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  • 51.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Green, Gill
    Pebl Feedback C.I.C., Colchester, UK.
    Davison, Charlie
    Pebl Feedback C.I.C., Colchester, UK.
    Krause, Kristine
    Department of Anthropology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Is Superdiversity a Useful Concept in European Medical Sociology?2017In: Frontiers in Sociology, E-ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 1, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical sociology has a poor track record of researching diversity in theoretically innovative ways. This paper notes usage of the term superdiversity in migration and urban studies, to ask about its utility in general and more specifically for researching the social production of health and illness. Referring to a multi-country interview study about healthcare seeking strategies, the need to understand the diversification of diversity and the challenges for multi-method health research are described. Six interviews each were conducted in Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the UK, to give a diversity sample of 24 adults who described their strategies and practice when seeking healthcare. In discussing how far superdiversity can help to model socioeconomic and cultural changes already identified as challenging health policy and service provision, the paper draws on case study material. The complex intersecting dimensions of population diversity to which superdiversity draws attention are undoubtedly relevant for commissioning and improving healthcare and research as well as policy. Whether models that reflect the complexity indicated by qualitative research can be envisaged in a timely fashion for quantitative research and questions of policy, commissioning, and research are key questions for superdiversity’s ongoing usefulness as a concept.

  • 52.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jama Mahmoud, Amina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Spatialisation & racialization: Understanding the interplay of migration and integration in constructing Swedish suburbs2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has, until recently, enjoyed exceptional status as a welfare state which has extended health and welfare benefits to large number of immigrants, in particular refugees and asylum seekers, without a breakdown in social cohesion.

     

    In 2009, civil unrest occurred across a range of city suburbs with a high proportion of people of immigrant background, and has been interpreted as an expression of discontent from young people unable to enjoy the full benefits of a well ordered society (Schierup and Alund 2011) in terms of access to housing and labour markets (Andersson, Magnusson Turner, and Holmqvist 2010).  The rioting occurred in outlying suburbs know as ‘förorter’ where the housing is characterised by the mass building project of the 1960s and 1970s which have come to be seen as problematic areas where crime and a lack of social cohesion are concentrated.

     

    Since official data are not collected around ethnicity or religion, the higher proportion of people of immigrant background in problematised suburbs has had the effect of racialising city zones. We interrogate this process by looking at news and website reporting and political commentary about unrest which has included arson of private (cars) and communal property (libraries and nursery schools) and stoning of public vehicles (busses and ambulances) occurring in two areas of a large Swedish city. The racialising effects of constructing spatial divisions between zones of the city are examined in how problematic outlying suburbs are described.

     

    237 words without including references

     

    Andersson, R. et al. 2010. Contextualising Ethnic Residential Segregation in Sweden: Welfare, Housing and Migration-Related Policies. Country Report for Sweden. NORFACE Research Programme on Migration.

    Schierup, C.-U., and A. Alund. 2011. “The End of Swedish Exceptionalism? Citizenship, Neoliberalism and the Politics of Exclusion.” Race & Class 53 (1): 45–64.

  • 53.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Humphris, Rachel
    University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Health Status of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Europe2017In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Global Public Health / [ed] David McQueen, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 1-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health status of refugees and asylum seekers varies significantly across the Europeanregion. Differences are attributed to the political nature of the legal categories of “asylumseeker” and “refugee”; the wide disparities in national health services; and the diversityin individual characteristics of this population including age, gender, socioeconomicbackground, country of origin, ethnicity, language proficiency, migration trajectory, andlegal status. Refugees are considered to be at risk of being or becoming relatively“unhealthy migrants” compared to those migrating on the basis of economic motives, whoare characterized by the “healthy migrant effect.” Refugees and asylum seekers are atrisk to the drivers of declining health associated with settlement such as poor diet andhousing. Restricted access to health care whether from legal, economic, cultural, orlanguage barriers is another likely cause of declining health status. There is also evidenceto suggest that the “embodiment” of the experience of exclusion and marginalization thatrefugee and asylum seekers face in countries of resettlement significantly drivesdecrements in the health status of this population.

