0898-6568, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 515-20Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Binding of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to the high affinity receptor-1 (FGFR-1) leads to activation of its endogenous tyrosine kinase activity. A number of substrates for the FGFR-1 kinase have been identified. Among those, FGF receptor-substrate-2 (FRS-2) was identified by virtue of its interaction with p13suc, a yeast protein involved in cell cycle regulation. We have used immobilized p13suc to identify a new substrate for FGRF-1, which is identical to "translocated in liposarcoma" (TLS). TLS is a RNA/DNA-binding protein which occurs in fusion products with different transcription factors in a variety of solid tumours. We show that TLS is tyrosine phosphorylated in intact cells by a number of different growth factors, indicating a role in growth regulation.

  • 61.
    Koch, Sina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Signal transduction by vascular endothelial growth factor receptors2012In: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine, ISSN 2157-1422, Vol. 2, no 7, p. a006502-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are master regulators of vascular development and of blood and lymphatic vessel function during health and disease in the adult. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of this family of five mammalian ligands, which act through three receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In addition, coreceptors like neuropilins (NRPs) and integrins associate with the ligand/receptor signaling complex and modulate the output. Therapeutics to block several of the VEGF signaling components have been developed with the aim to halt blood vessel formation, angiogenesis, in diseases that involve tissue growth and inflammation, such as cancer. In this review, we outline the current information on VEGF signal transduction in relation to blood and lymphatic vessel biology.

  • 62.
    Koch, Sina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    van Meeteren, Laurens A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Morin, Eric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Testini, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Weström, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björkelund, Hanna
    Le Jan, Sebastien
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Adler, Jeremy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Berger, Philipp
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    NRP1 Presented in trans to the Endothelium Arrests VEGFR2 Endocytosis, Preventing Angiogenic Signaling and Tumor Initiation2014In: Developmental Cell, ISSN 1534-5807, E-ISSN 1878-1551, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 633-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropilin 1 (NRP1) modulates angiogenesis by binding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor, VEGFR2. We examined the consequences when VEGFR2 and NRP1 were expressed on the same cell (cis) or on different cells (trans). In cis, VEGF induced rapid VEGFR2/NRP1 complex formation and internalization. In trans, complex formation was delayed and phosphorylation of phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma) and extracellular regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) was prolonged, whereas ERK1 phosphorylation was reduced. Trans complex formation suppressed initiation and vascularization of NRP1-expressing mouse fibrosarcoma and melanoma. Suppression in trans required high-affinity, steady-state binding of VEGF to NRP1, which was dependent on the NRP1 C-terminal domain. Compatible with a trans effect of NRP1, quiescent vasculature in the developing retina showed continuous high NRP1 expression, whereas angiogenic sprouting occurred where NRP1 levels fluctuated between adjacent endothelial cells. Therefore, through communication in trans, NRP1 can modulate VEGFR2 signaling and suppress angiogenesis.

  • 63.
    Kreuger, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kerjaschki, Dontscho
    Petrova, Tatiana
    Alitalo, Kari
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Early lymph vessel development from embryonic stem cells2006In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 1073-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this study was to establish a model system for lymph vessel development based on directed differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Stem cells were aggregated to form embryoid bodies, and subsequently cultured in 3-dimensional collagen matrix for up to 18 days. Treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and VEGF-A individually enhanced formation of lymphatic vessel structures, although combined treatment with VEGF-C and VEGF-A was most potent and gave rise to a network of LYVE-1, podoplanin, Prox1, and VEGF receptor-3 positive lymphatic vessel structures running parallel to and apparently emanating from, capillaries. In contrast, fibroblast growth factor-2, hepatocyte growth factor, or hypoxia had little or no effect on the development of the early lymphatics. Further, cells of hematopoietic origin were shown to express lymphatic markers. In summary, different subpopulations of lymphatic endothelial cells were identified on the basis of differential expression of several lymphatic and blood vessel markers, indicating vascular heterogeneity.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We conclude that the present model closely mimics the early steps of lymph vessel development in mouse embryos.

  • 64. Landgren, Eva
    et al.
    Schiller, Petter
    Cao, Yihai
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Placenta growth factor stimulates MAP kinase and mitogenicity but not phospholipase C-g and migration of Flt 1 expressing cells.1998In: Oncogene, Vol. 16, p. 359-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65. Lanner, Fredrik
    et al.
    Lee, Kian Leong
    Ortega, German C.
    Sohl, Marcus
    Li, Xiujuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Jin, Shaobo
    Hansson, Emil M.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Poellinger, Lorenz
    Lendahl, Urban
    Farnebo, Filip
    Hypoxia-Induced Arterial Differentiation Requires Adrenomedullin and Notch Signaling2013In: Stem Cells and Development, ISSN 1547-3287, E-ISSN 1557-8534, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1360-1369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia (low oxygen) and Notch signaling are 2 important regulators of vascular development, but how they interact in controlling the choice between arterial and venous fates for endothelial cells during vasculogenesis is less well understood. In this report, we show that hypoxia and Notch signaling intersect in promotion of arterial differentiation. Hypoxia upregulated expression of the Notch ligand Dll4 and increased Notch signaling in a process requiring the vasoactive hormone adrenomedullin. Notch signaling also upregulated Dll4 expression, leading to a positive feedback loop sustaining Dll4 expression and Notch signaling. In addition, hypoxia-mediated upregulation of the arterial marker genes Depp, connexin40 (Gja5), Cxcr4, and Hey1 required Notch signaling. In conclusion, the data reveal an intricate interaction between hypoxia and Notch signaling in the control of endothelial cell differentiation, including a hypoxia/adrenomedullin/Dll4 axis that initiates Notch signaling and a requirement for Notch signaling to effectuate hypoxia-mediated induction of the arterial differentiation program.

