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  • 51.
    Ma, Jing
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Adenovirus, Semliki Forest virus and vaccinia virus-induced immunogenic cell death augments oncolytic virus immunotherapy2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 341-341Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Mangsbo, Sara M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ninalga, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Tötterman, Thomas H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    CpG Therapy is Superior to BCG in an Orthotopic Bladder Cancer Model and Generates CD4+ T-cell Immunity2008In: Journal of immunotherapy (1997), ISSN 1524-9557, E-ISSN 1537-4513, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been successful in extending tumor remission in bladder cancer, the fifth most common cancer in men. However, relapses are frequent and some patients develop resistance to BCG. CpGs were previously demonstrated to be effective in the murine MB49 model. In this paper, we modeled a more aggressive orthotopic bladder cancer than previously studied. Moreover, we compared standard BCG immunotherapy side-by-side with the Toll-like receptor-9 agonist CpG. MB49 tumor-bearing mice were treated with BCG or CpG and survival as well as tumor progression were observed over time. Urine, blood, and tumors were collected and analyzed. Mice were rechallenged and evaluated for tumor-specific immunity. In this study, CpGs induced a complete response of large aggressive orthotopic MB49 bladder tumors, resulting in tumor-specific systemic immunity. Further, data indicated that this potent antitumor effect required T cells. A comparison of CpGs and BCG in both a highly and less aggressive orthotopic tumor model, and in a subcutaneous tumor model, demonstrated that CpGs were superior to BCG. In the orthotopic model, BCG induced a local cytokine storm during treatment initiation whereas CpG affected a more refined cytokine pattern over time. Increased levels of cytokines in serum correlated with enhanced survival in the subcutaneous model. Further, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that CpG-induced protective immunity was CD4 T-cell dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that CpGs are superior to BCG for bladder cancer immunotherapy. Thus, this potent new drug may be an attractive therapeutic alternative and should be evaluated in bladder cancer patients.

  • 53.
    Martikainen, Miika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Virus-Based Immunotherapy of Glioblastoma2019In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 186Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common type of primary brain tumor in adults. Despite recent advances in cancer therapy, including the breakthrough of immunotherapy, the prognosis of GBM patients remains dismal. One of the new promising ways to therapeutically tackle the immunosuppressive GBM microenvironment is the use of engineered viruses that kill tumor cells via direct oncolysis and via stimulation of antitumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on recently published results of phase I/II clinical trials with different oncolytic viruses and the new interesting findings in preclinical models. From syngeneic preclinical GBM models, it seems evident that oncolytic virus-mediated destruction of GBM tissue coupled with strong adjuvant effect, provided by the robust stimulation of innate antiviral immune responses and adaptive anti-tumor T cell responses, can be harnessed as potent immunotherapy against GBM. Although clinical testing of oncolytic viruses against GBM is at an early stage, the promising results from these trials give hope for the effective treatment of GBM in the near future.

  • 54.
    Martikainen, Miika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Univ Eastern Finland, AI Virtanen Inst Mol Sci, Dept Biotechnol & Mol Med, Kuopio 70211, Finland.
    Ruotsalainen, Janne
    Univ Eastern Finland, AI Virtanen Inst Mol Sci, Dept Biotechnol & Mol Med, Kuopio 70211, Finland.;Univ Hosp Magdeburg, Dept Dermatol, D-39120 Magdeburg, Germany..
    Tuomela, Johanna
    Univ Turku, Inst Biomed, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland..
    Harkonen, Pirkko
    Univ Turku, Inst Biomed, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland..
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Heikkila, Jari
    Abo Akad Univ, Dept Biochem & Pharm, Turku 20500, Finland..
    Hinkkanen, Ari
    Univ Eastern Finland, AI Virtanen Inst Mol Sci, Dept Biotechnol & Mol Med, Kuopio 70211, Finland..
    Oncolytic alphavirus SFV-VA7 efficiently eradicates subcutaneous and orthotopic human prostate tumours in mice2017In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 51-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite recent therapeutic and diagnostic advances, prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the Western world. Oncolytic viruses that replicate selectively in tumour cells represent a novel treatment candidate for these malignancies.

    Methods: We analysed infectivity of avirulent Semliki Firest virus SFV-VA7 in human prostate cancer cell lines VCaP, LNCaP and 22Rv1 and in nonmalignant prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1. Therapeutic potency of SFV-VA7 was evaluated in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse LNCaP xenograft models.

    Results: SFV-VA7 infected and killed the tested human prostate cancer cell lines irrespective of their hormone response status, while the nonmalignant prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1 proved highly virus resistant. Notably, a single peritoneal dose of SFV-VA7 was sufficient to eradicate all subcutaneous and orthotopic LNCaP tumours.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that SFV-VA7 is a novel, promising therapeutic virus against prostate cancer warranting further testing in early clinical trials.

  • 55.
    Molnár, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wennberg, Lars
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Islet Engraftment and Revascularization in Clinical and Experimental Transplantation2013In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Proper revascularization after transplantation is assumed to be crucial forappropriate islet graft function.