  • 54.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Humphris, Rachel
    Newall, Dave
    Phillimore, Jenny
    Public health aspects of migrant health: a review of the evidence on health status for refugees and asylum seekers in the European Region2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Refugees and asylum seekers are defined in many ways, but can be considered as those who did not make a voluntary choice to leave their country of origin and cannot return home in safety. Outcome data are limited and mostly focused on perinatal and mental health but do suggest significant levels of unmet need. This scoping review considered 72 studies in which refugees and asylum seekers formed part or all of the population studied. The results show that access to appropriate health care across the WHO European Region is very varied and is overwhelmingly shaped by legal frameworks and the regulation of the migration process. The need for improved communication with asylum seekers and coordinated action between agencies within and beyond the health care system is widely noted. Improved data are imperative to support intersectoral work to address the health care needs of asylum seekers and refugees.

  • 55.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jama Mahmud, Amina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Putting together services to meet everyday health needs: Diversity and bricolage in Sweden, UK, Portugal and Germany2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inequitable distribution of both healthcare resources and minority ethnic populations in European cities has put particular pressures on health service delivery. Multi-cultural models of society have tended to try to educate migrants and newly formed minorities in how to use services ‘appropriately’, rather than to reconfigure services. As neighbourhoods have been getting more diverse, existing models of healthcare delivery do not work so well, despite the rhetoric of ‘patient-centred care’.

     

    This study maps how people in two highly diverse neighbourhoods, with residents differentiated by faith, income, age, gender and legal status, put together the everyday support and healthcare they need. To build up a picture of the range of what people do to support their own wellbeing, we map people’s use of official health services, voluntary group support, informal help, including online and social media sources. This information, gathered by interviews and observations in neighbourhoods, is turned into an app that can be viewed and updated and which is used to further investigate the health care services that are valued and contrast these with the gaps where support is lacking.

     

    This paper draws on initial mapping data from Swedish neighbourhoods to critique ethnicity as a concept to investigate inequalities and diversity in respect of individuals’ relationship with healthcare, different modes of provision, and responsibilities for welfare allocation. Superdiversity (Vertovec 2007) is tested as a concept suitable for reconfiguring health services to respond to the ongoing diversification of diversity.

  • 56.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Liabo, Kristin
    Univ Exeter, Med Sch, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Ingold, Anne
    Independent interviewer, Hertfordshire, England.
    Roberts, Helen
    UCL Great Ormond St Inst Child Hlth, Child Hlth Res, London, England.
    Visibility, resilience, vulnerability in young migrants2019In: Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine, ISSN 1363-4593, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 533-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young unaccompanied asylum seekers have been portrayed as vulnerable, resilient or both. Those granted residency in Europe are offered support by health and social care systems, but once they leave the care system to make independent lives, what part can these services play? Our review of research with migrants who have been in care in Sweden and the United Kingdom found evidence of unmet need, but little research describing their own views of services. The limited published evidence, supplemented by interviews with care leavers in a UK inner city, suggests that in defining health needs, young people emphasise housing, education, employment and friendship over clinical or preventative services. Some felt well supported while others described feeling vulnerable, anxious, angry or sad. These experiences, if linked with the insensitivity of even one professional, could lower young people’s expectations of healthcare to the extent that they avoided contact with service providers. In supporting young migrants’ resilience to meet everyday challenges, friendly support from peers, carers and professionals was important. They needed determined advocacy at key moments. The different challenges for the Swedish and UK health and welfare systems along with the resilience/vulnerability trajectory are described.

