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  • 51.
    Nwaru, Bright, I
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Wallenberg Ctr Mol & Translat Med, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Suzuki, Shintaro
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden;Showa Univ, Dept Med, Div Allergol & Resp Med, Sch Med, Tokyo, Japan.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Sigrid
    ThermoFisher Sci, ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mincheva, Roxana
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Erik P.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rådinger, Madeleine
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Occupat & Environm Med, OLIN Unit, Umea, Sweden.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. ThermoFisher Sci, ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lötvall, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, POB 424, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Furry Animal Allergen Component Sensitization and Clinical Outcomes in Adult Asthma and Rhinitis2019In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, ISSN 2213-2198, E-ISSN 2213-2201, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1230-1238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sensitization to allergen components has been linked to asthma in children, but studies in adults are lacking.

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relation of sensitization to furry animal allergen components to risk of asthma, rhinitis, and markers of asthma severity in adults.

    METHODS: From the West Sweden Asthma Study, a random population-representative sample of adults aged 16 to 75 years, 2006 participants were clinically examined; 1872 were analyzed for serum IgE level to a mix of aeroallergens. Those with an IgE level of more than 0.35 kU(A)/L to cat, dog, or horse allergen components were analyzed for specific cat (Felis domesticus [Fel d 1, Fel d 2, and Fel d 4]), dog (Canis familiaris [Can f 1, Can f 2, Can f 3, and Can f 5]), and horse (Equus caballus [Equ c 1]) allergen components. We defined monosensitization, double sensitization, and polysensitization (>2 components) patterns and applied cluster analysis to derive distinct sensitization clusters.

    RESULTS: Sensitization to each allergen component, lipocalins, each sensitization pattern, and each sensitization cluster (nonsensitized, Fel d 1-driven sensitized, and multisensitized clusters) was associated with substantial increased risk of asthma, rhinitis, concomitant asthma and rhinitis, and Asthma Control Test-controlled asthma. Fel d 1, Can f 1, Can f 2, Can f 3, polysensitization, and multisensitized cluster were further associated with increased fractional exhaled nitric oxide and eosinophil levels, but with lower PD20 methacoline (provocative dose of methacholine causing a 20% drop in FEV1) values. There was no association with asthma exacerbations, FEV1 predicted values, emergency visits or regular oral steroid use, and neutrophil levels.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sensitization to furry animal allergen components is an important predictor of asthma, rhinitis, and markers of asthma severity with increased blood eosinophils, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, and airway hyperreactivity.

  • 52.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Umea Univ, Div Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Middelveld, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    James, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Natl Inst Enviromental Med, Expt Asthma & Allergy Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ono, J.
    Shino Test Corp, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Japan.
    Ohta, S.
    Saga Med Sch, Dept Lab Med, Saga, Japan.
    Izuhara, K.
    Saga Med Sch, Div Med Biochem, Dept Biomol Sci, Saga, Japan.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Forsberg, B.
    Umea Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    IgE sensitization to food allergens and airborne allergens in relation to biomarkers of type 2 inflammation in asthma2018In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1147-1154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We have recently reported that sensitization to food allergens and sensitization to airborne allergens had independent associations with increased fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and blood eosinophils in middle-aged adults and in young subjects with asthma.

    Objective: To investigate the relation between IgE sensitization and several type 2 inflammation biomarkers in adult asthmatics.

    Methods: FeNO, urinary eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (U-EDN), serum eosinophil cationic protein (S-ECP) and periostin were measured in 396 asthmatics, aged 17-76years, from the Swedish GA2LEN study. Sensitization to airborne allergens was examined with skin prick tests (3mm wheal) and sensitization to food allergens with measurement of specific IgE (0.35kU/L).

    Results: Asthmatics sensitized to food allergens had higher FeNO, 22.3ppb (18.6, 26.7) vs 16.1ppb (14.2, 18.2) (P=.005), S-ECP, 17.7mg/L (14.8, 21.1) vs 12.8mg/L (10.9, 14.9) (P=.01), and periostin, 73.7 (67.5, 80.3) ng/mL vs 59.9 (55.8, 64.2) ng/mL (P=.003), than non-sensitized subjects. Periostin levels in this group were also significantly higher than in the group sensitized only to airborne allergens (P=.01). Sensitization to food allergens related independently to FeNO (P=.02), S-ECP (P=.006) and periostin (P=.004), whereas sensitization only to airborne allergens related only to FeNO (P=.02) after adjustments for age, sex, height, weight and smoking history. FeNO correlated weakly with S-ECP (r=.17, P<.001), periostin (r=.19, P<.001) and U-EDN (0.16, P<.001). S-ECP also correlated weakly with U-EDN (r=.12, P=.02). None of the correlations between the remaining pairs of markers of type 2 inflammation were significant.

    Conclusions & Clinical Relevance: Sensitization to food allergens related to several local and systemic type 2 inflammation markers, such as FeNO, S-ECP and periostin. Assessing the profile of allergic sensitization, including to food allergens, might improve the understanding and interpretation of inflammatory markers and potentially improve asthma management.