    Methods:

    We developed a novel non-invasive imagingmethod, based on adenoviral transduction of islets with a hypoxia responsive reporter gene,for continuous in vivo monitoring of hypoxia in islet grafts in a mouse model. In addition,morphological data was obtained from a deceased patient previously subject to intraportaltransplantation.

    Results:

    We detected only transient hypoxia in a minority of the animalstransplanted. Importantly, a clear response to hypoxia was observed in vitro after removal ofthe islet-grafts on day twenty-eight after transplantation. Also, the morphological data fromthe deceased patient demonstrated an extensive revascularization of the transplanted islets. Infact, no differences could be seen between native, in pancreas biopsies taken prior to isletisolation, and transplanted islets regarding the number, distribution and shape of the bloodvessels. However, fewer small islets (diameter <39μm) were found in the liver compared to those found in native pancreases. Notably, an absolute majority of the transplanted islets were found remaining within the venous lumen, in direct contact with the vessel wall.

    Conclusions:

    In conclusion results presented show less pronounced islet graft hypoxia after subcapsulartransplantation than previously reported using more invasive methods. Also, formation of anextensive intra-islet capillary network, similar to that seen in native islets in the pancreas, wasseen after clinical islet transplantation.

  • 56. Muthana, M.
    et al.
    Rodrigues, S.
    Chen, Y. -Y
    Welford, A.
    Hughes, R.
    Tazzyman, S.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Morrow, F.
    Lewis, C. E.
    Macrophage delivery of an oncolytic virus abolishes tumor regrowth and metastasis after chemotherapy or irradiation2013In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 490-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frontline anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy and irradiation often slow tumor growth, but tumor regrowth and spread to distant sites usually occurs after the conclusion of treatment. We recently showed that macrophages could be used to deliver large quantities of a hypoxia-regulated, prostate-specific oncolytic virus (OV) to prostate tumors. In the current study, we show that administration of such OV-armed macrophages 48 hours after chemotherapy (docetaxel) or tumor irradiation abolished the posttreatment regrowth of primary prostate tumors in mice and their spread to the lungs for up to 27 or 40 days, respectively. It also significantly increased the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice compared with those given docetaxel or irradiation alone. These new findings suggest that such a novel, macrophage-based virotherapy could be used to markedly increase the efficacy of chemotherapy and irradiation in patients with prostate cancer.

  • 57.
    Ninalga, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Klevenfeldt, Magdalena
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tötterman, Thomas H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    CpG oligonucleotide therapy cures subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors and evokes protective immunity in murine bladder cancer2005In: Journal of immunotherapy (1997), ISSN 1524-9557, E-ISSN 1537-4513, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillation is standard immunotherapy for superficial bladder carcinoma. However, many patients become refractory to BCG, giving impetus to the development of alternative therapies. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) therapy has been shown to promote T(H)1-oriented antitumor responses in various tumor models. To investigate its therapeutic effect in bladder cancer, we used different CpG ODNs to treat C57BL/6 mice bearing the subcutaneous murine bladder tumor MB49. CpG type B ODN 1668 was superior at inhibiting tumor growth, leading to complete regression of large tumors. More importantly, CpG ODN 1668 also regressed orthotopically growing MB49 tumors for the first time. Rechallenge of CpG ODN-cured mice with MB49 showed that a majority of the mice were protected long term, demonstrating that CpG ODN therapy evokes a memory response. Adenoviral vectors (Ad) encoding CD40L, tumor necrosis factor-related activation-induced cytokine, lymphotactin, interleukin (IL) 2, and IL-15 were also investigated. AdCD40L and AdIL-15 transduction could abolish MB49 tumorigenicity, and these vectors were combined with CpG ODN 1668 to investigate any enhanced effects. No such effects were seen. All groups of mice treated with CpG ODNs, alone or in combination with adenoviral vector, exhibited increased serum concentrations of IL-12, indicative of a T(H)1 response. Our results show that CpG ODN therapy cures established subcutaneous and orthotopic bladder cancer via a T(H)1-mediated response and provides long-lasting protective immunity.

  • 58.
    Ninalga, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mangsbo, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Tötterman, Thomas H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    CpG oligonucleotides demonstrate increased therapeutic efficacy compared to BCG in an aggressive orthotopic bladder cancer model2008In: Journal of immunotherapy (1997), ISSN 1524-9557, E-ISSN 1537-4513, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been successful in extending tumor remission in bladder cancer, the fifth most common cancer in men. However, relapses are frequent and some patients develop resistance to BCG. CpGs were previously demonstrated to be effective in the murine MB49 model. In this paper, we modeled a more aggressive orthotopic bladder cancer than previously studied. Moreover, we compared standard BCG immunotherapy side-by-side with the Toll-like receptor-9 agonist CpG. MB49 tumor-bearing mice were treated with BCG or CpG and survival as well as tumor progression were observed over time. Urine, blood, and tumors were collected and analyzed. Mice were rechallenged and evaluated for tumor-specific immunity. In this study, CpGs induced a complete response of large aggressive orthotopic MB49 bladder tumors, resulting in tumor-specific systemic immunity. Further, data indicated that this potent antitumor effect required T cells. A comparison of CpGs and BCG in both a highly and less aggressive orthotopic tumor model, and in a subcutaneous tumor model, demonstrated that CpGs were superior to BCG. In the orthotopic model, BCG induced a local cytokine storm during treatment initiation whereas CpG affected a more refined cytokine pattern over time. Increased levels of cytokines in serum correlated with enhanced survival in the subcutaneous model. Further, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that CpG-induced protective immunity was CD4+ T-cell dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that CpGs are superior to BCG for bladder cancer immunotherapy. Thus, this potent new drug may be an attractive therapeutic alternative and should be evaluated in bladder cancer patients.

