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  • 51.
    Björksved, Margitha
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Department of Orthodontics, Public Dental Health Service, Eskilstuna, Sweden;Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden;School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Annika
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden;School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Closed vs open surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines: surgery time, postoperative complications, and patients' perceptions2018Ingår i: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 40, nr 6, s. 626-635Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Closed and open surgical techniques are two different main approaches to surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines (PDCs). Because there is insufficient evidence to support one technique over the other, there is a need for randomized controlled trials.

    Objectives: To compare surgery time, complications and patients' perceptions between closed and open surgical techniques in PDCs.

    Trial design: The trial was a multicentre, randomized, controlled trial with two parallel groups randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio.

    Material and methods: Study participants were 119 consecutive patients from 3 orthodontic centres, with PDCs planned for surgical exposure, randomly allocated according to a computer-generated randomization list, using concealed allocation. Full-thickness mucoperiosteal flap was raised, and bone covering the canine was removed in both interventions. In closed exposure, an attachment with a chain was bonded to the canine and the flap was sutured back with the chain penetrating the mucosa. In open exposure, a window of tissue around the tooth was removed and glass ionomer cement placed on the canine crown, to prevent gingival overgrowth during spontaneous eruption. Patient perceptions were assessed with two questionnaires, for the evening on the day of operation and 7 days post-surgery.

    Blinding: It was not possible to blind either patients or care providers to the interventions. The outcome assessors were blinded and were unaware of patients' intervention group.

    Results: Seventy-five girls and 44 boys, mean age 13.4 years (SD 1.46) participated in the study and got either of the interventions (closed exposure, n = 60; open exposure, n = 59). Surgery time did not differ significantly between the interventions. Complications though were more severe in bilateral cases and the patients experienced more pain and impairment in the open group.

    Conclusion: There were no statistically significant differences regarding surgery time between the groups. Postoperative complications were similar between the groups in unilateral PDCs, but more common in the open group in bilateral cases. More patients in the open group experienced pain and impairment compared to the closed group.

    Trial registration: Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02186548 and Researchweb.org, ID: 127201.

  • 52. Bosnic-Anticevich, S
    et al.
    Costa, E
    Menditto, E
    Lourenço, O
    Novellino, E
    Bialek, S
    Briedis, V
    Buonaiuto, R
    Chrystyn, H
    Cvetkovski, B
    Capua, S Di
    Kritikos, V
    Mair, A
    Orlando, V
    Paulino, E
    Salimäki, J
    Söderlund, R
    Tan, R
    Williams, D M
    Wroczynski, P
    Agache, I
    Ansotegui, I J
    Anto, J M
    Bedbrook, A
    Bachert, C
    Bewick, M
    Bindslev-Jensen, C
    Brozek, J
    Canonica, G W
    Cardona, V
    Carr, W
    Casale, T
    Chavannes, N H
    Correia de Sousa, J
    Cruz, A A
    Czarlewski, W
    De Carlo, G
    Demoly, P
    Devillier, P
    Dykewicz, M S
    Gaga, M
    El-Gamal, Y
    Fonseca, J
    Fokkens, W J
    Guzmán, M A
    Haahtela, T
    Hellings, P W
    Illario, M
    Ivancevich, J C
    Just, J
    Kaidashev, I
    Khaitov, M
    Khaltaev, N
    Keil, T
    Klimek, L
    Kowalski, M L
    Kuna, P
    Kvedariene, V
    Larenas-Linnemann, D
    Laune, D
    Le, L T T
    Carlsen, K C Lodrup
    Mahboub, B
    Maier, D
    Malva, J
    Manning, P
    Morais-Almeida, M
    Mösges, R
    Mullol, J
    Münter, L
    Murray, R
    Naclerio, R
    Namazova-Baranova, L
    Nekam, K
    Nyembue, T D
    Okubo, K
    O'Hehir, R E
    Ohta, K
    Okamoto, Y
    Onorato, G L
    Palkonen, S
    Panzner, P
    Papadopoulos, N G
    Park, H S
    Pawankar, R
    Pfaar, O
    Phillips, J
    Plavec, D
    Popov, T A
    Potter, P
    Prokopakis, E P
    Roller-Wirnsberger, R E
    Rottem, M
    Ryan, D
    Samolinski, B
    Sanchez-Borges, M
    Schunemann, H J
    Sheikh, A
    Sisul, J C
    Somekh, D
    Stellato, C
    To, T
    Todo-Bom, A
    Tomazic, P V
    Toppila-Salmi, S
    Valero, A
    Valiulis, A
    Valovirta, E
    Ventura, M T
    Wagenmann, M
    Wallace, D
    Waserman, S
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Yiallouros, P K
    Yorgancioglu, A
    Yusuf, O M
    Zar, H J
    Zernotti, M E
    Zhang, L
    Zidarn, M
    Zuberbier, T
    Bousquet, J
    ARIA pharmacy 2018 "Allergic rhinitis care pathways for community pharmacy".2018Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmacists are trusted health professionals. Many patients use over-the-counter (OTC) medications and are seen by pharmacists who are the initial point of contact of allergic rhinitis management in most countries. The role of pharmacists in integrated care pathways (ICPs) for allergic diseases is important. This paper builds on existing studies and provides tools intended to help pharmacists provide optimal advice/interventions/strategies to patients with rhinitis. The ARIA-pharmacy ICP includes a diagnostic questionnaire specifically focusing attention on key symptoms and markers of the disease, a systematic Diagnosis Guide (including differential diagnoses) and a simple flowchart with proposed treatment for rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity. Key prompts for referral within the ICP are included. The use of technology is critical to enhance the management of AR. However, the ARIA-pharmacy ICP should be adapted to local health care environments/situations as regional (national) differences exist in pharmacy care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 53. Bousquet, J
    et al.
    Arnavielhe, S
    Bedbrook, A
    Bewick, M
    Laune, D
    Mathieu-Dupas, E
    Murray, R
    Onorato, G L
    Pépin, J L
    Picard, R
    Portejoie, F
    Costa, E
    Fonseca, J
    Lourenço, O
    Morais-Almeida, M
    Todo-Bom, A
    Cruz, A A
    da Silva, J
    Serpa, F S
    Illario, M
    Menditto, E
    Cecchi, L
    Monti, R
    Napoli, L
    Ventura, M T
    De Feo, G
    Larenas-Linnemann, D
    Fuentes Perez, M
    Huerta Villabolos, Y R
    Rivero-Yeverino, D
    Rodriguez-Zagal, E
    Amat, F
    Annesi-Maesano, I
    Bosse, I
    Demoly, P
    Devillier, P
    Fontaine, J F
    Just, J
    Kuna, T P
    Samolinski, B
    Valiulis, A
    Emuzyte, R
    Kvedariene, V
    Ryan, D
    Sheikh, A
    Schmidt-Grendelmeier, P
    Klimek, L
    Pfaar, O
    Bergmann, K C
    Mösges, R
    Zuberbier, T
    Roller-Wirnsberger, R E
    Tomazic, P
    Fokkens, W J
    Chavannes, N H
    Reitsma, S
    Anto, J M
    Cardona, V
    Dedeu, T
    Mullol, J
    Haahtela, T
    Salimäki, J
    Toppila-Salmi, S
    Valovirta, E
    Gemicioğlu, B
    Yorgancioglu, A
    Papadopoulos, N
    Prokopakis, E P
    Bosnic-Anticevich, S
    O'Hehir, R
    Ivancevich, J C
    Neffen, H
    Zernotti, E
    Kull, I
    Melen, E
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Bachert, C
    Hellings, P
    Palkonen, S
    Bindslev-Jensen, C
    Eller, E
    Waserman, S
    Sova, M
    De Vries, G
    van Eerd, M
    Agache, I
    Casale, T
    Dykewickz, M
    Naclerio, R N
    Okamoto, Y
    Wallace, D V
    MASK 2017: ARIA digitally-enabled, integrated, person-centred care for rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity using real-world-evidence.2018Ingår i: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 8, artikel-id 45Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    mHealth, such as apps running on consumer smart devices is becoming increasingly popular and has the potential to profoundly affect healthcare and health outcomes. However, it may be disruptive and results achieved are not always reaching the goals. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) has evolved from a guideline using the best evidence-based approach to care pathways suited to real-life using mobile technology in allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma multimorbidity. Patients largely use over-the-counter medications dispensed in pharmacies. Shared decision making centered around the patient and based on self-management should be the norm. Mobile Airways Sentinel networK (MASK), the Phase 3 ARIA initiative, is based on the freely available MASK app (the Allergy Diary, Android and iOS platforms). MASK is available in 16 languages and deployed in 23 countries. The present paper provides an overview of the methods used in MASK and the key results obtained to date. These include a novel phenotypic characterization of the patients, confirmation of the impact of allergic rhinitis on work productivity and treatment patterns in real life. Most patients appear to self-medicate, are often non-adherent and do not follow guidelines. Moreover, the Allergy Diary is able to distinguish between AR medications. The potential usefulness of MASK will be further explored by POLLAR (Impact of Air Pollution on Asthma and Rhinitis), a new Horizon 2020 project using the Allergy Diary.

  • 54.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    MACVIA France, Malad Chron VIeillissement Actif France European, Montpellier, France;INSERM, VIMA Ageing & Chron Dis Epidemiol & Publ Hlth App, U1168, Villejuif, France;Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, UMR S 1168, Montigny Le Bretonneux, France;Euforea, Brussels, Belgium;Charite, Berlin, Germany.
    Devillier, P.
    Suresnes Univ Versailles St Quentin, Lab Pharmacol Resp, UPRES EA220, Pole Malad Resp,Hop Foch, Suresnes, France.
    Anto, J. M.
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGloBAL, Barcelona, Spain;IMIM Hosp Mar Res Inst, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Pompeu Fabra UPF, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bewick, M.
    IQ4U Consultants Ltd, London, England.
    Haahtela, T.
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Skin & Allergy Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Arnavielhe, S.
    Kyomed, Montpellier, France.
    Bedbrook, A.
    MACVIA France, Malad Chron VIeillissement Actif France European, Montpellier, France.
    Murray, R.
    MedScript Ltd, Dundalk, Ireland.
    van Eerd, M.
    Peercode DV, Gerdermalsen, Netherlands.
    Fonseca, J. A.
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, MEDIDA Lda, Ctr Hlth Technol & Serv Res CINTESIS, Porto, Portugal.
    Morais Almeida, M.
    Hosp CUF Descobertas, Allergy & Clin Immunol Dept, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Todo Bom, A.
    Univ Coimbra, Fac Med, Ctr Hosp Univ Coimbra, Imunoalergol, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Menditto, E.
    Univ Naples Federico II, Ctr Pharmacoecon, CIRFF, Naples, Italy.
    Passalacqua, G.
    Univ Genoa, Osped Policlin San Martino, Allergy & Resp Dis, Genoa, Italy.
    Stellato, C.
    Univ Salerno, Scuola Med Salernitana, Dept Med Surg & Dent, Salerno, Italy.
    Triggiani, M.
    Univ Salerno, Scuola Med Salernitana, Dept Med Surg & Dent, Salerno, Italy.
    Ventura, M. T.
    Univ Bari, Sch Med, Unit Geriatr Immunoallergol, Bari, Italy.
    Vezzani, G.
    AUSL Reggio Emilia, Arcispedale SMaria Nuova IRCCS, Dept Med Specialties, Pulm Unit, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Annesi-Maesano, I.
    UPMC Sorbonne Univ, Med Sch St Antoine, Dept Inst Pierre Louis Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, INSERM,Epidemiol Allerg & Resp Dis, Paris, France.
    Bourret, R.
    Ctr Hosp, Valenciennes, France.
    Bosse, I.
    Allergist, La Rochelle, France.
    Caimmi, D.
    UPMC Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, CHRU Montpellier, UMR S 1136,IPLESP,Equipe EPAR, Paris, France.
    Cartier, C.
    ASA Adv Solut Accelerator, Clapiers, France.
    Demoly, P.
    UPMC Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, CHRU Montpellier, UMR S 1136,IPLESP,Equipe EPAR, Paris, France.
    Just, J.
    Hop Enfants Armand Trousseau, AP HP, Ctr Asthme & Allergies, Allergol Dept, Paris, France;UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, Equipe EPAR, UMR S 1136,Inst Pierre Louis Epidemiol & Sante Pu, Paris, France.
    Portejoie, F.
    MACVIA France, Malad Chron VIeillissement Actif France European, Montpellier, France.
    Siroux, V.
    Univ Joseph Fourier, Univ Grenoble Alpes, Team Environm Epidemiol Appl Reprod & Resp Hlth, INSERM,IAB,U1209, Grenoble, France.
    Viart, F.
    ASA Adv Solut Accelerator, Clapiers, France.
    Bergmann, K. C.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Comprehens Allergy Ctr, Dept Dermatol & Allergy, Berlin, Germany;Global Allergy & Asthma European Network GA2LEN, Berlin, Germany.
    Keil, T.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Inst Social Med Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, Berlin, Germany;Univ Wurzburg, Inst Clin Epidemiol & Biometry, Wurzburg, Germany.
    Klimek, L.
    Ctr Rhinol & Allergol, Wiesbaden, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Med Mannheim, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Mannheim, Germany.
    Moesges, R.
    CRI Clin Res Int Ltd, Hamburg, Germany.
    Pfaar, O.
    Ctr Rhinol & Allergol, Wiesbaden, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Med Mannheim, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Mannheim, Germany.
    Shamai, S.
    CRI Clin Res Int Ltd, Hamburg, Germany;Univ Cologne, Inst Med Stat & Computat Biol, Fac Med, Cologne, Germany.
    Zuberbier, T.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Comprehens Allergy Ctr, Dept Dermatol & Allergy, Berlin, Germany;Global Allergy & Asthma European Network GA2LEN, Berlin, Germany.
    Mullol, J.
    Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin, ENT Dept, Rhinol Unit, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin, ENT Dept, Smell Clin, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Barcelona, CIBERES, IDIBAPS, Clin & Expt Resp Immunoallergy, Barcelona, Spain.
    Valero, A.
    Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin, ENT Dept, Rhinol Unit, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin, ENT Dept, Smell Clin, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Barcelona, CIBERES, IDIBAPS, Clin & Expt Resp Immunoallergy, Barcelona, Spain.
    Spranger, O.
    Global Allergy & Asthma Platform GAAPP, Vienna, Austria.
    Tomazic, P. V.
    Med Univ Graz, Dept ENT, Graz, Austria.
    Kowalski, M. L.
    Med Univ Lodz, HARC, Dept Immunol Rheumatol & Allergy, Lodz, Poland.
    Kuna, P.
    Med Univ Lodz, Barlicki Univ Hosp, Div Internal Med Asthma & Allergy, Lodz, Poland.
    Kupczyk, M.
    Med Univ Lodz, Barlicki Univ Hosp, Div Internal Med Asthma & Allergy, Lodz, Poland.
    Raciborski, F.
    Med Univ Warsaw, Dept Prevent Envinronmental Hazards & Allergol, Warsaw, Poland.
    Samolinski, B.
    Med Univ Warsaw, Dept Prevent Envinronmental Hazards & Allergol, Warsaw, Poland.
    Toppila-Salmi, S. K.
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Skin & Allergy Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Valovirta, E.
    Univ Turku, Dept Lung Dis & Clin Immunol, Turku, Finland;Terveystalo Allergy Clin, Turku, Finland.
    Cruz, A. A.
    Univ Fed Bahia, ProAR Nucleo Excelencia Asma, Salvador, BA, Brazil;GARD Execut Comm, Salvador, BA, Brazil.
    Sarquis-Serpa, F.
    Escola Super Ciencias Santa Casa de Misericordia, Asthma Reference Ctr, Vitoria, ES, Brazil.
    da Silva, J.
    Fed Univ Santa Catarina HU UFSC, Hosp Univ Polydoro Ernani de Sao Thiago, Nucleo Alergia, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil.
    Stelmach, R.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Heart Inst InCor, Div Pulm, Hosp Clin,Fac Med, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Larenas-Linnemann, D.
    Hosp Med Sur, Ctr Excellence Asthma & Allergy, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Rodriguez Gonzalez, M.
    Hosp Angeles Pedregal, Pediat Allergy & Clin Immunol, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Burguete Cabanas, M. T.
    Ctr Med Zambrano Hell, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Kvedariene, V.
    Vilnius Univ, Clin Infecious Chest Dis Dermatol & Allergol, Dept Pathol Forens Med & Pharmacol, Fac Med,Inst Biomed Sci, Vilnius, Lithuania;Inst Clin Med, Clin Infecious Chest Dis Dermatol & Allergol, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Valiulis, A.
    Vilnius Univ, Inst Clin Med, Inst Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth,Clin Childrens Dis, Vilnius, Lithuania;European Acad Paediat EAP UEMS SP, Brussels, Belgium.
    Chavannes, N. H.
    Leiden Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Fokkens, W. J.
    Acad Med Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ryan, D.
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Allergy & Resp Res Grp, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Sheikh, A.
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Med Informat Ctr, Asthma UK Ctr Appl Res, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Bachert, C.
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Upper Airways Res Lab, ENT Dept, Ghent, Belgium.
    Hellings, P. W.
    Euforea, Brussels, Belgium;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Leuven, Belgium;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    VandenPlas, O.
    Catholic Univ Louvain, Dept Chest Med, Ctr Hosp Univ UCL Namur, Yvoir, Belgium.
    Ballardini, N.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Kull, I.
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Allergy & Resp Res Grp, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melen, E.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westman, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept ENT Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Bindslev-Jensen, C.
    Odense Univ Hosp, ORCA, Dept Dermatol, Odense, Denmark;Odense Univ Hosp, ORCA, Allergy Ctr, Odense, Denmark.
    Eller, E.
    Odense Univ Hosp, ORCA, Dept Dermatol, Odense, Denmark;Odense Univ Hosp, ORCA, Allergy Ctr, Odense, Denmark.
    Bosnic-Anticevich, S.
    Univ Sydney, Woolcock Inst Med Res, Sydney Local Hlth Dist, Glebe, NSW, Australia.
    O'Hehir, R. E.
    Alfred Hosp, Dept Allergy Immunol & Resp Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Cent Clin Sch, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Immunol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Agache, I.
    Transylvania Univ, Brasov, Romania.
    Bieber, T.
    Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms Univ Bonn, Dept Dermatol & Allergy, Bonn, Germany.
    Casale, T.
    Univ S Florida, Div Allergy Immunol, Tampa, FL USA.
    Gemicioglu, B.
    Istanbul Univ, Cerrahpasa Fac Med, Dept Pulm Dis, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Ivancevich, J. C.
    Clin Santa Isabel, Serv Alergia & Immunol, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    De Vries, G.
    Peercode DV, Gerdermalsen, Netherlands.
    Sorensen, M.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Paediat & Adolescent Med, Tromso, Norway;UiT, Paediat Res Grp, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway.
    Yorgancioglu, A.
    Celal Bayar Univ, Dept Pulmonol, Manisa, Turkey;GARD Execut Comm, Manisa, Turkey.
    Laune, D.
    Kyomed, Montpellier, France.
    Daily allergic multimorbidity in rhinitis using mobile technology: A novel concept of the MASK study2018Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 73, nr 8, s. 1622-1631Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMultimorbidity in allergic airway diseases is well known, but no data exist about the daily dynamics of symptoms and their impact on work. To better understand this, we aimed to assess the presence and control of daily allergic multimorbidity (asthma, conjunctivitis, rhinitis) and its impact on work productivity using a mobile technology, the Allergy Diary. MethodsWe undertook a 1-year prospective observational study in which 4 210 users and 32585days were monitored in 19 countries. Five visual analogue scales (VAS) assessed the daily burden of the disease (i.e., global evaluation, nose, eyes, asthma and work). Visual analogue scale levels <20/100 were categorized as "Low" burden and VAS levels 50/100 as "High" burden. ResultsVisual analogue scales global measured levels assessing the global control of the allergic disease were significantly associated with allergic multimorbidity. Eight hypothesis-driven patterns were defined based on "Low" and "High" VAS levels. There were <0.2% days of Rhinitis Low and Asthma High or Conjunctivitis High patterns. There were 5.9% days with a Rhinitis HighAsthma Low pattern. There were 1.7% days with a Rhinitis HighAsthma HighConjunctivitis Lowpattern. A novel Rhinitis HighAsthma HighConjunctivitis High pattern was identified in 2.9% days and had the greatest impact on uncontrolled VAS global measured and impaired work productivity. Work productivity was significantly correlated with VAS global measured levels. ConclusionsIn a novel approach examining daily symptoms with mobile technology, we found considerable intra-individual variability of allergic multimorbidity including a previously unrecognized extreme pattern of uncontrolled multimorbidity.