  • 53.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Thermo Fisher Sci, Immunodiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kober, A.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Immunodiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berthold, M.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Immunodiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Multiplex component-based allergen microarray in recent clinical studies2016In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 1022-1032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades component-resolved diagnostics either as singleplex or multiplex measurements has been introduced into the field of clinical allergology, providing important information that cannot be obtained from extract-based tests. Here we review recent studies that demonstrate clinical applications of the multiplex microarray technique in the diagnosis and risk assessment of allergic patients, and its usefulness in studies of allergic diseases. The usefulness of ImmunoCAP ISAC has been validated in a wide spectrum of allergic diseases like asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, food allergy and anaphylaxis. ISAC provides a broad picture of a patient's sensitization profile from a single test, and provides information on specific and cross-reactive sensitizations that facilitate diagnosis, risk assessment, and disease management. Furthermore, it can reveal unexpected sensitizations which may explain anaphylaxis previously categorized as idiopathic and also display for the moment clinically non-relevant sensitizations. ISAC can facilitate a better selection of relevant allergens for immunotherapy compared with extract testing. Microarray technique can visualize the allergic march and molecular spreading in the preclinical stages of allergic diseases, and may indicate that the likelihood of developing symptomatic allergy is associated with specific profiles of sensitization to allergen components. ISAC is shown to be a useful tool in routine allergy diagnostics due to its ability to improve risk assessment, to better select relevant allergens for immunotherapy as well as detecting unknown sensitization. Multiplex component testing is especially suitable for patients with complex symptomatology.

  • 54.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Dosanjh, Amrita
    Department of Pediatrics , Scripps Hospital , San Diego , CA , USA.
    Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    New data analysis in a population study raises the hypothesis that particle size contributes to the pro-asthmatic potential of small pet animal allergens.2016In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The size of inhaled particles influences where they deposit and theoretically should be important for the development of airway inflammation and responsiveness. Our aim was to assess if sensitization to smaller-sized aeroallergens relates to higher prevalence of treated asthma, increased airway responsiveness, and airway and systemic inflammation.

    METHODS: Molecular-based IgE antibody determination was done in 467 subjects. Sensitized subjects were grouped based on the particle size of the aeroallergen: (1) Large particles only (mainly pollen); (2) Medium-sized particles (sensitized to mainly mite and mold and possibly to large particles); and 3) Small particles (sensitized to pet allergens and possibly to medium- and/or large-sized particles). Airway responsiveness to methacholine, exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), and serum eosinophil cationic protein (S-ECP) were measured. Asthma and rhinitis were questionnaire-assessed.

    RESULTS: Subjects sensitized to small particles had higher prevalence of treated asthma (35% versus 10%, P < 0.001), higher FENO50 (32 versus 17 ppb, P < 0.001), higher S-ECP (10 versus 7.5 ng/mL, P = 0.04), and increased bronchial responsiveness (dose-response slope, 5.6 versus 7.5, P < 0.001) compared with non-atopics. This was consistent after adjusting for potential confounders. Sensitization to only large or to medium and possibly also large aeroallergen particles was not related to any of these outcomes after adjustments.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sensitization to smaller particles was associated with a higher prevalence of asthma under treatment, higher airway responsiveness, and airway and systemic inflammation. Mapping of IgE sensitization to small particles might help to detect subjects having increased airway and systemic inflammation and bronchial responsiveness, indicating increased risk of developing asthma.

  • 55.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Thermo Fisher Sci, Immunodiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Allergen extract vs component sensitisation and airway inflammation, responsiveness and new-onset respiratory disease.2016In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 730-740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The absence of IgE sensitization to allergen components in the presence of sensitization to the corresponding extract has been reported, but its clinical importance has not been studied.

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of IgE sensitization to three aeroallergen extracts and the corresponding components in relation to the development of respiratory disease.

    Methods: A total of 467 adults participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) II and 302 in ECRHS III, 12years later. IgE sensitization to allergen extract and components, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine were measured in ECRHS II. Rhinitis and asthma symptoms were questionnaire-assessed in both ECRHS II and III.

    Results: A good overall correlation was found between IgE sensitization to extract and components for cat (r=0.83), timothy (r=0.96) and birch (r=0.95). However, a substantial proportion of subjects tested IgE positive for cat and timothy allergen extracts but negative for the corresponding components (48% and 21%, respectively). Subjects sensitized to both cat extract and components had higher FeNO (P=0.008) and more bronchial responsiveness (P=0.002) than subjects sensitized only to the extract. Further, subjects sensitized to cat components were more likely to develop asthma (P=0.005) and rhinitis (P=0.007) than subjects sensitized only to cat extract.

    Conclusion: Measurement of IgE sensitization to cat allergen components would seem to have a higher clinical value than extract-based measurement, as it related better to airway inflammation and responsiveness and had a higher prognostic value for the development of asthma and rhinitis over a 12-year period.

  • 56.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Allergen extract vs component sensitisation and airway inflammation, responsiveness and new-onset respiratory diseaseIn: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The absence of IgE sensitization to allergen components in the presence of sensitization to the corresponding extract has been reported, but its clinical importance has not been studied.

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of IgE sensitization to three  aeroallergen extracts and the corresponding components in relation to the development of respiratory disease.

    Methods: A total of 467 adults participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) II and 302 in ECRHS III, 12 years later. IgE sensitization to allergen extract and components, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine were measured in ECRHS II. Rhinitis and asthma symptoms were questionnaire-assessed in both ECRHS II and III.