  • 66.
    Le Jan, Sébastien
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hayashi, Makoto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kasza, Zsolt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bishop, Joseph R
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Heldin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Holmborn, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Spillmann, Dorothe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Esko, Jeffrey D
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Functional Overlap Between Chondroitin and Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans During VEGF-Induced Sprouting Angiogenesis2012In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1255-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate key steps of blood vessel formation. The present study was undertaken to investigate if there is a functional overlap between heparan sulfate proteoglycans and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans during sprouting angiogenesis.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Using cultures of genetically engineered mouse embryonic stem cells, we show that angiogenic sprouting occurs also in the absence of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. Cells unable to produce heparan sulfate instead increase their production of chondroitin sulfate that binds key angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor A, TGFβ, and platelet-derived growth factor B. Lack of heparan sulfate proteoglycan production however leads to increased pericyte numbers and reduced adhesion of pericytes to nascent sprouts, likely due to dysregulation of TGFβ and platelet-derived growth factor B signal transduction.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides direct evidence for a previously undefined functional overlap between chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans during sprouting angiogenesis. Our findings provide information relevant for potential future drug design efforts that involve targeting of proteoglycans in the vasculature.

  • 67.
    Lee, Chunsik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik
    Sollner, Christian
    Jahnen-Dechent, Willi
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Type 3 cystatins: fetuins, kininogen and histidine-rich glycoprotein2009In: Frontiers in Bioscience, ISSN 1093-9946, E-ISSN 1093-4715, Vol. 14, p. 2911-2922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review describes the properties of four structurally related, abundant plasma proteins denoted fetuin-A/alpha-2-Heremans Schmid-glycoprotein (AHSG), fetuin-B (FETUB), kininogen (KNG) and histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG). These proteins form a subgroup (denoted type 3) within the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors. Apart from KNG, the type 3 proteins appear to lack cystatin activity. AHSG has its major function in regulation of bone mineralization; the physiological role of FETUB is poorly understood. KNG serves dual functions in the assembly of the protein complex initiating the surface-activated blood coagulation cascade and as a precursor for the kinin hormones. The heparin-binding HRG has also been implicated in regulation of coagulation. In addition, several members of the type 3 cystatins have been implicated in tumor growth and shown to regulate endothelial cell function and formation of new blood vessels, angiogenesis. Thus, these proteins may potentially be useful in treatment of diseases characterized by excess angiogenesis such as cancer.

  • 68.
    Lee, Chunsik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dixelius, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Thulin, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kawamura, Harukiyo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Signal transduction in endothelial cells by the angiogenesis inhibitor histidine-rich glycoprotein targets focal adhesions2006In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 312, no 13, p. 2547-2556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) is an abundant heparin-binding plasma protein. We have shown that a fragment released from the central histidine/proline-rich (His/Pro-rich) domain of HRGP blocks endothelial cell migration in vitro and vascularization and growth of murine fibrosarcoma in vivo. The minimal active HRGP domain exerting the anti-angiogenic effect was recently narrowed down to a 35 amino acid peptide, HRGP330, derived from the His/Pro-rich domain of HRGP. By use of a signal transduction antibody array representing 400 different signal transduction molecules, we now show that HRGP and the synthetic peptide HRGP330 specifically induce tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and its downstream substrate paxillin in endothelial cells. HRGP/HRGP330 treatment of endothelial cells induced disruption of actin stress fibers, a process reversed by treatment of cells with the FAK inhibitor geldanamycin. In addition, VEGF-mediated endothelial cell tubular morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was inhibited by HRGP and HRGP330. In contrast, VEGF-induced proliferation was not affected by HRGP or HRGP330, demonstrating the central role of cell migration during tube formation. In conclusion, our data show that HRGP targets focal adhesions in endothelial cells, thereby disrupting the cytoskeletal organization and the ability of endothelial cells to assemble into vessel structures.

  • 69.
    Li, Xiujuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Embryonic stem cell models in vascular biology2009In: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 7, no Suppl. 1, p. 53-56Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embryonic stem cells have become an established tool in vascular biology to study the details of vasculogenesis as well as angiogenesis. There is also a future potential in using embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells for therapeutic purposes. It is important to evaluate this model by comparing features of endothelial cells derived from differentiating stem cells and their responsiveness to external stimuli to those of primary endothelial cells and to in vivo models. Through culture of mouse embryonic stem cell we discovered that differentiating stem cells are highly amenable to analyzing biochemical and cell biologic processes that are independent of flow. Endothelial cell function can be studied in the context of mutations or deletions that are embryonically lethal in vivo. Many, if not all, of the features of sprouting angiogenesis in differentiating stem cells closely mimic the in vivo process.

  • 70.
    Li, Xiujuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Shibuya, Masabumi
    Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan .
    VEGF receptor signal transduction2008In: Angiogenesis: in vitro systems, San Diego, USA: Elsevier, 2008, p. 261-284Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Signal transduction by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) through their cognate VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases follows the consensus scheme for receptor tyrosine kinases. Thus, binding of ligand induces receptor dimerization and activation of the tyrosine kinase through transphosphorylation between receptor molecules, leading to initiation of intracellular signal transduction pathways. Certain signal transduction pathways are shared with most, if not all, receptor tyrosine kinases, whereas some may be unique (e.g., transduced only by VEGF receptors). Indications that such unique signaling pathways may be discerned only when VEGF receptors are expressed in their proper context (i.e., in endothelial cells of microcapillary origin). In this chapter, we describe a number of methods for the study of signal transduction in endothelial cells. We describe how to isolate and examine endothelial cell lines. We also describe the embryoid body model representing vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, the procedure for subcutaneous Matrigel plugs, and, finally, how to construct gene-targeted mouse models. We emphasize the need for validation of in vitro data in more complex models, where endothelial cells reside in their proper three-dimensional context.