  • 59. Olsson, Par
    et al.
    Bera, Tapan
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Klinisk immunologi.
    Kumar, V
    Duray, Paul
    Vincent, James
    Lee, BK
    Pastan, Ira
    GDEP, a new gene differntially expressed in normal prostate and prostate cancer.2001In: Prostate, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 231-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The database of human expressed sequence tags (dbEST) is a potential source for the identification of tissue specific genes. The database contains sequences that originate from cDNA libraries from different tissues cell types and tumors. METHODS: Computer based analysis identified a cluster of sequence homologous ESTs, containing ESTs derived only from human prostate cDNA libraries. The tissue specificity was examined by multiple tissue RNA dot blots and RT-PCR. The new RNA transcript was characterized using northern blot analysis, RACE-PCR, and a ribonuclease protection assay. RESULTS: We have identified a gene differentially expressed in prostate using EST database analysis and experimental studies. We name the gene GDEP for gene differentially expressed in prostate. The major GDEP transcript is about 520 bp long. GDEP RNA was detected in nine prostate tissue samples, four normal and five cancer. Expression in prostate epithelial cells was established by in situ hybridization. Weak expression was detected in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. In vitro transcription/translation indicate that the RNA encodes a small 34 amino acid protein. The major transcript consists of two exons with one large intron (> 15 kb). The GDEP gene was mapped to chromosome 4q21.1 by radiation hybrid mapping. CONCLUSIONS: Our data proves that tissue specific genes can be identified by EST database mining. The prostate specificity of GDEP expression indicates that GDEP may be useful in the diagnosis or treatment of prostate cancer.

  • 60.
    Pan, Gang
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Bysani, Madhusudhan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Nord, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Galderma, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cavalli, Marco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Wadelius, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    PATZ1 down-regulates FADS1 by binding to rs174557 and is opposed by SP1/SREBP1c2017In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 2408-2422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The FADS1 and FADS2 genes in the FADS cluster encode the rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). Genetic variation in this region has been associated with a large number of diseases and traits many of them correlated to differences in metabolism of PUFAs. However, the causative variants leading to these associations have not been identified. Here we find that the multiallelic rs174557 located in an AluYe5 element in intron 1 of FADS1 is functional and lies within a PATZ1 binding site. The derived allele of rs174557, which is the common variant in most populations, diminishes binding of PATZ1, a transcription factor conferring allele-specific downregulation of FADS1 The PATZ1 binding site overlaps with a SP1 site. The competitive binding between the suppressive PATZ1 and the activating complex of SP1 and SREBP1c determines the enhancer activity of this region, which regulates expression of FADS1.

  • 61.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The cancer-immunity cycle as rational design for synthetic cancer drugs: Novel DC vaccines and CAR T-cells2017In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, ISSN 1044-579X, E-ISSN 1096-3650, Vol. 45, p. 23-35Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell therapy is an advanced form of cancer immunotherapy that has had remarkable clinical progress in the past decade in the search for cure of cancer. Most success has been achieved for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells where CAR T-cells targeting CD19 show very high complete response rates for patients with refractory acute B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are close to approval for this indication. CD19 CAR T-cells are also effective against B-cell chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (CLL) and B-cell lymphomas. Although encouraging, CAR T-cells have not yet proven clinically effective for solid tumors. This is mainly due to the lack of specific and homogenously expressed targets to direct the T-cells against and a hostile immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in solid tumors. Cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DC) are also making progress although clinical efficacy is still lacking. The likelihood of success is however increasing now when individual tumors can be sequences and patient-specific neoepitopes identified. Neoepitopes and/or neoantigens can then be included in patient based DC vaccines. This review discusses recent advancements of DC vaccines and CAR T-cells with emphasis on the cancer-immunity cycle, and current efforts to design novel cell therapies.

  • 62.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Vector-Encoded Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein Promotes Maturation of Dendritic Cells with Th1 Polarization and Improved Migration2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 193, no 5, p. 2287-2296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. Both HP-NAP protein and oncolytic viruses encoding HP-NAP have been suggested as immunotherapeutic anticancer agents and adjuvants for vaccination but with little known about its mode of action to activate adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses, and in this study we aim to evaluate the effect of HP-NAP on DC maturation, migration, and induction of adaptive immune response. Maturation markers CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, CD40, and CCR7 were upregulated on human DCs after treatment with supernatants from HP-NAP adenovirus-infected cells. HP-NAP-activated DCs had a Th1 cytokine secretion profile, with high IL-12 and relatively low IL-10 secretion, and migrated toward CCL19. Ag-specific T cells were efficiently expanded by Ag-presenting HP-NAP-activated DCs, which is an important property of functionally mature DCs. Furthermore, intradermal injections of HP-NAP-encoding adenovirus in C57BL/6 mice enhanced resident DC migration to draining lymph nodes, which was verified by imaging lymph nodes by two-photon microscopy and by phenotyping migrating cells by flow cytometry. In conclusion, therapeutic effects of HP-NAP are mediated by maturation of DCs and subsequent activation of Ag-specific T cells in addition to provoking innate immunity.