  • 57.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindenmeyer, Antje
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Phillimore, Jenny
    Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS), School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Padilla, Beatriz
    Department of Sociology, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA; Instituto Universitario de Lisboa (ISCTE‐IUL), Lisbon, Portugal.
    Brand, Tillman
    Department Prevention and Evaluation, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    ‘If there were doctors who could understand our problems, I would already be better’: dissatisfactory health care and marginalisation in superdiverse neighbourhoods2020In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How people in community settings describe their experience of disappointing health care, and their responses to such dissatisfaction, sheds light on the role of marginalisation and underlines the need for radically responsive service provision. Making the case for studying unprompted accounts of dissatisfaction with healthcare provision, this is an original analysis of 71 semi‐structured interviews with healthcare users in superdiverse neighbourhoods in four European cities. Healthcare users spontaneously express disappointment with services that dismiss their concerns and fail to attend to their priorities. Analysing characteristics of these healthcare users show that no single aspect of marginalisation shapes the expression of disappointment. In response to disappointing health care, users sought out alternative services and to persuade reluctant service providers, and they withdrew from services, in order to access more suitable health care and to achieve personal vindication. Promoting normative quality standards for diverse and diversifying populations that access care from a range of public and private service providers is in tension with prioritising services that are responsive to individual priorities. Without an effort towards radically responsive service provision, the ideal of universal access on the basis of need gives way to normative service provision.

  • 58.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Morgan, Myfanwy
    King's College London.
    Religion, deceased donation and disparities in transplantation among ethnic minority groups in the UK2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Phillimore, Jenny
    Public Policy, Immigrant Experiences, and Health Outcomes 
in the United Kingdom2016In: Immigration, public policy and health: Newcomer experiences in developed nations / [ed] Dennis Raphael, Toronto: Canadian Scholars' Press Inc., 2016, p. 133-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Phillimore, Jenny
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Padilla, Beatriz
    University of South Florida, Tampa, USA; University Institute of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Brand, Tilman
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Making Gendered Healthcare Work Visible: Over-Looked Labour in Four Diverse European Settings2019In: Social Inclusion, ISSN 2183-2803, E-ISSN 2183-2803, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 33-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare has long been a gendered enterprise, with women taking responsibility for maintaining health and engaging with service providers. Universal healthcare provision notwithstanding, women nonetheless undertake a range of health- care work, on their own account and on behalf of others, which remains largely invisible. As part of a multi-method com- parative European study that looked at access to healthcare in diverse neighbourhoods from the point of view of people’s own health priorities, the concept of ‘healthcare bricolage’ describes the process of mobilizing resources and overcoming constraints to meet particular health needs. Bricolage mediates between different kinds of resources to meet particular challenges and describing these processes makes visible that work which has been unseen, over-looked and naturalised, as part of a gendered caring role. Drawing on 160 semi-structured interviews and a survey with 1,755 residents of highly diverse neighbourhoods in Germany, UK, Sweden and Portugal, this article illustrates the gendered nature of healthcare bricolage. The complex variations of women’s bricolage within and beyond the public healthcare system show how gen- dered caring roles intersect with migration status and social class in the context of particular healthcare systems.

  • 61.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Skaraborg Institute, Skövde, Sweden.
    Undoing the unspeakable: researching racism in Swedish healthcare using a participatory process to build dialogue2019In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 17, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Racism is difficult to discuss in the context of Swedish healthcare for various cultural and administrative reasons. Herein, we interpret the fragmentary nature of the evidence of racialising processes and the difficulty of reporting racist discrimination in terms of structural violence.

    Methods:

    In response to the unspeakable nature of racism in Swedish healthcare, we propose a phased participatory process to build a common vocabulary and grammar through a consultative framework involving healthcare providers and service users as well as policy-makers. These stakeholders will be involved in an educational intervention to facilitate discussion around and avoidance of racism in service provision.

    Discussion:

    Both the participatory process and outcomes of the process, e.g. educational interventions, will contribute to the social and political conversation about racism in healthcare settings. Creating new ways of discussing sensitive topics allows ameliorative actions to be taken, benefitting healthcare providers and users. The urgency of the project is underlined.

