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  • 51.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Writing about Research Methods in the Arts and Humanities2011In: Theories and Methodologies in Postgraduate Feminist Research: Researching Differently / [ed] Rosemarie Buikema, Gabriele Griffin, Nina Lykke, London: Routledge , 2011, p. 91-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. University of York.
    Adamson, Maria
    Middlesex University.
    Psychological Counselling in Russia: The Making of a Gendered Profession in a Transitional Economy2011In: European Journal of Women’s Studies, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 279-294Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Branstrom-Ohman, AnneliUmea University.Kalman, HildurUmea University.
    The Emotional Politics of Research Collaboration2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Buikema, RosemarieUtrecht University.Lykke, NinaLinkoping University.
    Theories and Methodologies in Postgraduate Feminist Research: Researching Differently2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umea University.
    Managing Differences: The Complexities of Leadership and Leadership Styles in Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration2013In: The Social Politics of Research Collaboration / [ed] Gabriele Griffin, Katarina Hamberg, Britta Lundgren, New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 39-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Hamberg, KatarinaUmea University.Lundgren, BrittaUmea University.
    The Social Politics of Research Collaboration2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Hanmer, Jalna
    The Impact of Women's Studies on Its Students' Relationships and Everyday Practices2005In: Doing Women's Studies: Employment Opportunities, Personal Impacts and Social Consequences / [ed] Gabriele Griffin, London: Zed Books , 2005, p. 141-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Hayler, MattBirmingham University.
    Research Methods for Reading Digital Data in the Digital Humanities2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Hayler, MattBirmingham University.
    Research Methods for Reading Digital Data in the Digital Humanities2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Hayler, Matt Steven
    Univ Birmingham, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.
    Collaboration in Digital Humanities Research - Persisting Silences2018In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 12, no 1, article id UNSP 000351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration has become a hallmark of Digital Humanities (DH) research. Nonetheless it remains under-discussed and for those not deeply engaged in DH a bit of a mystery. Drawing on recent DH work and publications that engage with questions of DH collaboration in different ways (e.g. [Deegan and McCarthy] [Griffin and Hayler 2016] [Hayler and Griffin 2016]), we analyse three types of DH collaboration: 1) human-human interactions; 2) human-machine/material interactions; and 3) machine/material-machine/material interactions. We argue that engagement with collaboration processes and practices enables us to think through how DH tools and practices reinforce, resist, shape, and encode material realities which both pre-exist, and are co-produced by them. We suggest that understanding these entanglements facilitates a critical DH in which academic hierarchies and disciplinary preconceptions are challenged.

  • 61.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Jordal, MalinUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Body, Migration, Re/Constructive Surgery: Making the Gendered Body in a Globalized World2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. London Sch Econ, Gender Inst, London, England.
    Jordal, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Introduction2018In: BODY, MIGRATION, RE/CONSTRUCTIVE SURGERIES: MAKING THE GENDERED BODY IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD / [ed] Griffin, G Jordal, M, ROUTLEDGE , 2018, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body modification, self- or other-administered, invasive or non-invasive, lasting or temporary, has a long history and is conducted in many cultures and contexts. Advances in biotechnology, surgical techniques, opportunities for intervention and the rapid expansion of social media and their use have thus to some extent foregrounded and 'normalized' public discussions on body modification. Migration as the accompaniment of bodily intervention has been particularly relevant to women at whom many practices concerning bodily interventions are directed, not least in the context of genital re/constructive surgery. Both in the American and in the European contexts, 'medical necessity' as opposed to 'elective' or aesthetic bodily interventions is a key distinction that has been taken up extensively in the context of re/constructive surgery. Gender reassignment surgery involves the construction of embodied gender identities that either augment or establish the patient's preferred gender. The chapter also presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in this book.

  • 63.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Leibetseder, Doris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    'Only Applies to Research Conducted in Sweden...': Dilemmas in Gaining Ethics Approval in Transnational Qualitative Research2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Research, ISSN 1609-4069Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Hayler, Matt
    et al.
    Birmingham University.
    Griffin, GabrieleUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Research Methods for Creating and Curating Data in the Digital Humanities2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Jordal, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Clitoral Reconstruction: Understanding Changing Gendered Health Care Needs in a Globalized Europe2018In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 154-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The migratory flows of recent decades that have exercised Europe as a socio-political and economic entity have produced extensive responses and interventions from European gender scholars. One relatively recent phenomenon in this context is the question of reparative surgical interventions, specifically clitoral reconstruction, in cases where women who have migrated to Europe have experienced female genital cutting. Clitoral reconstruction, which this article begins to explore, is recent in part because the related surgery was only established in the 1990s and is to date only practised in a few European countries, and in part because the research with women who ask for and have undergone such surgery has also only recently begun. This article is therefore an initial attempt to map some of the related terrain and to suggest further work that needs to be done in this increasingly important area.