  • 63.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dyczynski, Matheus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, CCK, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Baskaran, Sathishkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Lei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lulla, Aleksei
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Lulla, Valeria
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Saul, Sirle
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Merits, Andres
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Estonia..
    Leja-Jarblad, Justyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Safe and effective treatment of experimental neuroblastoma and glioblastoma using systemically administered triple microRNA-detargeted oncolytic Semliki Forest virus2017In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1519-1530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and high-risk neuroblastoma are cancers with poor outcome. Immunotherapy in the form of neurotropic oncolytic viruses is a promising therapeutic strategy for these malignancies. Here we evaluate the oncolytic potential of the neurovirulent and partly interferon (IFN)-β-resistant Semliki Forest virus (SFV)-4 in GBMs and neuroblastomas. To reduce neurovirulence we constructed SFV4miRT, which is attenuated in normal CNS cells through insertion of microRNA target sequences for miR124, miR125, miR134 Experimental Design:Oncolytic activity of SFV4miRT was examined in mouse neuroblastoma and GBM cell lines and in patient-derived human glioblastoma cell cultures (HGCC). In vivo neurovirulence and therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in two syngeneic orthotopic glioma models (CT-2A, GL261) and syngeneic subcutaneous neuroblastoma model (NXS2). The role of IFN-β in inhibiting therapeutic efficacy was investigated.

    RESULTS:

    The introduction of microRNA target sequences reduced neurovirulence of SFV4 in terms of attenuated replication in mouse CNS cells and ability to cause encephalitis when administered intravenously. A single intravenous injection of SFV4miRT prolonged survival and cured 4 of 8 mice (50%) with NXS2 and 3 of 11 mice (27%) with CT-2A, but not for GL261 tumor bearing mice. In vivo therapeutic efficacy in different tumor models inversely correlated to secretion of IFN-β by respective cells upon SFV4 infection in vitro Similarly, killing efficacy of HGCC lines inversely correlated to IFN-β response and interferon-α⁄β receptor (IFNAR)-1 expression.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    SFV4miRT has reduced neurovirulence, while retaining its oncolytic potential. SFV4miRT is an excellent candidate for treatment of GBMs and neuroblastomas with low IFN-β secretion.

  • 64.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    An infection-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus secreting H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein with therapeutic effects on neuroendocrine tumors2013In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 2008-2018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil Activating Protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. HP-NAP can mediate anti-tumor effects by recruiting neutrophils and inducing Th1-type differentiation in the tumor microenvironment. It therefore holds strong potential as a therapeutic gene. Here, we armed a replication-selective, infection-enhanced adenovirus with secretory HP-NAP, Ad5PTDf35-[Δ24-sNAP], and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy against neuroendocrine tumors. We observed that it could specifically infect and eradicate a wide range of tumor cells lines from different origin in vitro. Insertion of secretory HP-NAP did not affect the stability or replicative capacity of the virus and infected tumor cells could efficiently secrete HP-NAP. Intratumoral administration of the virus in nude mice xenografted with neuroendocrine tumors improved median survival. Evidence of biological HP-NAP activity was observed 24 hours after treatment with neutrophil infiltration in tumors and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and MIP2-α in the systemic circulation. Furthermore, evidence of Th1-type immune polarization was observed as a result of increase in IL-12/23 p40 cytokine concentrations 72 hours post-virus administration. Our observations suggest that HP-NAP can serve as a potent immunomodulator in promoting anti-tumor immune response in the tumor microenvironment and enhance the therapeutic effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

