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  • 51.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Chen, Song
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Rubino, Stefano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Weng, H
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington.
    Tang, Liping
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Influence of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on inflammatory response2015In: European Cells and Materials, ISSN 1473-2262, E-ISSN 1473-2262, Vol. 29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Chen, Song
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Rubino, Stefano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Weng, Hong
    Tang, Liping
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Influence of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle morphology on inflammatory response2015In: European Cells and Materials, ISSN 1473-2262, E-ISSN 1473-2262, Vol. 29, no S1, p. 43-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lind, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Tang, Liping
    University of Texas at Arlington.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Controlling Osteogenic Differentiation through Nanoporous Alumina2014In: Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 2158-7027, E-ISSN 2158-7043, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 98-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanotopographical features are found to have significant effects on bone behavior. In the presentstudy, nanoporous aluminas with different pore sizes (20, 100 and 200 nm in diameter), were eva-luated for their osteoinductive and drug eluting properties. W20-17 marrow stromal cells wereseeded on nanoporous alumina with and without the addition of BMP-2. Although cell prolifera-tion was not affected by pore size, osteogenic differentiation was 200 nm as compared to 20 and100 nm pores induced higher alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and osteocalcin expression le-vels, thus indicating osteoblastic differentiation. Cell morphology revealed that cells cultured on20 nm pores adopted a rounded shape, while larger pores (200 nm) elicited an elongated morpho-logy. Furthermore, ALP expression levels were consistently higher on BMP-2 loaded nanoporousalumina surfaces compared to unloaded surfaces, indicating that not only is nanoporous aluminaosteoinductive, but also has the potential to be used as a drug eluting bone-implant coating.

  • 54.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lu, Xi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    The Influence of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticle Morphology on Embryonic Development in a Zebrafish Exposure Model2017In: NANOMATERIALS, ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanomaterials are used in many different industries such as cosmetics, food, clothing, and electronics. There is increasing concern that exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) during pregnancy can adversely affect fetal development. It is well known that the size, charge, and chemistry of a nanoparticle can modulate embryological development. The role that particle morphology plays on early development, however, is still widely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effect of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (HANP) morphology on embryological development in a zebrafish exposure model. Four distinct HANP morphologies (dots, long rods, sheets, and fibers) were fabricated and characterized. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to HANPs (0-100 mg/L), and viability and developmental deformities were evaluated for up to 5 days post-fertilization (dpf). Malformations such as pericardial edema and axial curvature were apparent in embryos as early as 1 dpf, following exposure to the dot and fiber particles, and developed in embryos by 3 dpf in the sheet and long rod particle groups. Minimal death was observed in response to dot, long rod, and sheet particles (<= 25%), while fiber particles induced overwhelming toxicity (<= 60%) after 1 dpf, and complete toxicity during all subsequent time points. Collectively, these results suggest that nanoparticle morphology can significantly impact embryological development and should be a required consideration when designing nanomaterials for commercial use.

  • 55.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lu, Xi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Singh, Vijay P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Engman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Pujari-Palmer, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Incorporation and delivery of an organoselenium antioxidant from a brushite cement2017In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 197, p. 115-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inflammatory reaction occurs following biomaterial implantation in the body, which produce toxic byproducts such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although ROS is required to clear the wound, excessive ROS can damage the tissue around the implant site, eventually leading to implant failure. One approach to control the inflammatory response is to incorporate an antioxidant into the biomaterial in order to scavenge ROS produced by activated phagocytes. In the present study, an organoselenium antioxidative compound was incorporated into a brushite cement, with the goal of scavenging ROS generated from activated primary human mononuclear leukocytes (MNCs), in vitro. The effect of the antioxidant on the physical properties of brushite cement, and its release from the cement were investigated via compressive strength, setting time, phase composition, and UV spectroscopy analysis. The physical properties of brushite remained unchanged following incorporation of the antioxidant. The antioxidant was slowly released from the cement, following a non-Fickian transport mechanism, with approximately 60% of the loaded antioxidant released over five days. The released antioxidant was then tested for its ability to scavenge ROS released by MNCs using the luminol amplified chemiluminescence assay. The results show that antioxidative released at both early stages (24 h) and late stages (120 h) retained its scavenging capacity and effectively reduced ROS production. These results indicate that brushite cements loaded with organoselenium compounds can modulate ROS production after implantation and potentially modulate the inflammatory response to improve device integration.