  • 71.
    Li, Xiujuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Edholm, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lanner, Fredrik
    Breier, Georg
    Farnebo, Filip
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lentiviral rescue of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression in flk1-/- embryonic stem cells shows early priming of endothelial precursors2007In: Stem Cells, ISSN 1066-5099, E-ISSN 1549-4918, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 2987-2995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF) family and its receptors are important for vascular development and maintenance of blood vessels, as well as for angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels. Loss of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2; designated Flk-1 in mouse) results in arrest of vascular and hematopoietic development in vivo. We used lentiviral transduction to reconstitute VEGFR-2 expression in flk1-/- embryonic stem (ES) cells. VEGF-induced vasculogenesis and sprouting angiogenesis were rescued in transduced ES cultures differentiating in vitro as EBs. Although the transgene was expressed in the pluripotent stem cells and lacked linage restriction during differentiation, the extent of endothelial recruitment was similar to that in wild-type EBs. Reconstitution of VEGFR-2 in flk1-/- ES cells allowed only precommitted precursors to differentiate into functional endothelial cells able to organize into vascular structures. Chimeric EB cultures composed of wild-type ES cells mixed with flk1-/- ES cells or reconstituted VEGFR-2expressing ES cells were created. In the chimeric cultures, flk1-/- endothelial precursors were excluded from wild-type vessel structures, whereas reconstituted VEGFR-2-expressing precursors became integrated together with wild-type endothelial cells to form chimeric vessels. We conclude that maturation of endothelial precursors, as well as organization into vascular structures, requires expression of VEGFR-2.

  • 72.
    Li, Xiujuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Padhan, Narendra
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöström, Elisabet O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Roche, Francis P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Testini, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Honkura, Naoki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sainz-Jaspeado, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gordon, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bentley, Katie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Harvard Univ, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Sch Med, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Philippides, Andrew
    Univ Sussex, Ctr Computat Neurosci & Robot, Chichester 1 CI 104, Brighton BN1 9RH, E Sussex, England..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dejana, Elisabetta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. IFOM IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, I-20139 Milan, Italy..
    Stan, Radu V.
    Dartmouth Coll, Dept Pathol, Geisel Sch Med Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 USA..
    Vestweber, Dietmar
    Max Planck Inst Mol Biomed, Dept Vasc Cell Biol, Rontgenstr 20, D-48149 Munster, Germany..
    Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Biomol Res, Mol Cell Biol, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Betsholtz, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Vasc Biol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pietras, Kristian
    Lund Univ, Medicon Village, Translat Canc Res, Bldg 404-A3, S-22381 Lund, Sweden..
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    VEGFR2 pY949 signalling regulates adherens junction integrity and metastatic spread2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 11017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific role of VEGFA-induced permeability and vascular leakage in physiology and pathology has remained unclear. Here we show that VEGFA-induced vascular leakage depends on signalling initiated via the VEGFR2 phosphosite Y949, regulating dynamic c-Src and VE-cadherin phosphorylation. Abolished Y949 signalling in the mouse mutant Vegfr2(Y949F/Y949F) leads to VEGFA-resistant endothelial adherens junctions and a block in molecular extravasation. Vessels in Vegfr2(Y949F/Y949F) mice remain sensitive to inflammatory cytokines, and vascular morphology, blood pressure and flow parameters are normal. Tumour-bearing Vegfr2(Y949F/Y949F) mice display reduced vascular leakage and oedema, improved response to chemotherapy and, importantly, reduced metastatic spread. The inflammatory infiltration in the tumour micro-environment is unaffected. Blocking VEGFA-induced disassembly of endothelial junctions, thereby suppressing tumour oedema and metastatic spread, may be preferable to full vascular suppression in the treatment of certain cancer forms.

  • 73. Li, Zhilun
    et al.
    Zhang, Hongquan
    Lundin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Thullberg, Minna
    Liu, Yajuan
    Wang, Yunling
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Strömblad, Staffan
    p21-activated kinase 4 phosphorylation of integrin beta5 Ser-759 and Ser-762 regulates cell migration2010In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 285, no 31, p. 23699-23710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modulation of integrin alphavbeta5 regulates vascular permeability, angiogenesis, and tumor dissemination. In addition, we previously found a role for p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) in selective regulation of integrin alphavbeta5-mediated cell motility (Zhang, H., Li, Z., Viklund, E. K., and Strömblad, S. (2002) J. Cell Biol. 158, 1287-1297). This report focuses on the molecular mechanisms of this regulation. We here identified a unique PAK4-binding membrane-proximal integrin beta5-SERS-motif involved in controlling cell attachment and migration. We also mapped the integrin beta5-binding site within PAK4. We found that PAK4 binding to integrin beta5 was not sufficient to promote cell migration, but that PAK4 kinase activity was required for PAK4 promotion of cell motility. Importantly, PAK4 specifically phosphorylated the integrin beta5 subunit at Ser-759 and Ser-762 within the beta5-SERS-motif. Point mutation of these two serine residues abolished the PAK4-induced cell migration, indicating a functional role for these phosphorylations in migration. Our results may give important leads to the functional regulation of integrin alphavbeta5, with implications for vascular permeability, angiogenesis, and cancer dissemination.

  • 74.
    Lundin, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rönnstrand, Lars
    Ludwiginstitutet för Cancerforskning.
    Cross, Michael
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hellberg, Carina
    Ludwiginstitutet för Cancerforskning.
    Lindahl, Ulf
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Differential tyrosine phosphorylation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-1 and receptor proximal signal transduction in response to FGF-2 and heparin.2003In: Exp Cell Res, ISSN 0014-4827, Vol. 287, no 1, p. 190-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sulfated regions in heparan sulfate and heparin are known to affect fibroblast growth factor (FGF) function. We have studied the mechanism whereby heparin directs FGF-2-induced FGF receptor-1 (FGFR-1) signal transduction. FGF-2 alone stimulated maximal phosphorylation of Src homology domain 2 tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) and the adaptor molecule Crk, in heparan sulfate-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) 677 cells expressing FGFR-1. In contrast, for phospholipase Cgamma(1) (PLCgamma(1)) and the adaptor molecule Shb to be maximally tyrosine-phosphorylated, cells had to be stimulated with both FGF-2 and heparin (100 ng/ml). Tyrosine residues 463 in the juxtamembrane domain and 766 in the C-terminal tail in FGFR-1 are known to bind Crk and PLCgamma(1), respectively. Analysis of tryptic phosphopeptide maps of FGFR-1 from cells stimulated with FGF-2 alone and FGF-2 together with heparin showed that FGF-2 alone stimulated a several-fold increase in tyrosine 463 in the juxtamembrane domain. In contrast, heparin had to be included in order for tyrosine 766 to be phosphorylated to the same fold level. Our data imply that tyrosine 463 is phosphorylated and able to transduce signals in response to FGF-2 treatment alone; furthermore, we suggest that FGFR-1 dimerization/kinase activation is stabilized by heparin.