  • 65.
    Roche, Francis P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Ohlin, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Histidine-Rich Glycoprotein (HRG): A Novel Gene-Therapy Effector for the Treatment of Cancer2013In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 21, p. S241-S241Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Roche, Francis P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Ohlin, Elisabet K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Histidine-Rich Glycoprotein (HRG): A Novel Gene-Therapy Effector for the Treatment of Cancer2014In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 22, p. S243-S244Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Roche, Francis P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pietilä, Ilkka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kaito, Hiroshi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sjöström, Elisabet O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sobotzki, Nadine
    ETH Zürich, Department of Health Sciences and Technology & Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Noguer, Oriol
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Persson Skare, Tor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wollscheid, Bernd
    ETH Zürich, Department of Health Sciences and Technology & Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, Zürich, Switzerland..
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Leukocyte differentiation by histidine-rich glycoprotein/stanniocalcin-2 complex regulates murine glioma growth through modulation of anti-tumor immunity2018In: Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, ISSN 1535-7163, E-ISSN 1538-8514, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 1961-1972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma-protein histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is implicated in phenotypic switching of tumor-associated macrophages, regulating cytokine production and phagocytotic activity, thereby promoting vessel normalization and anti-tumor immune responses. To assess the therapeutic effect of HRG gene delivery on CNS tumors, we used adenovirus-encoded HRG to treat mouse intracranial GL261 glioma. Delivery of Ad5-HRG to the tumor site resulted in a significant reduction in glioma growth, associated with increased vessel perfusion and increased CD45+ leukocyte and CD8+ T cell accumulation in the tumor. Antibody-mediated neutralization of colony-stimulating factor-1 suppressed the effects of HRG on CD45+ and CD8+ infiltration. Using a novel protein interaction-decoding technology, TRICEPS-based ligand receptor capture (LRC), we identified Stanniocalcin-2 (STC2) as an interacting partner of HRG on the surface of inflammatory cells in vitro and co-localization of HRG and STC2 in gliomas. HRG reduced the suppressive effects of STC2 on monocyte CD14+ differentiation and STC2-regulated immune response pathways. In consequence, Ad5-HRG treated gliomas displayed decreased numbers of Interleukin-35+ Treg cells, providing a mechanistic rationale for the reduction in GL261 growth in response to Ad5-HRG delivery. We conclude that HRG suppresses glioma growth by modulating tumor inflammation through monocyte infiltration and differentiation. Moreover, HRG acts to balance the regulatory effects of its partner, STC2, on inflammation and innate and/or acquired immunity. HRG gene delivery therefore offers a potential therapeutic strategy to control anti-tumor immunity.

  • 68. Schenk, Ellen
    et al.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Kraaij, Robert
    Adamson, Rachel
    Maitland, Norman J.
    Bangma, Chris H.
    Preclinical Safety Assessment of Ad[I/PPT-E1A], a Novel Oncolytic Adenovirus for Prostate Cancer2014In: Human Gene Therapy Clinical Development, ISSN 2324-8637, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 7-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in the Western world. Patients can be cured only when the tumor has not metastasized outside the prostate. However, treatment with curative intent fails in a significant number of men, often resulting in untreatable progressive disease with a fatal outcome. Oncolytic adenovirus therapy may be a promising adjuvant treatment to reduce local failure or the outgrowth of micrometastatic disease. Within the European gene therapy consortium GIANT, we have developed a novel prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus: Ad[I/PPT-E1A]. This adenovirus specifically kills prostate cells via prostate-specific replication. This article describes the clinical development of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] with particular reference to the preclinical safety assessment of this novel virus. The preclinical safety assessment involved an efficacy study in a human orthotopic xenograft mouse model, a specificity study in human primary cells, and a toxicity study in normal mice. These studies confirmed that Ad[I/PPT-E1A] efficiently kills prostate tumor cells in vivo, is not harmful to other organs, and is well tolerated in mice after systemic delivery. The safety, as well as the immunological effects of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] as a local adjuvant therapy, will now be studied in a phase I dose-escalating trial in patients with localized prostate cancer who are scheduled for curative radical prostatectomy and can be used as an updated paradigm for similar therapeutic viruses.

  • 69.
    Shridhar, N.
    et al.
    Univ Bonn, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-53127 Bonn, Germany.;Univ Magdeburg, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-39120 Magdeburg, Germany..
    Ruotsalainen, J.
    Univ Magdeburg, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-39120 Magdeburg, Germany..
    van der Sluis, T.
    Univ Magdeburg, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-39120 Magdeburg, Germany..
    Rogava, M.
    Univ Bonn, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-53127 Bonn, Germany..
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Kastenmueller, W.
    Univ Bonn, Inst Expt Immunol, D-53127 Bonn, Germany..
    Gaffal, E.
    Univ Magdeburg, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-39120 Magdeburg, Germany..
    Tueting, T.
    Univ Bonn, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-53127 Bonn, Germany.;Univ Magdeburg, Dept Dermatol, Lab Expt Dermatol, D-39120 Magdeburg, Germany..
    Modifying melanoma immune microenvironment by heterologous prime-boost vaccination with adenovirus and Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus vectors2018In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625, Vol. 27, no 3, p. E54-E55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Tötterman, Thomas H.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    The immunotherapy of prostate and bladder cancer2005In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 728-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of the immune system in controlling the growth of tumour cells is highly complex and has been extensively debated. It is well documented that the immune system controls virally induced cancers, and there is evidence for a role of specific immunity in other types of tumours. The greater understanding of the regulation and optimization of adoptive, specific immune responses, and the better characterization of tumour-associated antigens indicate the way for active specific vaccination and cell therapy in urological tumours. Currently, bacille Calmette Guerin immunotherapy is established for localized bladder cancer and many experimental immunotherapies are under evaluation. Here we review some timely aspects of tumour immunology, and describe the current status and development of immunotherapy in prostate and bladder cancer.