    Results: A good overall correlation was found between IgE sensitization to extract and components for cat (r=0.83), timothy (r=0.96) and birch (r=0.95). However, a substantial proportion of subjects tested IgE-positive for cat and timothy allergen extracts but negative for the corresponding components (48% and 21%, respectively). Subjects sensitized to both cat extract and components had higher FeNO (p=0.008) and more bronchial responsiveness (p=0.002) than subjects sensitized only to the extract. Further, subjects sensitized to cat components were more likely to develop asthma (p=0.005) and rhinitis (p=0.007) than subjects sensitized only to cat extract.

    Conclusion: Measurement of IgE sensitization to cat allergen components would seem to have a higher clinical value than extract-based measurement, as it related better to airway inflammation and responsiveness and had a higher prognostic value for the development of asthma and rhinitis over a 12-year period.

  • 57.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Thermo Fisher Sci, Immunodiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Clinical relevance of measuring IgE to cat allergen components2015In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 70, no S101, p. 134-135, article id 278Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    The predictive value of microarray assessed IgE-sensitisation for new-onset rhinitis in adults2014In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 69, p. 334-334Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Burney, Peter
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Torén, Kjell
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Natural History of Perceived Food Hypersensitivity and IgE Sensitisation to Food Allergens in a Cohort of Adults2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, p. e85333-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    No longitudinal studies exist on the natural history of food hypersensitivity and IgE sensitisation to food allergens in adults.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To examine the natural history of food hypersensitivity, the natural history of IgE sensitisation to food allergens and to investigate the risk factors for new onset food hypersensitivity.

    METHODS:

    Food hypersensitivity was questionnaire-assessed in 2307 individuals (aged 20-45 years) from Iceland and Sweden during the European Community Respiratory Health Survey both at baseline and follow-up 9 years later. IgE food and aeroallergen sensitisation were assessed in a subgroup of these individuals (n = 807). Values of 0.35 kU/L and above were regarded as positive sensitisation.

    RESULTS:

    Food hypersensitivity was reported by 21% of the subjects and this proportion remained unchanged at follow-up (p = 0.58). Fruits, nuts and vegetables were the three most common causes of food hypersensitivity, with a similar prevalence at baseline and follow-up. The prevalence IgE sensitisation to food allergens decreased in general by 56% (p<0.001) and IgE sensitisation to peanut decreased in particular by 67% (p = 0.003). The prevalence of timothy grass IgE sensitisation decreased by 15% (p = 0.003) while cat, mite and birch IgE sensitisation did not decrease significantly. Female sex, rhinitis, eczema and presence of IgE sensitisation to aeroallergens were independently associated with new onset food hypersensitivity.

    CONCLUSION:

    The prevalence of food hypersensitivity remained unchanged while the prevalence of IgE sensitisation to food allergens decreased in adults over a 9-year follow-up period. The decrease in prevalence of IgE sensitisation to food allergens was considerably larger than the change in prevalence of IgE sensitisation to aeroallergens.

  • 60.
    Patelis, Antonios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Nordvall, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Aeroallergen and food IgE sensitization and local and systemic inflammation in asthma2014In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 380-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We recently reported an independent association between IgE sensitization to food allergens and increased airway inflammation, assessed by fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), in a population-based study (J Allergy Clin Immunol, 130, 2012, 397). Similar studies have not been performed in populations with asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the allergic sensitization profile in asthmatics and examine FeNO, airway responsiveness and blood eosinophilia in relation to type and degree of IgE sensitization.

    METHOD: FeNO, airway responsiveness, blood eosinophil count (B-Eos) and IgE sensitization to food allergens and aeroallergens were determined in 408 subjects with asthma, aged 10-34 years.

    RESULTS: Asthmatics had higher prevalence of IgE sensitization against all allergens than controls (P < 0.001). Mite, pollen, furry animal, mould and food sensitizations were each associated with increased FeNO, airway responsiveness and B-Eos in asthmatics. IgE sensitization to mould, furry animals and food allergens was independently related to FeNO (all P < 0.05) after adjustment for age, sex, height, smoking history and medication. IgE sensitization to mould (P < 0.001) and furry animals (P = 0.02) was related to airway responsiveness in a similar model. Finally, IgE sensitization to mould (P = 0.001), furry animals (P < 0.001) and food allergens (P < 0.001) was independently related to B-Eos.

    CONCLUSION: Independent effects of IgE sensitization to aeroallergens (furry animals and mould) and food allergens were found on both local and systemic markers of inflammation in asthma. The finding regarding food IgE sensitization is novel, and a clinical implication might be that even food sensitization must be assessed to fully understand inflammation patterns in asthma.

  • 61.
    Reier-Nilsen, T.
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsen, Lödrup K. C.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Michelsen, M. M.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Drottning, S.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsen, K.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Nygaard, U. C.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Domain Infect Control & Environm Hlth, Oslo, Norway.
    Namork, E.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Domain Infect Control & Environm Hlth, Oslo, Norway.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Thermofisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Geir, H.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Does oral immunotherapy improve quality of life in children with severe peanut allergy?2018In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 73, no Suppl. 105, p. 69-70, article id 124Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Reier-Nilsen, T.
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Michelsen, M. M.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsen, K. -H
    Mowinckel, P.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Nygaard, U. C.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Control & Environm Hlth, Oslo, Norway.
    Namork, E.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Control & Environm Hlth, Oslo, Norway.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Thermofisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Håland, G.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Predicting reactivity threshold in children with anaphylaxis to peanut2018In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 415-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Peanut allergy necessitates dietary restrictions, preferably individualized by determining reactivity threshold through an oral food challenge (OFC). However, risk of systemic reactions often precludes OFC in children with severe peanut allergy.