  • 55.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    CHRU Arnaud Villeneuve, Fdn Partenariale FMC VIA LR, MACVIA France, Montpellier, France; VIMA Ageing Chron Dis Epidemiol Publ Hlth App, INSERM U, Villejuif, France; Univ Versailles St Quentin en Yvelines, UMRS, Montigny Le Bretonneux, France; Euforea, Brussels, Belgium; Humboldt Univ, Berlin Inst Hlth, Comprehens Allergy Ctr, Berlin, Germany; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Dept Dermatol & Allergy, Berlin, Germany.
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Zurkuhlen, A.
    Gesundheitsregion KölnBonn ‑ HRCB Projekt GmbH, Kohln, Germany.
    Guidance to 2018 good practice: ARIA digitally-enabled, integrated, person-centred care for rhinitis and asthma2019Ingår i: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 9, artikel-id 16Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Mobile Airways Sentinel NetworK (MASK) belongs to the Fondation Partenariale MACVIA-LR of Montpellier, France and aims to provide an active and healthy life to rhinitis sufferers and to those with asthma multimorbidity across the life cycle, whatever their gender or socio-economic status, in order to reduce health and social inequities incurred by the disease and to improve the digital transformation of health and care. The ultimate goal is to change the management strategy in chronic diseases.

    Methods: MASK implements ICT technologies for individualized and predictive medicine to develop novel care pathways by a multi-disciplinary group centred around the patients.

    Stakeholders: Include patients, health care professionals (pharmacists and physicians), authorities, patient’s associations, private and public sectors.

    Results: MASK is deployed in 23 countries and 17 languages. 26,000 users have registered.

    EU grants (2018): MASK is participating in EU projects (POLLAR: impact of air POLLution in Asthma and Rhinitis, EIT Health, DigitalHealthEurope, Euriphi and Vigour).

    Lessons learnt: (i) Adherence to treatment is the major problem of allergic disease, (ii) Self-management strategies should be considerably expanded (behavioural), (iii) Change management is essential in allergic diseases, (iv) Education strategies should be reconsidered using a patient-centred approach and (v) Lessons learnt for allergic diseases can be expanded to chronic diseases.

  • 56. Bousquet, Jean
    et al.
    Hellings, Peter W
    Agache, Ioana
    Amat, Flore
    Annesi-Maesano, Isabella
    Ansotegui, Ignacio J
    Anto, Josep M
    Bachert, Claus
    Bateman, Eric D
    Bedbrook, Anna
    Bennoor, Kazi
    Bewick, Mickael
    Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten
    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia
    Bosse, Isabelle
    Brozek, Jan
    Brussino, Luisa
    Canonica, Giorgio W
    Cardona, Victoria
    Casale, Thomas
    Cepeda Sarabia, Alfonso M
    Chavannes, Niels H
    Cecchi, Lorenzo
    Correia de Sousa, Jaime
    Costa, Elisio
    Cruz, Alvaro A
    Czarlewski, Wienczyslawa
    De Carlo, Giuseppe
    De Feo, Giulia
    Demoly, Pascal
    Devillier, Philippe
    Dykewicz, Mark S
    El-Gamal, Yehia
    Eller, Esben E
    Fonseca, Joao A
    Fontaine, Jean-François
    Fokkens, Wytske J
    Guzmán, Maria-Antonieta
    Haahtela, Tari
    Illario, Maddalena
    Ivancevich, Juan-Carlos
    Just, Jocelyne
    Kaidashev, Igor
    Khaitov, Musa
    Kalayci, Omer
    Keil, Thomas
    Klimek, Ludger
    Kowalski, Marek L
    Kuna, Piotr
    Kvedariene, Violeta
    Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree
    Laune, Daniel
    Le, Lan T T
    Carlsen, Karin Lodrup
    Lourenço, Olga
    Mahboub, Bassam
    Mair, Alpana
    Menditto, Enrica
    Milenkovic, Branislava
    Morais-Almeida, Mario
    Mösges, Ralph
    Mullol, Joaquim
    Murray, Ruth
    Naclerio, Robert
    Namazova-Baranova, Leyla
    Novellino, Ettore
    O'Hehir, Robyn E
    Ohta, Ken
    Okamoto, Yoshitaka
    Okubo, Kimi
    Onorato, Gabrielle L
    Palkonen, Susanna
    Panzner, Petr
    Papadopoulos, Nikos G
    Park, Hae-Sim
    Paulino, Ema
    Pawankar, Ruby
    Pfaar, Oliver
    Plavec, Davor
    Popov, Ted A
    Potter, Paul
    Prokopakis, Emmanuel P
    Rottem, Menachem
    Ryan, Dermot
    Salimäki, Johanna
    Samolinski, Boleslaw
    Sanchez-Borges, Mario
    Schunemann, Holger J
    Sheikh, Aziz
    Sisul, Juan-Carlos
    Rajabian-Söderlund, Rojin
    Sooronbaev, Talant
    Stellato, Cristiana
    To, Teresa
    Todo-Bom, Ana-Maria
    Tomazic, Peter-Valentin
    Toppila-Salmi, Sanna
    Valero, Antonio
    Valiulis, Arunas
    Valovirta, Erkka
    Ventura, Maria-Teresa
    Wagenmann, Martin
    Wang, De Yun
    Wallace, Dana
    Waserman, Susan
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Yorgancioglu, Arzu
    Zhang, Luo
    Zhong, Nanshan
    Zidarn, Mihaela
    Zuberbier, Torsten
    Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) Phase 4 (2018): Change management in allergic rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity using mobile technology.2019Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 143, nr 3, s. 864-879Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) has evolved from a guideline by using the best approach to integrated care pathways using mobile technology in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma multimorbidity. The proposed next phase of ARIA is change management, with the aim of providing an active and healthy life to patients with rhinitis and to those with asthma multimorbidity across the lifecycle irrespective of their sex or socioeconomic status to reduce health and social inequities incurred by the disease. ARIA has followed the 8-step model of Kotter to assess and implement the effect of rhinitis on asthma multimorbidity and to propose multimorbid guidelines. A second change management strategy is proposed by ARIA Phase 4 to increase self-medication and shared decision making in rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity. An innovation of ARIA has been the development and validation of information technology evidence-based tools (Mobile Airways Sentinel Network [MASK]) that can inform patient decisions on the basis of a self-care plan proposed by the health care professional.

  • 57.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Replik från Katarina Strand Brodd: Målet är tydliga rutiner för sena aborter2017Ingår i: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, artikel-id pii: ESZRArtikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 58.
    Brough, H. A.
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Life Course Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp,Dept Women & Childrens Heath, London, England;Guys & St Thomass NHS Fdn Trust, Childrens Allergy Serv, London, England;Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Immunol & Microbial Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp, London, England.
    Kull, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Sodersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Sachs Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Richards, K.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Life Course Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp,Dept Women & Childrens Heath, London, England;Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Immunol & Microbial Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp, London, England.
    Hallner, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderhäll, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Allergy Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Douiri, A.
    Kings Coll London, Div Hlth & Social Care Res, London, England.
    Penagos, M.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Life Course Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp,Dept Women & Childrens Heath, London, England;Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Immunol & Microbial Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp, London, England.
    Melen, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Sachs Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Allergy Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Turcanu, V.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Life Course Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp,Dept Women & Childrens Heath, London, England;Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Immunol & Microbial Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp, London, England.
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lack, G.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Life Course Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp,Dept Women & Childrens Heath, London, England;Guys & St Thomass NHS Fdn Trust, Childrens Allergy Serv, London, England;Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Sch Immunol & Microbial Sci, Paediat Allergy Grp, London, England.
    Environmental peanut exposure increases the risk of peanut sensitization in high-risk children2018Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, nr 5, s. 586-593Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High household peanut consumption is associated with the development of peanut allergy, especially when peanut allergic cases are compared against atopic controls; thus, environmental peanut exposure (EPE) may be a risk factor for peanut sensitization and allergy. In this study, we explored the relationship between EPE and school-age peanut sensitization in a population-based cohort.

    Methods: Maternal bed dust was collected postnatally, and EPE was quantified using a polyclonal peanut ELISA. Peanut sensitization was assessed by specific IgE to peanut extract and sIgE to peanut protein component allergens Ara h 1, 2 or 3 >= 0.35kU/L (primary peanut sensitization). Initial nested case-control analysis was performed comparing peanut-sensitized cases against high-risk controls (matched for parental atopy) (n = 411) using a conditional regression analysis. This was followed by whole cohort analysis (n = 1878) comparing EPE against peanut sIgE sensitization at ages 4 and 8 years using generalized estimating equations and against primary peanut sensitization at age 8 years using a logistic regression model. Finally, a subgroup analysis was performed comparing the impact of EPE in peanut-sensitized vs egg-sensitized, peanut-tolerant individuals using logistic regression analysis. Levels of EPE were compared between groups using the Mann-Whitney U test.

    Results: In the nested case-control analysis, a higher level of EPE around birth was associated with peanut-specific IgE sensitization at age 4 years (OR=1.41, 95% CI:1.05-1.90) and primary peanut sensitization at age 8 years (OR=2.11, 95% CI:1.38-3.22) compared against high-risk controls. When the whole BAMSE cohort was assessed, EPE was no longer associated with peanut sensitization; however, on subgroup analysis, EPE was associated with primary peanut sensitization when compared against egg-sensitized peanut-tolerant controls with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.44 per unit EPE (95% CI:1.06-1.94). There was no significant interaction between EPE and FLG loss-of-function mutations, egg sensitization at age 4 years, infantile eczema or parental atopy on peanut sensitization.

    Conclusions: Higher levels of environmental exposure to peanut in the first few months of life appear to increase the probability of developing school-age peanut sensitization in atopic children (based on egg sensitization and parental atopy).

  • 59. Brunstein, Claudio G
    et al.
    Pasquini, Marcelo C
    Kim, Soyoung
    Fei, Mingwei
    Adekola, Kehinde
    Ahmed, Ibrahim
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    Agrawal, Vaibhav
    Auletta, Jeffrey J
    Battiwalla, Minoo
    Bejanyan, Nelli
    Bubalo, Joseph
    Cerny, Jan
    Chee, Lynette
    Ciurea, Stefan O
    Freytes, Cesar
    Gadalla, Shahinaz M
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Hashmi, Shahrukh K
    Hematti, Peiman
    Hildebrandt, Gerhard
    Holmberg, Leona A
    Lahoud, Oscar B
    Landau, Heather
    Lazarus, Hillard M
    de Lima, Marcos
    Mathews, Vikram
    Maziarz, Richard
    Nishihori, Taiga
    Norkin, Maxim
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Reshef, Ran
    Rotz, Seth
    Savani, Bipin
    Schouten, Harry C
    Seo, Sachiko
    Wirk, Baldeep M
    Yared, Jean
    Mineishi, Shin
    Rogosheske, John
    Perales, Miguel-Angel
    Effect of Conditioning Regimen Dose Reduction in Obese Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation2019Ingår i: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 480-487Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Data are limited on whether to adjust high-dose chemotherapy before autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (autoHCT) in obese patients. This study explores the effects of dose adjustment on the outcomes of obese patients, defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2. Dose adjustment was defined as a reduction in standard dosing ≥ 20%, based on ideal, reported dosing and actual weights. We included 2 groups of US patients who had received autoHCT between 2008 and 2014. Specifically, we included patients with multiple myeloma (MM, n = 1696) treated with high-dose melphalan and patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphomas (n = 781) who received carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan conditioning. Chemotherapy dose was adjusted in 1324 patients (78%) with MM and 608 patients (78%) with lymphoma. Age, sex, BMI, race, performance score, comorbidity index, and disease features (stage at diagnosis, disease status, and time to transplant) were similar between dose groups. In multivariate analyses for MM, adjusting for melphalan dose and for center effect had no impact on overall survival (P = .894) and treatment-related mortality (TRM) (P = .62), progression (P = .12), and progression-free survival (PFS; P = .178). In multivariate analyses for lymphoma, adjusting chemotherapy doses did not affect survival (P = .176), TRM (P = .802), relapse (P = .633), or PFS (P = .812). No center effect was observed in lymphoma. This study demonstrates that adjusting chemotherapy dose before autoHCT in obese patients with MM and lymphoma does not influence mortality. These results do not support adjusting chemotherapy dose in this population.

  • 60.
    Burke, Michael J.
    et al.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol Blood & Marrow Transplant, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Childrens Hosp Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Verneris, Michael R.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Pediat, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Le Rademacher, Jennifer
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Div Biostat, Inst Hlth & Soc, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    He, Wensheng
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Abdel-Azim, Hisham
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Abraham, Allistair A.
    Childrens Natl Med Ctr, Ctr Canc & Blood Disorders, Div Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Washington, DC 20010 USA..
    Auletta, Jeffery J.
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Div Hematol Oncol Bone Marrow Transplantat & Infe, Columbus, OH USA..
    Ayas, Mouhab
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp & Res Ctr, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Brown, Valerie I.
    Penn State Hershey Childrens Hosp, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Oncol Hematol, Hershey, PA USA.;Penn State Univ, Milton S Hershey Med Ctr, Coll Med, Hershey, PA 17033 USA..
    Cairo, Mitchell S.
    New York Med Coll, Dept Pediat, Valhalla, NY 10595 USA..
    Chan, Ka Wah
    Texas Transplant Inst, Dept Pediat, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Diaz Perez, Miguel A.
    Hosp Infantil Univ Nino Jesus, Dept Hematol Oncol, Madrid, Spain..
    Dvorak, Christopher C.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Pediat, Med Ctr, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Egeler, R. Maarten
    Hosp Sick Children, Dept Hematol Oncol, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada..
    Eldjerou, Lamis
    Univ Florida, Dept Pediat, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Frangoul, Haydar
    Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol, Sch Med, Nashville, TN USA..
    Guilcher, Gregory M. T.
    Alberta Childrens Prov Gen Hosp, Sect Paediat Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplant, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Hayashi, Robert J.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    Makassed Gen Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, Beiruit, Lebanon..
    Kasow, Kimberly A.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Leung, Wing H.
    St Jude Childrens Res Hosp, Div Bone Marrow Transplantat, Memphis, TN 38105 USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Hematologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pulsipher, Michael A.
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Shah, Niketa
    Mayo Clin Arizona, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol, Phoenix, AZ USA.;Phoenix Childrens Hosp, Phoenix, AZ USA..
    Shah, Nirali N.
    Natl Canc Inst NIH, Pediat Oncol Branch, Ctr Canc Res, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Thiel, Elizabeth
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Talano, Julie-An
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Pediat, Div Hematol Oncol Blood & Marrow Transplant, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Childrens Hosp Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Kitko, Carrie L.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Pediat, Stem Cell Transplant Program, Nashville, TN USA..
    Transplant Outcomes for Children with T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Second Remission: A Report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research2015Ingår i: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 21, nr 12, s. 2154-2159Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Survival for children with relapsed T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is poor when treated with chemotherapy alone, and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not well described. Two hundred twenty-nine children with T-ALL in second complete remission (CR2) received an HCT after myeloablative conditioning between 2000 and 2011 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Median age was 10 years (range, 2 to 18). Donor source was umbilical cord blood (26%), matched sibling bone marrow (38%), or unrelated bone marrow/peripheral blood (36%). Acute (grades II to IV) and chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in, respectively, 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% to 45%) and 26% (95% CI, 20% to 33%) of patients. Transplant-related mortality at day 100 and 3-year relapse rates were 13% (95% CI, 9% to 18%) and 30% (95% CI, 24% to 37%), respectively. Three-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 48% (95% CI, 41% to 55%) and 46% (95% CI, 39% to 52%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with bone marrow relapse, with or without concurrent extramedullary relapse before HCT, were most likely to relapse (hazard ratio, 3.94; P =.005) as compared with isolated extramedullary disease. In conclusion, HCT for pediatric T-ALL in CR2 demonstrates reasonable and durable outcomes, and consideration for HCT is warranted. (c) 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

  • 61. Calissendorff, Jan
    et al.
    Mikulski, Emil
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Larsen, Erik H
    Möller, Marika
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    A Prospective Investigation of Graves' Disease and Selenium: Thyroid Hormones, Auto-Antibodies and Self-Rated Symptoms.2015Ingår i: European thyroid journal, ISSN 2235-0640, Vol. 4, nr 2, s. 93-8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In Graves' thyrotoxicosis tachycardia, weight loss and mental symptoms are common. Recovery takes time and varies between patients. Treatment with methimazole reduces thyroid hormone levels. According to previous research, this reduction has been faster if selenium (Se) is added.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate whether supplementing the pharmacologic treatment with Se could change the immune mechanisms, hormone levels and/or depression and anxiety.

    METHODS: We prospectively investigated 38 patients with initially untreated thyrotoxicosis by measuring the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), thyroid receptor antibodies and thyroid peroxidase auto-antibodies before medication and at 6, 18 and 36 weeks after commencing treatment with methimazole and levo-thyroxine, with a randomized blinded oral administration of 200 µg Se/day or placebo. The selenoprotein P concentration was determined in plasma at inclusion and after 36 weeks. The patients were also assessed with questionnaires about depression, anxiety and self-rated symptoms before medication was started and after 36 weeks.

    RESULTS: FT4 decreased more in the Se group at 18 weeks (14 vs. 17 pmol/l compared to the placebo group, p = 0.01) and also at 36 weeks (15 vs. 18 pmol/l, p = 0.01). The TSH increased more in the Se group at 18 weeks (0.05 vs. 0.02 mIU/l, p = 0.04). The depression and anxiety scores were similar in both groups. In the Se group, the depression rates correlated negatively with FT3 and positively with TSH. This was not seen in the placebo group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Se supplementation can enhance biochemical restoration of hyperthyroidism, but whether this could shorten clinical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis and reduce mental symptoms must be investigated further.

