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  • 51.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Information Science.
    Sjöström, Jonas
    Jönköping International Business School and Linköping University.
    The Principle of Identity Cultivation on the Web2008In: ERCIM News, ISSN 0926-4981, E-ISSN 1564-0094, Vol. 72, no January, p. 31-32Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Web 2.0 and the commercial interest in open-source software both reflect a current trend towards increased user involvement in product and service development. To stay competitive in this era of open innovation, companies must learn to trust users as codevelopers and to make use of the Web as an instrument for identity cultivation.

  • 52.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå universitet.
    Pragmatizing the normative artifact: Design science research in Scandinavia and beyond2018In: Communications of the Association for Information Systems, ISSN 1529-3181, E-ISSN 1529-3181, Vol. 43, p. 68-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this panel report, we analyze the discussion that unfolded during the “Design Science Research: A Scandinavian Approach?” panel held at the third Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems in Sigtuna, Sweden, in August, 2012. The second author of this paper chaired the panel, which also included Tone Bratteteig, Shirley Gregor, Ola Henfridsson, Alan Hevner, Jan Pries-Heje, and Tuure Tuunanen as panelists. Three themes that highlight how the design of artifacts contributes to knowledge production emerged during the panel. The first theme addresses our responsibility, as a research community, to come up not only with descriptions of the world but also to try to change things into preferable states. The second theme emphasizes that knowledge production also happens through the design of artifacts. The third theme identifies an apparent pragmatic turn in our discipline.

  • 53.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Information Systems.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media. Umeå universitet.
    Pragmatizing the normative artifact: Design science research in Scandinavia and beyond2018In: Communications of the Association for Information Systems, ISSN 1529-3181, E-ISSN 1529-3181, p. 68-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this panel report, we analyze the discussion that unfolded during the “Design Science Research: A Scandinavian Approach?” panel held at the third Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems in Sigtuna, Sweden, in August, 2012. The second author of this paper chaired the panel, which also included Tone Bratteteig, Shirley Gregor, Ola Henfridsson, Alan Hevner, Jan Pries-Heje, and Tuure Tuunanen as panelists. Three themes that highlight how the design of artifacts contributes to knowledge production emerged during the panel. The first theme addresses our responsibility, as a research community, to come up not only with descriptions of the world but also to try to change things into preferable states. The second theme emphasizes that knowledge production also happens through the design of artifacts. The third theme identifies an apparent pragmatic turn in our discipline.

  • 54.
    Ó Conchúir, Eoin
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Holmström Olsson, Helena
    IT-universitetet i Göteborg.
    Ågerfalk, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Fitzgerald, Brian
    Benefits of global software development: Exploring the unexplored2009In: Software Process: Improvement and Practice, ISSN 1077-4866, E-ISSN 1099-1670, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations are increasingly moving to the global software development (GSD) model because of significant benefits that can accrue. However, GSD is fraught with challenges arising from geographical, temporal and socio-cultural distances. The emphasis in the literature to date has typically been on how to overcome the challenges associated with GSD. While a number of GSD benefits have been widely referred to in the literature, there are also a number of less obvious benefits that can be inferred as potentially accruing from GSD. In this article, we identify the various benefits of GSD, labeling them as ‘referred’ and ‘inferred’, respectively. We provide a categorization in terms of (a) organizational, (b) team and (c) process-task. While the ‘referred’ benefits most often apply at the organizational level (e.g. cost savings, access to large multi-skilled workforces, reduced time to market and proximity to customer), the ‘inferred’ benefits apply to a greater extent at team and process-task level (e.g. task modularization, team autonomy, improved documentation and clearly defined processes). In the decision of whether or not to globalize software development activities, a categorization including both ‘referred’ and ‘inferred’ benefits will be helpful in providing a synthesis of all potential benefits associated with GSD.

12 51 - 54 of 54
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