  • 56.
    Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari-Palmer, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Reduced oxidative stress in primary human cells by antioxidant released from nanoporous alumina2016In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 568-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoporous alumina elicits different inflammatory responses dependent on pore size, such as increased complement activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, on 200 versus 20 nm pores. In this study, we attempt to further modulate inflammatory cell response by loading nanoporous alumina membranes (20, 100, and 200 nm pores), with an antioxidant, Trolox, for controlled drug release. For mononuclear cells (MNC) no difference in cell response, due to pore size, was seen when cultured on nonloaded membranes. However, when exposed to membranes loaded with Trolox, 100 uM was enough to quench ROS by more than 95% for all pore sizes. Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) produced significantly more ROS when exposed to 20 versus 100 nm pores. For Trolox loaded membranes, this trend reversed, due to slower release of antioxidant from the 20 nm pores. Furthermore, Trolox exhibited a unique effect on PMNCs that has not previously been reported: It delayed the production of ROS in a manner distinct from antioxidant activity. The present study confirms that nanoporous alumina is a suitable vehicle for drug delivery, and that Trolox can successfully modulate the inflammatory response of both MNC and PMNCs.

  • 57.
    Singh, Vijay P
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Poon, Jia-fei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Butcher, Ray J.
    Department of Chemistry, Howard University, USA..
    Lu, Xi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Mestres, Gemma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Synthetical Organic Chemistry.
    Effect of a Bromo Substituent on the Glutathione Peroxidase Activity of a Pyridoxine-like Diselenide2015In: The Journal of Organic Chemistry, Vol. 50, no 15, p. 7385-7395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In search for better mimics of the glutathioneperoxidase enzymes, pyridoxine-like diselenides 6 and 11,carrying a 6-bromo substituent, were prepared. Reaction of2,6-dibromo-3-pyridinol 5 with sodium diselenide provided 6via aromatic nucleophilic substitution of the 2-bromosubstituent. LiAlH4 caused reduction of all four ester groupsand returned 11 after acidic workup. The X-ray structure of 6showed that the dipyridyl diselenide moiety was kept in analmost planar, transoid conformation. According to NBOanalysis,this was due to weak intramolecular Se···O (1.1 kcal/mol) and Se···N-interactions (2.5 kcal/mol). That the 6-bromo substituent increased the positive charge on seleniumwas confirmed by NPA-analysis and seen in calculated andobserved 77Se NMR-shifts. Diselenide 6 showed a more than 3-fold higher reactivity than the corresponding des-bromocompound 3a and ebselen when evaluated in the coupled reductase assay. Experiments followed for longer time (2 h) confirmedthat diselenide 6 is a better GPx-catalyst than 11. On the basis of 77Se-NMR experiments, a catalytic mechanism for diselenide 6was proposed involving selenol, selenosulfide and seleninic acid intermediates. At low concentration (10 μM) where it showedonly minimal toxicity, it could scavenge ROS produced by MNC- and PMNC-cells more efficiently than Trolox.

  • 58.
    Singh, Vijay P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Poon, Jia-fei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Yan, Jiajie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Lu, Xi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Butcher, Ray J.
    Howard Univ, Dept Chem, Washington, DC 20059 USA.
    Gates, Paul J.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Chem, Bristol BS8 1TS, Avon, England.
    Engman, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Nitro-, Azo-, and Amino Derivatives of Ebselen: Synthesis, Structure, and Cytoprotective Effects2017In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 313-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel azo-bis-ebselen compounds 7 were prepared by reduction of 7-nitro-2-aryl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)ones 3 and 6 with sodium benzenetellurolate; NaTeC6H5, and by reaction of 2-bromo-3-nitrobenzamides with Na2Se2. The X-ray structure of 7b showed that the molecule, due to strong intramolecular secondary Se center dot center dot center dot N interactions, is completely planar. Azo-compounds 7 upon further reaction with NaTeC6H5 were reductively cleaved to provide 2 equiv of the corresponding aromatic amine. The weak Se-N bond was not stable enough to survive the reaction conditions, and diselenides 8 were isolated after workup. Whereas azo-bis-ebselens 7 were poor mimics of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-enzymes, nitroebselens 3, 6, and 11b and diselenides 8 were 3-6-fold more active than ebselen. Based on Se-77 NMR. spectroscopy, a catalytic cycle for diselenide 8b, involving aminoebselen 14, was proposed. As assessed by chemiluminescence measurements, the good GPx-mimics could reduce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stimulated human mononuclear cells more efficiently than Trolox. No toxic effects of the, compounds were seen in MC3T3-cells at 25 mu M.

  • 59.
    Xia, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Carlsson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Evaluation of CaP spherical particles on rat osteoblasts2012In: 4th NanoImpactNet Integrating Conference and the 1st QNano Integrating Conference, "From theory to practice - development, training and enabling nanosafety and health research", UCD Dublin, Ireland, 27 February - 2 March, 2012 / [ed] Michael Riediker, 2012, p. 120-120Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Xia, Wei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lindahl, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ballo, Ahmed
    Gothenburg University.
    Hoess, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Pujari, Shiuli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Lausmaa, Jukka
    SP.
    Thomsen, Peter
    Gothenburg University.
    Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Biological properties of ion substituted apatite coatings2013Conference paper (Refereed)
12 51 - 60 of 60
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