  • 62. Carlsson, Anja M
    et al.
    Ngasala, Billy E
    Dahlström, Sabina
    Membi, Christopher
    Veiga, Isabel M
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Abdulla, Salim
    Premji, Zul
    Gil, J Pedro
    Björkman, Anders
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Plasmodium falciparum population dynamics during the early phase of anti-malarial drug treatment in Tanzanian children with acute uncomplicated malaria2011Ingår i: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 10, s. 380-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    This study aimed to explore Plasmodium falciparum population dynamics during the early phase of anti-malarial drug treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy in children with clinical malaria in a high transmission area in Africa.

    METHODS:

    A total of 50 children aged 1-10 years with acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Bagamoyo District, Tanzania, were enrolled. Participants were hospitalized and received supervised standard treatment with artemether-lumefantrine according to body weight in six doses over 3 days. Blood samples were collected 11 times, i.e. at time of diagnosis (-2 h) and 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h after initiation of treatment. Parasite population dynamics were assessed using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-genotyping of merozoite surface protein (msp) 1 and 2.

    RESULTS:

    PCR-analyses from nine sequential blood samples collected after initiation of treatment identified 20 and 21 additional genotypes in 15/50 (30%) and 14/50 (28%) children with msp1 and msp2, respectively, non-detectable in the pre-treatment samples (-2 and 0 h combined). Some 15/20 (75%) and 14/21 (67%) of these genotypes were identified within 24 h, whereas 17/20 (85%) and 19/21 (90%) within 48 h for msp1 and msp2, respectively. The genotype profile was diverse, and varied considerably over time both within and between patients, molecular markers and their respective families.

    CONCLUSION:

    PCR analyses from multiple blood samples collected during the early treatment phase revealed a complex picture of parasite sub-populations. This underlines the importance of interpreting PCR-outcomes with caution and suggests that the present use of PCR-adjustment from paired blood samples in anti-malarial drug trials may overestimate assessment of drug efficacy in high transmission areas in Africa.The study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov with identifier NCT00336375.

  • 63.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning Dalarna.
    Englund, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning Dalarna.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Early multidisciplinary assessment was associated with longer periods of sick leave: A randomized controlled trial in a primary health care centre2013Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 31, nr 3, s. 141-146Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To study the effects on sick leave from an early multidisciplinary assessment at a primary health care centre. Design. Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting

    Patients who saw GPs at a primary health care centre in mid-Sweden and asked for a sickness certificate for psychiatric or musculoskeletal diagnoses were invited to participate. Patients included were sick-listed for less than four weeks; 33 patients were randomized either to an assessment within a week by a physiotherapist, a psychotherapist, and an occupational therapist or to "standard care". The therapists used methods and tools they normally use in their clinical work.

    Main outcome measure

    Proportion of patients still sick-listed three months after randomization, total and net days on sick leave, and proportion who were on part-time sick leave.

    Results

    At follow-up after three months, in contrast to the pre-trial hypothesis, there was a trend toward a higher proportion of patients still sick-listed in the intervention group (7/18) as compared with the control group (3/15). The intervention group also had significantly longer sick-listing periods (mean 58 days) than the control group (mean 36 days) (p = 0.038). The proportion of patients who were part time sick-listed was significantly higher in the intervention group (10/18) than in the control group (2/15) (p = 0.027).

    Conclusions

    In this study an early multidisciplinary assessment was associated with longer periods on sick leave and more individuals on part-time sick leave.

  • 64.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Falun, Sweden.
    Lytsy, Per
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin.
    Anderzén, Ingrid
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Falun, Sweden.
    Motivation for return to work and actual return to work among people on long-term sick leave due to pain syndrome or mental health conditionsManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 65.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Lännerström, Linda
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Holmström, Inger Knutsson
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning.
    General practitioners' perceptions of working with the certification of sickness absences following changes in the Swedish social security system: a qualitative focus-group study2015Ingår i: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, artikel-id 21Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many physicians in Sweden, as well as in other countries, find the matter of certification of sickness absence (COSA) particularly burdensome. The issuing of COSAs has also been perceived as a work-environment problem among physicians. Among general practitioners (GPs) are the highest proportion of physicians in Sweden who experience difficulties with COSA. Swedish authorities have created several initiatives, by changing the social security system, to improve the rehabilitation of people who are ill and decrease the number of days of sick leave used. The aim of this study was to describe how GPs in Sweden perceive their work with COSA after these changes. Methods: A descriptive design with a qualitative, inductive focus-group discussion (FGD) approach was used. Results: Four categories emerged from the analysis of FGDs with GPs in Sweden: 1) Physicians' difficulties in their professional role; 2) Collaboration with other professionals facilitates the COSA; 3) Physicians' approach in relation to the patient; 4) An easier COSA process. Conclusions: Swedish GPs still perceived COSA to be a burdensome task. However, system changes in recent years have facilitated work related to COSA. Cooperation with other professionals on COSA was perceived positively.

  • 66.
    Carlsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Klinisk psykologi i hälso- och sjukvård. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Patient Information Websites About Medically Induced Second-Trimester Abortions: A Descriptive Study of Quality, Suitability, and Issues2017Ingår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 19, nr 1, artikel-id e8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients undergoing medically induced second-trimester abortions feel insufficiently informed and use the Web for supplemental information. However, it is still unclear how people who have experience with pregnancy termination appraise the quality of patient information websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions, whether they consider the websites suitable for patients, and what issues they experience with the websites.

    Objective: Our objective was to investigate the quality of, suitability of, and issues with patient information websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions and potential differences between websites affiliated with the health care system and private organizations.

    Methods: We set out to answer the objective by using 4 laypeople who had experience with pregnancy termination as quality assessors. The first 50 hits of 26 systematic searches were screened (N=1300 hits) using search terms reported by the assessors. Of these hits, 48% (628/1300) were irrelevant and 51% (667/1300) led to websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions. After correcting for duplicate hits, 42 patient information websites were included, 18 of which were affiliated with the health care system and 24 with private organizations. The 4 assessors systematically assessed the websites with the DISCERN instrument (total score range 16-80), the Ensuring Quality Information for Patients (EQIP) tool (total score range 0-100), as well as questions concerning website suitability and perceived issues.

    Results: The interrater reliability was 0.8 for DISCERN and EQIP, indicating substantial agreement between the assessors. The total mean score was 36 for DISCERN and 40 for EQIP, indicating poor overall quality. Websites from the health care system had greater total EQIP (45 vs 37, P>.05) and reliability scores (22 vs 20, P>.05). Only 1 website was recommended by all assessors and 57% (24/42) were rated as very unsuitable by at least one assessor. The most reported issues with the websites involved lack of information (76%, 32/42), and poor design (36%, 15/42).

    Conclusions: The high number of irrelevant hits and poor quality of patient information websites are considerable issues that must be addressed and considered when consulting patients awaiting medically induced second-trimester abortions. In clinical encounters, health professionals should initiate discussions concerning websites about medically induced second-trimester abortions and inform patients about the issues and quality deficits associated with these websites.

  • 67.
    Carlsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Klinisk psykologi i hälso- och sjukvård.
    Melander, Marttala Ulla
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Språkvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för nordiska språk.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Vårdvetenskap.
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Institutionen för Kvinnors och Barns Hälsa, Karolinska Institutet.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Obstetrisk forskning. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Mattsson, Elisabet
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Klinisk psykologi i hälso- och sjukvård. Institutionen för Vårdvetenskap, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke Högskola.
    Quality of Patient Information Websites About Congenital Heart Defects: Mixed-Methods Study of Perspectives Among Individuals With Experience of a Prenatal Diagnosis2017Ingår i: Interactive Journal of Medical Research, E-ISSN 1929-073X, Vol. 6, nr 2, artikel-id e15Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When a heart defect is prenatally diagnosed in the fetus, expectant parents experience a great need for information about various topics. After the diagnosis, the Web is used for supplemental information, and the scarcity of research calls attention to the need to explore patient information websites from the perspectives of the intended consumers.

    Objective: The overarching aim of this study was to explore the quality of Swedish patient information websites about congenital heart defects, from the perspectives of individuals with experience of a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defect in the fetus.

    Methods: This was a mixed-methods study of websites identified through systematic searches in the two most used Web-based search engines. Of the total 80 screened hits, 10 hits led to patient information websites about congenital heart defects. A quality assessment tool inspired by a previous study was used to evaluate each website’s appearance, details, relevance, suitability, information about treatment choices, and overall quality. Answers were given on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from 1, representing the lowest score, to 5, representing the highest score. Each website was assessed individually by persons with experience of continued (n=4) and terminated (n=5) pregnancy following a prenatal diagnosis. Assessments were analyzed with Kendall’s coefficient of concordance W, Mann-Whitney U test, Friedman’s test, and a Wilcoxon-Nemenyi-McDonald-Thompson test. In addition, each assessor submitted written responses to open-ended questions in the quality assessment tool, and two joint focus group discussions were conducted with each group of assessors. The qualitative data were analyzed with inductive manifest content analysis.

    Results: Assessments represented a low score (median=2.0) for treatment choices and moderate scores (median=3.0) for appearance, details, relevance, suitability, and overall quality. No website had a median of the highest achievable score for any of the questions in the quality assessment tool. Medians of the lowest achievable score were found in questions about treatment choices (n=4 websites), details (n=2 websites), suitability (n=1 website), and overall quality (n=1 website). Websites had significantly different scores for appearance (P=.01), details (P<.001), relevance (P<.001), suitability (P<.001), treatment choices (P=.04), and overall quality (P<.001). The content analysis of the qualitative data generated six categories: (1) advertisements, (2) comprehensiveness, (3) design, (4) illustrations and pictures, (5) language, and (6) trustworthiness. Various issues with the included websites were highlighted, including the use of inappropriate advertisements, biased information, poor illustrations, complex language, and poor trustworthiness.

    Conclusions: From the perspectives of the intended consumers, patient information websites about congenital heart defects are, to a large extent, inadequate tools for supplemental information following a prenatal diagnosis. Health professionals should initiate discussions with patients about their intentions to use the Web, inform them about the varied quality in the Web-based landscape, and offer recommendations for appropriate Web-based sources.

  • 68.
    Castegren, Markus
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Infektionssjukdomar.
    Jonasson, Mikaela
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Castegren, Sara
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lipcsey, Miklós
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Sjölin, Jan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Infektionssjukdomar.
    Initial levels of organ failure, microbial findings and mortality in intensive care-treated primary, secondary and tertiary sepsis2015Ingår i: CRITICAL CARE AND RESUSCITATION, ISSN 1441-2772, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 174-181Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Analysis of whether patients with primary, secondary and tertiary sepsis, defined by the presence or absence of recent systemic inflammation-inducing events before the onset of sepsis, differ in clinical presentation, microbiological test results, treatment received and outcome. Design, setting and participants: A retrospective observational study in a single, general intensive care unit, of all patients treated for severe sepsis or septic shock from 2006 to 2011. Patients with haematological malignancies, with immunosuppressive diseases or being treated with immunosuppressive drugs were excluded. Interventions: None. Main outcome measures: Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, incidence of organ failure, microbiological results of blood cultures and mortality. Results: We included 213 patients, who were classified as having primary (n = 121), secondary (n = 65) or tertiary sepsis (n = 27). The groups differed significantly in SOFA score, the incidence of kidney failure and coagulation failure at onset of sepsis in the ICU, as well as in blood culture findings. No differences in 7-day or 28-day mortality were seen, but the time of death occurred earlier among non-survivors in the primary sepsis group. Conclusions: Inflammatory insults before the onset of sepsis affect the clinical picture, blood microbial findings, and in non-survivors, the time of death. These results could, if validated in a prospective study, form a basis for a novel and simple strategy for stratifying patients in clinical studies for immunomodulation therapies in sepsis.

  • 69.
    Casulo, Carla
    et al.
    Univ Rochester, Wilmot Canc Inst, New York, NY USA.
    Friedberg, Jonathan W.
    Univ Rochester, Wilmot Canc Inst, New York, NY USA.
    Ahn, Kwang W.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Flowers, Christopher
    Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Sch Med, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    DiGilio, Alyssa
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Smith, Sonali M.
    Univ Chicago, Sect Hematol Oncol, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Ahmed, Sairah
    Univ MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Div Canc Med, Houston, TX USA.
    Inwards, David
    Mayo Clin, Div Hematol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riydah, Saudi Arabia.
    Chen, Andy, I
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Portland, OR 97201 USA.
    Choe, Hannah
    Weill Cornell Med Coll, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, New York, NY USA.
    Cohen, Jonathon
    Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Sch Med, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Copelan, Edward
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Levine Canc Inst, Charlotte, NC USA.
    Farooq, Umar
    Univ Iowa, Dept Med, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Fenske, Timothy S.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Freytes, Cesar
    Texas Transplant Inst, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Gaballa, Sameh
    Thomas Jefferson Univ Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Philadelphia, PA 19107 USA.
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Univ Kansas, Div Hematol Malignancies & Cellular Therapeut, Med Ctr, Kansas City, KS 66103 USA.
    Jethava, Yogesh
    Univ Arkansas Med Sci, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Little Rock, AR 72205 USA.
    Kamble, Rammurti T.
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Div Hematol & Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kenkre, Vaishalee P.
    Univ Wisconsin, Div Hematol & Oncol, Madison, WI USA.
    Lazarus, Hillard
    Univ Hosp Cleveland, Seidman Canc Ctr, Med Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Lazaryan, Aleksandr
    Univ Minnesota, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rezvani, Andrew R.
    Stanford Hlth Care, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Stanford, CA USA.
    Rizzieri, David
    Duke Univ, Div Hematol Malignancies & Cellular Therapy, Durham, NC USA.
    Seo, Sachiko
    East Hosp, Natl Canc Res Ctr, Chiba, Japan.
    Shah, Gunjan L.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Shah, Nina
    Univ MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Div Canc Med, Houston, TX USA.
    Solh, Melham
    Northside Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Grp Georgia, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Sureda, Anna
    Inst Catala Oncol Hosp, Hematol Dept, Barcelona, Spain.
    William, Basem
    Ohio State Med Ctr, James Canc Ctr, Columbus, OH USA.
    Cumpston, Aaron
    West Virginia Univ Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Morgantown, WV USA.
    Zelenetz, Andrew D.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Link, Brian K.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Autologous Transplantation in Follicular Lymphoma with Early Therapy Failure: A National LymphoCare Study and Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Analysis2018Ingår i: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 24, nr 6, s. 1163-1171Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) experiencing early therapy failure (ETF) within 2 years of frontline chemoimmunotherapy have poor overall survival (OS). We analyzed data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) and the National LymphoCare Study (NLCS) to determine whether autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (autoHCT) can improve outcomes in this high-risk FL subgroup. ETF was defined as failure to achieve at least partial response after frontline chemoimmunotherapy or lymphoma progression within 2 years of frontline chemoimmunotherapy. We identified 2 groups: the non-autoHCT cohort (patients from the NLCS with ETF not undergoing autoHCT) and the autoHCT cohort (CIBMTR patients with ETF undergoing autoHCT). All patients received rituximab-based chemotherapy as frontline treatment; 174 non-autoHCT patients and 175 autoHCT patients were identified and analyzed. There was no difference in 5-year OS between the 2 groups (60% versus 67%, respectively; P = .16). A planned subgroup analysis showed that patients with ETF receiving autoHCT soon after treatment failure (≤1 year of ETF; n = 123) had higher 5-year OS than those without autoHCT (73% versus 60%, P = .05). On multivariate analysis, early use of autoHCT was associated with significantly reduced mortality (hazard ratio, .63; 95% confidence interval, .42 to .94; P = .02). Patients with FL experiencing ETF after frontline chemoimmunotherapy lack optimal therapy. We demonstrate improved OS when receiving autoHCT within 1 year of treatment failure. Results from this unique collaboration between the NLCS and CIBMTR support consideration of early consolidation with autoHCT in select FL patients experiencing ETF.

  • 70.
    Catharina, Frank
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindbäck, Camilla
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Christina, Takman
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Healthcare professionals’ perceptions of their work with patients of working age with heart failure2017Ingår i: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of knowledge about healthcare professionals’ perspectives on rehabilitation in relation to heart failure.Still, collaboration between different professionals can impact patients. The purpose of this study was to describe healthcareprofessionals’ perceptions of their work with patients of working age with heart failure. The sample population consisted of sixnurses, one physiotherapist and one cardiologist. One individual interview and two focus-group interviews were conducted.The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Three descriptive categories were constructed: ‘the impact ofheart failure on patients’ life situations’, ‘heart failure service’, and ‘patients’ process of returning to work’. To support patients,healthcare professionals need to find ways to combine patients’ personal needs with protocol-driven care.

  • 71.
    Cederbom, Sara
    et al.
    OsloMet Oslo Metropolitan Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Physiotherapy, Postboks 4,St Olays Plass, N-0130 Oslo, Norway.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Fysioterapi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Impact of the fall prevention Otago Exercise Programme on pain among community-dwelling older adults: a short- and long-term follow-up study2019Ingår i: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 14, s. 721-726Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain is a major public health issue among community-dwelling older adults, with a prevalence of 45-80%. In addition to being strongly associated with reduced physical function, loss of independence, psychological distress, lower quality of life, and risk of earlier death. Recent research has also found that pain in older adults is associated with a higher risk of falls, which itself is another major health concern. Long-term and high-intensity pain are predictors of chronic pain and pain-related disability. Therefore, establishing an evidence-based intervention that can reduce both pain and falls in older adults is of high importance.

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether a home-based fall-preventive exercise-program can reduce pain in the target population over both the short and long term.

    Patients and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study with a 1-group pretest-posttest design. We included 119 participants who had participated in a recent 2-year fall prevention intervention in a randomized controlled trial. The intervention included exercises based on the Otago Exercise Programme (OEP), an individually tailored and prescribed program that involves home-based exercises supervised by a physiotherapist. Pain was measured using an item from the EuroQol-5D questionnaire.

    Results: Pain was significantly reduced from baseline (n=119) at 3 (n=105, p=0.003), 12 (n=96, p=0.041), and 24 (n=80, p=0.028) months following the commencement of OEP-based exercises.

    Conclusions: These results indicate that the OEP could be a suitable evidence-based program for both pain management and fall prevention among community-dwelling older people who live with pain and are at a higher risk of falling. Our study highlights an effective technique for better pain management and fall prevention in older adults.