  • 66.
    Jordal, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Sigurjonsson, Hannes
    'I want what every other woman has': reasons for wanting clitoral reconstructive surgery after female genital cutting – a qualitative study from Sweden2019In: Culture, Health and Sexuality, ISSN 1369-1058, E-ISSN 1464-5351, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 701-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Female genital cutting (FGC) involves the removal of women's external genitalia for non-therapeutic reasons. An estimated 38,000 women living in Sweden have undergone some form of the procedure. These women often belong to marginalised minorities of immigrant women from countries where FGC is widespread. Clitoral reconstructive surgery following FGC has recently been introduced in Sweden. This study investigates women's perceptions of FGC and clitoral reconstructive surgery with a particular focus on: (1) reasons for requesting reconstructive surgery, and (2) FGC-affected women's expectations of the surgery. Seventeen women referred for clitoral reconstructive surgery at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, participated in the study. Findings revealed five factors motivating women's request for clitoral reconstruction (CR): (1) symbolic restitution - undoing the harm of FGC; (2) repairing the visible stigma of FGC; (3) improving sex and intimacy through physical, aesthetic and symbolic recovery; (4) eliminating physical pain; (5) and CR as a personal project offering hope. These factors were highly interconnected, suggesting that the reasons for seeking surgery were often multiple and complex.

  • 67.
    Leibetseder, Doris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Introduction: Queer and Trans Reproduction with Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART), in Europe2018In: Journal of International Women's Studies, ISSN 1539-8706, E-ISSN 1539-8706, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Martinsson, Lena
    et al.
    Goteborg University.
    Griffin, GabrieleUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.Giritli Nygren, KatarinaMid Sweden University.
    Challenging the Myth of Gender Equality in Sweden2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is often considered one of the most gender-equal countries in the world and held up as a model to follow, but the reality is more complex. This is the first book to explode the myth of Swedish gender equality, both offering a new perspective for an international audience, and suggesting how equality might be rethought more generally. While the authors argue that the gender-equality mantra in Sweden has led to a society with increased opportunities for some, they also assert that the dominant norm of gender equality has become nationalistic and builds upon heteronormative and racial principles. Examining the changing meanings and parameters of gender equality against the country's social-democratic tradition and in the light of contemporary neoliberal ideologies, the book constitutes an urgent contribution to the debates about gender-equality policies and politics.

  • 69.
    Martinsson, Lena
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gender Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Uppsala Univ Sweden, Gender Res, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ York, Womens Studies, York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England..
    Nygren, Katarina Giritli
    Mid Sweden Univ, Sociol, Sundsvall, Sweden.;Mid Sweden Univ, Forum Gender Studies, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Afterword: rethinking gender equality2016In: Challenging The Myth Of Gender Equality In Sweden / [ed] Lena Martinsson, Gabriele Griffin, Katarina Giritli Nygren, Bristol: Policy Press, 2016, p. 211-215Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Martinsson, Lena
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gender Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Univ York, Womens Studies, York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England..
    Nygren, Katarina Giritli
    Mid Sweden Univ, Sociol, Sundsvall, Sweden.;Mid Sweden Univ, Forum Gender Studies, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Introduction: challenging the myth of gender equality in Sweden2016In: Challenging The Myth Of Gender Equality In Sweden / [ed] Martinsson, L; Griffin, G; Nygren, KG, POLICY PRESS , 2016, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Mphaphuli, Memory
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, University of Ghent.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    'Ducking, diving and playing along': Negotiating everyday heteroerotic subjectivity in the field2019In: ISSN 1443-9883Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72. Nyarango, Margaret
    et al.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Circumsizing the mind, reconstructing the body: Contextualizing genital reconstructive surgery in Burkina Faso2018In: Body, Migration, Re/Constructive Surgery: Making the Gendered Body in a Globalized World / [ed] Gabriele Griffin and Malin Jordal, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 121-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burkina Faso is one African country that offers reconstructive surgery for circumcised women. 1 Burkinabe government officials, ‘Afropolitan’ health professionals and activists opposing ‘female genital mutilation’ portray these practices as inevitably causing grave problems for women. This message has been largely accepted and is reproduced in urban Burkina Faso. Based on fieldwork in Burkina Faso by the first author, we argue that as currently conceptualized, this official discourse re-victimizes circumcised women by redefining what is natural, healthy, desirable, sexually attractive and marriageable. Yet, as we shall suggest, reconstructive surgery is not readily accessible, successful or, indeed, endorsed. Nonetheless, some Burkinabe women seem to have found a space of fulfilment in their adoption of a worldview which combines Raëlian values, traditional Burkinabe ideals, feminist and other discourses.

  • 73.
    Saeed, Muhammad
    et al.
    Department of Global and Social Studies, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Researching a Sensitive Topic in an Unstable Environment: Fieldwork Dilemmas in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Provice of Pakistan2019In: Qualitative Research Journal, ISSN 1443-9883, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 248-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore fieldwork dilemmas for a Pakhtun researcher, educated in the West, to research family or domestic violence in the unstable, hostile environment of the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A gender studies approach is here combined with masculinities studies, and a critical qualitative research methodology is used in this study.

    Findings

    The paper argues that unstable regions dominated by certain forms of masculinity require specific research approaches when conducting research and addressing a topic that is culturally taboo.

    Practical implications

    The paper suggests how the insider–outsider dynamic plays out for researchers who come from a particular field and return to it under changed circumstances. It also indicates how a taboo topic in a context where direct questioning is not possible might be approached through the use of vignettes.

    Social implications

    The paper suggests how the contradictory position of a masculinity, simultaneously bearing traces of the hegemonic and of marginalization, may be negotiated in the field.

    Originality/value

    Social research on the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan is rarely conducted and reported due to the unrest in this region. The paper thus contributes original insights from fieldwork carried out there. It also contributes to the limited but growing literature on conducting fieldwork in hostile environments.

12 51 - 73 of 73
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