  • 75.
    Magnusson, Peetra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rolny, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    Wikner, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Wu, Y
    Hicklin, DJ
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Deregulation of Flk-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in fibroblast growth factor receptor-1-deficient vascular stem cell development2004In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 117, no Pt 8, p. 1513-1523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have employed embryoid bodies derived from murine embryonal stem cells to study effects on vascular development induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor-1, in comparison to the established angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and its receptor VEGF receptor-2. Exogenous FGF-2 promoted formation of morphologically distinct, long slender vessels in the embryoid bodies, whereas VEGF-A-treated bodies displayed a compact plexus of capillaries. FGF-2 stimulation of embryonal stem cells under conditions where VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 function was blocked, led to formation of endothelial cell clusters, which failed to develop into vessels. FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies responded to VEGF-A by establishment of the characteristic vascular plexus, but FGF-2 had no effect on vascular development in the absence of FGFR-1. The FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies displayed considerably increased basal level of vessel formation, detected by immunohistochemical staining for platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31. This basal vascularization was blocked by neutralizing antibodies against VEGFR-2 or VEGF-A and biochemical analyses indicated changes in regulation of VEGFR-2 in the absence of FGFR-1 expression. We conclude that VEGF-A/VEGFR-2-dependent vessel formation occurs in the absence of FGF-2/FGFR-1, which, however, serve to modulate vascular development.

  • 76.
    Magnusson, Peetra U
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Mellberg, Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lukinius, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    FGFR-1 regulates angiogenesis through cytokines interleukin-4 and pleiotrophin2007In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 110, no 13, p. 4214-4222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) in blood vessel formation has remained unclear. We used differentiating stem-cell cultures (embryoid bodies) and teratomas to show that FGIF receptor-1 (FGFR-1) exerts a negative regulatory effect on endothelial cell function in these models. Embryoid bodies lacking expression of FGFR-1 as a result of gene targeting (Fgfr-1(-/-)) displayed increased vascularization and a distinct, elongated vessel morphology. Teratomas derived from FGFR-1-deficient stem cells were characterized by an increased growth rate and abundant, morphologically distinct vessels. Transmission electron microscopy of the Fgfr-1(-/-) teratomas showed a compact and voluminous but functional endothelium, which anastomosed with the host circulation. The increased vascularization and altered endothelial cell morphology was dependent on secreted factor(s), based on the transfer of the Fgfr-1(+/-) vascular phenotype by conditioned medium to Fgfr-1(+/-) embryoid bodies. Antibody and transcript arrays showed down-regulation of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and up-regulation of pleiotrophin in Fgfr-1(-/-) embryoid bodies, compared with the heterozygous cultures. We used neutralizing antibodies to show that IL-4 and pleiotrophin act as negative and positive angiogenic regulators, respectively. We conclude that FGFR-1 negatively regulates endothelial cell function by altering the balance of modulatory cytokines.

  • 77.
    Magnusson, Peetra U.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Looman, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Åhgren, Aive
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Wu, Yan
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Heuchel, Rainer L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta constitutive activity promotes angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro2007In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 2142-2149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE - Knockout studies have demonstrated crucial roles for the platelet-derived growth factor-B and its cognate receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), in blood vessel maturation, that is, the coverage of newly formed vessels with mural cells/pericytes. This study describes the consequences of a constitutively activating mutation of the PDGFR-β (Pdgfrb) introduced into embryonic stem cells with respect to vasculogenesis/angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS - Embryonic stem cells were induced to either form teratomas in vivo or embryoid bodies, an in vitro model for mouse embryogenesis. Western blotting studies on embryoid bodies showed that expression of a single allele of the mutant Pdgfrb led to increased levels of PDGFR-β tyrosine phosphorylation and augmented downstream signal transduction. This was accompanied by enhanced vascular development, followed by exaggerated angiogenic sprouting with abundant pericyte coating as shown by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence. Pdgfrb embryoid bodies were characterized by increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and VEGF receptor-2; neutralizing antibodies against VEGF-A/VEGF receptor-2 blocked vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in mutant embryoid bodies. Moreover, Pdgfrb embryonic stem cell-derived teratomas in nude mice were more densely vascularized than wild-type teratomas. CONCLUSION - Increased PDGFR-β kinase activity is associated with elevated expression of VEGF-A and VEGF receptor-2, acting directly on endothelial cells and resulting in increased vessel formation.

  • 78.
    Magnusson, Peetra Ulrica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ronca, Roberto
    Dell'Era, Patrizia
    Carlstedt, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Partanen, Juha
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 expression is required for hematopoietic but not endothelial cell development2005In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 944-949Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Massena, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kutschera, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    The mechanisms of VEGF-A-induced recruitment of pro-angiogenic neutrophils2013In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 43, no SI, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Massena, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Seignez, Cédric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Binet, François
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Herrera Hidalgo, Carmen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lomei, Jalal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Weström, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Shibuya, Masabumi
    Jobu Univ, Gakubunkan Inst Physiol & Med, Gunma, Japan.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Gerwins, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Identification and characterization of VEGF-A-responsive neutrophils expressing CD49d, VEGFR1, and CXCR4 in mice and humans2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 17, p. 2016-2026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is upregulated during hypoxia and is the major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF-A expression has also been found to recruit myeloid cells to ischemic tissues where they contribute to angiogenesis. This study investigates the mechanisms underlying neutrophil recruitment to VEGF-A as well as the characteristics of these neutrophils. A previously undefined circulating subset of neutrophils shown to be CD49d(+)VEGFR1(high)CXCR4(high) was identified in mice and humans. By using chimeric mice with impaired VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) or VEGFR2 signaling (Flt-1tk(-/-), tsad(-/-)), we found that parallel activation of VEGFR1 on neutrophils and VEGFR2 on endothelial cells was required for VEGF-A-induced recruitment of circulating neutrophils to tissue. Intravital microscopy of mouse microcirculation revealed that neutrophil recruitment by VEGF-A versus by the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 [CXCL2]) involved the same steps of the recruitment cascade but that an additional neutrophil integrin (eg, VLA-4 [CD49d/CD29]) played a crucial role in neutrophil crawling and emigration to VEGF-A. Isolated CD49d(+) neutrophils featured increased chemokinesis but not chemotaxis compared with CD49d(-) neutrophils in the presence of VEGF-A. Finally, by targeting the integrin α4 subunit (CD49d) in a transplantation-based angiogenesis model that used avascular pancreatic islets transplanted to striated muscle, we demonstrated that inhibiting the recruitment of circulating proangiogenic neutrophils to hypoxic tissue impairs vessel neoformation. Thus, angiogenesis can be modulated by targeting cell-surface receptors specifically involved in VEGF-A-dependent recruitment of proangiogenic neutrophils without compromising recruitment of the neutrophil population involved in the immune response to pathogens.