  • 72.
    Chaudhury, Sonali
    et al.
    Ann & Robert H Lurie Childrens Hosp Chicago, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplanta, 225 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Sparapani, Rodney
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hu, Zhen-Huan
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    Univ S Florida, Coll Med, H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL 33612 USA..
    Abdel-Azim, Hisham
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Malone, Adriana
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Bone Marrow & Stem Cell Transplantat, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Froedtert Mem Lutheran Hosp, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Daly, Andrew
    Univ Calgary, Tom Baker Canc Ctr, Cumming Sch Med, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Bacher, Ulrike
    Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg, Interdisciplinary Clin Stem Cell Transplantat, Hamburg, Germany..
    Wirk, Baldeep M.
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Kamble, Rammurti T.
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Div Hematol & Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Gale, Robert P.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Wood, William A.
    Univ N Carolina, Div Hematol Oncol, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Hale, Gregory
    Univ S Florida, All Childrens Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, St Petersburg, FL 33701 USA..
    Wiernik, Peter H.
    Canc Res Fdn New York, Bronx, NY USA..
    Hashmi, Shahrukh K.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Rochester, MN USA..
    Marks, David
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Pediat Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Ustun, Celalettin
    Univ Minneapolis, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Munker, Reinhold
    Louisiana State Univ Hlth Shreveport, Dept Internal Med, Sect Hematol Oncol, Shreveport, LA USA..
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Alyea, Edwin
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Div Hematol Malignancies, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Popat, Uday
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat & Cellular Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Sobecks, Ronald
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Kalaycio, Matt
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Maziarz, Richard
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, Adult Blood & Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Hijiya, Nobuko
    Ann & Robert H Lurie Childrens Hosp Chicago, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplanta, 225 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children and Young Adults with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A CIBMTR Cohort Analysis2016Ingår i: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 1056-1064Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in children and young adults is uncommon. Young patients have long life expectancies and low morbidity with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Prolonged tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) use may cause significant morbidity. In addition, indication for HCT in patients in the first chronic phase is not established. We hence retrospectively evaluated outcomes in 449 CML patients with early disease receiving myeloablative HCT reported to the CIBMTR. We analyzed various factors affecting outcome, specifically the effect of age and pre-HCT TKI in pediatric patients (age < 18 years, n = 177) and young adults (age 18 to 29 years, n = 272) with the goal of identifying prognostic factors. Post-HCT probability rates of 5-year overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) were 75% and 59%, respectively. Rates of OS and LFS were 76% and 57% in <18-year and 74% and 60% in 18- to 29-year group, respectively, by univariate analysis (P = .1 and = .6). Five-year rates of OS for HLA matched sibling donor (MSD) and bone marrow (BM) stem cell source were 83% and 80%, respectively. In multivariate analysis there was no effect of age (<18 versus 18 to 29) or pre-HCT TKI therapy on OS, LFS, transplant related mortality, or relapse. Favorable factors for OS were MSD (P < .001) and recent HCT (2003 to 2010; P = .04). LFS was superior with MSD (P < .001), BM as graft source (P = .001), and performance scores > 90 (P = .03) compared with unrelated or mismatched peripheral blood stem cells donors and recipients with lower performance scores. Older age was associated with increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (P = .0002). In the current era, HCT outcomes are similar in young patients and children with early CML, and best outcomes are achieved with BM grafts and MSD.

  • 73. Chavannes, Niels
    et al.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och klinisk epidemiologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och klinisk epidemiologi.
    Roman, Miguel
    Moran, Ana
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    Crockett, Alan
    Cave, Andrew
    Williams, Siân
    Jones, Rupert
    Tsiligianni, Ioanna
    van der Molen, Thys
    Price, David
    UNLOCK: Uncovering and Noting Long-term Outcomes in COPD to enhance Knowledge2010Ingår i: Primary Care Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1471-4418, E-ISSN 1475-1534, Vol. 19, nr 4, s. 408-Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
  • 74.
    Chen, Y-B
    et al.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Yawkey 9E 9052 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Wang, T.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood, Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Div Biostat, Inst Hlth & Soc, Milwaukee, WI USA..
    Hemmer, M. T.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood, Marrow Transplant Res, Dept Med, Milwaukee, WI USA..
    Brady, C.
    Natl Marrow Donor Program Be Match, Ctr Int Blood, Marrow Transplant Res, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Couriel, D. R.
    Marrow Transplant Program, Utah Blood, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Alousi, A.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Div Canc Med, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Pidala, J.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Res Inst, Tampa, FL USA..
    Urbano-Ispizua, A.
    Univ Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Barcelona, Inst Res Josep Carreras, Dept Hematol, Hosp Clin, Barcelona, Spain..
    Choi, S. W.
    Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Nishihori, T.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Teshima, T.
    Univ Hosp, Fukuoka, Japan..
    Inamoto, Y.
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Hematopoiet Stem Cell Transplantat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Wirk, B.
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Marks, D. I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Abdel-Azim, H.
    Univ So Calif, Keck Sch Med, Marrow Transplantat, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Lehmann, L.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA USA..
    Yu, L.
    Louisiana State Univ, Med Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol, Childrens Hosp,Ctr Canc & Blood Disorders,HSC, New Orleans, LA USA..
    Bitan, M.
    Tel Aviv Sourasky Med Ctr, Tel Aviv, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Cairo, M. S.
    New York Med Coll, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol, Stem Cell Transplantat, Dept Pediat, Valhalla, NY USA..
    Qayed, M.
    Emory Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Atlanta, GA, Australia..
    Salit, R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA USA..
    Gale, R. P.
    Imperial Coll London, Hematol Res Ctr, Div Expt Med, Dept Med, London, England..
    Martino, R.
    Hosp Santa Creu St Pau, Div Clin Hematol, Barcelona, Spain..
    Jaglowski, S.
    Ohio State Univ, Med Ctr, Div Hematol, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Bajel, A.
    Royal Melbourne Hosp City Campus, Melbourne, Australia..
    Savani, B.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Med, Nashville, TN USA..
    Frangoul, H.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Pediat, Nashville, TN USA..
    Lewis, I. D.
    Royal Adelaide Hosp, Haematol & Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Storek, J.
    Univ Calgary, Dept Med, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Askar, M.
    Baylor Univ, Med Ctr, Dallas, TX USA..
    Kharfan-Dabaja, M. A.
    H Lee Mofitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Aljurf, M.
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Ringden, O.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reshef, R.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, Columbia Ctr Translat Immunol, New York, NY USA..
    Olsson, R. F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hashmi, S.
    Mayo Clin Rochester, Rochester, MN USA..
    Seo, S.
    Nat Canc Res Ctr, East Hosp, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan..
    Spitzer, T. R.
    MacMillan, M. L.
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Lazaryan, A.
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol, Dept Med, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Spellman, S. R.
    Arora, M.
    Cutler, C. S.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Dept Med Oncol, Boston, MA USA..
    GvHD after umbilical cord blood transplantation for acute leukemia: an analysis of risk factors and effect on outcomes2017Ingår i: Bone Marrow Transplantation, ISSN 0268-3369, E-ISSN 1476-5365, Vol. 52, nr 3, s. 400-408Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) registry, we analyzed 1404 umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) patients (single (>= 18 years) = 810, double (< 18 years) = 594) with acute leukemia to define the incidence of acute GvHD (aGvHD) and chronic GvHD (cGvHD), analyze clinical risk factors and investigate outcomes. After single UCBT, 100-day incidence of grade II-IV aGvHD was 39% (95% confidence interval (CI), 36-43%), grade III-IV aGvHD was 18% (95% CI, 15-20%) and 1-year cGvHD was 27% (95% CI, 24-30%). After double UCBT, 100-day incidence of grade II-IV aGvHD was 45% (95% CI, 41-49%), grade III-IV aGvHD was 22% (95% CI, 19-26%) and 1-year cGvHD was 26% (95% CI, 22-29%). For single UCBT, multivariate analysis showed that absence of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was associated with aGvHD, whereas prior aGvHD was associated with cGvHD. For double UCBT, absence of ATG and myeloablative conditioning were associated with aGvHD, whereas prior aGvHD predicted for cGvHD. Grade III-IV aGvHD led to worse survival, whereas cGvHD had no significant effect on disease-free or overall survival. GvHD is prevalent after UCBT with severe aGvHD leading to higher mortality. Future research in UCBT should prioritize prevention of GvHD.

  • 75.
    Cheng, Yee Chung
    et al.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Shi, Yushu
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Brazauskas, Ruta
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hemmer, Michael T.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Bishop, Michael R.
    Univ Chicago Hosp, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Nieto, Yago
    Univ Texas, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Stadtmauer, Edward
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Ayash, Lois
    Karmanos Canc Inst, Detroit, MI USA.;Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Lazarus, Hillard
    Univ Hosp, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Holmberg, Leona
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Lill, Michael
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA..
    Olsson, R
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wirk, Baldeep Mona
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Seattle, WA USA..
    Arora, Mukta
    Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Hari, Parameswaran
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Ueno, Naoto
    Univ Texas, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Long-Term Outcome of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Compared to Non-Inflammatory Breast Cancer in the Setting of High-Dose Chemotherapy with Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation2017Ingår i: Journal of Cancer, ISSN 1837-9664, E-ISSN 1837-9664, Vol. 8, nr 6, s. 1009-1017Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare aggressive form of breast cancer. It is well known that the long-term survival and progression-free survival of IBC are worse than that of non-IBC. We report the long term outcomes of patients with IBC and non-IBC who had undergone high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT).

    Methods: All 3387 patients with IBC or non-IBC who underwent HDC with AHCT between1990-2002 and registered with CIBMTR were included in this analysis. Transplant-related mortality (TRM), disease relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two cohorts. Multivariate Cox regression model was used to determine the independent impact of stage on outcomes.

    Results: 527 patients with IBC and 2,860 patients with non-IBC were included; the median age at transplantation (47 vs 46 years old) and median follow-up period in the 2 groups (167 vs 168 months) were similar. The most common conditioning regimen was cyclophosphamide and carboplatin based in both groups (54% in IBC and 50% in non-IBC). AHCT was well tolerated in both groups. TRM was similar in both groups (one year TRM was 2% for IBC and 3% for non-IBC, p= 0.16). The most common cause of death was disease progression or relapse (81% in IBC and 75% in non-IBC). The median survival for both IBC and non-IBC was the same at 40 months. The PFS at 10 years was 27% (95% CI: 23-31%) for IBC and 24% (95% CI: 22-26%) for non-IBC (p= 0.21), and the OS at 10 years was 31% (95% CI: 27-35%) for IBC and 28% (95% CI: 26-30%) for non-IBC (p= 0.16). In univariate analysis, patients with stage III IBC and no active diseases at transplantation had lower PFS and OS than that in non-IBC. In multivariate analysis, controlling for age, disease status at AHCT, hormonal receptor status, time from HR 1.16, 95% CI: 1- 1.34, p=0.0459), worse PFS (HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.01-1.36, p= 0.0339) and higher risk of disease relapse/progression (HR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.06- 1.45, p= 0.0082) as compared to stage III non-IBC. Amongst all patients a higher stage disease was associated with worse PFS, OS and disease relapse/ progression.

    Conclusions: Long-term outcomes of stage III IBC patients who underwent AHCT were poorer than that in non-IBC patients confirming that the poor prognosis of IBC even in the setting of HDC with AHCT.

  • 76.
    Chhabra, Saurabh
    et al.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, 9200 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Ahn, Kwang Woo
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Dept Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA;Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Hu, Zhen-Huan
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Jain, Sandeep
    Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Charleston, SC 29425 USA.
    Assal, Amer
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Cerny, Jan
    UMass Mem Med Ctr, Worcester, MA USA.
    Copelan, Edward A.
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA.
    Daly, Andrew
    Tom Baker Canc Clin, Calgary, AB, Canada.
    DeFilipp, Zachariah
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Gadalla, Shahinaz M.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Clin Genet Branch, NIH, Rockville, MD USA.
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England.
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Univ Kansas, Med Ctr, Div Hematol & Oncol, Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Kansas City, KS 66103 USA.
    Hamilton, Betty K.
    Cleveland Clin Fdn, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, 9500 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44195 USA.
    Hildebrandt, Gerhard Carl
    Univ Kentucky, Markey Canc Ctr, Lexington, KY USA.
    Hsu, Jack W.
    Shands HealthCare, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Gainesville, FL USA;Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL USA.
    Inamoto, Yoshihiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Hematopoiet Stem Cell Transplantat, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kanate, Abraham S.
    West Virginia Univ, Osborn Hematopoiet Malignancy & Transplantat Prog, Morgantown, WV 26506 USA.
    Khoury, H. Jean
    Emory Univ Hosp, 1364 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Univ Hosp Cleveland, Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Litzow, Mark R.
    Mayo Clin Rochester, Div Hematol & Transplant Ctr, Rochester, MN USA.
    Nathan, Sunita
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.
    Olsson, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pawarode, Attaphol
    Univ Michigan, Dept Internal Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Med Sch,Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Ringden, Olle
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rowe, Jacob M.
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Dept Hematol, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Saad, Ayman
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, 221 Kirkland Hall, Nashville, TN 37235 USA.
    Schouten, Harry C.
    Acad Ziekenhuis, Dept Hematol, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Seo, Sachiko
    Natl Canc Res Ctr East, Dept Hematol & Oncol, Chiba, Japan.
    Shah, Nirav N.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, 9200 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Solh, Melhem
    Northside Hosp, Blood & Marrow Transplant Grp Georgia, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Stuart, Robert K.
    Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Charleston, SC 29425 USA.
    Ustun, Celalettin
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol & Transplantat, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Woolfrey, Ann E.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Yared, Jean A.
    Univ Maryland, Greenebaum Canc Ctr, Div Hematol Oncol, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program,Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.
    Alyea, Edwin P.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Kalaycio, Matt E.
    Cleveland Clin Fdn, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, 9500 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44195 USA.
    Popat, Uday
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Sobecks, Ronald M.
    Cleveland Clin Fdn, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, 9500 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44195 USA.
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.
    Myeloablative vs reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia2018Ingår i: BLOOD ADVANCES, ISSN 2473-9529, Vol. 2, nr 21, s. 2922-2936Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is a potentially curative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Optimal conditioning intensity for allo-HCT for CML in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is unknown. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database, we sought to determine whether reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC) allo-HCT and myeloablative conditioning (MAC) result in similar outcomes in CML patients. We evaluated 1395 CML allo-HCT recipients between the ages of 18 and 60 years. The disease status at transplant was divided into the following categories: chronic phase 1, chronic phase 2 or greater, and accelerated phase. Patients in blast phase at transplant and alternative donor transplants were excluded. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) after allo-HCT. MAC (n = 1204) and RIC allo-HCT recipients (n = 191) from 2007 to 2014 were included. Patient, disease, and transplantation characteristics were similar, with a few exceptions. Multivariable analysis showed no significant difference in OS between MAC and RIC groups. In addition, leukemia-free survival and nonrelapse mortality did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. Compared with MAC, the RIC group had a higher risk of early relapse after allo-HCT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.85; P = .001). The cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) was lower with RIC than with MAC (HR, 0.77; P = .02). RIC provides similar survival and lower cGVHD compared with MAC and therefore may be a reasonable alternative to MAC for CML patients in the TKI era.

  • 77.
    Chlibek, Roman
    et al.
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic..
    Pauksens, Karlis
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Infektionssjukdomar.
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    van Rijckevorsel, Gini
    Publ Hlth Serv Amsterdam, Dept Infect Dis, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Richardus, Jan H.
    Municipal Publ Hlth Serv Rotterdam Rijnmond, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Plassmann, Georg
    Unterfrintroper Hausarztzentrum, Essen, Germany..
    Schwarz, Tino F.
    Stiftung juliusspital, Cent Lab, Wurzburg, Germany.;Stiftung juliusspital, Vaccinat Ctr, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Catteau, Gregory
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Lal, Himal
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Heineman, Thomas C.
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Long-term immunogenicity and safety of an investigational herpes zoster subunit vaccine in older adults2016Ingår i: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 34, nr 6, s. 863-868Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An investigational subunit vaccine containing the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) and the AS01(B) adjuvant system is being evaluated for the prevention of herpes zoster (HZ) in older adults. A phase II trial evaluating different formulations of this vaccine (containing 25 mu g, 50 mu g, or 100 mu g gE) was conducted in adults >= 60 years of age and showed that all formulations elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses for up to 3 years after vaccination. In this follow-up study in subjects who received two doses of the 50 mu g gE/AS01(B) formulation (HZ/su), we assessed the persistence of the immune responses for up to 6 years after vaccination. Methods: This phase II, open-label, multicenter, single-group trial conducted in the Czech Republic, Germany, Sweden, and the Netherlands followed 129 subjects who had received two doses (2 months apart) of HZ/su during the initial trial. Vaccine-induced immune responses (frequencies of gE-specific CD4(+) T cells expressing >= 2 activation markers and serum anti-gE antibody concentrations) were evaluated at 48, 60, and 72 months after the first HZ/su dose. Results: Six years after vaccination with HZ/su, gE-specific cell-mediated immune responses and anti-gE antibody concentrations had decreased by 20-25% from month 36, but remained higher than the prevaccination values. At month 72, the gE-specific cell-mediated immune response was 3.8 times higher than the prevaccination value (477.3 vs. 119.4 activated gE-specific CD4(+) T cells per 10(6) cells), and the anti-gE antibody concentration was 7.3 times higher than the prevaccination value (8159.0 vs. 1121.3 mIU/mL). No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported between months 36 and 72. Conclusions: gE-specific cellular and humoral immune responses persisted for 6 years after two-dose vaccination with HZ/su in healthy older adults. No safety concerns were identified.

  • 78. Cook, Jackie
    et al.
    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit
    Gonzalez, Iveth J.
    Bell, David
    Edlund, Elin
    Nassor, Majda H.
    Msellem, Mwinyi
    Ali, Abdullah
    Abass, Ali K.
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for point-of-care detection of asymptomatic low-density malaria parasite carriers in Zanzibar2015Ingår i: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 14, s. 43-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Asymptomatic, low parasite density malaria infections are difficult to detect with currently available point-of-care diagnostics. This study piloted a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) kit for field-friendly, high-throughput detection of asymptomatic malaria infections during mass screening and treatment (MSAT) in Zanzibar, a malaria pre-elimination setting. Methods: Screening took place in three known hotspot areas prior to the short rains in November. Finger-prick blood was taken for screening by rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and LAMP and collected on filter paper for subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. LAMP results were compared to RDT and to PCR using McNemar's test. Results: Approximately 1,000 people were screened. RDT detected ten infections (1.0% (95% CI 0.3-1.6)) whilst both LAMP and PCR detected 18 (1.8% (95% CI 0.9-2.6)) infections. However, PCR identified three infections that LAMP did not detect and vice versa. LAMP testing was easy to scale-up in field conditions requiring minimal training and equipment, with results ready one to three hours after screening. Conclusions: Despite lower than expected prevalence, LAMP detected a higher number of infections than the currently used diagnostic, RDT. LAMP is a field-friendly, sensitive diagnostic test that could be useful for MSAT malaria campaigns which require quick results to enable prompt treatment.

  • 79. Cook, Jackie
    et al.
    Xu, Weiping
    Msellem, Mwinyi
    Vonk, Marlotte
    Bergström, Beatrice
    Gosling, Roly
    Al-Mafazy, Abdul-Wahid
    McElroy, Peter
    Molteni, Fabrizio
    Abass, Ali K
    Garimo, Issa
    Ramsan, Mahdi
    Ali, Abdullah
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Björkman, Anders
    Mass Screening and Treatment on the Basis of Results of a Plasmodium falciparum-Specific Rapid Diagnostic Test Did Not Reduce Malaria Incidence in Zanzibar2015Ingår i: The Internet Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1528-8366, Vol. 211, nr 9, s. 1476-1483Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Seasonal increases in malaria continue in hot spots in Zanzibar. Mass screening and treatment (MSAT) may help reduce the reservoir of infection; however, it is unclear whether rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect a sufficient proportion of low-density infections to influence subsequent transmission.

    METHODS:

    Two rounds of MSAT using Plasmodium falciparum-specific RDT were conducted in 5 hot spots (population, 12 000) in Zanzibar in 2012. In parallel, blood samples were collected on filter paper for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Data on confirmed malarial parasite infections from health facilities in intervention and hot spot control areas were monitored as proxy for malaria transmission.