  • 62.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Public Policy, Immigrant Experiences, and Health Outcomes 
in Sweden2016In: Immigration, public policy and health: Newcomer experiences in developed nations / [ed] Dennis Raphael, Toronto: Canadian Scholars' Press Inc., 2016, p. 291-314Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Weich, Scott
    University of Warwick, UK.
    Griffith, Laura
    University of Warwick.
    Commander, Martin
    University of Warwick.
    Experiences of Acute Mental Health Care in an Ethnically Diverse Inner City: Qualitative Interview Study2010In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Brand, T.
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Bremen, Germany.
    Samkange-Zeeb, F.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Bremen, Germany.
    Knecht, M.
    Univ Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Padilla, B.
    ISCTE Inst Univ Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Pemberton, S.
    Keele Univ, Keele, Staffs, England.
    Phillimore, J.
    Univ Birmingham, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.
    Zeeb, H.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Bremen, Germany.
    Unmet needs for healthcare in superdiverse neighbourhoods: results from the UPWEB study2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 76-76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Gil-Salmeron, A.
    et al.
    Polibienestar Res Inst, Valencia, Spain.
    Valia-Cotanda, E.
    Polibienestar Res Inst, Valencia, Spain.
    Garces-Ferrer, J.
    Polibienestar Res Inst, Valencia, Spain.
    Karnaki, P.
    Inst Prevent Med Environm & Occupat Hlth Prolepsi, Maroussi, Greece.
    Zota, D.
    Inst Prevent Med Environm & Occupat Hlth Prolepsi, Maroussi, Greece.
    Linos, A.
    Inst Prevent Med Environm & Occupat Hlth Prolepsi, Maroussi, Greece.
    Lebano, Adele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Immigrants and refugees' principal characteristics across Europe: a literature review2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 61-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 66. Green, Gill
    et al.
    Davison, Charlie
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Krause, Kristine
    Morente Mejias, Felipe
    Alex, Gabriele
    Pathways to care: how superdiversity shapes the need for navigational assistance2014In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1205-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recently developed sociological concept of superdiversity provides a potentially interesting and useful way of developing an understanding of life in contemporary Europe. Here we report on research based on individual narratives about access to health care, as described by a range of people from very different sociocultural backgrounds in four European countries. This article notes the frequent appearance in first-person narratives of the need for navigational assistance in the form of knowledge, cultural competence and orientation that facilitate the identification and use of pathways to health care. Our dataset of 24 semi-structured interviews suggests that, in the context of needing health care, the feeling of being a ‘stranger in a strange land’ is common in people from a wide range of backgrounds. In social settings characterised by transnationalism and cultural heterogeneity, it is important to understand the need for navigational assistance, particularly at times of uncertainty, in the design and delivery of health services. The relationship between the inhabitants of contemporary Europe and the healthcare systems available in the places where they live is dominated by both complexity and contingency – and this is the cultural field in which navigation operates.

  • 67.
    Hamed, Sarah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Klingberg, Sonja
    Cambridge University.
    Mahmud, Amina Jama
    Independant researcher.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Researching health in diverse neighbourhoods:: critical reflection on the use of a community research model in Uppsala, Sweden2018In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 612-, article id s13104-018-3717-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A community research model developed in the United Kingdom was adopted in a multi-country study of health in diverse neighbourhoods in European cities, including Sweden. This paper describes the challenges and opportunities of using this model in Sweden.Results: In Sweden, five community researchers were recruited and trained to facilitate access to diverse groups in the two study neighbourhoods, including ethnic, religious, and linguistic minorities. Community researchers recruited participants from the neighbourhoods, and assisted during semi-structured interviews. Their local networks, and knowledge were invaluable for contextualising the study and finding participants. Various factors made it difficult to fully apply the model in Sweden. The study took place when an unprecedented number of asylum-seekers were arriving in Sweden, and potential collaborators’ time was taken up in meeting their needs. Employment on short-term, temporary contracts is difficult since Swedish Universities are public authorities. Strong expectations of stable full-time employment, make flexible part-time work undesirable. The community research model was only partly suc-cessful in embedding the research project as a collaboration between community members and the University. While there was interest and some involvement from neighbourhood residents, the research remained University-led with a limited sense of community ownership.Keywords: Sweden, Healthcare research, Community research.