    Objective: We aimed to determine whether clinical and/or immunological characteristics were associated with reactivity threshold in children with anaphylaxis to peanut and secondarily, to investigate whether these characteristics were associated with severity of the allergic reaction during OFC.

    Methods: A double-blinded placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) with peanut was performed in 96 5- to 15-year-old children with a history of severe allergic reactions to peanut and/or sensitization to peanut (skin prick test [SPT] 3 mm or specific immunoglobulin E [s-IgE] 0.35 kUA/L). Investigations preceding the DBPCFC included a structured interview, SPT, lung function measurements, serological immunology assessment (IgE, IgG and IgG(4)), basophil activation test (BAT) and conjunctival allergen provocation test (CAPT). International standards were used to define anaphylaxis and grade the allergic reaction during OFC.

    Results: During DBPCFC, all 96 children (median age 9.3, range 5.1-15.2) reacted with anaphylaxis (moderate objective symptoms from at least two organ systems). Basophil activation (CD63(+) basophils 15%), peanut SPT and the ratio of peanut s-IgE/total IgE were significantly associated with reactivity threshold and lowest observed adverse events level (LOAEL) (all P < .04). Basophil activation best predicted very low threshold level (<3 mg of peanut protein), with an optimal cut-off of 75.8% giving a 93.5% negative predictive value. None of the characteristics were significantly associated with the severity of allergic reaction.

    Conclusion and Clinical Relevance: In children with anaphylaxis to peanut, basophil activation, peanut SPT and the ratio of peanut s-IgE/total IgE were associated with reactivity threshold and LOAEL, but not with allergy reaction severity.

  • 63.
    Reier-Nilsen, Tonje
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Michelsen, Merethe Melbye
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsen, Karin C. Lodrup
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsen, Kai-Hakon
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Mowinckel, Petter
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Nygaard, Unni C.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Control & Environm Hlth, Oslo, Norway.
    Namork, Ellen
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Infect Control & Environm Hlth, Oslo, Norway.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Haland, Geir
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Feasibility of desensitizing children highly allergic to peanut by high-dose oral immunotherapy2019In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 337-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are limited data on the feasibility, efficacy and safety of high‐dose oral immunotherapy (OIT) in children highly allergic to peanuts.

    Objective: In children highly allergic to peanut, we primarily aimed to determine the feasibility of reaching the maximum maintenance dose (MMD) of 5000 mg peanut protein or, alternatively, a lower individual maintenance dose (IMD), by OIT up‐dosing. Secondarily, we aimed to identify adverse events (AEs) and determine factors associated with reaching a maintenance dose.

    Methods: The TAKE‐AWAY peanut OIT trial enrolled 77 children 5‐15 years old, with a positive oral peanut challenge. Fifty‐seven were randomized to OIT with biweekly dose step‐up until reaching MMD or IMD and 20 to observation only. Demographic and biological characteristics, AEs, medication and protocol deviations were explored for associations with reaching maintenance dose.

    Results: All children had anaphylaxis defined by objective symptoms in minimum two organ systems during baseline challenge. The MMD was reached by 21.1%, while 54.4% reached an IMD of median (minimum, maximum) 2700 (250, 4000) mg peanut protein, whereas 24.5% discontinued OIT. During up‐dosing, 19.4% experienced anaphylaxis. Not reaching the MMD was caused by distaste for peanuts (66.7%), unacceptable AEs (26.7%) and social reasons (6.7%). Increased peanut s‐IgG4/s‐IgE ratio (OR [95% CI]: 1.02 [1.00, 1.04]) was associated with reaching MMD.

    Conclusion: Although 75.5% of children with peanut anaphylaxis reached a maintenance dose of 0.25‐5 g, only 21.1% reached the MMD. Distaste for peanuts and AEs, including high risk of anaphylaxis, limited the feasibility of reaching MMD.