  • 71.
    Vikman, Sofia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Cunningham, Janet L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    de la Torre, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tötterman, Thomas H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gene expression in midgut carcinoid tumors: potential targets for immunotherapy2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classical midgut carcinoids are serotonin-secreting tumors derived from enterochromaffin cells in the gut. Metastatic disease represents a therapeutic challenge and immunotherapy implies a novel approach for treatment. In order to define antigens suitable for T-cell therapy with a preferential expression in midgut carcinoid tissue a broad screening of genes with preferential neuroendocrine restriction, genes described as over-expressed in various malignancies, and genes encoding cancer-testis associated antigens was performed. The expression of 32 genes was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 28 midgut carcinoid specimens, in the cell line BON and in normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to evaluate protein expression. Expression is shown of genes that have previously not been observed in midgut carcinoid tumors, such as Survivin and GAGEs. Also the expression is confirmed of genes that encode pivotal proteins in enterochromaffin cells, such as TPH1 and VMAT1, and their tissue-restricted expression is indicated. In addition, gene expression of IA-2 and CDX-2 in normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract and in tumor is shown. Protein expression of TPH, VMAT1, and Survivin was detected in tumor tissue. This study elucidates that TPH1, VMAT1, and Survivin should be further investigated as potential target antigens for T cell-mediated immunotherapy of midgut carcinoids.

  • 72.
    Vågesjö, Evalina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Strategic recruitment of proangiogenic leukocytes to the ischemic hindlimb increases functional tissue perfusion2013In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 43, no SI, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Strategical steering of the immune system: induction of leukocyte vascular chaperoning increases functional blood flow responses in ischemic muscle2014In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 28, no 1, article id 670.6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Waldén, Tomas B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Immunological shielding by induced recruitment of regulatory T lymphocytes delays rejection of islets transplanted to muscle2015In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 263-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only clinically available curative treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is replacement of the pancreatic islets by allogeneic transplantation, which requires immunosuppressive therapies. Regimens used today are associated with serious adverse effects and impaired islet engraftment and function. The aim of the current study was to induce local immune privilege by accumulating immune-suppressive regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) at the site of intramuscular islet transplantation to reduce the need of immunosuppressive therapy during engraftment. Islets were co-transplanted with a plasmid encoding the chemokine CCL22 into muscle of MHC-mismatched mice, after which pCCL22 expression and leukocyte recruitment were studied in parallel with graft functionality. Myocyte pCCL22 expression and secretion resulted in local accumulation of Tregs. When islets were co-transplanted with pCCL22, significantly fewer effector T lymphocytes wereobserved in close proximity to the islets, leading to delayed graft rejection.As a result, diabeticrecipients co-transplanted with islets and pCCL22 intramuscularly became normoglycemic for ten consecutive days, while grafts co-transplanted with control plasmid muscle were rejected immediately leaving recipients severely hyperglycemic. Here, we propose a simple method to initially shield MHC-mismatched islets by the recruitment of endogenous Tregs during engraftment in order to improve early islet survival. Using this approach, the very high doses of systemic immunosuppression used initially following transplantation can thereby be avoided.

  • 75.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Waldén, Tomas B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Immunological Shielding by Induced Recruitment of Regulatory T-Lymphocytes Delays Rejection of Islets Transplanted in Muscle2015In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 263-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only clinically available curative treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is replacement of the pancreatic islets by allogeneic transplantation, which requires immunosuppressive therapies. Regimens used today are associated with serious adverse effects and impaired islet engraftment and function. The aim of the current study was to induce local immune privilege by accumulating immune-suppressive regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs) at the site of intramuscular islet transplantation to reduce the need of irnmunosuppressive therapy during engraftment. Islets were cotransplanted with a plasmid encoding the chemokine CCL22 into the muscle of MHC-mismatched mice, after which pCCL22 expression and leukocyte recruitment were studied in parallel with graft functionality. Myocyte pCCL22 expression and secretion resulted in local accumulation of Tregs. When islets were cotransplanted with pCCL22, significantly fewer effector T-lymphocytes were observed in close proximity to the islets, leading to delayed graft rejection. As a result, diabetic recipients cotransplanted with islets and pCCL22 intramuscularly became normoglycemic for 10 consecutive days, while grafts cotransplanted with control plasmid were rejected immediately, leaving recipients severely hyperglycemic. Here we propose a simple method to initially shield MHC-mismatched islets by the recruitment of endogenous Tregs during engraftment in order to improve early islet survival. Using this approach, the very high doses of systemic immunosuppression used initially following transplantation can thereby be avoided.