  • 68.
    Nazroo, James
    et al.
    University of Manchester.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Health, ethnicity and race2010In: The New Companion to Medical Sociology / [ed] William C Cockerham, Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2010, p. 113-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69. Ozcurumez, Saime
    et al.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Akyuz, Selin
    The Conceptualization problem in research and responses to sexual and gender-based violence in forced migration2020In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conceptualization of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) has developed rapidly over recent decades and the understanding of SGBV in the context of forced migration continues to evolve. Based on a scoping review of scholarly work and reports by non-governmental organizations and international organizations between 1993 and 2018, this study identifies limitations to the current conceptualization of SGBV, and proposes a re-conceptualization. The paper argues that the existing literature overemphasizes the contexts of war zones and conflict and excludes post-flight settings, and focuses mainly on the victimization of women, excluding other at-risk groups. The tendency to focus on conflict zones and to underline the victim status of women constrains the usefulness of the conceptualization for informing research as well as protection and response. This review considers the multifaceted causes and consequences of gendered vulnerabilities and insecurities that are exposed in forced migration processes in order to make sense of SGBV as a gendered harm. Through a constructivist and de-essentialising theoretical lens, the study proposes to conceptualize SGBV in terms of continuities in forced migration occuring over time in interwoven territories and a variety of contexts from countries of origin to settlement.

  • 70. Pemberton, Simon
    et al.
    Phillimore, Jenny
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Padilla, Beatriz
    Lopes, Jessica
    Samerski, Silja
    Humphris, Rachel
    Access to healthcare in superdiverse neighbourhoods2019In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 55, p. 128-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date little attention has been focused on how the differing features of ‘superdiverse’ neighbourhoods shape residents’ access to healthcare services. Through utilising a cross-national mixed-methods approach, the paper highlights how defining features of superdiverse neighbourhoods - ‘newness’, ‘novelty’ and ‘diversity’ - influence a number of neighbourhood ‘domains’ and ‘rules of access’ that regulate access to healthcare. Issues of uncertainty, affordability, compliance, transna- tionalism and the diversity of community and local sociability are identified as being particularly significant, but which may vary in importance according to the nationality, ethnicity and / or religion of particular individuals.

  • 71.
    Phillimore, J. A.
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, Inst Res Superdivers, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Brand, T.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Dept Prevent & Evaluat, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Superdiversity, population health and health care: opportunities and challenges in a changing world2019In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 172, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Ethno-national approaches to research public health and migrant outcomes have dominated for decades but lack efficacy in a globalised world and in view of the intractable nature of health outcome inequalities for migrant and minority groups. This article highlights some of the challenges and opportunities associated with a superdiversity perspective in public health research.

    Superdiversity and ethno-national approaches: Migration patterns have changed with more people arriving from more places and the diversification of diversity meaning that the ethno-national categories utilised in public health research have reduced explanatory potential.

    The example of maternal and perinatal mortality in the United Kingdom: Adjusting UK perinatal mortality rates by five ethnic groups based on assumptions of relationships between high levels of risk and ethnic groups masks the scale of inequality faced by groups wherein mortality rates are increasing and highlights some of the difficulties associated with using ethno-national classifications.

    A superdiversity perspective: A superdiversity approach moves beyond ethno-nationalism to socially locate groups focussing on commonalities and differences across spaces and characteristics and employing intracategorical or anticategorical approaches.