    RESULTS:

    Approximately 64% of the population (7859) were screened at least once. P. falciparum prevalence, as measured by RDT, was 0.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], .1%-.3%) in both rounds, compared with PCR measured prevalences (for all species) of 2.5% (95% CI, 2.1%-2.9%) and 3.8% (95% CI, 3.2%-4.4%) in rounds 1 and 2, respectively. Two fifths (40%) of infections detected by PCR included non-falciparum species. Treatment of RDT-positive individuals (4% of the PCR-detected parasite carriers) did not reduce subsequent malaria incidence, compared with control areas.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostic tools for detection of all human malaria species are needed to make MSAT an effective strategy in settings where malaria elimination programs are in the pre-elimination phase.

  • 80.
    Cornell, Robert F.
    et al.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Bachanova, Veronika
    Univ Minnesota, Med Ctr, Bone & Marrow Transplant Program, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    D'Souza, Anita
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Woo-Ahn, Kwang
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Martens, Michael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Oncol, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Huang, Jiaxing
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Al-Homsi, A. Samer
    Spectrum Hlth, Blood & Marrow Transplant, Grand Rapids, MI USA..
    Chhabra, Saurabh
    Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Med, Charleston, SC USA..
    Copelan, Edward
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Diaz, Miguel-Angel
    Hosp Infanta Univ Nino Jesus, Dept Hematol Oncol, Madrid, Spain..
    Freytes, Cesar O.
    Texas Transplant Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Univ Kansas, Med Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Div Hematol & Oncol, Kansas City, KS 66103 USA..
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Hildebrandt, Gerhard
    Univ Kentucky, Div Hematol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Markey Canc Ctr, Lexington, KY USA..
    Kamble, Rammurti T.
    Baylor Coll Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed
    H Lee Moffitt Canc & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila
    Univ Virginia Hlth Syst, Div Hematol Oncol, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Univ Hosp Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Marks, David I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    H Lee Moffitt Canc & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Saad, Ayman
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA..
    Usmani, Saad
    Carolinas HealthCare Syst, Levine Canc Inst, Dept Hematol Oncol & Blood Disorders, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Vesole, David H.
    Hackensack UMC, John Theurer Canc Ctr, Hackensack, NJ USA..
    Yared, Jean
    Univ Maryland, Dept Med, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, Div Hematol Oncol,Greenebaum Canc Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Mark, Tomer
    Weill Cornell Med Coll, Dept Med, New York, NY USA..
    Nieto, Yago
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Stem Cell Transplantat & Cellular Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Hari, Parameswaran
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Allogeneic Transplantation for Relapsed Waldenström Macroglobulinemia and Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma2017Ingår i: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 23, nr 1, s. 60-66Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (WM/LPL) is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic proliferation, lymph node and spleen enlargement, bone marrow involvement, and IgM production. Treatment varies based on the extent and biology of disease. In some patients, the use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) may have curative potential. We evaluated long-term outcomes of 144 patients who received adult alloHCT for WM/LPL. Data were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database (2001 to 2013). Patients received myeloablative (n = 67) or reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC; n = 67). Median age at alloHCT was 53 years, and median time from diagnosis to transplantation was 41 months. Thirteen percent (n = 18) failed prior autologous HCT. About half (n = 82, 57%) had chemosensitive disease at the time of transplantation, whereas 22% had progressive disease. Rates of progression-free survival, overall survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 5 years were 46%, 52%, 24%, and 30%, respectively. Patients with chemosensitive disease and better pretransplant disease status experienced significantly superior overall survival. There were no significant differences in progression-free survival based on conditioning (myeloablative, 50%, versus RIC, 41%) or graft source. Conditioning intensity did not impact treatment-related mortality or relapse. The most common causes of death were primary disease and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). AlloHCT yielded durable survival in select patients with WM/LPL. Strategies to reduce mortality from GVHD and post-transplant relapse are necessary to improve this approach.

  • 81. Cornell, Robert F
    et al.
    D'Souza, Anita
    Kassim, Adetola A
    Costa, Luciano J
    Innis-Shelton, Racquel D
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Huang, Jiaxing
    Abidi, Muneer
    Aiello, Jack
    Akpek, Gorgun
    Bashey, Asad
    Bashir, Qaiser
    Cerny, Jan
    Comenzo, Raymond
    Diaz, Miguel Angel
    Freytes, César
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Hashmi, Shahrukh
    Holmberg, Leona
    Hossain, Nasheed
    Kamble, Rammurti T
    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed
    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila
    Kyle, Robert
    Kumar, Shaji
    Lazarus, Hillard
    Lee, Cindy
    Maiolino, Angelo
    Marks, David I
    Meehan, Kenneth
    Mikhael, Joe
    Nath, Rajneesh
    Nishihori, Taiga
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Ramanathan, Muthalagu
    Saad, Ayman
    Seo, Sachiko
    Usmani, Saad
    Vesole, David
    Vij, Ravi
    Vogl, Dan
    Wirk, Baldeep M
    Yared, Jean
    Krishnan, Amrita
    Mark, Tomer
    Nieto, Yago
    Hari, Parameswaran
    Maintenance versus Induction Therapy Choice on Outcomes after Autologous Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma2017Ingår i: Biology of blood and marrow transplantation, ISSN 1083-8791, E-ISSN 1523-6536, Vol. 23, nr 2, s. 269-277Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Bortezomib (V), lenalidomide (R), cyclophosphamide (C), and dexamethasone (D) are components of the most commonly used modern doublet (RD, VD) or triplet (VRD, CVD) initial induction regimens before autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for multiple myeloma (MM) in the United States. In this study we evaluated 693 patients receiving "upfront" AHCT after initial induction therapy with modern doublet or triplet regimens using data reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 2008 to 2013. Analysis was limited to those receiving a single AHCT after 1 line of induction therapy within 12 months from treatment initiation for MM. In multivariate analysis, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were similar irrespective of induction regimen. However, high-risk cytogenetics and nonreceipt of post-transplant maintenance/consolidation therapy were associated with higher risk of relapse. Patients receiving post-transplant therapy had significantly improved 3-year PFS versus no post-transplant therapy (55% versus 39%, P = .0001). This benefit was most evident in patients not achieving at least a complete response post-AHCT (P = .005). In patients receiving upfront AHCT, the choice of induction regimen (doublet or triplet therapies) appears to be of lower impact than use of post-transplant therapy.

  • 82.
    Courbis, Anne-Lise
    et al.
    Univ Montpellier, IMT Mines Ales, LGI2P, Ales, France.
    Murray, Ruth Brigid
    Medscript NZ Ltd, Dept Allerg Dis, Kapiti Coast, New Zealand.
    Arnavielhe, Sylvie
    Kyomed, Montpellier, France.
    Caimmi, Davide
    Montpellier Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Dis, Montpellier, France.
    Bedbrook, Anna
    Contre Malad Chron Vleillissement Actif France Eu, Montpellier, France.
    Van Eerd, Michiel
    Peercode BV, Geldermalsen, Netherlands.
    De Vries, Govert
    Peercode BV, Geldermalsen, Netherlands.
    Dray, Gerard
    Univ Montpellier, IMT Mines Ales, LGI2P, Ales, France.
    Agache, Ioana
    Transylvania Univ Brasov, Brasov, Romania.
    Morais-Almeida, Mario
    CUF Descobertas Hosp, Immunoallergy Dept, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Bachert, Claus
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Upper Airways Res Lab, ENT Dept, Ghent, Belgium.
    Bergmann, Karl Christian
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Dept Dermatol & Allergy, Allergy Ctr Charite, Berlin, Germany.
    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia
    Univ Sydney, Woolcock Inst Med Res, Glebe, NSW, Australia;Sydney Local Hlth Dist, Glebe, NSW, Australia.
    Brozek, Jan
    McMaster Univ, Dept Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Bucca, Caterina
    Univ Pneumol Unit AOU Molinette, Hosp City Hlth & Sci Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Camargos, Paulo
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Med Sch, Dept Pediat, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.
    Canonica, Giorgio Walter
    Humanitas Univ & Res Hosp, Personalized Med Asthma & Allergy Clin, Milan, Italy.
    Carr, Warner
    Allergy & Asthma Associates Southern Calif, Mission Viejo, CA USA.
    Casale, Thomas
    Univ S Florida, Morsani Coll Med, Div Allergy & Immunol, Tampa, FL USA.
    Fonseca, Joao A.
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, CINTESIS, Porto, Portugal;LDA, MEDIDA, Porto, Portugal.
    Haahtela, Tari
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Skin & Allergy Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kalayci, Omer
    Hacettepe Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat Allergy, Ankara, Turkey.
    Klimek, Ludger
    Ctr Rhinol & Allergol, Wiesbaden, Germany.
    Kuna, Piotr
    Med Univ Lodz, Barlicki Univ Hosp, Lodz, Poland.
    Kvedariene, Violeta
    Vilnius Univ, Inst Biomed Sci, Clin Infect Chest Dis Dermatol & Allergol, Dept Pathol,Fac Med, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Larenas Linnemann, Desiree
    Hosp Med Sur, Clin Alergia Asma & Pediat, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Lieberman, Phil
    Univ Tennessee, Coll Med, Dept Internal Med & Pediat, Div Allergy & Immunol, Germantown, TN USA.
    Mullol, Joaquim
    Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin Clin & Expt Resp Immunoallergy, ENT Dept, IDIBAPS,CIBERES, Barcelona, Spain.
    Ohehir, Robyn
    Monash Univ, Alfred Hosp, Dept Allergy Immunol & Resp Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Cent Clin Sch, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos
    Univ Manchester, Div Infect Immun & Resp Med, Manchester, Lancs, England;Univ Athens, Pediat Clin 2, Allergy Dept, Athens, Greece.
    Price, David
    Observat & Pragmat Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.
    Ryan, Dermot
    Univ Edinburgh, Med Sch, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Samolinski, Boleslaw
    Med Univ Warsaw, Dept Prevent Environm Hazards & Allergol, Warsaw, Poland.
    Simons, F. Estelle
    Univ Manitoba, Fac Med, Dept Immunol, Dept Pediat & Child Hlth, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Tomazic, Peter
    Med Univ Graz, Dept ENT, Graz, Austria.
    Triggiani, Massimo
    Univ Salerno, Div Allergy & Clin Immunol, Salerno, Italy.
    Valiulis, Arunas
    Vilnius Univ, Inst Clin Med Dis, Clin Childrens Dis, Dept Publ Hlth,Inst Hlth Sci,Fac Med, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Valovirta, Erkka
    Univ Turku, Dept Lung Dis & Clin Allergol, Turku, Finland;Terveystalo, Allergy Clin, Turku, Finland.
    Wagenmann, Martin
    Univ Klinikum Dusseldorf, HNO Klin, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Yorgancioglu, Arzu
    Celal Bayar Univ, Fac Med, Dept Pulmonol, Manisa, Turkey.
    Bousquet, Jean
    Contre Malad Chron Vleillissement Actif France Eu, Montpellier, France;VIMA Ageing & Chron Dis Epidemiol & Publ Hlth App, INSERM, U 1168, Villejuif, France;Univ Versailles St Quentin en Yvelines, UMRS 1168, Montigny Le Bretonneux, France;CHU Montpellier, 371 Ave Doyen Gaston Giraud, F-34295 Montpellier 5, France.
    Electronic Clinical Decision Support System for allergic rhinitis management: MASK e-CDSS2018Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, nr 12, s. 1640-1653Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) management has changed in recent years following the switch from the concept of disease severity to the concept of disease control, publication of the AR clinical decision support system (CDSS) and development of mobile health (m-health) tools for patients (eg Allergy Diary). The Allergy Diary Companion app for healthcare providers is currently being developed and will be launched in 2018. It incorporates the AR CDSS to provide evidence-based treatment recommendations, linking all key stakeholders in AR management.

    Objective: To produce an electronic version of the AR CDSS (e-CDSS) for incorporation into the Allergy Diary Companion, to describe the app interfaces used to collect information necessary to inform the e-CDSS and to summarize some key features of the Allergy Diary Companion.

    Methods: The steps involved in producing the e-CDSS and incorporating it into the Allergy Diary Companion were (a) generation of treatment management scenarios; (b) expert consensus on treatment recommendations; (c) generation of electronic decisional algorithms to describe all AR CDSS scenarios; (d) digitization of these algorithms to form the e-CDSS; and (e) embedding the e-CDSS into the app to permit easy user e-CDSS interfacing.

    Results: Key experts in the AR field agreed on the AR CDSS approach to AR management and on specific treatment recommendations provided by Allergy Diary Companion. Based on this consensus, decision processes were developed and programmed into the Allergy Diary Companion using Titanium Appcelerator (JavaScript) for IOS tablets. To our knowledge, this is the first time the development of any m-health tool has been described in this transparent and detailed way, providing confidence, not only in the app, but also in the provided management recommendations.

    Conclusion: The Allergy Diary Companion for providers provides guideline and expert-endorsed AR management recommendations. [MASK paper No 32].

  • 83.
    Cunningham, A. L.
    et al.
    Westmead Inst Med Res, Westmead, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Lal, H.
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Kovac, M.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Chlibek, R.
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic..
    Hwang, S. -J
    Diez-Domingo, J.
    Fdn Fomento Invest Sanitaria & Biomed, Vaccine Res Unit, Valencia, Spain..
    Godeaux, O.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Levin, M. J.
    Univ Colorado, Dept Pediat, Anschutz Med Campus, Aurora, CO USA.;Univ Colorado, Dept Med, Anschutz Med Campus, Aurora, CO USA..
    McElhaney, J. E.
    Hlth Sci North Res Inst, Sudbury, ON, Canada..
    Puig-Barbera, J.
    Fdn Fomento Invest Sanitaria & Biomed, Vaccine Res Unit, Valencia, Spain..
    Abeele, C. Vanden
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Vesikari, T.
    Univ Tampere, Vaccine Res Ctr, Tampere, Finland..
    Watanabe, D.
    Aichi Med Univ, Dept Dermatol, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan..
    Zahaf, T.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Ahonen, A.
    Univ Tampere, Vaccine Res Ctr, Tampere, Finland..
    Athan, E.
    Deakin Univ, Barwon Hlth, Dept Infect Dis, Geelong, Vic, Australia..
    Barba-Gomez, J. F.
    Inst Dermatol Jalisco Dr Jose Barba Rubio, Zapopan, Mexico..
    Campora, L.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    de Looze, F.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Med, AusTrials, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Sch Med, Discipline Gen Practice, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Downey, H. J.
    Jacksonville Ctr Clin Res, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Ghesquiere, W.
    Univ British Columbia, Infect Dis Sect, Victoria, BC, Canada..
    Gorfinkel, I.
    PrimeHlth Clin Res, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Korhonen, T.
    Univ Tampere, Vaccine Res Ctr, Tampere, Finland..
    Leung, E.
    United Christian Hosp, Dept Med & Geriatr, Div Geriatr Med, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    McNeil, S. A.
    Dalhousie Univ, IWK Hlth Ctr, Canadian Ctr Vaccinol, Halifax, NS, Canada.;Dalhousie Univ, Nova Scotia Hlth Author, Halifax, NS, Canada..
    Oostvogels, L.
    GSK Vaccines, Wavre, Belgium..
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Sormland Cty Council, Clin Res Ctr, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Smetana, J.
    Univ Def, Fac Mil Hlth Sci, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic..
    Weckx, L.
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Ctr Referencia Imunobiol Especiais, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Yeo, W.
    Univ Wollongong, Grad Sch Med, Illawarra Hlth & Med Res Inst, Wollongong, NSW, Australia..
    Heineman, T. C.
    GSK Vaccines, King Of Prussia, PA USA..
    Efficacy of the Herpes Zoster Subunit Vaccine in Adults 70 Years of Age or Older2016Ingår i: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 375, nr 11, s. 1019-1032Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND A trial involving adults 50 years of age or older (ZOE-50) showed that the herpes zoster subunit vaccine (HZ/su) containing recombinant varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E and the AS01(B) adjuvant system was associated with a risk of herpes zoster that was 97.2% lower than that associated with placebo. A second trial was performed concurrently at the same sites and examined the safety and efficacy of HZ/su in adults 70 years of age or older (ZOE-70). METHODS This randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial was conducted in 18 countries and involved adults 70 years of age or older. Participants received two doses of HZ/su or placebo (assigned in a 1: 1 ratio) administered intramuscularly 2 months apart. Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia was assessed in participants from ZOE-70 and in participants pooled from ZOE-70 and ZOE-50. RESULTS In ZOE-70, 13,900 participants who could be evaluated (mean age, 75.6 years) received either HZ/su (6950 participants) or placebo (6950 participants). During a mean follow-up period of 3.7 years, herpes zoster occurred in 23 HZ/su recipients and in 223 placebo recipients (0.9 vs. 9.2 per 1000 person-years). Vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 89.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.2 to 93.7; P<0.001) and was similar in participants 70 to 79 years of age (90.0%) and participants 80 years of age or older (89.1%). In pooled analyses of data from participants 70 years of age or older in ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 (16,596 participants), vaccine efficacy against herpes zoster was 91.3% (95% CI, 86.8 to 94.5; P<0.001), and vaccine efficacy against postherpetic neuralgia was 88.8% (95% CI, 68.7 to 97.1; P<0.001). Solicited reports of injection-site and systemic reactions within 7 days after injection were more frequent among HZ/su recipients than among placebo recipients (79.0% vs. 29.5%). Serious adverse events, potential immune-mediated diseases, and deaths occurred with similar frequencies in the two study groups. CONCLUSIONS In our trial, HZ/su was found to reduce the risks of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia among adults 70 years of age or older. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 ClinicalTrials.govnumbers, NCT01165177 and NCT01165229.)