  • 76.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Herrera Hidalgo, Carmen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rundqvist, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Cell & Mol Biol Dept, Solna, Sweden.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Johnson, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Cell & Mol Biol Dept, Solna, Sweden; Univ Cambridge, Physiol Dev & Neurosci Dept, Cambridge, England.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Perivascular macrophages regulate blood flow following tissue damage2018In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 48, no S1, p. 44-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Eriksson, Ulf J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Uncovering a new role for immune cells: macrophages assist in regulation of blood flow in ischemic muscleManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 78. Wolfgang, CD
    et al.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Klinisk immunologi.
    Lee, BK
    Pastan, I
    T cell receptor gamma chain alternate reading frame protein (TARP) expression in prostate cancer cells leads to an increased growth rate and induction of caveolins and amphiregulin.2001In: Cancer Res., Vol. 61, no 22, p. 8122-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, we showed that prostate and prostate cancer cells express a truncated T-cell receptor gamma chain mRNA that uses an alternative reading frame to produce a novel nuclear T-cell receptor gamma chain alternate reading frame protein (TARP). TARP is expressed in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line but not in the androgen-independent PC3 prostate cancer cell line, indicating that TARP may play a role in prostate cancer progression. To elucidate the function of TARP, we generated a stable PC3 cell line that expresses TARP in a constitutive manner. Expression of TARP in PC3 cells resulted in a more rapid growth rate with a 5-h decrease in doubling time. cDNA microarray analysis of 6538 genes revealed that caveolin 1, caveolin 2, amphiregulin, and melanoma growth stimulatory activity alpha were significantly up-regulated, whereas IL-1beta was significantly down-regulated in PC3 cells expressing TARP. We also demonstrated that TARP expression is up-regulated by testosterone in LNCaP cells that express a functional androgen receptor. These results suggest that TARP has a role in regulating growth and gene expression in prostate cancer cells.

  • 79.
    Wu, Chengjun
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Lund Univ, Div Med Microbiol, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Cao, Xiaofang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Huijbers, Elisabeth J. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, Angiogenesis Lab, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Akusjärvi, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Johansson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Svensson, Catharina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    HAdV-2-suppressed growth of SV40 T antigen-transformed mouse mammary epithelial cell-induced tumours in SCID mice2016In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 489, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) vectors are promising tools for cancer therapy, but the shortage of efficient animal models for productive HAdV infections has restricted the evaluation of systemic effects to mainly immunodeficient mice. Previously, we reported a highly efficient replication of HAdV-2 in a non-tumorigenic mouse mammary epithelial cell line, NMuMG. Here we show that HAdV-2 gene expression and progeny formation in NMuMG cells transformed with the SV40 T antigen (NMuMG-T cells) were as efficient as in the parental NMuMG cells. Injection of HAdV-2 into tumours established by NMuMG-T in SCID mice caused reduced tumour growth and signs of intratumoural lesions. HAdV-2 replicated within the NMuMG-T-established tumours, but not in interspersed host-derived tissues within the tumours. The specific infection of NMuMG-T-derived tumours was verified by the lack of viral DNA in kidney, lung or spleen although low levels of viral DNA was occasionally found in liver.

  • 80.
    Xie, Yuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Sundström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maturi, Naga P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tan, E-Jean
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Marinescu, Voichita D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tirfing, Malin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Chen, Lei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Fredrik J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    LGR5 promotes tumorigenicity and invasion of glioblastoma stem-like cells and is a potential therapeutic target for a subset of glioblastoma patients2019In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 247, no 2, p. 228-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor which lacks efficient treatment and predictive biomarkers. Expression of the epithelial stem cell marker Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) has been described in GBM, but its functional role has not been conclusively elucidated. Here, we have investigated the role of LGR5 in a large repository of patient-derived GBM stem cell (GSC) cultures. The consequences of LGR5 overexpression or depletion have been analyzed using in vitro and in vivo methods, which showed that, among those with highest LGR5 expression (LGR5(high)), there were two phenotypically distinct groups: one that was dependent on LGR5 for its malignant properties and another that was unaffected by changes in LGR5 expression. The LGR5-responding cultures could be identified by their significantly higher self-renewal capacity as measured by extreme limiting dilution assay (ELDA), and these LGR5(high)-ELDA(high) cultures were also significantly more malignant and invasive compared to the LGR5(high)-ELDA(low) cultures. This showed that LGR5 expression alone would not be a strict marker of LGR5 responsiveness. In a search for additional biomarkers, we identified LPAR4, CCND2, and OLIG2 that were significantly upregulated in LGR5-responsive GSC cultures, and we found that OLIG2 together with LGR5 were predictive of GSC radiation and drug response. Overall, we show that LGR5 regulates the malignant phenotype in a subset of patient-derived GSC cultures, which supports its potential as a predictive GBM biomarker. Copyright (c) 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 81.
    Younis, Shady
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Ain Shams Univ, Dept Anim Prod, Cairo 11241, Egypt.
    Kamel, Wael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Falkeborn, Tina
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Wang, Hao
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Daniels, Robert
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hinkula, Jorma
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Akusjärvi, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77483 USA.
    Multiple nuclear-replicating viruses require the stress-induced protein ZC3H11A for efficient growth2018In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 16, p. E3808-E3816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The zinc finger CCCH-type containing 11A (ZC3H11A) gene encodes a well-conserved zinc finger protein that may function in mRNA export as it has been shown to associate with the transcription export (TREX) complex in proteomic screens. Here, we report that ZC3H11A is a stress-induced nuclear protein with RNA-binding capacity that localizes to nuclear splicing speckles. During an adenovirus infection, the ZC3H11A protein and splicing factor SRSF2 relocalize to nuclear regions where viral DNA replication and transcription take place. Knockout (KO) of ZC3H11A in HeLa cells demonstrated that several nuclear-replicating viruses are dependent on ZC3H11A for efficient growth (HIV, influenza virus, herpes simplex virus, and adenovirus), whereas cytoplasmic replicating viruses are not (vaccinia virus and Semliki Forest virus). High-throughput sequencing of ZC3H11A-cross-linked RNA showed that ZC3H11A binds to short purine-rich ribonucleotide stretches in cellular and adenoviral transcripts. We show that the RNA-binding property of ZC3H11A is crucial for its function and localization. In ZC3H11A KO cells, the adenovirus fiber mRNA accumulates in the cell nucleus. Our results suggest that ZC3H11A is important for maintaining nuclear export of mRNAs during stress and that several nuclear-replicating viruses take advantage of this mechanism to facilitate their replication.