  • 64. Sato, Sakura
    et al.
    Yamamoto, Mikita
    Yanagida, Noriyuki
    Ito, Komei
    Ohya, Yukihiro
    Imai, Takanori
    Nagao, Mizuho
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Thermo Fisher Sci.
    Movérare, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. Thermo Fisher Sci.
    Ebisawa, Motohiro
    Jug r 1 sensitization is important in walnut-allergic children and youth.2017In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, ISSN 2213-2198, E-ISSN 2213-2201, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1784-1786.e1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Savolainen, Johannes
    et al.
    Univ Turku, Dept Pulm Dis & Clin Allergol, Turku, Finland;Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Mascialino, Barbara
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pensamo, Elina
    Univ Turku, Dept Pulm Dis & Clin Allergol, Turku, Finland;Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Aberg, K. Magnus
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Silvan, Maija
    Harkatie Primary Care Ctr, Lieto, Finland.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Korhonen, Krista
    Harkatie Primary Care Ctr, Lieto, Finland.
    Structured intervention plan including component-resolved diagnostics helps reducing the burden of food allergy among school-aged children2019In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Food allergies can substantially burden patients and families by negatively affecting finances, social relationships, and personal perceptions of health. This study was performed under the Finnish Allergy Programme aimed at reducing avoidance diets to foods in schoolchildren by 50%. The main goal of this study was to investigate how many children could be freed from diet restrictions in a Finnish school district through a diagnostic algorithm including component-resolved diagnostics and food challenge. The secondary aim was to provide a crude estimate of the burden of the elimination food diets in the region, and the savings associated with the proposed intervention. Methods A total of 205 children on a food avoidance diet according to the school register because of food allergy were invited into the study. One hundred and fifty-seven children were interviewed, tested for IgE to extracts and allergen components and food challenged in respective order. Results After two years, 12 children still had an avoidance diet and three of them were treated successfully with sOTI; the rest suspended their avoidance diet (n = 134) or dropped out of the study (n = 11). The cost of the elimination diets was estimated in 172 700euro per year at start and 13 200euro per year at the end of the study; total savings were 128 400euro yearly. Conclusions The results demonstrate a 65% reduction of avoidance diets to foods in school-aged children, exceeding the 50% aim of the Finnish Allergy Programme. Therefore, it is possible to actively reduce the number of food allergy diagnoses that remain unmonitored in the society through a tailored diagnostic work-up.

  • 66. Savvatianos, Savvas
    et al.
    Konstantinopoulos, Anastasios P.
    Borga, Ase
    Stavroulakis, George
    Lidholm, Jonas
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Manousakis, Emmanouil
    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.
    Sensitization to cashew nut 2S albumin, Ana o 3, is highly predictive of cashew and pistachio allergy in Greek children2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 192-194Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67. Senouf, Avigael H. Benhamou
    et al.
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Eigenmann, Philippe A.
    Native and denatured egg white protein IgE tests discriminate hen's egg allergic from egg-tolerant children2015In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 12-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAccurate diagnosis of egg allergy by IgE testing is challenged by a large number of atopic subjects sensitized, but clinically tolerant to eggs. In addition, discrimination between allergy to raw only, or raw and cooked egg allergy is important. In this study, we investigate the diagnostic performance of IgE tests to native and denatured egg proteins. MethodsAccording to food challenges and clinical tolerance, study subjects were randomized to the following groups: (Group A) sensitized but clinically tolerant to egg, (Group B) allergic to raw egg only, or (Group C) allergic to raw and cooked egg. Serum-specific IgE to native or reduced and oxidized egg white, ovomucoid, and ovalbumin were measured. ResultsIncreasing titers of specific IgE to the various proteins were found according to the degree of the egg allergy. Cut-off values for IgE testing to native egg could be determined to distinguish between raw egg allergic and egg-tolerant subjects (1.6kU/l), as well as raw and cooked egg allergic and egg-tolerant subjects (4.1kU/l). ROC curves analysis showed that native ovalbumin was the best test for the diagnosis of allergy to raw and cooked egg, and native ovomucoid was best to distinguish between allergy to raw only, and allergy to raw and cooked egg. Sequential testing improved the diagnosis, when in addition to IgE to native egg white, IgE to native ovalbumin was tested for the diagnosis of raw and cooked egg allergy, and IgE to native ovomucoid for the discrimination between allergy to raw only, or to raw and cooked eggs. ConclusionThe diagnosis of egg allergy can be significantly improved using a panel of IgE tests to egg proteins in the native or denatured form. The accuracy can be improved using combined IgE testing.

  • 68.
    Sjölander, Sigrid
    et al.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bjerg, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Gothenburg Univ, Krefting Res Ctr, S-41124 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bengtsson-Gref, Otti
    Thermo Fisher Sci, ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Borres, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ronmark, Eva
    Umea Univ, OLIN Unit, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Lotvall, Jan
    Gothenburg Univ, Krefting Res Ctr, S-41124 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lundback, Bo
    Gothenburg Univ, Krefting Res Ctr, S-41124 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    IgE to Furry Animal Allergen Components Was Associated with Asthma in a Population: Based Study of Adults2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 135, no 2, p. AB22-AB22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Sjölander, Sigrid
    et al.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Nora
    Astrid Lindgrens Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekoff, Helena
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wieser, Sandra
    Med Univ Vienna, Div Immunopathol, Dept Pathophysiol & Allergy Res, Ctr Pathophysiol, Vienna, Austria..
    Hedlin, Gunilla
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Allergy Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Valenta, Rudolf
    Med Univ Vienna, Div Immunopathol, Dept Pathophysiol & Allergy Res, Ctr Pathophysiol, Vienna, Austria.;Med Univ Vienna AKH, Vienna, Austria..
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Nilsson, Caroline
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Karolinska Inst, S-10064 Stockholm, Sweden.;Soder Sjukhuset, Sachs Childrens Hosp, S-10064 Stockholm, Sweden..
    High Diagnostic Sensitivity and Specificity By Analysis of IgE to Different Types of Gliadins When Evaluating Wheat Allergy in Children2016In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 137, no 2, p. AB135-AB135Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Suzuki, S.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ekerljung, L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Borres, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Thermo Fisher Sci, R&D ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjölander, S.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, R&D ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mincheva, R.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ronmark, E.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lotvall, J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Severity of allergic asthma is associated to multiple dog and/or cat allergen component sensitization2016In: ALLERGY, ISSN 0105-4538, Vol. 71, p. 278-278Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Suzuki, Shintaro
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden; Showa Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Allergol & Resp Med, Tokyo, Japan.
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Wallenberg Ctr Mol & Translat Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Sigrid
    Thermo Fisher Sci, ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mincheva, Roxana
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Erik P.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå Univ, OLIN Unit, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Occupat & Environm Med, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Thermo Fisher Sci, ImmunoDiagnost, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lotvall, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Krefting Res Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Characterization of sensitization to furry animal allergen components in an adult population2019In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 495-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are paucity of data on sensitization to furry animal allergen components in adults. Furry animals are major sensitizers and contributors to asthma burden in northern Europe and North America.

