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  • 51.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    «Sonate, que me veux-tu?»: Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the Problem of Instrumental Music2005In: Ad Parnassum, ISSN 1722-3954, Vol. 3, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The frequency of approving citations of Fontenelle’s famous question, «Sonate, que me veux-tu», re ects the degree of perplexity which met the idea of purely instrumental music in eighteenth-century French musical writing.Although the expressive qualities of such music were rarely denied tout-court, for a century whose pursuit of signs followed an almost exclusively positive conception, the question of what instrumental music signi- ed permitted of no easy answers. For this reason theoretical interest in the aesthetics of instrumental music was almost completely overshadowed by the enormous quantity of material devoted to vocal and theatrical music. The contributions to music theory by the philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau are often placed in rm association with this suspicion of the ‘emptiness’ of instrumental music.There are good reasons for this. Rous- seau’s musical writings are almost exclusively concerned with vocal music, his aesthetics of music amount essentially to an aesthetics of opera, and his own compositions are all either vocal or in some way theatrical. Moreover, in systematically pitting signi cant music against merely ‘sensational’ music, the prescriptive thrust of his music theory would appear strongly to condemn pure instrumental music as being neither relevant nor desirable. My intention in this paper is not so much to question the idea that Rousseau condemned pure instrumental music, but rather to suggest that the grounds on which he did so were neither so firm nor unambiguous as is often supposed. After giving a brief exposition of the extreme position taken in Rousseau’s Lettre sur la musique françoise, and offering suggestions as to why the extremity is exceptional, I examine a few key quotations from elsewhere in Rousseau’s musical writings in order to question whether the notion of musical signi cance, as developed by Rousseau in his writings, can really be conceived in opposition to non-vocal music. 

  • 52.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Systems of harmony and colour2018In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, Vol. May 18, no 6007, p. 18-19Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 53.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    The Corridor / The Cure2015In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5855, p. 17-18Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 54.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    The ex factor2017In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5946, p. 19-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    The impact of kitsch2017In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5962, p. 21-22Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 56.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    The Mastersingers of Nuremberg2017In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5946, p. 19-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Dammann, Guy
    King's College London.
    The Morality of Musical Imitation in Jean-Jacques Rousseau2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis analyses the relation between Rousseau’s musical writings and elements of his moral, social and linguistic philosophy. In particular, I am concerned to demonstrate: (i.) how the core of Rousseau’s theory of musical imitation is grounded in the same analysis of the nature of man which governs his moral and social philosophy; (ii.) how this grounding does not extend to the stylistic prescriptions the justification of which Rousseau intended his musical writings to offer. The central argument draws on Rousseau’s analysis of the origin of man as distinctively human. This origin extends to the awareness of moral and aesthetic value, and to communication in speech and song. Rousseau’s moral analyses of social and political life usually take the form of relating contemporary practice to the original structure in which man’s awareness of his own good is commensurate with that of the good of others. The analysis of music follows a similar model: music is to be considered good in so far as it replicates, or faithfully reflects, the original model of communication. The value of music is thereby understood to extend to moral as well as aesthetic goodness. Given the subtlety of Rousseau’s understanding of the ‘origin’, I argue that this analysis of music’s aesthetic value is powerful and far‐ reaching in its relevance for contemporary musical aesthetics. However, I also argue that while the analysis in general is good in this way, it does not entail the specific kind of musical‐stylistic preferences which Rousseau sought to use it to advance. 

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  • 58.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    The music of time: Review of Der Ring Des Nibelungen, Stockholm Royal Opera2017In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5957, p. 20-22Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    The Ontology of Music Criticism2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music criticism, whether conceived as newspaper concert and opera reviews or more widely as critical writing about music, is often understood as a parasitic medium. This is true in the simple sense that music criticism could not exist without the music it takes for its object. Conversely, it is also held to be true that music can exist perfectly well without criticism.

    This paper challenges the second of these assumptions. According to the standard view, music criticism stands outside musical works and their performances, offering evaluative and descriptive propositions about them. It therefore does not contribute to the works and performances themselves but purports to contribute to their understanding only. 

    This paper offers an alternative model, according to which successful musical criticism can be understood as contributing to the works themselves. It is structured in three parts. First, a revised ontology of musical works is offered, according to which musical works are understood in normative terms as fields of experience which are substantively formed and altered by instances of musical performance (including recorded performance). Second, a theory of musical criticism whereby the act of criticism is understood to be partly constitutive of the field of musical experience denoted by the word. Criticism, that is to say, contributes directly to the field of what is to be experienced in a particular work, and thus, if persuasive and pervasive, has the potential to become part of what the work is. Third, I will offer a brief analysis of a ETA Hoffmann’s review of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, aiming to show how Hoffmann’s critical appraisal of the work became part of what could be heard in the music.

    Finally, I will return to the opening premise and conclude by arguing that music, considered as art, cannot exist perfectly well without the critical discourse that surrounds it, and further by sketching out some of the implications for the practice of music in the present day.

  • 60.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    “The Ontology of Music Criticism”, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art CriticismIn: Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, ISSN 0021-8529, E-ISSN 1540-6245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    The poet’s friend: musical cosmopolitanism in Benjamin Britten’s vocal worksIn: Parnassus. Poetry in review, ISSN 0048-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I discuss Benjamin Britten's handling of song texts in foreign langauges with a view to grounding some remarks about the cosmopolitanism of his musical style.

  • 62.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    The power of song2015In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Wagner, Die Meistersinger, English National Opera

  • 63.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    THE RING OF TRUTH: The wisdom of Wagner's Ring of the Nibelung2017In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5957, p. 20-22Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Trapped in the machinery2015In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5877, p. 17-18Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Carl Maria von Weber, Der Jaegerbruden, Danish Royal Opera, Copenhagen

  • 65.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Unstable Frustrations2014In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Verdi, Un Ballo in Maschera, Royal Opera House, London

  • 66.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    VANESSA2018In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 6021, p. 26-26Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology. Crit Circle, Mus Sect, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Verismo in action2017In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 5942, p. 22-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Ways of Listening2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Dammann, Guy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Whitsun Festival2019In: TLS - The Times Literary Supplement, ISSN 0307-661X, E-ISSN 1366-7211, no 6065, p. 18-19Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 70.
    Dammann, Guy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Schellekens Dammann, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.
    On The Moral Psychology and Normative Force Of Aesthetic Reasons2017In: Estetika, ISSN 0014-1291, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 20-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the way in which we adduce reasons in support of our aesthetic judgements. We examine the seemingly question-begging nature of that process, such that any aesthetic quality we adduce as a reason can be found compelling qua reason for a particular judgement if and only if that judgement is already assented to. We then analyse this phenomenon in the parallel contexts of gustatory taste and friendship, where the differences are understood to lie primarily with differences in the normative force of reasons held in support of gustatory judgements, aesthetic judgements, and personal friendships. While some question-begging obtains in all cases, in the latter we can begin to see that friendship can be justified with reference to its contribution to the good of ourselves. This is explored further in connection with the way in which examining our reasons for being friends with people is actually productive and generative of that friendship. Our conclusion is that while the giving of reasons for aesthetic judgements is still subject to a certain question-begging, those judgements acquire a powerful normative force in cultural contexts where it can be seen that assenting to them constitutes the realization of our good as individuals.

12 51 - 70 of 70
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