  • 84.
    Dahal, Prabin
    et al.
    World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.
    Simpson, Julie Anne
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostatist, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Abdulla, Salim
    Ifakara Hlth Inst, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Achan, Jane
    MRC Unit, Banjul, Gambia.
    Adam, Ishag
    Univ Khartoum, Fac Med, Khartoum, Sudan.
    Agarwal, Aarti
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Allan, Richard
    Mentor Initiat, Fajara, Gambia.
    Anvikar, Anupkumar R.
    Natl Inst Malaria Res, Sector 8, Dwarka, New Delhi 110077, India.
    Arinaitwe, Emmanuel
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda.
    Ashley, Elizabeth A.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med, Oxford, England;Myanmar Oxford Clin Res Unit, Yangon, Myanmar.
    Awab, Ghulam Rahim
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand;Minist Publ Hlth, Islam Republ Afghanistan, Kabul, Afghanistan.
    Bassat, Quique
    Ctr Investigacao Saude Manhica CISM, Maputo, Mozambique;Univ Barcelona, Hosp Clin, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain;ICREA, Pg Lluis Companys 23, Barcelona 08010, Spain.
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Depatment Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bompart, Francois
    Sanofi Access Med, Gentilly, France.
    Borrmann, Steffen
    Kenya Med Res Inst Kilifi, Kilifi, Kenya;Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kilifi, Kenya;Heidelberg Univ, Sch Med, Dept Infect Dis, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bousema, Teun
    Radboud Inst Hlth Sci, Radboudumc Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Med Microbiol, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Broek, Ingrid
    Centrum Infectieziektebestrijding, Epidemioloog Epidemiol Surveillance RIVM, Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Bukirwa, Hasifa
    African Field Epidemiol Network, Kampala, Uganda.
    Carrara, Verena I.
    Shoklo Malaria Res Unit, Mae Sot, Bangkok, Thailand;Mahidol Oxford Univ Res Unit, Bangkok, Thailand.
    Corsi, Marco
    Private Consultancy Drug Dev Trop Dis, Sigma Tau SpA Ind Farmaceutiche Riunite, Pomezia, Rome, Italy.
    Cot, Michel
    Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, MERIT, IRD, F-75006 Paris, France.
    D'Alessandro, Umberto
    MRC Unit, Fajara, Gambia;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England.
    Davis, Timothy M. E.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Crawley, WA, Australia.
    de Wit, Marit
    Med Sans Frontieres Operat Ctr Amsterdam, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Deloron, Philippe
    Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, MERIT, IRD, F-75006 Paris, France.
    Desai, Meghna
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Dimbu, Pedro Rafael
    Natl Malaria Control Program, Luanda, Angola.
    Djalle, Djibrine
    Inst Pasteur, BP 923, Bangui, Cent Afr Republ.
    Djimde, Abdoulaye
    Univ Sci Techn & Technol Bamako, Fac Pharm, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Dept Epidemiol Parasit Dis, Bamako, Mali.
    Dorsey, Grant
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Univ Sci Techn & Technol Bamako, Malaria Res & Training Ctr, Dept Epidemiol Parasit Dis, Fac Med & Odonto Stomatol, Bamako, Mali.
    Drakeley, Chris J.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Infect & Immun, London, England.
    Duparc, Stephan
    Med Malaria Venture, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Edstein, Michael D.
    Australian Army Malaria Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Espie, Emmanuelle
    R&D Ctr, GSK Vaccines, Clin & Epidemiol Dept, Epicentre, Ave Fleming 20,1300 Wavre,8 Rue St Sabin, F-75011 Paris, France.
    Faiz, Abul
    Malaria Res Grp, Chittagong, Bangladesh;Dev Care Fdn, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Falade, Catherine
    Univ Ibadan, Coll Med, Dept Pharmacol & Therapeut, Ibadan, Nigeria.
    Fanello, Caterina
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Ctr Global Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Faucher, Jean-Francois
    Besancon Univ Med Ctr, Dept Infect Dis, Mother & Child Hlth Trop Res Unit, Inst Rech Dev IRD, Besancon, France.
    Faye, Babacar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Fac Med, Dept Med Parasitol, Dakar, Senegal.
    Fortes, Filomeno de Jesus
    Natl Malaria Control Program, Luanda, Angola.
    Gadalla, Nahla B.
    Sudanese Amer Med Assoc, Fairfax, VA USA.
    Gaye, Oumar
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Dept Med Parasitol, Fac Med, Dakar, Senegal.
    Gil, J. Pedro
    Karolinska Inst, Div Pharmacogenet, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Drug Resistance Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Lisbon, Ctr Biodivers Funct & Integrat Gen, Fac Ciencias, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Greenwood, Brian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Fac Infect & Trop Dis, London, England.
    Grivoyannis, Anastasia
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, Baltimore, MD 21287 USA.
    Hamed, Kamal
    Basilea Pharmaceut Int Ltd, Basel, Switzerland;Novartis Pharmaceut, E Hanover, NJ USA.
    Hien, Tran Tinh
    Oxford Univ Clin Res Unit OUCRU, Ctr Trop Med, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Program MOP, Oxford, England.
    Hughes, David
    Novartis Int AG, Basel, Switzerland.
    Humphreys, Georgina
    Wellcome Trust Res Labs, London, England;World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, London, England.
    Hwang, Jimee
    US Centers Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, US Presidents Malaria Initiat Malaria Branch, Atlanta, GA USA;Univ Calif San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA;Global Hlth Grp, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Ibrahim, Maman Laminou
    Ctr Rech Med & Saniataire CERMES, Niamey, Niger.
    Janssens, Bart
    Medecins Sans Frontieres, Phnom Penh, Belgium.
    Jullien, Vincent
    Univ Paris 05, Assistance Publique Hop Paris, Serv Pharmacol Clin, Paris, France;Grp Hosp Cochin Saint Vincent Paul, Inserm U663, WWARN, Paris, France.
    Juma, Elizabeth
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Kamugisha, Erasmus
    Weill Bugando Univ Coll Hlth Sci, Mwanza, Tanzania.
    Karema, Corine
    Minist Hlth, Natl Malaria Control Program TRAC Plus, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Karunajeewa, Harin A.
    Walter & Eliza Hall Inst Med Res, Parkville, Vic, Australia.
    Kiechel, Jean R.
    Drugs Neglected Dis initiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Kironde, Fred
    Islam Univ Uganda, Habib Med Sch, Kampala, Uganda.
    Kofoed, Poul-Erik
    Bandim Hlth Project, Indepth Network, Apartado 861, Bissau, Guinea Bissau;Lillebaelt Hosp, Hlth Serv Res Unit, Vejle, Denmark;IRS Univ Southern Denmark, Vejle, Denmark;Kolding Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Kolding, Denmark.
    Kremsner, Peter G.
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Trop Med, Tubingen, Germany;Ctr Recherches Medic Lambarene, Lambarene, Gabon.
    Lameyre, Valerie
    Sanofi Access Med, Gentilly, France.
    Lee, Sue J.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand;Churchill Hosp, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med, Oxford, England.
    Marsh, Kevin
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med, Oxford, England;Wellcome Trust Res Programme, Kilifi, Kenya;Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Kilifi, Kenya.
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Internationell mödra- och barnhälsovård (IMCH), Internationell barnhälsa och nutrition.
    Mayxay, Mayfong
    Mahosot Hosp, Lao Oxford Mahosot Hospital, Wellcome Trust Res Unit, Microbiol Lab, Viangchan, Laos.
    Menan, Herve
    Univ Cocody, Dept Parasitol, Fac Pharm, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire;Univ Hlth Sci, Minist Hlth, Fac Postgraduate Studies, Viangchan, Laos.
    Mens, Petra
    Acad Med Ctr, Med Microbiol Parasitol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Mutabingwa, Theonest K.
    Hubert Kairuki Mem Univ, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Infect & Trop Dis, London, England.
    Ndiaye, Jean-Louis
    Univ Cheikh Anta Diop, Fac Med, Parasitol & Mycol Lab, Dakar, Senegal.
    Ngasala, Billy E.
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Infect Dis Unit, Malaria Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Noedl, Harald
    Med Univ Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Nosten, Francois
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med Res Bldg, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Old Rd Campus, Oxford, England;Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit, Shoklo Malaria Res Unit, Mae Sot, Thailand.
    Offianan, Andre Toure
    Inst Pasteur Cote Ivoire, Malariol Dept, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire.
    Oguike, Mary
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Immunol & Infect, London, England.
    Ogutu, Bernhards R.
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Kisumu, Kenya;US Army Med Res Unit, Kisumu, Kenya.
    Olliaro, Piero
    UNICEF, UNDP, World Bank, WHO TDR, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Direct Regionale Ouest, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso;Ctr Muraz Bobo Dioulasso, Non Transmissible Dis Dept, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.
    Piola, Patrice
    Inst Pasteur Cambodge, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
    Plowe, Christopher V.
    Duke Univ, Duke Global Hlth Inst, Durham, NC USA.
    Plucinski, Mateusz M.
    US Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch, US Presidents Malaria Initiat, Atlanta, GA USA;Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Epidem Intelligence Serv, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Pratt, Oliver James
    Minist Hlth & Social Welf, Natl Malaria Control Program, Monrovia, Liberia.
    Premji, Zulfikarali
    Muhimbili Univ Coll Hlth Sci, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Ramharter, Michael
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Med 1, Bernhard Nocht Inst Trop Med, Dept Trop Med, Hamburg, Germany.
    Rogier, Christophe
    Div Expertise & Def Hlth strategy, Cent Directorate, French Mil Hlth Serv, Paris, France;IRBA, Bretigny Sur Orge, France;URMITE, UMR 6236, Marseille, France.
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Rosenthal, Philip J.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Sawa, Patrick
    Human Hlth Div, Int Ctr Insect Physiol & Ecol, Mbita, Kenya.
    Schramm, Birgit
    Epicentre, Paris, France.
    Sibley, Carol
    WWARN, Oxford, England;Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Sinou, Veronique
    Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, SSA, IRBA,MCT, Marseille, France.
    Sirima, Sodiomon
    GRAS, 06 BP 10248, Ouagadougou 06, Burkina Faso.
    Smithuis, Frank
    Myanmar Oxford Clin Res Unit, Oxford, England.
    Staedke, Sarah G.
    Infect Dis Res Collaborat, Kampala, Uganda;London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Clin Res, London, England.
    Sutanto, Inge
    Univ Indonesia, Dept Parasitol, Fac Med, 6 Salemba Raya, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia.
    Talisuna, Ambrose Otau
    WHO, Reg Off Afr, Brazzaville, Rep Congo;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Tarning, Joel
    WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network, Oxford, England;Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Mahidol Oxford Trop Med Res Unit, Bangkok, Thailand.
    Taylor, Walter R. J.
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand.
    Temu, Emmanuel
    MENTOR Initiat, Crawley, England.
    Thriemer, Kamala L.
    Charles Darwin Univ, Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Global & Trop Hlth Div, Darwin, NT, Australia.
    Thuy, Nhien Nguyen
    Oxford Univ Clin Res Unit OUCRU, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Program MOP, Ctr Trop Med, Oxford, England.
    Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam
    Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Ctr Global Hlth, Div Parasit Dis & Malaria, Malaria Branch & Presidents Malaria Initiat, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Ursing, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC C1, Solna, Sweden;Danderyd Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Danderyd, Sweden.
    van Herp, Michel
    Operat Ctr Brussels, Med Sans Frontieres, Brussels, Belgium;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Div Infect Dis, Ctr Trop Med & Travel Med, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Vugt, Michele
    Whitty, Christopher
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Infect & Trop Dis, Malaria Partnership, London, England.
    William, Yavo
    Univ Cocody, Dept Parasitol, Fac Pharm, Abidjan, Cote Ivoire.
    Winnips, Cornelis
    NovartisInternat AG, Basel, Switzerland.
    Zongo, Issaka
    Inst Rech Sci Sante, Direct Regionale lOuest, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.
    Guerin, Philippe
    World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med, Oxford, England.
    Price, Ric N.
    World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England;Menzies Sch Hlth Res Charles Darwin Univ, Darwin, NT, Australia;Churchill Hosp, Ctr Clin Vaccinol & Trop Med, Oxford, England.
    Stepniewska, Kasia
    World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Ctr Trop Med & Global Hlth, WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network WWARN, Oxford, England.
    Competing risk events in antimalarial drug trials in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network individual participant data meta-analysis2019Ingår i: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 18, artikel-id 225Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Therapeutic efficacy studies in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria are confounded by new infections, which constitute competing risk events since they can potentially preclude/pre-empt the detection of subsequent recrudescence of persistent, sub-microscopic primary infections.

    Methods: Antimalarial studies typically report the risk of recrudescence derived using the Kaplan-Meier (K-M) method, which considers new infections acquired during the follow-up period as censored. Cumulative Incidence Function (CIF) provides an alternative approach for handling new infections, which accounts for them as a competing risk event. The complement of the estimate derived using the K-M method (1 minus K-M), and the CIF were used to derive the risk of recrudescence at the end of the follow-up period using data from studies collated in the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network data repository. Absolute differences in the failure estimates derived using these two methods were quantified. In comparative studies, the equality of two K-M curves was assessed using the log-rank test, and the equality of CIFs using Gray's k-sample test (both at 5% level of significance). Two different regression modelling strategies for recrudescence were considered: cause-specific Cox model and Fine and Gray's sub-distributional hazard model.

    Results: Data were available from 92 studies (233 treatment arms, 31,379 patients) conducted between 1996 and 2014. At the end of follow-up, the median absolute overestimation in the estimated risk of cumulative recrudescence by using 1 minus K-M approach was 0.04% (interquartile range (IQR): 0.00-0.27%, Range: 0.00-3.60%). The overestimation was correlated positively with the proportion of patients with recrudescence [Pearson's correlation coefficient (rho): 0.38, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.30-0.46] or new infection [rho: 0.43; 95% CI 0.35-0.54]. In three study arms, the point estimates of failure were greater than 10% (the WHO threshold for withdrawing antimalarials) when the K-M method was used, but remained below 10% when using the CIF approach, but the 95% confidence interval included this threshold.

    Conclusions: The 1 minus K-M method resulted in a marginal overestimation of recrudescence that became increasingly pronounced as antimalarial efficacy declined, particularly when the observed proportion of new infection was high. The CIF approach provides an alternative approach for derivation of failure estimates in antimalarial trials, particularly in high transmission settings.

  • 85.
    Dean, Elizabeth
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola.
    An Exploration of the Scientific Writing Experience ofNon-native English-speaking Doctoral Supervisors and Students Using a Phenomemngraphic Approach2015Ingår i: Journal of Biomedical Education, ISSN 2314-503X, Vol. 2015, artikel-id 542781Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonnative English-speaking scholars and trainees are increasingly submitting their work to English journals. The study’s aim was to describe their experiences regarding scientific writing in English using a qualitative phenomenographic approach. Two focus groups (5 doctoral supervisors and 13 students) were conducted. Participants were nonnative English-speakers in a Swedish health sciences faculty. Group discussion focused on scientific writing in English, specifically, rewards, challenges, facilitators, and barriers. Participants were asked about their needs for related educational supports. Inductive phenomenographic analysis included extraction of referential (phenomenon as a whole) and structural (phenomenon parts) aspects of the transcription data. Doctoral supervisors and students viewed English scientific writing as challenging but worthwhile. Both groups viewed mastering English scientific writing as necessary but each struggles with the process differently. Supervisors viewed it as a long-term professional responsibility (generating knowledge, networking, and promotion eligibility). Alternatively, doctoral students viewed its importance in the short term (learning publication skills). Both groups acknowledged they would benefit from personalized feedback on writing style/format, but in distinct ways. Nonnative English-speaking doctoral supervisors and students in Sweden may benefit from on-going writing educational supports. Editors/reviewers need to increase awareness of the challenges of international contributors and maximize the formative constructiveness of their reviews.