    Objective: To characterize sensitization patterns to furry animal allergen components in Swedish adults.

    Methods: Based on the West Sweden Asthma Study, a random population (n = 1103) and an asthma sample (n = 769) were tested for allergen sensitization using Phadiatop®. Those with IgE ≥ 0.35 kUA/L were tested for cat (Fel d 1, 2, and 4), dog (Can f 1, 2, 3, and 5), and horse (Equ c 1) allergen component sensitization. We defined allergen component poly‐sensitization patterns, identified data‐driven sensitization clusters, described component sensitization overlaps, and assessed determinants of sensitization patterns.

    Results: The prevalence of allergen component sensitization ranged from 0.8% for Fel d 2 and Can f 3 to 8.9% for Fel d 1. The most common dog component was Can f 5 (3.6%); 2.1% were sensitized to Equ c 1. Those sensitized to Fel d 2 and Fel d 4 were commonly sensitized to Fel d 1. The most common dog component overlap was between Can f 1/Can f 2 and Can f 5. Mono‐sensitization was 5.6%, double sensitization 1.5% and poly‐sensitization 2.1%. Sensitization was always higher in the asthma than in the random sample. Three sensitization clusters were derived, namely non‐sensitized (90% in random vs 66% in asthma sample); Fel d 1‐driven sensitized (7% vs 19%); and multi‐sensitized (3% vs 15%). Key determinants of sensitization were gender, age, raised on a farm, family history of allergy or asthma, smoking, and occupational exposure to dust or fumes.

    Conclusions & Clinical Relevance: Fel d 1 and Can f 5 are the most common cat and dog components sensitization in this adult Swedish population. Mono‐sensitization is more common than poly‐sensitization. This detailed characterization highlights the current distribution of furry animal allergen components in Swedish adults, and their impact on clinical outcomes of asthma will be further explored.

  • 72. Syk, J.
    et al.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Borres, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Reduction of IgE by intensified anti-inflammatory treatment in patients with atopic asthma2014In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 69, p. 61-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Tedner, S. G.
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Konradsen, J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderhäll, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlin, G.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsen, Lödrup K. C.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Rehbinder, E. M.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol, Oslo, Norway.
    Skjerven, H. O.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlsen, M. H.
    Univ Oslo, Inst Basic Med Sci, Dept Nutr, Oslo, Norway.
    Fatnes, T. A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Fugelli, P.
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Granum, B.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Oslo, Norway.
    Haugen, G.
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Oslo, Norway.
    Jonassen, C. M.
    Ostfold Hosp Trust, Ctr Lab Med, Genet Unit, Kalnes, Norway;Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Fac Chem Biotechnol & Food Sci, As, Norway.
    Landrö, L.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol, Oslo, Norway.
    Lunde, J.
    Ostfold Hosp Trust, Dept Paediat, Kalnes, Norway.
    Marsland, B. J.
    CHUV UNIL, Dept Biol & Med, Serv Pneumol, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Rudi, K.
    Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Fac Chem Biotechnol & Food Sci, As, Norway.
    Sjöborg, K.
    Ostfold Hosp Trust, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Kalnes, Switzerland.
    Staff, A. C.
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Obstet & Gynaecol, Oslo, Norway.
    Vettukattil, R.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Van Hage, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsen, K.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Paediat & Adolescent Med, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Asarnoj, A.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordlund, B.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maternal sensitization during pregnancy2018In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 73, no Suppl. 105, p. 694-694, article id 1358Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Tsolakis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Lidholm, J.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nordvall, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Borres, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Sensitisation to the cat allergen component Fel d 4 is independently related to the degree of inflammation in young asthmatics2015In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 70, no S101, p. 96-96, article id 196Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Tsolakis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Nordvall, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Borres, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Low grade IgE sensitisation and Th2-driven inflammation in asthma2016In: ALLERGY, ISSN 0105-4538, Vol. 71, p. 6-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Tsolakis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Nordvall, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    The absence of serum IgE antibodies indicates non-type 2 disease in young asthmatics2018In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 722-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Atopic asthma is associated with elevated type-2 biomarkers such as fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and blood eosinophil (B-Eos) count. However, increased type 2 markers have also been reported in traditionally defined non-atopic asthma.

