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  • 51.
    Jansson, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    “We are going through a deep dark valley”: Social anxiety and the success of the art of Haddon Sundblom and Warner Sallman2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    American artists Haddon Sundblom and Warner Sallman were the creators of some of the most famous images of the 20th century. They both also happen to have roots in the same small municipality in the Åland Islands archipelago. Sundblom created the famous images of Santa Claus for Coca-Cola’s yearly Christmas advertisments, and Sallman painted the famous “Head of Christ” image of Jesus. The purpose of this paper is to seek an explanation for the astounding success of their images. I begin by reviewing some letters sent by American immigrants from Åland back home to their relatives in the municipality of Föglö, where Sundblom’s and Sallman’s fathers came from, during the period 1933-1951. These letters eloquently express the tensions and anxiety faced by the general population during this time of depression and war. The paper then proceeds to examine the social psychological dynamics experienced by Americans during this period through a consideration of the historical literature. The tentative argument presented in the paper holds that the images of Sundblom and Sallman represented two kinds of gods: a god of commercialism (Santa) and a god of Christianity (Jesus), both figures being made more accessible and comforting than they previously had been experienced by consumers of these images.

  • 52.
    Jansson, David
    Vassar College.
    “What would Lee do?”: Internal orientalism in the U.S. and the moral geographies of “Southern” nationalism2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper employs the framework of internal orientalism to explore the conceptions of the moral geographies of Southern identity among members of the Southern nationalist organization the League of the South. Internal orientalism in the U.S. involves the construction of an American national identity through the othering of the South. A primary aspect of the othering of the South involves the assumption that “the South” is the moral antithesis of “America,” in that the moral deficits that beset “the South” are not only characteristic of the region’s essential nature but also largely absent from the moral landscape of “America.” Through interviews with members of the League of the South I investigate the influence of internal orientalism on the imagined moral geographies of Southern nationalism. For League of the South members, it is the South that is the moral bedrock of the nation in contrast to a degraded and depraved America. The South’s morality inheres in its commitment to, among other things, Christianity, agrarianism, and proper gender roles. This study reveals the centrality of moral judgments to the ongoing process of internal orientalism and shows the ways in which it is refracted by the effects of race and power.

  • 53.
    Jansson, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    “What Would Lee Do?”: Religion and the Moral Landscapes of Southern Nationalism in the United States2010In: Mapping the End Times: American Evangelical Geopolitics and Apocalyptic Visions / [ed] Jason Dittmer and Tristan Sturm, Farnham: Ashgate, 2010, p. 27-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Jansson, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Casper-Futterman, Evan
    Rutgers University.
    Between cowardice and courage: U.S. Soldier Dissent and Resistance in Iraq2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The U.S. military during the Vietnam War experienced severe internal disruptions in the form of resistance by soldiers to the execution of their orders. Such resistance nearly incapacitated the military, according to some observers. After (and even during) the war, the military made several important changes with the aim of reducing the likelihood of similar disruptions in the future. We discuss how two of these in particular, the end of the draft and the creation of the All-Volunteer Force, along with changes in the way troops are rotated, created a “new military culture” that made internal dissent, much less resistance, more difficult and unlikely. With this background, we consider two examples of soldier oppositional practice in the current war and occupation in Iraq: the Appeal for Redress and the refusal of deployment committed by soldiers such as Lt. Ehren Watada. We show how the spaces of the new military culture have shaped oppositional practice in these two cases. We go on to draw parallels between the restrictive military environment and the militarization of the civilian sphere, where only a certain form of patriotism is considered legitimate and dissent and resistance are being pushed out of the sphere of respectability.

  • 55.
    Jansson, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Hannah, Matthew
    När valfriheten blir ett gissel2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 56.
    Jansson, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Koch, Natalie
    Syracuse University.
    Toward a critical geography of sport: space, power, and social justice2017In: Critical Geographies of Sport: Space, Power and Sport in Global Perspective / [ed] Natalie Koch, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 237-252Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Perrem, John Guy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Jansson, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Regulating fear: The processes of creating ‘stranger danger’ and their impact on Japanese children’s urban public space mobilities2016In: Encountering, Regulating and Resisting Different Forms of Children’s and Young People’s Mobile Exclusion in Urban Public Space / [ed] John Guy Perrem, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2016, p. 131-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58. Schlosser, Kolson
    et al.
    White, George
    Leib, Jonathan
    Dalby, Simon
    Algeo, Katie
    Jansson, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Zimmerman, Jackson
    Nationalism in Geography Classrooms: Challenges and Opportunities2011In: Journal of geography (Houston), ISSN 0022-1341, E-ISSN 1752-6868, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 166-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This set of essays is based on a panel session convened at the 2009 meeting of the Association of American Geographers, which sought to explore the many challenges and pitfalls involved with teaching nationalism as a topic in geography classrooms. The authors offer different but complementary insights into the practical difficulties and potential strategies for covering an innately difficult topic. The discussion of nationalism in the essays is also an effective venue with which to further engage discussions of critical pedagogy.

12 51 - 58 of 58
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