    Conclusions: Superdiversity brings new levels of demographic complexity and fluidity. Greater reflexivity is needed in diversity research with justification of classifications used for analysis necessary when research questions are developed.

  • 72.
    Phillimore, Jenny
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Doos, Lucy
    Univ Birmingham, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.
    Padilla, Beatriz
    Inst Univ Lisboa, ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Samerski, Silja
    Univ Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Health providers as bricoleurs: An examination of the adaption of health ecosystems to superdiversity in Europe2019In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 361-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the ways in which healthcare providers from a mixed economy of welfare operating in superdiverse neighbourhoods connect and innovate across the healthcare ecosystem to meet diverse and complex needs. Moving beyond a health systems approach which siloes different types of provision, we use the concept of bricolage to make visible the work undertaken by providers across the ecosystem. While we show that public, private and civil society provision all adapt to meet complex and diverse needs to some degree, we highlight the importance of inter-connectedness between providers and note the role of civil society in addressing gaps and cracks in provision. The importance of adopting a whole ecosystem approach and focusing on the actions and interactions which enable the ecosystem to function in complex demographic environments is highlighted before we stress the dangers of over-reliance on civil society.

  • 73. Phillimore, Jenny
    et al.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Knecht, Michi
    Padilla, Beatriz
    Brand, Tilman
    Cheung, Sin Yi
    Pemberton, Simon
    Zeeb, Hajo
    Understanding healthcare practices in superdiverse neighbourhoods and developing the concept of welfare bricolage: Protocol of a cross-national mixed-methods study2015In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 15, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diversity in Europe has both increased and become more complex posing challenges to both national and local welfare state regimes. Evidence indicates specific barriers for migrant, faith and minority ethnic groups when accessing healthcare. However, previous studies of health in diverse cities in European countries have mainly adopted an ethno-national focus. Taking into account the new complexity of diversity within cities, a deeper and multi-faceted understanding of everyday health practices in superdiverse contexts is needed to support appropriate healthcare provision. Methods/Design: This protocol describes a mixed method study investigating how residents in superdiverse neighbourhoods access healthcare. The study will include participant observation and qualitative interviewing as well as a standardised health survey and will be carried out in eight superdiverse neighbourhoods - with varying deprivations levels and trajectories of change - in four European countries (Germany, Portugal, Sweden and UK). In each neighbourhood, trained polylingual community researchers together with university researchers will map formal and informal provision and infrastructures supportive to health and healthcare. In-depth interviews with residents and healthcare providers in each country will investigate local health-supportive practices. Thematic analysis will be used to identify different types of help-seeking behaviours and support structures across neighbourhoods and countries. Using categories identified from analyses of interview material, a health survey will be set up investigating determinants of access to healthcare. Complex models, such as structural equation modelling, will be applied to analyse commonalities and differences between population groups, neighbourhoods and countries. Discussion: This study offers the potential to contribute to a deeper understanding of how residents in superdiverse neighbourhoods deal with health and healthcare in everyday practices. The findings will inform governmental authorities, formal and informal healthcare providers how to further refine health services and how to achieve equitable access in diverse population groups.

  • 74. Phillimore, Jenny
    et al.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Knecht, Michi
    Padilla, Beatriz
    Pemberton, Simon
    Bricolage as conceptual tool for understanding access to healthcare in superdiverse populations2019In: Social Theory & Health, ISSN 1477-8211, E-ISSN 1477-822X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 231-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper applies, for the first time, the concept of bricolage to understand the experiences of superdiverse urban populations and their practices of improvisation in accessing health services across healthcare ecosystems. By adopting the concept of healthcare bricolage and an ecosystem approach, we render visible the agency of individuals as they creatively mobilise, utilise, and re-use resources in the face of constraints on access to healthcare services. Such resources include multiple knowledges, ideas, materials, and networks. The concept of bricolage is particularly useful given that superdiverse populations are by definition heterogeneous, multilingual and transnational, and frequently in localities characterised as "resource-poor", in which bricolage may be necessary to overcome such constraints, and where mainstream healthcare providers have limited understanding of the challenges that populations experience in accessing services. The "politics of bricolage" as neoliberal strategies of self-empowerment legitimising the withdrawal of the welfare state are critically discussed. Conflicting aspects of bricolage are made explicit in setting out tactics of relevance to researching the practices of bricolage.