  • 86.
    Demenais, Florence
    et al.
    INSERM, UMR 946, Genet Variat & Human Dis Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Univ Hematol, Paris, France..
    Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia
    INSERM, UMR 946, Genet Variat & Human Dis Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Univ Hematol, Paris, France..
    Barnes, Kathleen C.
    Univ Colorado, Colorado Ctr Personalized Med, Div Biomed Informat & Personalized Med, Denver, CO 80202 USA..
    Cookson, William O. C.
    Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Sect Genom Med, London, England..
    Altmueller, Janine
    Univ Cologne, Cologne Ctr Genom, Cologne, Germany.;Univ Cologne, CMMC, Cologne, Germany..
    Ang, Wei
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Womens & Infants Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Barr, R. Graham
    Columbia Univ, Dept Med, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Div Epidemiol, New York, NY USA..
    Beaty, Terri H.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Div Genet Epidemiol, Dept Epidemiol, Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Becker, Allan B.
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Pediat & Child Hlth, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Beilby, John
    Queen Elizabeth II Med Ctr, Dept Diagnost Genom Lab, PathWest Lab Med, Nedlands, WA, Australia..
    Bisgaard, Hans
    Univ Copenhagen, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Prospect Studies Asthma Childhood, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Bjornsdottir, Unnur Steina
    Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Dept Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Bleecker, Eugene
    Wake Forest Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Gen, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA..
    Bonnelykke, Klaus
    Univ Copenhagen, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Prospect Studies Asthma Childhood, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Vrjie Univ, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Bouzigon, Emmanuelle
    INSERM, UMR 946, Genet Variat & Human Dis Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Univ Hematol, Paris, France..
    Brightling, Christopher E.
    Univ Leicester, Glenfield Hosp, Inst Lung Hlth, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Brossard, Myriam
    INSERM, UMR 946, Genet Variat & Human Dis Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Univ Hematol, Paris, France..
    Brusselle, Guy G.
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med, Ghent, Belgium.;Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Resp Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Burchard, Esteban
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Bioengn & Therapeut Sci & Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA..
    Burkart, Kristin M.
    Columbia Univ, Coll Phys & Surg, Div Pulm Allergy & Crit Care, New York, NY USA..
    Bush, Andrew
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.;Royal Brompton Harefield Natl Hlth Serv NHS Fdn T, London, England..
    Chan-Yeung, Moira
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Med, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Chung, Kian Fan
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.;Royal Brompton & Harefield Natl Hlth Serv NHS Tru, Biomed Res Unit, London, England..
    Alves, Alexessander Couto
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England..
    Curtin, John A.
    Univ Manchester, Div Infect Immun & Resp Med, Sch Biol Sci, Fac Biol Med & Hlth,Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Custovic, Adnan
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Pediat, London, England..
    Daley, Denise
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Med, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Univ British Columbia, Ctr Heart & Lung Innovat, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    de Jongste, Johan C.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Div Resp Med, Dept Pediat, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Del-Rio-Navarro, Blanca E.
    Hosp Infantil Mexico Dr Federico Gomez, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Donohue, Kathleen M.
    Columbia Univ, Dept Med, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Div Epidemiol, New York, NY USA..
    Duijts, Liesbeth
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Div Resp Med, Dept Pediat, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Pediat, Div Neonatol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Eng, Celeste
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Gen Practice & Primary Hlth Care, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Farrall, Martin
    Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Fedorova, Yuliya
    Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa Sci Ctr, Ufa, Russia..
    Feenstra, Bjarke
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Epidemiol Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ferreira, Manuel A.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Genet & Computat Biol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Freidin, Maxim B.
    Tomsk NRMC, Res Inst Med Genet, Populat Genet Lab, Tomsk, Russia..
    Gajdos, Zofia
    Childrens Hosp, Div Genet & Endocrinol, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Gauderman, Jim
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Gehring, Ulrike
    Univ Utrecht, Inst Risk Assessment Sci, Div Environm Epidemiol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Geller, Frank
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Epidemiol Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Genuneit, Jon
    Ulm Univ, Inst Epidemiol & Med Biometry, Ulm, Germany..
    Gharib, Sina A.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA USA..
    Gilliland, Frank
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Granell, Raquel
    Univ Bristol, Bristol Med Sch, Populat Hlth Sci, Bristol, Avon, England.;Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Graves, Penelope E.
    Univ Arizona, Asthma & Airway Dis Res Ctr, Tucson, AZ USA.;Univ Arizona, Inst BIO5, Tucson, AZ USA..
    Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Sch Engn & Nat Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Haahtela, Tari
    Univ Helsinki, Skin & Allergy Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Heckbert, Susan R.
    Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Heederik, Dick
    Univ Utrecht, Inst Risk Assessment Sci, Div Environm Epidemiol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Univ Hosp Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & En, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 1, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Heliovaara, Markku
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf THL, Helsinki, Finland..
    Henderson, John
    Univ Bristol, Bristol Med Sch, Populat Hlth Sci, Bristol, Avon, England.;Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Himes, Blanca E.
    Univ Penn, Dept Biostat Epidemiol & Informat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Hirose, Hiroshi
    Keio Univ, Dept Internal Med, Hlth Ctr, Tokyo, Japan..
    Hirschhorn, Joel N.
    Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Endocrinol, Boston, MA USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Ctr Basic & Translat Obes Res, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Pediat, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Genet, Boston, MA USA..
    Hofman, Albert
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA..
    Holt, Patrick
    Univ Western Australia, Cell Biol Telethon Kids Inst, Subiaco, WA, Australia..
    Hottenga, Jouke
    Vrjie Univ, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Hudson, Thomas J.
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.;AbbVie Inc, Redwood City, CA USA..
    Hui, Jennie
    Queen Elizabeth II Med Ctr, Dept Diagnost Genom Lab, PathWest Lab Med, Nedlands, WA, Australia.;Busselton Populat Med Res Inst, Perth, WA, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Nedlands, WA, Australia..
    Imboden, Medea
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Ivanov, Vladimir
    Kursk State Med Univ, Dept Biol Med Genet & Ecol, Kursk, Russia..
    Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Dept Pediat, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    James, Alan
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Pulm Physiol & Sleep Med, Busselton Populat Med Res Inst, Nedlands, WA, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Crawley, WA, Australia..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England.;Univ Oulu, Fac Med, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu, Finland.;Univ Oulu, Bioctr Oulu, Oulu, Finland.;Oulu Univ Hosp, Unit Primary Care, Oulu, Finland..
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Jones, Graham
    Western Sydney Univ, Sch Sci & Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Jonsdottir, Ingileif
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Jousilahti, Pekka
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf THL, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kabesch, Michael
    Univ Childrens Hosp Regensburg KUNO, Dept Pediat Pneumol & Allergy, Regensburg, Germany..
    Kahonen, Mika
    Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere, Finland.;Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland..
    Kantor, David B.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Crit Care Med, Dept Anesthesiol Perioperat & Pain Med, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Anaesthesia, Boston, MA USA..
    Karunas, Alexandra S.
    Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa Sci Ctr, Ufa, Russia.;Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, Ufa, Russia..
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa Sci Ctr, Ufa, Russia.;Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, Ufa, Russia..
    Koppelman, Gerard H.
    Univ Groningen, Beatrix Childrens Hosp, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Pediat Pulmonol & Pediat Allergol, Groningen, Netherlands.;Groningen Res Inst Asthma & COPD GRIAC, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Kozyrskyj, Anita L.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Pediat, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Kreiner, Eskil
    Univ Copenhagen, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Prospect Studies Asthma Childhood, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Kubo, Michiaki
    RIKEN Ctr Integrat Med Sci, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Kumar, Rajesh
    Ann & Robert H Lurie Childrens Hosp Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611 USA.;Northwestern Univ, Dept Pediat, Div Allergy & Clin Immunol, Feinberg Sch Med, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Kumar, Ashish
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kuokkanen, Mikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf THL, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland..
    Lahousse, Lies
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Ghent, Fac Pharmaceut Sci, Pharmaceut Care Unit, Ghent, Belgium..
    Laitinen, Tarja
    Univ Turku, Dept Pulm Med, Turku, Finland.;Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland..
    Laprise, Catherine
    Univ Quebec Chicoutimi, Dept Sci Fondament, Chicoutimi, PQ, Canada.;Ctr Sante & Serv Sociaux Saguenay Lac St Jean, Saguenay, PQ, Canada..
    Lathrop, Mark
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Lau, Susanne
    Charite, Pediat Pneumol & Immunol, Berlin, Germany..
    Lee, Young-Ae
    Max Delbruck Centrum MDC Mol Med, Berlin, Germany.;Charite, Pediat Allergol Expt & Clin Res Ctr, Berlin, Germany..
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Dept Clin Chem, Fimlab Labs, Tampere, Finland..
    Letort, Sebastien
    INSERM, UMR 946, Genet Variat & Human Dis Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Univ Hematol, Paris, France..
    Levin, Albert M.
    Henry Ford Hlth Syst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA..
    Li, Guo
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA USA..
    Liang, Liming
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA..
    Loehr, Laura R.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Div Gen Med, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    London, Stephanie J.
    NIEHS, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, POB 12233, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA..
    Loth, Daan W.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Manichaikul, Ani
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Gen, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Marenholz, Ingo
    Max Delbruck Centrum MDC Mol Med, Berlin, Germany.;Charite, Pediat Allergol Expt & Clin Res Ctr, Berlin, Germany..
    Martinez, Fernando J.
    Univ Arizona, Asthma & Airway Dis Res Ctr, Tucson, AZ USA.;Univ Arizona, Inst BIO5, Tucson, AZ USA..
    Matheson, Melanie C.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Mathias, Rasika A.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Med, Div Allergy & Clin Immunol, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Matsumoto, Kenji
    Natl Res Inst Child Hlth & Dev, Dept Allergy & Clin Immunol, Tokyo, Japan..
    Mbarek, Hamdi
    Vrjie Univ, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    McArdle, Wendy L.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol Bioresource Labs, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Melbye, Mads
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Epidemiol Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Melen, Erik
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Sachs Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meyers, Deborah
    Wake Forest Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Gen, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA..
    Michel, Sven
    Univ Childrens Hosp Regensburg KUNO, Dept Pediat Pneumol & Allergy, Regensburg, Germany..
    Mohamdi, Hamida
    INSERM, UMR 946, Genet Variat & Human Dis Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Univ Hematol, Paris, France..
    Musk, Arthur W.
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Resp Med, Nedlands, WA, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Populat Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Myers, Rachel A.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Appl Genom & Precis Med, Durham, NC USA..
    Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A. E.
    Groningen Res Inst Asthma & COPD GRIAC, Groningen, Netherlands.;Univ Groningen, Dept Pulmonol, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Noguchi, Emiko
    Univ Tsukuba, Fac Med, Dept Med Genet, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan..
    O'Connor, George T.
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Pulmonary Ctr, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Natl Heart Lung & Blood Inst Framingham Heart Stu, Framingham, MA USA..
    Ogorodova, Ludmila M.
    Siberian State Med Univ, Dept Fac Pediat, Tomsk, Russia..
    Palmer, Cameron D.
    Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Endocrinol, Boston, MA USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Ctr Basic & Translat Obes Res, Boston, MA USA..
    Palotie, Aarno
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Analyt & Translat Genet Unit, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Analyt & Translat Genet Unit, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Analyt & Translat Genet Unit, Dept Psychiat, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Broad Inst, Stanley Ctr Psychiat Res & Program Med & Populat, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Park, Julie E.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Med, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Pennell, Craig E.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Womens & Infants Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Pershagen, Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Polonikov, Alexey
    Kursk State Med Univ, Dept Biol Med Genet & Ecol, Kursk, Russia..
    Postma, Dirkje S.
    Groningen Res Inst Asthma & COPD GRIAC, Groningen, Netherlands.;Univ Groningen, Dept Pulmonol, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Puzyrev, Valery P.
    Tomsk NRMC, Res Inst Med Genet, Populat Genet Lab, Tomsk, Russia..
    Raby, Benjamin A.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Raitakari, Olli T.
    Univ Turku, Dept Clin Physiol & Nucl Med, Turku, Finland.;Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland..
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Med & Mol Genet, London, England..
    Rich, Stephen S.
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Gen, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Robertson, Colin F.
    Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Respiratory Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Mory Univ, Hubert Dept Global Hlth, Atlanta, GA USA.;Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Populat Hlth Res, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Salam, Muhammad T.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Kern Med, Dept Psychiat, Bakersfield, CA USA..
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf THL, Helsinki, Finland..
    Schlunssen, Vivi
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Scott, Robert
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England..
    Selivanova, Polina A.
    Siberian State Med Univ, Dept Fac Therapy, Tomsk, Russia..
    Sigsgaard, Torben
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Simpson, Angela
    Univ Manchester, Div Infect Immun & Resp Med, Sch Biol Sci, Fac Biol Med & Hlth,Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England.;Natl Hlth Serv NHS Fdn Trust, Univ Hosp South Manchester, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Siroux, Valerie
    INSERM, Inst Adv Biosci, Team Environm Epidemiol Appl Reprod & Resp Hlth, U1209, Grenoble, France.;Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, UMR5309, Inst Adv Biosci,Team Environm Epidemiol Appl Repr, Grenoble, France..
    Smith, Lewis J.
    Northwestern Univ, Div Pulm & Crit Care Med, Feinberg Sch Med, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Solodilova, Maria
    Kursk State Med Univ, Dept Biol Med Genet & Ecol, Kursk, Russia..
    Standl, Marie
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 1, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Stefansson, Kari
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Strachan, David P.
    St Georges Univ London, Populat Hlth Res Inst, London, England..
    Stricker, Bruno H.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Netherlands Healthcare Inspectorate, The Hague, Netherlands.;Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Takahashi, Atsushi
    RIKEN Ctr Integrat Med Sci, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Thompson, Philip J.
    Univ Western Australia, Inst Resp Hlth, Nedlands, WA, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.;Lung Hlth Clin, Nedlands, WA, Australia..
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Tiesler, Carla M. T.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 1, Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dr von Hauner Childrens Hosp, Div Metab Dis & Nutrit Med, Munich, Germany..
    Torgerson, Dara G.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko
    RIKEN Ctr Integrat Med Sci, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.;Tokyo Med & Dent Univ, Dept Med Sci Math, Med Res Inst, Tokyo, Japan..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van der Valk, Ralf J. P.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Generat R Study Grp, Dept Pediat,Div Resp Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vaysse, Amaury
    INSERM, UMR 946, Genet Variat & Human Dis Unit, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot, Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Inst Univ Hematol, Paris, France..
    Vedantam, Sailaja
    Childrens Hosp, Div Genet & Endocrinol, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA..
    von Berg, Andrea
    Marien Hosp Wesel, Dept Pediat, Wesel, Germany..
    von Mutius, Erika
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dr Von Hauner Childrens Hosp, Munich, Germany.;German Ctr Lung Res, Munich, Germany..
    Vonk, Judith M.
    Groningen Res Inst Asthma & COPD GRIAC, Groningen, Netherlands.;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Waage, Johannes
    Univ Copenhagen, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Prospect Studies Asthma Childhood, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Wareham, Nick J.
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England..
    Weiss, Scott T.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    White, Wendy B.
    Tougaloo Coll, UTEC, Jackson Heart Study, Jackson, MI USA..
    Wickman, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widen, Elisabeth
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland..
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Vrjie Univ, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Williams, L. Keoki
    Henry Ford Hlth Syst, Ctr Hlth Policy & Hlth Serv Res, Detroit, MI USA.;Henry Ford Hlth Syst, Dept Internal Med, Detroit, MI USA..
    Wouters, Inge M.
    Univ Utrecht, Inst Risk Assessment Sci, Div Environm Epidemiol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Yang, James J.
    Univ Michigan, Sch Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England..
    Moffatt, Miriam F.
    Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Sect Genom Med, London, England..
    Ober, Carole
    Univ Chicago, Dept Human Genet, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Nicolae, Dan L.
    Univ Chicago, Dept Stat, Med Genet Sect, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.;Univ Chicago, Dept Human Genet, Med Genet Sect, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.;Univ Chicago, Dept Med, Med Genet Sect, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Multiancestry association study identifies new asthma risk loci that colocalize with immune-cell enhancer marks2018Ingår i: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 50, nr 1, s. 42-+Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined common variation in asthma risk by conducting a meta-analysis of worldwide asthma genome-wide association studies (23,948 asthma cases, 118,538 controls) of individuals from ethnically diverse populations. We identified five new asthma loci, found two new associations at two known asthma loci, established asthma associations at two loci previously implicated in the comorbidity of asthma plus hay fever, and confirmed nine known loci. Investigation of pleiotropy showed large overlaps in genetic variants with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The enrichment in enhancer marks at asthma risk loci, especially in immune cells, suggested a major role of these loci in the regulation of immunologically related mechanisms.

  • 87.
    Deol, Abhinav
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    Wayne State Univ, Karmanos Canc Inst, Dept Oncol, 4100 John R,4 HWCRC, Detroit, MI 48201 USA..
    Sengsayadeth, Salyka
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Nashville, TN USA..
    Ahn, Kwang Woo
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Wang, Hai-Lin
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Antin, Joseph Harry
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Battiwalla, Minoo
    NHLBI, Hematol Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Bornhauser, Martin
    Carl Gustav Carus Univ Hosp, Dresden, Germany..
    Cahn, Jean-Yves
    Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Grenoble, France..
    Camitta, Bruce
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Midwest Ctr Canc & Blood Disorders, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Childrens Hosp Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA..
    Chen, Yi-Bin
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Cutler, Corey S.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Med, Div Expt Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Univ Kansas, Med Ctr, Div Hematol & Oncol, Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Kansas City, KS 66103 USA..
    Hamadani, Mehdi
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Inamoto, Yoshihiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Div Hematopoiet Stem Cell Transplantat, Tokyo, Japan..
    Jagasia, Madan
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Nashville, TN USA..
    Kamble, Rammurti
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Div Hematol & Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Koreth, John
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Univ Hosp Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Liesveld, Jane
    Univ Rochester, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Rochester, NY 14642 USA..
    Litzow, Mark R.
    Mayo Clin, Div Hematol, Rochester, NY USA.;Mayo Clin, Transplant Ctr, Rochester, NY USA..
    Marks, David I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol Natl Hlth Serv Trust, Pediat Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Tampa, FL USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Div Therapeut Immunol, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reshef, Ran
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Blood & Marrow Transplantat Program, New York, NY USA.;Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Columbia Ctr Translat Immunol, New York, NY USA..
    Rowe, Jacob M.
    Shaare Zedek Med Ctr, Dept Hematol, Jerusalem, Israel..
    Saad, Ayman A.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA..
    Sabloff, Mitchell
    Univ Ottawa, Dept Med, Div Hematol, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Ottawa Hosp, Res Inst, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Schouten, Harry C.
    Acad Hosp Maastricht, Dept Hematol, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Shea, Thomas C.
    Univ North Carolina Hlth Care, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Soiffer, Robert J.
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Ctr Hematol Oncol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Uy, Geoffrey L.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Oncol, St Louis, MO USA..
    Waller, Edmond K.
    Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Wiernik, Peter H.
    Our Lady Mercy Med Ctr, Bronx, NY USA..
    Wirk, Badeep
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Div Bone Marrow Transplant, Seattle, WA USA..
    Woolfrey, Ann E.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Bunjes, Donald
    Ulm Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 3, Ulm, Germany..
    Devine, Steven
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Internal Med, Comprehens Canc Ctr James, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    de Lima, Marcos
    Univ Hosp Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Sandmaier, Brenda M.
    Univ Washington, Div Med Oncol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Weisdorf, Dan
    Natl Marrow Donor Program Be Match, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Khoury, Hanna Jean
    Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Does FLT3 Mutation Impact Survival After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia?: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Analysis2016Ingår i: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 122, nr 19, s. 3005-3014Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with FMS like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a poor prognosis and are referred for early allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). METHODS: Data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) were used to evaluate 511 adult patients with de novo AML who underwent HCT during 2008 through 2011 to determine whether FLT3 mutations had an impact on HCT outcomes. RESULTS: In total, 158 patients (31%) had FLT3 mutations. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed an increased risk of relapse at 3 years in the FLT3 mutated group compared with the wild-type (WT) group (38% [95% confidence interval (CI), 30%-45%] vs 28% [95% CI, 24%-33%]; P = .04; relative risk, 1.60 [95% CI, 1.15-2.22]; P = .0048). However, FLT3 mutation status was not significantly associated with nonrelapse mortality, leukemia-free survival, or overall survival. Although more patients in the FLT3 mutated group died from relapsed primary disease compared with those in the WT group (60% vs 46%), the 3-year overall survival rate was comparable for the 2 groups (mutated group: 49%; 95% CI, 40%-57%; WT group: 55%, 95% CI, 50%-60%; P = .20). CONCLUSIONS: The current data indicate that FLT3 mutation status did not adversely impact overall survival after HCT, and about 50% of patients with this mutation who underwent HCT were long-term survivors.

  • 88. Derogar, M.
    et al.
    Blomberg, J.
    Sadr-Azodi, O.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Hospital teaching status and volume related to mortality after pancreatic cancer surgery in a national cohort2015Ingår i: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 102, nr 5, s. 548-557Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The association between hospital teaching status and mortality after pancreatic resection is not well explored. Although hospital volume is related to short-term mortality, the effect on long-term survival needs investigation, taking into account hospital teaching status and selective referral patterns. Methods: This was a nationwide retrospective register-based cohort study of patients undergoing pancreatic resection between 1990 and 2010. Follow-up for survival was carried out until 31 December 2011. The associations between hospital teaching status and annual hospital volume and short-, intermediate- and long-term mortality were determined by use of multivariable Cox regression models, which provided hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 per cent c.i. The analyses were mutually adjusted for hospital teaching status and volume, as well as for patients' sex, age, education, co-morbidity, type of resection, tumour site and histology, time interval, referral and hospital clustering. Results: A total of 3298 patients were identified during the study interval. Hospital teaching status was associated with a decrease in overall mortality during the latest interval (years 2005-2010) (university versus non-university hospitals: HR 0.72, 95 per cent c.i. 0.56 to 0.91; P = 0.007). During all time periods, hospital teaching status was associated with decreased mortality more than 2 years after surgery (university versus non-university hospitals: HR 0.86, 0.75 to 0.98; P = 0.026). Lower annual hospital volume increased the risk of short-term mortality (HR for 3 or fewer compared with 4-6 pancreatic cancer resections annually: 1.60, 1.04 to 2.48; P = 0.034), but not long-term mortality. Sensitivity analyses with adjustment for tumour stage did not change the results. Conclusion: Hospital teaching status was strongly related to decreased mortality in both the short and long term. This may relate to processes of care rather than volume per se. Very low-volume hospitals had the highest short-term mortality risk.

  • 89.
    Doorn, Katie Aafjes-van
    et al.
    Adelphi Univ, Derner Inst Adv Psychol Studies, Garden City, NY 21402 USA.;Univ Oxford, Oxford Inst Clin Psychol Training, Oxford, England..
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cooper, Angela
    Dalhousie Univ, Ctr Emot & Hlth, Halifax, NS, Canada..
    Macdonald, James
    Headington Psychotherapy, Oxford, England..
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning.
    Patients' Affective Processes Within Initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy Sessions2017Ingår i: Psychotherapy, ISSN 0033-3204, E-ISSN 1939-1536, Vol. 54, nr 2, s. 175-183Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that patients' in-session experience of previously avoided affects may be important for effective psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients' in-session levels of affect experiencing in relation to their corresponding levels of insight, motivation, and inhibitory affects in initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy (EDT) sessions. Four hundred sixty-six 10-min video segments from 31 initial sessions were rated using the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale. A series of multilevel growth models, controlling for between-therapist variability, were estimated to predict patients' adaptive affect experiencing (Activating Affects) across session segments. In line with our expectations, higher within-person levels of Insight and Motivation related to higher levels of Activating Affects per segment. Contrary to expectations, however, lower levels of Inhibition were not associated with higher levels of Activating Affects. Further, using a time-lagged model, we did not find that the levels of Insight, Motivation, or Inhibition during one session segment predicted Activating Affects in the next, possibly indicating that 10-min segments may be suboptimal for testing temporal relationships in affective processes. Our results suggest that, to intensify patients' immediate affect experiencing in initial EDT sessions, therapists should focus on increasing insight into defensive patterns and, in particular, motivation to give them up. Future research should examine the impact of specific inhibitory affects more closely, as well as between-therapist variability in patients' in-session adaptive affect experiencing.