    Objective:

    To determine a clinically useful level of IgE sensitization for ruling out type 2 asthma. Methods: Asthmatics (N=408; age 10-35years) were analysed using the multi-allergen tests Phadiatop and fx5 (ImmunoCAP). Subjects were grouped based on IgE-antibody concentrations: 0.35kU(A)/L for at least one test (n=326) or <0.35kU(A)/L for both tests (n=82). he latter group was subsequently divided into 2 groups: IgE 0.10-0.34kU(A)/L (n=34) and IgE<0.10kU(A)/L (n=48). The relationships between type 2 biomarkers, and inadequate asthma control (ACT<20), reduced lung function (FEV1<80%), recent asthma attacks and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine were determined.

    Results:

    In univariate analyses, at least one type 2 marker related to each asthma outcome in subjects with IgE 0.35kU(A)/L. In subjects with IgE 0.10-0.34kU(A)/L, elevated FeNO related to reduced lung function (P=.008) and B-Eos to AHR (P=.03). No associations were found in subjects with IgE<0.10kU(A)/L. In multivariate analysis, a relationship between FeNO and reduced lung function remained in subjects with IgE<0.35kU(A)/L (P=.03).

    Conclusion and Clinical Relevance:

    Clinically relevant elevation of type 2 biomarkers was seen in young asthmatics with IgE antibodies <0.35kU(A)/L, but not those with IgE<0.10kU(A)/L. It seems possible to define non-type 2 asthma through sensitive IgE-antibody measurement.

  • 77.
    Tsolakis, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Nordvall, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Mattsson, Lars
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lidholm, Jonas
    Thermo Fisher Scientific, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pedroletti, C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Sensitization to minor cat allergen components is associated with type-2 biomarkers in young asthmatics2018In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1186-1194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cat allergy is a major trigger of asthma world-wide. Molecular patterns of cat sensitization vary between individuals, but their relationship to inflammation in asthmatics has not been extensively studied.

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and levels of IgE antibodies against different cat allergen components and their relationship to type-2 inflammation and total IgE among young asthmatic subjects sensitized to furry animals.

    Methods: Patients with asthma (age 10-35 years; n = 266) and IgE sensitization to cat, dog or horse extract (ImmunoCAP), were analysed for IgE to the cat allergen components Fel d 1 (secretoglobin), Fel d 2 (serum albumin), Fel d 4 and Fel d 7 (lipocalins). Independent associations between IgE-antibody concentrations, and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), blood eosinophil (B-Eos) count, and total IgE were analysed by multiple linear regression after adjustment for possible confounders.

    Results: The level of IgE against Fel d 2 was independently related to FeNO (P = .012) and total IgE (P < .001), and IgE against Fel d 4 associated with B-Eos count (P = .009) and total IgE (P < .001). IgE antibodies against Fel d 1 or cat extract did not independently relate to these inflammatory markers (P = .23-.51).

    Conclusions: Levels of IgE to lipocalin (Fel d 4) and serum albumin (Fel d 2), but not to secretoglobin (Fel d 1) or cat extract, were independently associated with type-2 biomarkers and total IgE in young asthmatics.

    Clinical relevance: We suggest that measurement of IgE to minor cat allergen components may be useful when investigating asthma morbidity in cat allergic subjects.

  • 78.
    Valcour, Andre
    et al.
    Lab Corp Amer, 1447 York Court Rd, Burlington, NC 27216 USA..
    Jones, Joseph E.
    Phadia US Inc, Thermo Fisher Sci, Portage, MI USA..
    Lidholm, Jonas
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hamilton, Robert G.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Sensitization profiles to peanut allergens across the United States2017In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Measurement of IgE antibody to peanut components can aid in the prediction of allergic responses the food.

    Objective: To investigate the association between patient demographics (age, location) and allergic sensitization to peanut components across the United States.

    Methods: Serum samples from 12,155 individuals with peanut extract specific IgE levels of 0.35 kUA/L or higher were analyzed for IgE antibodies to Ara h 1, 2, 3, 8, and 9 by ImmunoCAP.

    Results: Among this population of peanut sensitized individuals, 79.1% of children (<3 years old) were sensitized to one or more peanut storage proteins (Ara h 1, 2, and/or 3), in contrast to 64.2% of adolescents (12-15 years old) and 22.1% of adults (>20 years old). Although sensitization was more prevalent to Ara h 2 than to the other storage proteins, a sizable fraction of patients were sensitized to Ara h 1 and/or 3 but not to Ara h 2 (eg, 13% of children <3 years old). Moreover, 9.6% of children, 10.2% of adolescents, and 10.5% of adults were sensitized to Ara h 9, whereas 2.4% of children, 49.4% of adolescents, and 42.9% of adults produced IgE to Ara h 8 (pathogenesis-related protein 10). Sensitization to Ara h 8 alone was markedly higher in the Northeastern United States relative to other regions of the country.

    Conclusion: We conclude that sensitization to individual peanut components is highly dependent on age and geographic location. Given that a severe allergic reaction to peanut is unlikely in individuals with isolated sensitization to Ara h 8, a sizable fraction of patients, in particular adolescents and adults, may be at lower risk than anticipated based only on demonstration of sensitization to whole peanut extract.