  • 75.
    Phillimore, Jenny
    et al.
    Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS), School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK.
    Brand, Tilman
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Achterstraße 30, D-28359, Bremen, Germany.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Padilla, Beatriz
    University of South Florida, Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL, 33620, USA Instituto Universitario de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Lisbon, Portugal.
    Healthcare bricolage in Europe’s superdiverse neighbourhoods: A mixed methods study2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 1325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Studies of the relationship between diverse populations, healthcare access and health outcomes have been dominated by approaches focusing on ethno-national groups or specific healthcare sectors. Healthcare bricolage conceptualises the processes by which individuals use multiple resources to address health concerns. It is relevant in superdiverse neighbourhoods with complex populations. This paper is original in its application of mixed methods to examine the extent to which, and the reasons why, individuals engage in healthcare bricolage.

    Methods

    The study utilized a parallel sequential methodology. Eight superdiverse neighbourhoods were selected, two in each of Bremen, Birmingham, Lisbon and Uppsala. Ethnographic research scoping the nature of each healthcare ecosystem was followed by 160 interviews (20 each neighbourhood) with a maximum variation sample of residents undertaken October 2015 to December 2016. Interviewees were asked to recall a health concern and describe actions taken to attempt resolution. Data was coded with a MAXQDA codebook checked for inter-coder reliability. Interview findings enabled identification of five types of bricolage, the nature of healthcare resources utilised and the factors which influenced residents’ tactics. Results were used to design a household survey using new questions and validated epidemiological instruments implemented January to October 2017. Respondents were identified using random address files and interviewed in person or by telephone. Multinomal logistic regressions were used to estimate the effect of changing the values of determinants on the probability of observing an outcome.

    Results

    Age, gender, level of education, migration background and extent of functional limitation were associated with bricolage tactics. Individuals demonstrating high levels of agency were more likely than those with low levels to engage in bricolage. Residents with high levels of trust in physicians were less likely to bricolage than those with lower levels of trust. Levels of health literacy showed no significant effects.

    Conclusions

    The nature and severity of health concern, trust in physicians and agency shaped residents’ bricolage tactics. The concept of bricolage enabled us to make visible the actions and resources utilised around public healthcare systems that would otherwise remain outwith healthcare access research. Actions were frequently undertaken via networks offering insights into healthcare-seeking behaviour.

  • 76.
    Roberts, Helen
    et al.
    UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
    Ingold, Anne
    Hertfordshire, UK.
    Liabo, Kristin
    University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK.
    Manzotti, Grazia
    UCL Institute of Child Health Library, London, UK.
    Reeves, David
    UCL Institute of Child Health Library, London, UK.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Moving on: Transitions out of care for young people with learning disabilities in England and Sweden2018In: British Journal of Learning Disabilities, ISSN 1354-4187, E-ISSN 1468-3156, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 54-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people with learning disabilities are frequently underrepresented in research accounts. This study describes the experiences of young people moving from the care system. We scoped the English and Swedish literature for first-hand accounts and interviewed four young people with learning disabilities leaving the English care system. We combined findings from both sources. “Grey” and campaigning literature are more likely than academic studies to include the voices of service users, but even then, the voices tend to be those of professional or family carers. Both the literature and interviews demonstrate young peoples’ awareness and understanding of the social as well as financial benefits of work. Good foster care could be precarious, and young people in unhappy placements lacked direction. Exploitation around a young person's housing and finances could be problems. There was evidence of “threshold” difficulties in accessing services. Despite an NHS commitment to listening to users in the UK, and similar aspirations in Sweden, our search of the literature identified few studies reporting care leavers' with learning disabilities own words. Our data add to the voices of a group frequently silent or silenced. We found evidence of resilience and hope as well as difficulties and frustrations. The accounts in the literature and our interviews provide data on what it can be like to try to operate “the system.” The people we spoke with and those whose accounts we found in the literature were thoughtful and engaging. They provide an important source of knowledge for policy and practice.