  • 81.
    Matsumoto, Taro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bohman, Svante
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dixelius, Johan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Berge, Tone
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Magnusson, Peetra
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Wang, Ling
    Wikner, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Qi, Jian Hua
    Wernstedt, Christer
    Ludwiginstitutet för Cancerforskning.
    Wu, Jiong
    Bruheim, Skjalg
    Mugishima, Hideo
    Mukhopadhyay, Debrabata
    Spurkland, Anne
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    VEGF receptor-2 Y951 signaling and a role for the adapter molecule TSAd in tumor angiogenesis.2005In: EMBO J, ISSN 0261-4189, Vol. 24, no 13, p. 2342-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) activation by VEGF-A is essential in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. We have generated a pan-phosphorylation site map of VEGFR-2 and identified one major tyrosine phosphorylation site in the kinase insert (Y951), in addition to two major sites in the C-terminal tail (Y1175 and Y1214). In developing vessels, phosphorylation of Y1175 and Y1214 was detected in all VEGFR-2-expressing endothelial cells, whereas phosphorylation of Y951 was identified in a subset of vessels. Phosphorylated Y951 bound the T-cell-specific adapter (TSAd), which was expressed in tumor vessels. Mutation of Y951 to F and introduction of phosphorylated Y951 peptide or TSAd siRNA into endothelial cells blocked VEGF-A-induced actin stress fibers and migration, but not mitogenesis. Tumor vascularization and growth was reduced in TSAd-deficient mice, indicating a critical role of Y951-TSAd signaling in pathological angiogenesis.

  • 82.
    Matsumoto, Taro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Schiller, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dietrich, Lothar C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bahram, Fuad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Iribe, Yuji
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Wikner, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Chan, Gordon
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ninein Is Expressed in the Cytoplasm of Angiogenic Tip-Cells and Regulates Tubular Morphogenesis of Endothelial Cells2008In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 28, p. 2123-2130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective— Angiogenesis is an integral part of many physiologicalprocesses but may also aggravate pathological conditions suchas cancer. Development of effective angiogenesis inhibitorsrequires a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanismsregulating vessel formation. The aim of this project was toidentify proteins that regulate tubular morphogenesis of endothelialcells.

    Methods and Results— Phosphotyrosine-dependent affinity-purificationand mass spectrometry showed tyrosine phosphorylation of nineinduring tubular morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Ninein wasrecently identified as a centrosomal microtubule-anchoring protein.Our results show that ninein is localized in the cytoplasm inendothelial cells, and that it is highly expressed in the vasculaturein normal and pathological human tissues. Using embryoid bodiesas a model of vascular development, we found that ninein isabundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells duringsprouting angiogenesis, in particular in the sprouting tip-cell.In accordance, siRNA-dependent silencing of ninein in endothelialcells inhibited tubular morphogenesis.

    Conclusions— In this study, we show that ninein is expressedin developing vessels and in endothelial tip cells, and thatninein is critical for formation of the vascular tube. Thesedata strongly implicate ninein as an important new regulatorof angiogenesis.

    Proteins orchestrating morphological changes accompanying formationof the vascular tube constitute new targets for antiangiogenictherapy. In this study, we identify the microtubule-anchoringprotein ninein as an important new regulator of tubular morphogenesisof endothelial cells. This is the first report of a functionalrole of ninein in angiogenesis.

  • 83.
    Matsumoto, Taro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Turesson, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Book, Majlis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gerwins, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    p38 MAP kinase negatively regulates endothelial cell survival,proliferation, and differentiation in FGF-2-stimulated angiogenesis2002In: Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0021-9525, E-ISSN 1540-8140, Vol. 156, no 1, p. 149-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) is activated in response to environmental stress and inflammatory cytokines. Although several growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, mediate activation of p38, the consequences for growth factor-dependent cellular functions have not been well defined. We investigated the role of p38 activation in FGF-2-induced angiogenesis. In collagen gel cultures, bovine capillary endothelial cells formed tubular growth-arrested structures in response to FGF-2. In these collagen gel cultures, p38 activation was induced more potently by FGF-2 treatment compared with that in proliferating cultures. Treatment with the p38 inhibitor SB202190 enhanced FGF-2-induced tubular morphogenesis by decreasing apoptosis, increasing DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, and enhancing the kinetics of cell differentiation including increased expression of the Notch ligand Jagged1. Overexpression of dominant negative mutants of the p38-activating kinases MKK3 and MKK6 also supported FGF-2-induced tubular morphogenesis. Sustained activation of p38 by FGF-2 was identified in vascular endothelial cells in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). SB202190 treatment enhanced FGF-2-induced neovascularization in the CAM, but the vessels displayed abnormal features indicative of hyperplasia of endothelial cells. These results implicate p38 in organization of new vessels and suggest that p38 is an essential regulator of FGF-2-driven angiogenesis.