  • 90.
    Drevin, Jennifer
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Vårdvetenskap.
    Stern, Jenny
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Vårdvetenskap.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Butler, Stephen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Vårdvetenskap. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Internationell mödra- och barnhälsovård (IMCH). Uppsala universitet, Nationellt centrum för kvinnofrid (NCK).
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Adverse childhood experiences influence development of pain during pregnancy.2015Ingår i: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, nr 8, s. 840-846Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and pain with onset during pregnancy.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

    SETTING: Eighteen antenatal clinics in southern Mid-Sweden.

    SAMPLE: Of 293 women invited to participate, 232 (79%) women agreed to participate in early pregnancy and were assessed in late pregnancy.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed in early and late pregnancy. The questionnaires sought information on socio-demography, ACE, pain location by pain drawing and pain intensity by visual analogue scales. Distribution of pain was coded in 41 predetermined areas.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain in third trimester with onset during present pregnancy: intensity, location and number of pain locations.

    RESULTS: In late pregnancy, 62% of the women reported any ACE and 72% reported any pain location with onset during the present pregnancy. Among women reporting any ACE the median pain intensity was higher compared with women without such an experience (p = 0.01). The accumulated ACE displayed a positive association with the number of reported pain locations in late pregnancy (rs  = 0.19, p = 0.02). This association remained significant after adjusting for background factors in multiple regression analysis (p = 0.01). When ACE was dichotomized the prevalence of pain did not differ between women with and without ACE. The subgroup of women reporting physical abuse as a child reported a higher prevalence of sacral and pelvic pain (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.02, respectively).

    CONCLUSIONS: Adverse childhood experiences were associated with higher pain intensities and larger pain distributions in late pregnancy, which are risk factors for transition to chronic pain postpartum.

  • 91.
    D'Souza, Anita
    et al.
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Dispenzieri, Angela
    Mayo Clin, Rochester, MN USA..
    Wirk, Baldeep
    Seattle Canc Care Alliance, Seattle, WA USA..
    Zhang, Mei-Jie
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Huang, Jiaxing
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Gertz, Morie A.
    Mayo Clin, Rochester, MN USA..
    Kyle, Robert A.
    Mayo Clin, Rochester, MN USA..
    Kumar, Shaji
    Mayo Clin, Rochester, MN USA..
    Comenzo, Raymond L.
    Tufts Med Ctr, Boston, MA USA..
    Gale, Robert Peter
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Hematol Res Ctr, London, England..
    Lazarus, Hillard M.
    Univ Hosp Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Nashville, TN USA..
    Cornell, Robert F.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Nashville, TN USA..
    Weiss, Brendan M.
    Univ Penn, Med Ctr, Abramson Canc Ctr, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Vogl, Dan T.
    Univ Penn, Med Ctr, Abramson Canc Ctr, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Freytes, Cesar O.
    South Texas Vet Hlth Care Syst, San Antonio, TX USA.;Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 USA..
    Scott, Emma C.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, Ctr Hematol Malignancies, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Landau, Heather J.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, New York, NY 10021 USA..
    Moreb, Jan S.
    Shands HealthCare, Gainesville, FL USA.;Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Costa, Luciano J.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Ramanathan, Muthalagu
    Univ Massachusetts, Mem Med Ctr, Worcester, MA 01605 USA..
    Callander, Natalie S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Carbone Canc Ctr, Madison, WI USA..
    Kamble, Rammurti T.
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ganguly, Siddhartha
    Univ Kansas, Med Ctr, Kansas City, KS 66103 USA..
    Nishihori, Taiga
    Univ S Florida, Coll Med, H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Tampa, FL 33612 USA..
    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L.
    Univ Virginia Hlth Syst, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Wood, William A.
    Univ N Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Mark, Tomer M.
    Weill Cornell Med Coll, New York, NY USA..
    Hari, Parameswaran
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Ctr Int Blood & Marrow Transplant Res, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Improved Outcomes After Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Light Chain Amyloidosis: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Study2015Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 33, nr 32, s. 3741-+Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation, or autotransplantation, is effective in light-chain amyloidosis (AL), but it is associated with a high risk of early mortality (EM). In a multicenter randomized comparison against oral chemotherapy, autotransplantation was associated with 24% EM. We analyzed trends in outcomes after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for AL in North America. Patients and Methods Between 1995 and 2012, 1,536 patients with AL who underwent autotransplantation at 134 centers were identified in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database. EM and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in three time cohorts: 1995 to 2000 (n = 140), 2001 to 2006 (n = 596), and 2007 to 2012 (n = 800). Hematologic and renal responses and factors associated with EM, relapse and/or progression, progression-free survival and OS were analyzed in more recent subgroups from 2001 to 2006 (n = 197) and from 2007 to 2012 (n = 157). Results Mortality at 30 and 100 days progressively declined over successive time periods from 11% and 20%, respectively, in 1995 to 2000 to 5% and 11%, respectively, in 2001 to 2006, and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in 2007 to 2012. Correspondingly, 5-year OS improved from 55% in 1995 to 2000 to 61% in 2001 to 2006 and to 77% in 2007 to 2012. Hematologic response to transplantation improved in the latest cohort. Renal response rate was 32%. Centers performing more than four AL transplantations per year had superior survival outcomes. In the multivariable analysis, cardiac AL was associated with high EM and inferior progression-free survival and OS. Autotransplantation in 2007 to 2012 and use of higher dosages of melphalan were associated with a lowered relapse risk. A Karnofsky score less than 80 and creatinine levels 2 mg/m(2) or greater were associated with worsened OS. Conclusion Post-transplantation survival in AL has improved, with a dramatic reduction in early post-transplantation mortality and excellent 5-year survival. The risk-benefit ratio for autotransplantation has changed, and randomized comparison with nontransplantation approaches is again warranted.

  • 92. Dumitrescu, Bogdan
    et al.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Strand, Roland
    Bed rest when the water breaks early: in accordance with the evidence or old habit?2015Ingår i: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Bed rest is often prescribed as part of the treatment plan for women with preterm premature rupture of membranes in the hope of avoiding premature birth. The purpose of this study was to determine the routine care of these patients in Swedish hospitals.A survey was sent to all hospitals in Sweden with an obstetrics department (n=45). Out of these, 31 answered our survey (69 %). The women were separated into three groups depending on gestation length (22+0-26+6, 27+0-32+6 and 33+0-36+6).Most hospitals chose to admit the women and to recommend total or partial bed rest. The earlier in the pregnancy the rupture occurred, the more likely the patient was to be confined to total bed rest.The study shows that this topic is controversial. Most hospitals use bed rest even though there is no evidence to support that it is of benefit for the patient. More studies in this area are required in order to find an optimal treatment for this patient group.

  • 93.
    Dumitrescu, Bogdan
    et al.
    Obstetrik och gynekologi, Mälarsjukhuset, Eskilstuna.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Strand, Roland T
    Obstetrik och gynekologi, Mälarsjukhuset, Eskilstuna.
    Sängläge vid tidig vattenavgång - enligt evidens eller gammal vana?2015Ingår i: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, nr 112Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 94.
    Ekeblad, Annika
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.; Vasternorrland Cty Council, Psychiat Clin, Harnosand, Sweden.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap. Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Psychiat Sect, Clin Neurosci, Solna, Sweden.
    Vestberg, Robert
    Vasternorrland Cty Council, Psychiat Clin, Harnosand, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.2016Ingår i: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 33, nr 12, s. 1090-1098Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate.

    METHODS: Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin.

    RESULTS: IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score <10). The dropout rate was significantly higher in CBT (40%; 19/47) compared to IPT (19%; 8/43). Statistically controlling for antidepressant medication use did not change the results.

    CONCLUSIONS: IPT was noninferior to CBT in a sample of depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity.

  • 95.
    Ekenros, L.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Papoutsi, Zoi
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Novum, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Friden, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;St Erik Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Acad Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wright, K. Dahlman
    Karolinska Inst, Novum, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Hirschberg, A. Linden
    Karolinska Inst, Div Obstet & Gynecol, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Expression of sex steroid hormone receptors in human skeletal muscle during the menstrual cycle2017Ingår i: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 219, nr 2, s. 486-493Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Variations in sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle may affect neuromuscular performance and the risk of sustaining musculoskeletal injury in women. The aim of this study was to investigate mRNA and protein levels for sex steroid hormone receptors in skeletal muscle in three distinct phases of the menstrual cycle. Methods: Fifteen, healthy women with regular menstrual cycles participated in the study. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were obtained in three hormonally verified phases of the menstrual cycle for each individual, that is the follicular phase, the ovulatory phase and the luteal phase. mRNA and protein levels of oestrogen (ER and ER), progesterone (PR) and androgen (AR) receptors were analysed. Results: There was an overall significant variation in mRNA and protein levels of ER and PR across the menstrual cycle. mRNA and protein levels of ER were highest in the follicular phase when oestradiol levels were low, whereas protein levels of PR were highest in the luteal phase when progesterone levels were high. mRNA levels of PR were highest in the ovulatory phase. No significant variation in AR levels was detected across the menstrual cycle. ER levels were very low in all three phases of the menstrual cycle. Conclusion: Significant variations in mRNA and protein levels of ER and PR were detected in skeletal muscle during three confirmed phases of the menstrual cycle. These results may have an impact on effects of muscular training and sports injuries in women.

  • 96.
    Elfving, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shakely, Deler
    Malaria Research, Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria
    Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Baltzell, Kimberly
    Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California San Francisco, USA.
    Ali, Abdullah S
    Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Programme, Ministry of Health, Zanzibar, Tanzania.
    Bachelard, Marc
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falk, Kerstin I
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljung, Annika
    Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Msellem, Mwinyi I
    Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Programme, Ministry of Health, Zanzibar, Tanzania.
    Omar, Rahila S
    Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Programme, Ministry of Health, Zanzibar, Tanzania.
    Parola, Philippe
    Aix Marseille University, UM63, WHO collaborative centre for rickettsioses and other arthropod borne bacterial diseases, Faculté de Médecine, Marseille, France.
    Xu, Weiping
    Malaria Research, Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Petzold, Max
    Akademistatistik, Centre for Applied Biostatistics, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Trollfors, Birger
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björkman, Anders
    Malaria Research, Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindh, Magnus
    Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Internationell mödra- och barnhälsovård (IMCH). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Acute Uncomplicated Febrile Illness in Children Aged 2-59 months in Zanzibar: Aetiologies, Antibiotic Treatment and Outcome2016Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikel-id e0146054Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the fact that a large proportion of children with fever in Africa present at primary health care facilities, few studies have been designed to specifically study the causes of uncomplicated childhood febrile illness at this level of care, especially in areas like Zanzibar that has recently undergone a dramatic change from high to low malaria transmission.

    METHODS: We prospectively studied the aetiology of febrile illness in 677 children aged 2-59 months with acute uncomplicated fever managed by IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) guidelines in Zanzibar, using point-of-care tests, urine culture, blood-PCR, chest X-ray (CXR) of IMCI-pneumonia classified patients, and multiple quantitative (q)PCR investigations of nasopharyngeal (NPH) (all patients) and rectal (GE) swabs (diarrhoea patients). For comparison, we also performed NPH and GE qPCR analyses in 167 healthy community controls. Final fever diagnoses were retrospectively established based on all clinical and laboratory data. Clinical outcome was assessed during a 14-day follow-up. The utility of IMCI for identifying infections presumed to require antibiotics was evaluated.

    FINDINGS: NPH-qPCR and GE-qPCR detected ≥1 pathogen in 657/672 (98%) and 153/164 (93%) of patients and 158/166 (95%) and 144/165 (87%) of controls, respectively. Overall, 57% (387/677) had IMCI-pneumonia, but only 12% (42/342) had CXR-confirmed pneumonia. Two patients were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Respiratory syncytial virus (24.5%), influenza A/B (22.3%), rhinovirus (10.5%) and group-A streptococci (6.4%), CXR-confirmed pneumonia (6.2%), Shigella (4.3%) were the most common viral and bacterial fever diagnoses, respectively. Blood-PCR conducted in a sub-group of patients (n = 83) without defined fever diagnosis was negative for rickettsiae, chikungunya, dengue, Rift Valley fever and West Nile viruses. Antibiotics were prescribed to 500 (74%) patients, but only 152 (22%) had an infection retrospectively considered to require antibiotics. Clinical outcome was generally good. However, two children died. Only 68 (11%) patients remained febrile on day 3 and three of them had verified fever on day 14. An additional 29 (4.5%) children had fever relapse on day 14. Regression analysis determined C-reactive Protein (CRP) as the only independent variable significantly associated with CXR-confirmed pneumonia.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study on uncomplicated febrile illness in African children that both applied a comprehensive laboratory panel and a healthy control group. A majority of patients had viral respiratory tract infection. Pathogens were frequently detected by qPCR also in asymptomatic children, demonstrating the importance of incorporating controls in fever aetiology studies. The precision of IMCI for identifying infections requiring antibiotics was low.

  • 97.
    Ellonen, Noora
    et al.
    Univ Tampere, Tampere, Finland..
    Lucas, Steven
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa.
    Janson, Staffan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa. Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Parents' Self-Reported Use of Corporal Punishment and Other Humiliating Upbringing Practices in Finland and Sweden: A Comparative Study2017Ingår i: Child Abuse Review, ISSN 0952-9136, E-ISSN 1099-0852, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 289-304Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden and Finland were the first countries to ban corporal punishment 30years ago. Since then, the prevalence of attitudes supporting the use of corporal punishment and the practice itself have decreased. This study examines the current frequencies of corporal punishment and other humiliating upbringing practices in Finnish and Swedish families. The analysis is based on survey data among 3170 Finnish and 1358 Swedish parents with children from newborn to 12years of age. Data were analysed using univariate tests (chi-square) and logistic regression. According to the analysis, a larger proportion of Finnish parents, and especially mothers, use humiliating upbringing practices compared to Swedish parents. This difference is not found with regard to corporal punishment. A larger proportion of Finnish parents push their children compared to Swedish parents, while a larger proportion of Swedish parents shake their children. In both countries, corporal punishment is more frequently used by fathers, boys are more often victimised than girls, toddlers are more often exposed to corporal punishment and school-age children are more often subjected to psychologically abusive practices. Corporal punishment and other humiliating upbringing practices are strongly correlated in both countries. The differences found between countries were not explained by socio-demographic factors.

  • 98. Erra, Elina O
    et al.
    Askling, Helena Hervius
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Riutta, Jukka
    Vene, Sirkka
    Yoksan, Sutee
    Lindquist, Lars
    Pakkanen, Sari H
    Huhtamo, Eili
    Vapalahti, Olli
    Kantele, Anu
    A single dose of vero cell-derived Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine (Ixiaro) effectively boosts immunity in travelers primed with mouse brain-derived JE vaccines2012Ingår i: Clinical Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1058-4838, E-ISSN 1537-6591, Vol. 55, nr 6, s. 825-834Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A significant part of the world population lives in areas with endemic Japanese encephalitis (JE). For travelers from nonendemic countries, Vero cell-derived vaccine (JE-VC; Ixiaro) has replaced traditional mouse brain-derived vaccines (JE-MB) associated with safety concerns. The 2 vaccines are derived from different viral strains: JE-VC from the SA14-14-2 strain and JE-MB from the Nakayama strain. No data exist regarding whether JE-VC can be used to boost immunity after a primary series of JE-MB; therefore, a primary series of JE-VC has been recommended to all travelers regardless of previous vaccination history.

    METHODS:

    One hundred twenty travelers were divided into 4 groups: Volunteers with no prior JE vaccination received primary immunization with (group 1) JE-MB or (group 2) JE-VC, and those primed with JE-MB received a single booster dose of (group 3) JE-MB or (group 4) JE-VC. Immune responses were tested before and 4-8 weeks after vaccination using plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) against both vaccine strains.

    RESULTS:

    In vaccine-naive travelers, the vaccination response rate for test strains Nakayama and SA14-14-2 was 100% and 87% after primary vaccination with JE-MB and 87% and 94% after JE-VC, respectively. Antibody levels depended on the target virus, with higher titers against homologous than heterologous PRNT(50) target strain (P < .001). In travelers primed with JE-MB, vaccination response rates were 91% and 91%, and 98% and 95% after a booster dose of JE-MB or JE-VC, respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that a higher proportion of primed (98%/95%) than nonprimed (39%/42%) volunteers responded to a single dose of JE-VC (P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    A single dose of JE-VC effectively boosted immunity in JE-MB-primed travelers. Current recommendations should be reevaluated.

    CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION:

    NCT01386827.

  • 99. Erra, Elina O.
    et al.
    Askling, Helena Hervius
    Yoksan, Sutee
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Riutta, Jukka
    Vene, Sirkka
    Lindquist, Lars
    Vapalahti, Olli
    Kantele, Anu
    Cross-protection elicited by primary and booster vaccinations against Japanese encephalitis: A two-year follow-up study2013Ingår i: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 32, nr 1, s. 119-123Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine (JE-VC, IXIARO) has replaced the traditional mouse brain-derived preparations (JE-MB) in travelers' vaccinations against Japanese encephalitis. We showed recently that a single JE-VC dose efficiently boosts immunity in JE-MB-primed vaccinees, and that JE-VC elicits cross-protective immunity against non-vaccine genotypes, including the emerging genotype I. While these studies only provided short-term data, the present investigation evaluates the longevity of seroprotection in the same volunteers.

    Methods:

    The study comprised 48 travelers who had received (1) JE-VC primary series, (2) JE-MB primary series followed by a single JE-VC booster dose, or (3) JE-MB primary series and a single JE-MB booster dose. Serum samples were collected two years after the last vaccine dose, and evaluated with the plaque-reduction neutralization test against seven Japanese encephalitis virus strains representing genotypes I-IV. PRNT50 titers >= 10 were considered protective.

    Results:

    Two years after the primary series with JE-VC, 87-93% of the vaccinees proved to be cross-protected against test strains representing genotypes II-IV and 73% against those of genotype I. After a single homologous or heterologous booster dose to JE-MB-primed subjects, the two-year seroprotection rates against genotype I-IV strains were 89-100%.

    Conclusions:

    After JE-VC primary series, seroprotection appeared to wane first against genotype I. The first booster should not be delayed beyond two years. In JE-MB-primed subjects, a single JE-VC booster provided cross-protective immunity against genotype I-IV strains in almost all vaccinees, suggesting an interval of two years or even longer for the second booster. These data further support the use of a single JE-VC dose for boosting JE-MB immunity.

  • 100. Erra, Elina O
    et al.
    Askling, Helena Hervius
    Yoksan, Sutee
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Riutta, Jukka
    Vene, Sirkka
    Lindquist, Lars
    Vapalahti, Olli
    Kantele, Anu
    Cross-protective capacity of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines against circulating heterologous JE virus genotypes2013Ingår i: Clinical Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1058-4838, E-ISSN 1537-6591, Vol. 56, nr 2, s. 267-270Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Current Japanese encephalitis vaccines are derived from strains of genotype III, yet heterologous genotypes are emerging in endemic areas. Inactivated vaccines given to European travelers were found to elicit protective levels of neutralizing antibodies against heterologous strains of genotypes I-IV.

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