  • 79.
    Valcour, Andre
    et al.
    LabCorp, Ctr Esoter Testing, Burlington, NC USA.
    Lidholm, Jonas
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hamilton, Robert G.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Sensitization profiles to hazelnut allergens across the United States2019In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 111-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Measurement of IgE antibody to hazelnut components can aid in the prediction of allergic responses to the food.

    Objective: To investigate the association between patient demographics (age, location) and patterns of allergic sensitization to hazelnut components across the United States and to investigate the degree of correlation between hazelnut sensitization with sensitization to other tree nuts, peanuts, and their components.

    Methods: Serum samples from 10,503 individuals with hazelnut extract specific IgE (sIgE) levels of 0.35 kU(A)/L or higher were analyzed for IgE antibodies to Cor a 1, 8, 9, and 14 by ImmunoCAP. A subset of these patients were analyzed for IgE antibodies to peanut, walnut, and cashew nut IgE along with associated components.

    Results: Among hazelnut sensitized individuals, children (<3 years old) were predominantly sensitized to Cor a 9 and Cor a 14. Conversely, Cor a 1 sIgE sensitization was much higher in adults than children, especially in the Northeastern United States. Cor a 8 sensitization was relatively constant (near 10%) across all ages. Cosensitization of hazelnut with other tree nuts and peanuts was related to correlation of IgE concentrations of individual component families.

    Conclusion: We conclude that sensitization to individual hazelnut components is highly dependent on age and/or geographic location. Component correlations suggest that cosensitization to hazelnut and walnut may be caused by their pathogenesis-related protein 10 allergens, nonspecific lipid transfer proteins, or seed storage proteins, whereas hazelnut and peanut cosensitization is more often caused by cross-reactivity of pathogenesis-related protein 10 (Cor a 1 and Ara h 8) and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (Cor a 8 and Ara h 9). (c) 2018 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

  • 80.
    Valcour, Andre
    et al.
    1447 York Court Rd, Burlington, NC USA.
    Lidholm, Jonas
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hamilton, Robert G.
    Johns Hopkins Asthma & Allergy Ctr, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Sensitization Profiles to Hazelnut Allergens across the United States of America2019In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 143, no 2, p. AB238-AB238, article id 721Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Villalta, D.
    et al.
    S Maria Angeli Hosp, Allergy & Clin Immunol Unit, Via Montereale 24, I-33170 Pordenone, Italy..
    Pantarotto, L.
    S Maria Angeli Hosp, Allergy & Clin Immunol Unit, Via Montereale 24, I-33170 Pordenone, Italy..
    Da Re, M.
    S Maria Angeli Hosp, Allergy & Clin Immunol Unit, Via Montereale 24, I-33170 Pordenone, Italy..
    Conte, M.
    S Maria Angeli Hosp, Allergy & Clin Immunol Unit, Via Montereale 24, I-33170 Pordenone, Italy..
    Sjölander, S.
    Uppsala Univ, Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Borres, Magnus P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala Univ, Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Martelli, P.
    S Maria Angeli Hosp, Allergy & Clin Immunol Unit, Via Montereale 24, I-33170 Pordenone, Italy..
    High prevalence of sIgE to Galactose--1,3-galactose in rural pre-Alps area: a cross-sectional study2016In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 377-380Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Yanagida, Noriyuki
    et al.
    Sagamihara Natl Hosp, Dept Pediat, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Sato, Sakura
    Sagamihara Natl Hosp, Dept Allergy, Clin Res Ctr Allergy & Rheumatol, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Asaumi, Tomoyuki
    Sagamihara Natl Hosp, Dept Pediat, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Ogura, Kiyotake
    Sagamihara Natl Hosp, Dept Pediat, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Borres, Magnus P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Thermo Fisher Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ebisawa, Motohiro
    Sagamihara Natl Hosp, Dept Allergy, Clin Res Ctr Allergy & Rheumatol, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Safety and feasibility of heated egg yolk challenge for children with egg allergies2017In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 348-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hen's egg allergy is a frequent cause of childhood food allergy. Egg yolk is used in various commonly consumed foods; if children with allergy to hen's egg could eat heated egg yolk, their quality of life (QOL) would improve. No reports exist regarding oral food challenges (OFCs) for heated egg yolk. We aimed to clarify whether pediatric patients allergic to hen's egg could consume heated egg yolk.

    Methods: Data from pediatric patients who had undergone OFCs for heated egg yolk were evaluated retrospectively.

    Results: Among 919 patients, positive OFC results were obtained in 17.0% of patients; seven presented with severe symptoms. Older age, high specific IgEvalue for ovomucoid, low total IgE levels, and history of anaphylaxis related to food other than hen's egg were risk factors for positive OFC results. Specific IgE values for eggwhite, ovomucoid, and egg yolk, indicative of a negative predictive value > 95%, were 0.71, 0.41, and 0.17 kU(A)/l, respectively. Aspecific IgE to ovomucoidlevels of 100 kU(A)/l predictedheated egg yolk-positive OFCs for 38.3% of patients. Among 763 patients with a negative OFC, seven (0.9%) reacted to heated egg yolk at home, and 756 (99.1%) consumed hen's egg yolk safely.

    Conclusions: Most pediatric patients allergic to heated hen's egg safely consumed heated egg yolk. Heated egg yolk OFCs rarely provoked severe symptoms and may be recommended for improving the QOL of children with allergy to hen's egg.

12 51 - 82 of 82
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