  • 84.
    Mellberg, Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bahram, Fuad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hayashi, Makoto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rennel, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Orzechowski Westholm, Jakub
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Linnaeus Centre for Bioinformatics.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lindahl, Per
    Cross, Michael J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Transcriptional profiling reveals a critical role for tyrosine phosphatase VE-PTP in regulation of VEGFR2 activity and endothelial cell morphogenesis2009In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1490-1502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To define molecular events accompanying formation of the 3-dimensional   (3D) vascular tube, we have characterized gene expression during vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced tubular morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Microarray analyses were performed comparing gene induction in growth-arrested, tube-forming endothelial cells harvested from 3D collagen cultures to that in proliferating endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin. Differentially expressed genes were clustered and analyzed for specific endothelial expression through publicly  available datasets. We validated the contribution of one of the identified genes vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase   (VE-PTP), to endothelial morphogenesis. Silencing of VE-PTP expression was accompanied by increased VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine  phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling pathways. The  increased VEGFR2 activity promoted endothelial cell cycle progression,   overcoming the G(0)/G(1) arrest associated with organization into   tubular structures in the 3D cultures. Proximity ligation showed close   association between VEGFR2 and VE-PTP in resting cells. Activation of   VEGFR2 by VEGF led to rapid loss of association, which was resumed with   time in parallel with decreased receptor activity. In conclusion, we   have identified genes, which may serve critical functions in formation  of the vascular tube. One of these, VE-PTP, regulates VEGFR2 activity  thereby modulating the VEGF-response during angiogenesis.-Mellberg, S.,  Dimberg, A., Bahram, F., Hayashi, M., Rennel, E., Ameur, A., Westholm,   J. O., Larsson, E., Lindahl, P., Cross, M. J., Claesson-Welsh, L.   Transcriptional profiling reveals a critical role for tyrosine   phosphatase VE-PTP in regulation of VEGFR2 activity and endothelial cell morphogenesis. FASEB J. 23, 1490-1502 (2009)

  • 85.
    Mitran, Bogdan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Guler, R.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roche, Francis P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindström, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Selvaraju, Ramkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET-MRI Platform.
    Heetwood, F.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rinne, Sara S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Ståhl, S.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Löfblom, J.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Novel high affinity affibody for radionuclide imaging of VEGFR2 in glioma vasculature: proof-of-principle in murine model2017In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 44, p. S239-S239Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Mitran, Bogdan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Güler, Rezan
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roche, Francis P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Lindström, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Selvaraju, Ramkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET-MRI Platform. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Fleetwood, Filippa
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rinne, Sara S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Löfblom, John
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Radionuclide imaging of VEGFR2 in glioma vasculature using biparatopic affibody conjugate: proof-of-principle in a murine model2018In: Theranostics, ISSN 1838-7640, E-ISSN 1838-7640, Vol. 8, no 16, p. 4462-4476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) is a key mediator of angiogenesis and therefore a promising therapeutic target in malignancies including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Molecular imaging of VEGFR2 expression may enable patient stratification for antiangiogenic therapy. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the capacity of the novel anti-VEGFR2 biparatopic affibody conjugate (Z(VEGFR2)-Bp(2)) for in vivo visualization of VEGFR2 expression in GBM.

    Methods: Z(VEGFR2)-Bp(2) coupled to a NODAGA chelator was generated and radiolabeled with indium-111. The VEGFR2-expressing murine endothelial cell line MS1 was used to evaluate in vitro binding specificity and affinity, cellular processing and targeting specificity in mice. Further tumor targeting was studied in vivo in GL261 glioblastoma orthotopic tumors. Experimental imaging was performed.

    Results: [In-111]In-NODAGA-Z(VEGFR2)-Bp(2) bound specifically to VEGFR2 (K-D=33 +/- 18 pM). VEGFR2-mediated accumulation was observed in liver, spleen and lungs. The tumor-to-organ ratios 2 h post injection for mice bearing MS1 tumors were approximately 11 for blood, 15 for muscles and 78 for brain. Intracranial GL261 glioblastoma was visualized using SPECT/CT. The activity uptake in tumors was significantly higher than in normal brain tissue. The tumor-to-cerebellum ratios after injection of 4 mu g [In-111]In-NODAGA-Z(VEGFR2)-Bp(2) were significantly higher than the ratios observed for the 40 mu g injected dose and for the non-VEGFR2 binding size-matched conjugate, demonstrating target specificity. Microautoradiography of cryosectioned CNS tissue was in good agreement with the SPECT/CT images.

    Conclusion: The anti-VEGFR2 affibody conjugate [In-111]In-NODAGA-Z(VEGFR2)-Bp(2) specifically targeted VEGFR2 in vivo and visualized its expression in a murine GBM orthotopic model. Tumor-to-blood ratios for [In-111]In-NODAGA-Z(VEGFR2)-Bp(2) were higher compared to other VEGFR2 imaging probes. [In-111]In-NODAGA-Z(VEGFR2)-Bp(2) appears to be a promising probe for in vivo noninvasive visualization of tumor angiogenesis in glioblastoma.

  • 87.
    Morin, Eric
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Egevad, Lars
    Sandström, Per
    Hermenberg, Ulrika
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Sjöberg, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Perivascular Neuropilin-1 expression is an independent marker of improved survival in renal cell carcinomaIn: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Considerable progress in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment has been made in the last decade with the introduction of drugs targeting tumor angiogenesis. However, the 5-year survival of metastatic disease is still only 10-15%. Here, we explored the prognostic significance of compartment-specific expression of Neuropilin 1 (NRP1), a co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). NRP1 expression was analyzed in RCC tumor vessels, in perivascular tumor cells and generally in the tumor cells. Moreover, complex formation between NRP1 and the main VEGF receptor, VEGFR2, was determined.

    Methods: VEGFR2/NRP1 complex formation in cis (on the same cell) and trans (between cells) configurations was determined by in situ proximity ligation assay, and NRP1 protein expression in three compartments (endothelial cells, perivascular tumor cells and general tumor cell expression) was determined by immunofluorescent staining, in a cohort of 64 advanced renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Results: VEGFR2/NRP1 trans complexes were detected in 75% of the patient samples. The presence of trans VEGFR2/NRP1 complexes or perivascular NRP1 was associated with a reduced tumor vessel density. The presence of VEGFR2/NRP1 trans complexes, perivascular NRP1 and general tumor cell NRP1 expression correlated with improved survival, however, only VEGFR2/NRP1 trans complexes and perivascular NRP1 expression remained significant in multivariable analysis.