  • 77.
    Roberts, Helen M.
    et al.
    UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ingold, Anne
    Hertfordshire, UK.
    Manzotti, Grazia
    UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health Library, UK.
    Reeves, David
    UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health Library, UK.
    Liabo, Kristian
    Institute for Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, UK.
    Moving on: multiple transitions for unaccompanied child migrants leaving care in England and Sweden2017In: International Journal of Social Science Studies, ISSN 2324-8033, E-ISSN 2324-8041, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the priorities of young people who arrived in England or Sweden as unaccompanied minors and are leaving the care of the state to transition to adult life. Policy and practice for these young people are themselves in transition in Europe, and we aim to contribute to the slender first person qualitative evidence base for those delivering services. Our methods comprised a scoping review of scholarly and grey literature, and group and individual interviews. Despite a commitment in both countries to listening to the voices of young people, we identified few studies representing the voices of unaccompanied care leavers. In both the literature and our interviews, health in a clinical sense was rarely among their priorities. Their accounts focused on the determinants of health, and in particular housing, education, food and employment. In Sweden, where services are universal rather than targeted, the Health and Social Care Board (Socialstyrelsen) notes the paradox of unaccompanied children being surrounded by adult supporters, none of whom takes overall responsibility for the young person and his/her everyday life. Those we spoke to describe the vital role played by foster carers, health and social care professionals and friends that they could rely on. The young people whose narratives appear in the research literature and those in our own sample are working hard to cope with multiple transitions and to manage health in its widest sense, whether by finding the right place to live or attending to their education or training.

  • 78.
    Ryan, Sarah
    et al.
    Oxford University.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Is Care Unsafe for People with a Learning Disability?: The Case of Connor Sparrowhawk2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Samkange-Zeeb, F.
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany..
    Doos, L.
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Social Policy, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Humphris, R.
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Social Policy, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Lopes, J.
    Univ Minho, Braga, Portugal..
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Language is still a major obstacle when accessing and/or providing healthcare services in several European countries2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 144-144Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Willander, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jonsson, Pernilla
    Analysenheten, Svenska kyrkan, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Conditions for Religious Pluralism in Swedish Hospital Chaplaincy: A Research Note2019In: Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy, ISSN 0885-4726, E-ISSN 1528-6916, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research interest in hospital chaplaincy has increased, in part because it is believed to contribute to the development of just models of religious pluralism. This research note brings attention to hospital chaplaincy in Sweden, a country where religious diversity has substantially increased due to migration but where research in hospital chaplaincy is scarce. In order to advocate for future research, this research note describes the organization of hospital chaplaincy in Sweden, presents new analyses of official data showing its extent and religious composition, and proposes that the organization of hospital chaplaincy in this country needs to be re-considered now that religious diversity is a given. Showing that hospital chaplaincy in this country is still under the overbearing influence of Christianity, this research note argues that there is a need for research that sheds light on the asymmetrical power relations that exist and that paves the way for innovations in religious pluralist models for health care chaplaincy.

  • 81.
    Zeeb, H.
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Phillimore, J.
    Univ Birmingham, Inst Superdivers, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.
    Knecht, M.
    Univ Bremen, Dept Anthropol & Cultural Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Padilla, B.
    Univ Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Pemberton, S.
    Univ Keele, Keele, Staffs, England.
    Brand, T.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Transnational healthcare usage in superdiverse neighbourhoods: survey results from European countries2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 43-43Article in journal (Other academic)
12 51 - 81 of 81
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