  • 82.
    Yu, Di
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Leja, Justyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Majdalani, Nadim
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Adenovirus with Hexon Tat-Protein Transduction Domain Modification Exhibits Increased Therapeutic Effect in Experimental Neuroblastoma and Neuroendocrine Tumors2011In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 85, no 24, p. 13114-13123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is widely used as an oncolytic agent for cancer therapy. However, its infectivity is highly dependent on the expression level of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the surfaces of tumor cells. Furthermore, infected cells overproduce adenovirus fiber proteins, which are released prior to cell lysis. The released fibers block CAR on noninfected neighboring cells, thereby preventing progeny virus entry. Our aim was to add a CAR-independent infection route to Ad5 to increase the infectivity of tumor cells with low CAR expression and prevent the fiber-masking problem. We constructed Ad5 viruses that encode the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV-1 Tat protein (Tat-PTD) in hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the hexon protein. Tat-PTD functions as a cell-penetrating peptide, and Tat-PTD-modified Ad5 showed a dramatic increased transduction of CAR-negative cell lines compared to unmodified vector. Moreover, while tumor cell infectivity was severely reduced for Ad5 in the presence of fiber proteins, it was only marginally reduced for Tat-PTD-modified Ad5. Furthermore, because of the sequence alteration in the hexon HVR, coagulation factor X-mediated virus uptake was significantly reduced. Mice harboring human neuroblastoma and neuroendocrine tumors show suppressed tumor growths and prolonged survival when treated with Tat-PTD-modified oncolytic viruses. Our data suggest that modification of Ad5 with Tat-PTD in HVR5 expands its utility as an oncolytic agent.

  • 83.
    Yu, Di
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Xu, Jing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Adamson, Rachel
    Maitland, Norman
    Fan, Xiaolong
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vectors with Tat-PTD Modified Hexon and Serotype 35 Fiber Show Greatly Enhanced Transduction Capacity of Primary Cell Cultures2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e54952-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors represent one of the most efficient gene delivery vectors in life sciences. However, Ad5 is dependent on expression of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus- receptor (CAR) on the surface of target cell for efficient transduction, which limits it's utility for certain cell types. Herein we present a new vector, Ad5PTDf35, which is an Ad5 vector having serotype 35 fiber-specificity and Tat-PTD hexon-modification. This vector shows dramatically increased transduction capacity of primary human cell cultures including T cells, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, pancreatic islets and exocrine cells, mesenchymal stem cells and tumor initiating cells. Biodistribution in mice following systemic administration (tail-vein injection) show significantly reduced uptake in the liver and spleen of Ad5PTDf35 compared to unmodified Ad5. Therefore, replication-competent viruses with these modifications may be further developed as oncolytic agents for cancer therapy. User-friendly backbone plasmids containing these modifications were developed for compatibility to the AdEasy-system to facilitate the development of surface-modified adenoviruses for gene delivery to difficult-to-transduce cells in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research.

  • 84.
    Yu, Di
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Leja, Justyna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Preclinical Evaluation of AdVince, an Oncolytic Adenovirus Adapted for Treatment of Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Cancer2017In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 54-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer immunotherapy is becoming a cornerstone in the clinical care of cancer patients due to the breakthrough trials with immune checkpoint blockade antibodies and chimeric antigen receptor T cells. The next breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy is likely to be oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively kill tumor cells and deceive the immune system to believe that the tumor is a foreign entity that needs to be eradicated. We have developed AdVince, an oncolytic adenovirus for treatment of liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor (NET). AdVince includes the gene promoter from human chromogranin A for selective replication in neuroendocrine cells, miR122 target sequences for reduced liver toxicity, and a cell-penetrating peptide in the capsid for increased infectivity of tumor cells and optimized spread within tumors. This paper describes the preclinical evaluation of AdVince on freshly isolated human gastrointestinal NET cells resected from liver metastases and freshly isolated human hepatocytes as well as in fresh human blood. AdVince selectively replicates in and kills NET cells. Approximately, 73-fold higher concentration of AdVince is needed to induce similar level of cytotoxicity in NET cells as in hepatocytes. AdVince did not activate complement or induce considerable amount of proinflammatory cytokines or chemokines in human blood. The data presented herein indicate that AdVince can be safely evaluated in a phase I/IIa clinical trial for patients with liver-dominant NET.

  • 85.
    Zhang, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Feenstra, Tjerk
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Li, Xiujuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Laaniste, Liisi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Ohlin, K Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Magnusson, Peetra U
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg, Karin Nilsson
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Dieterich, Lothar C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.2015In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 8, no 406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization.

12 51 - 85 of 85
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