    Conclusion: Our work shows that VEGFR2/NRP1 complexes in trans, as well as perivascular NRP1 expression, are independent markers of improved survival in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

  • 88.
    Morin, Eric
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöberg, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Tjomsland, Vegard
    University of Oslo, Department of Hepato-pancreato-biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo, Norway.
    Testini, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Franklin, Oskar
    Umeå University, Department of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå University, Department of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Öhlund, Daniel
    Umeå University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå, Sweden ; Umeå University, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kiflemariam, Sara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    VEGF receptor-2/neuropilin 1 trans-complex formation between endothelial and tumor cells is an independent predictor of pancreatic cancer survival2018In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 246, no 3, p. 311-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unstable and dysfunctional tumor vasculature promotes cancer progression and spread. Signal transduction by the pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 (VEGFR2) is modulated by VEGFA-dependent complex formation with neuropilin 1 (NRP1). NRP1 expressed on tumor cells can form VEGFR2/NRP1 trans-complexes between tumor cells and endothelial cells which arrests VEGFR2 on the endothelial surface, thus interfering with productive VEGFR2 signaling. In mouse fibrosarcoma, VEGFR2/NRP1 trans-complexes correlated with reduced tumor vessel branching and reduced tumor cell proliferation. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) strongly expressed NRP1 on both tumor cells and endothelial cells, in contrast to other common cancer forms. Using proximity ligation assay, VEGFR2/NRP1 trans-complexes were identified in human PDAC tumor tissue, and its presence was associated with reduced tumor vessel branching, reduced tumor cell proliferation, and improved patient survival after adjusting for other known survival predictors. We conclude that VEGFR2/NRP1 trans-complex formation is an independent predictor of PDAC patient survival. 

  • 89.
    Mortensen, Anja C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Morin, Eric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Brown, Christopher J
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Lane, David P
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Enhancing therapeutic effects of radio-immunotherapy using the novel stapled MDM2/X-p53 antagonist PM2Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Nilsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bahram, Fuad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Li, Xiujuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gualandi, Laura
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Koch, Sina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Anisimov, Andrey
    Kholová, Ivana
    Pytowski, Bronislaw
    Baldwin, Megan
    Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo
    Alitalo, Kari
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    VEGF receptor 2/-3 heterodimers detected in situ by proximity ligation on angiogenic sprouts2010In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1377-1388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vascular endothelial growth factors VEGFA and VEGFC are crucial regulators of vascular development. They exert their effects by dimerization and activation of the cognate receptors VEGFR2 and VEGFR3. Here, we have used in situ proximity ligation to detect receptor complexes in intact endothelial cells. We show that both VEGFA and VEGFC potently induce formation of VEGFR2/-3 heterodimers. Receptor heterodimers were found in both developing blood vessels and immature lymphatic structures in embryoid bodies. We present evidence that heterodimers frequently localize to tip cell filopodia. Interestingly, in the presence of VEGFC, heterodimers were enriched in the leading tip cells as compared with trailing stalk cells of growing sprouts. Neutralization of VEGFR3 to prevent heterodimer formation in response to VEGFA decreased the extent of angiogenic sprouting. We conclude that VEGFR2/-3 heterodimers on angiogenic sprouts induced by VEGFA or VEGFC may serve to positively regulate angiogenic sprouting.

  • 91.
    Nilsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Vaskulär Biologi.
    Rolny, Charlotte
    Wu, Yan
    Pytowski, Bronislaw
    Hicklin, Dan
    Alitalo, Kari
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Vaskulär Biologi.
    Wennström, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Vaskulär Biologi.
    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 in hypoxia-induced vascular development.2004In: FASEB Journal, ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 18, no 13, p. 1507-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Noguer, Oriol
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Tugues, Sonia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Honjo, Satoshi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Histidine-rich Glycoprotein Regulates Macrophage Differentiation2012In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 48, no S5, p. S267-S267Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    VEGF receptor signalling: in control of vascular function2006In: Nature reviews. Molecular cell biology, ISSN 1471-0072, E-ISSN 1471-0080, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 359-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth-factor receptors (VEGFRs) regulate the cardiovascular system. VEGFR1 is required for the recruitment of haematopoietic precursors and migration of monocytes and macrophages, whereas VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 are essential for the functions of vascular endothelial and lymphendothelial cells, respectively. Recent insights have shed light onto VEGFR signal transduction and the interplay between different VEGFRs and VEGF co-receptors in development, adult physiology and disease.

  • 94.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Johansson, Irja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Einarsson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christofferson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sasaki, Takako
    Timpl, Rupert
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    The minimal active domain of endostatin is a heparin-binding motif that mediates inhibition of tumor vascularization2004In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 64, no 24, p. 9012-9017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endostatin constitutes the COOH-terminal 20,000 Da proteolytic fragment of collagen XVIII and has been shown to possess antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic properties. In the present study, we have investigated the role of the heparin-binding sites in the in vivo mechanism of action of endostatin. The majority of the heparin binding is mediated by arginines 155/158/184/270 in endostatin, but there is also a minor site constituted by arginines 193/194. Using endostatin mutants lacking either of these two sites, we show that inhibition of fibroblast growth factor-2-induced angiogenesis in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane requires both heparin-binding sites. In contrast, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor-A-induced chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis by endostatin was only dependent on the minor heparin-binding site (R193/194). These arginines were also required for endostatin to inhibit fibroblast growth factor-2- and vascular endothelial growth factor-A-induced chemotaxis of primary endothelial cells. Moreover, we show that a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acids 180-199 of human endostatin (which covers the minor heparin-binding site) inhibits endothelial cell chemotaxis and reduces tumor vascularization in vivo. Substitution of arginine residues 193/194 for alanine attenuates the antiangiogenic effects of the peptide. These data show an essential role for heparin binding in the antiangiogenic action of endostatin.

  • 95.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Larsson, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dixelius, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Johansson, Irja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lee, Chunsik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Oellig, Cornelia
    Björk, Ingemar
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    A fragment of histidine-rich glycoprotein is a potent inhibitor of tumor vascularization2004In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 599-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we show that recombinant human histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) has potent antiangiogenic properties as judged from effects on a syngeneic tumor model in C57/bl6 mice. Growth of fibrosarcoma, a very aggressive tumor, was reduced by >60% by HRGP treatment, and tumor angiogenesis was dramatically decreased. Treatment with HRGP led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation in the tumors. In contrast, HRGP did not affect apoptosis or DNA synthesis in endothelial cells or tumor cells in vitro. The mechanism of action of HRGP involves rearrangement of focal adhesions and decreased attachment of endothelial cells to vitronectin and, as a consequence, reduced endothelial cell migration. By using truncated versions of HRGP, we demonstrate that the isolated 150 amino acid-residue His/Pro-rich domain, which is also released by spontaneous proteolysis from purified HRGP, mediates the inhibitory effect on chemotaxis. Moreover, the His/Pro-rich domain must be released from HRGP to exert its effect. This study shows for the first time inhibitory effects of HRGP on tumor vascularization in vivo, thus providing proof of concept that HRGP is an angiogenesis inhibitor.

  • 96.
    Padhan, Narendra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nordling, Torbjorn E. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Stockholm Bioinformat Ctr, Sci Life Lab, Box 1031, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Mech Engn, 1 Univ Rd, Tainan 70101, Taiwan..
    Sundström, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Åkerud, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Birgisson, Helgi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    High sensitivity isoelectric focusing to establish a signaling biomarker for the diagnosis of human colorectal cancer2016In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 16, article id 683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) involves recurrent amplifications/mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream signal transducers of the Ras pathway, KRAS and BRAF. Whether genetic events predicted to result in increased and constitutive signaling indeed lead to enhanced biological activity is often unclear and, due to technical challenges, unexplored. Here, we investigated proliferative signaling in CRC using a highly sensitive method for protein detection. The aim of the study was to determine whether multiple changes in proliferative signaling in CRC could be combined and exploited as a "complex biomarker" for diagnostic purposes. Methods: We used robotized capillary isoelectric focusing as well as conventional immunoblotting for the comprehensive analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathways converging on extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), AKT, phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and c-SRC in normal mucosa compared with CRC stage II and IV. Computational analyses were used to test different activity patterns for the analyzed signal transducers. Results: Signaling pathways implicated in cell proliferation were differently dysregulated in CRC and, unexpectedly, several were downregulated in disease. Thus, levels of activated ERK1 (pERK1), but not pERK2, decreased in stage II and IV while total ERK1/2 expression remained unaffected. In addition, c-SRC expression was lower in CRC compared with normal tissues and phosphorylation on the activating residue Y418 was not detected. In contrast, PLC gamma 1 and AKT expression levels were elevated in disease. Immunoblotting of the different signal transducers, run in parallel to capillary isoelectric focusing, showed higher variability and lower sensitivity and resolution. Computational analyses showed that, while individual signaling changes lacked predictive power, using the combination of changes in three signaling components to create a "complex biomarker" allowed with very high accuracy, the correct diagnosis of tissues as either normal or cancerous. Conclusions: We present techniques that allow rapid and sensitive determination of cancer signaling that can be used to differentiate colorectal cancer from normal tissue.

  • 97.
    Padhan, Narendra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Rudbeck Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Yan, Junhong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Rudbeck Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Eindhoven Univ Technol, Inst Complex Mol Syst, Dept Biomed Engn, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Boge, Annegret
    Protein Simple, 3001 Orchard Pkwy, San Jose, CA 95134 USA..
    Scrivener, Elaine
    Protein Simple, 3001 Orchard Pkwy, San Jose, CA 95134 USA..
    Birgisson, Helgi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Colorectal Surgery.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Rudbeck Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gullberg, Mats
    Olink Biosci, Dag Hammarskjolds Vag 52B, S-75237 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Rudbeck Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Rudbeck Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Rudbeck Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Highly sensitive and specific protein detection via combined capillary isoelectric focusing and proximity ligation2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 1490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection and quantification of proteins and their post-translational modifications are crucial to decipher functions of complex protein networks in cell biology and medicine. Capillary isoelectric focusing together with antibody-based detection can resolve and identify proteins and their isoforms with modest sample input. However, insufficient sensitivity prevents detection of proteins present at low concentrations and antibody cross-reactivity results in unspecific detection that cannot be distinguished from bona fide protein isoforms. By using DNA-conjugated antibodies enhanced signals can be obtained via rolling circle amplification (RCA). Both sensitivity and specificity can be greatly improved in assays dependent on target recognition by pairs of antibodies using in situ proximity ligation assays (PLA). Here we applied these DNA-assisted RCA techniques in capillary isoelectric focusing to resolve endogenous signaling transducers and isoforms along vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathways at concentrations too low to be detected in standard assays. We also demonstrate background rejection and enhanced specificity when protein detection depended on binding by pairs of antibodies using in situ PLA, compared to assays where each antibody preparation was used on its own.

  • 98. Qi, J H
    et al.
    Matsumoto, T
    Huang, K
    Olausson, K
    Christofferson, R
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Claesson-Welsh, L
    Phosphoinositide 3 kinase is critical for survival, mitogenesis and migration but not for differentiation of endothelial cells.1999In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 371-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99. Qi, JH
    et al.
    Ebrahem, Q
    Moore, N
    Murphy, G
    Claesson-Welsh, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bond, M
    Baker, A
    Anand-Apte, B
    A novel function for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP3): inhibition of angiogenesis by blockage of VEGF binding to VEGF receptor-2.2003In: Nat Med., Vol. 9, p. 407-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Roche, Francis P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Ohlin, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Histidine-Rich Glycoprotein (HRG): A Novel Gene-Therapy Effector for the Treatment of Cancer2013In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 21, p. S241-S241Article in journal (Other academic)
123 51 - 100 of 116
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