uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
10111213 601 - 633 of 633
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 601.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ekegren, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Karlsson, Mathias
    Stockholm Soder Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Clin Res, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bergenheim, Mikael
    Cent Hosp Karlstad, Dept Surg, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Plasma levels of S100B during pregnancy in women developing pre-eclampsia2012In: Pregnancy Hypertension, ISSN 2210-7789, E-ISSN 2210-7797, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 398-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    S100B is suggested to be a peripheral biomarker of central nervous system injury with increased blood–brain barrier permeability. The aim of this study was to investigate if there is a difference in plasma levels of S100B throughout pregnancy between women developing pre-eclampsia and those who did not.

    Study design

    A nested case-control study within a longitudinal study cohort was performed. Healthy pregnant women were enrolled and plasma samples were collected at gestational weeks 10, 25, 28, 33 and 37. Levels of S100B throughout pregnancy were analyzed with an ELISA assay.

    Results

    The levels of S100B did not change between gestational weeks 10 and 37 (0.047 vs. 0.052; p = 0.71) in the healthy controls, but the S100B levels increased between corresponding weeks in women who developed pre-eclampsia (0.052 vs. 0.075; p < 0.05). In gestational weeks 33 and 37 women who developed pre-eclampsia had higher levels of S100B than the controls (p = 0.047 and p = 0.010, respectively).

    Conclusion

    S100B levels increase during pregnancy in women who develop pre-eclampsia and there is an increased S100B level in women who develop pre-eclampsia compared with healthy pregnancies several weeks before clinical symptoms of the disease. The increased amount of plasma S100B in women developing pre-eclampsia might be secondary to cerebral vascular damage and S100B is a potential peripheral biomarker reflecting cerebral involvement in pre-eclampsia.

  • 602.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Karolinska Univ Hosp & Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsdottir, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Nelander, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Simic, Marija
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Karolinska Univ Hosp & Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stephansson, Olof
    Karolinska Univ Hosp & Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Calif Berkeley, Sch Publ Hlth, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Karolinska Univ Hosp & Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Prehypertension in Pregnancy and Risks of Small for Gestational Age Infant and Stillbirth2016In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 640-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is not fully known whether maternal prehypertension is associated with increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes, and it is debated whether increases in blood pressure during pregnancy influence adverse fetal outcomes. We performed a population-based cohort study in nonhypertensive women with term (37 weeks) singleton births (n=157446). Using normotensive (diastolic blood pressure [DBP] <80 mmHg) women as reference, we calculated adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals between prehypertension (DBP 80-89 mmHg) at 36 gestational weeks (late pregnancy) and risks of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth or stillbirth. We further estimated whether an increase in DBP from early to late pregnancy affected these risks. We found that 11% of the study population had prehypertension in late pregnancy. Prehypertension was associated with increased risks of both SGA birth and stillbirth; adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.69 (1.51-1.90) and 1.70 (1.16-2.49), respectively. Risks of SGA birth in term pregnancy increased by 2.0% (95% confidence intervals 1.5-2.8) per each mmHg rise in DBP from early to late pregnancy, whereas risk of stillbirth was not affected by rise in DBP during pregnancy. We conclude that prehypertension in late pregnancy is associated with increased risks of SGA birth and stillbirth. Risk of SGA birth was also affected by rise in DBT during pregnancy. Our findings provide new insight to the relationship between maternal blood pressure and fetal well-being and suggest that impaired maternal perfusion of the placenta contribute to SGA birth and stillbirth.

  • 603.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Gunnarsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The paternal role in pre-eclampsia and giving birth to a small for gestational age infant: a population-based cohort study2012In: BMJ open, ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 4, p. e001178-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To estimate the effect of partner change on risks of pre-eclampsia and giving birth to a small for gestational age infant.

    DESIGN:

    Prospective population study.

    SETTING:

    Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    Women with their first and second successive singleton births in Sweden between 1990 and 2006 without pregestational diabetes and/or hypertension (n=446 459).

    OUTCOME MEASURES:

    Preterm (<37 weeks) and term (≥37 weeks) pre-eclampsia, and giving birth to a small for gestational age (SGA) infant. Risks were adjusted for interpregnancy interval, maternal age, body mass index, height and smoking habits in second pregnancy, years of involuntary childlessness before second pregnancy, mother's country of birth, years of formal education and year of birth. Further, when we calculated risks of SGA we restricted the study population to women with non-pre-eclamptic pregnancies.

    RESULTS:

    In women who had a preterm pre-eclampsia in first pregnancy, partner change was associated with a strong protective effect for preterm pre-eclampsia recurrence (OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.88). Similarly, partner change was also associated with a protective effect of recurrence of SGA birth (OR 0.75; 95% CI 0.67 to 0.84). In contrast, among women without SGA in first birth, partner change was associated with an increased risk of SGA in second pregnancy. Risks of term pre-eclampsia were not affected by partner change.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There is a paternal effect on risks of preterm pre-eclampsia and giving birth to an SGA infant.

  • 604.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Random albumin/creatinine ratio for quantification of proteinuria in manifest pre-eclampsia - Reply2007In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 120-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 605.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Random albumin/creatinine ratio for quantification of proteinuria in manifest pre-eclampsia - Reply2007In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 119-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 606.
    Wilander, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Wikström, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    HPV-test för kvalitetskontroll av gynekologiska cellprov2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 105, no 48-49, p. 3560-3564Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 607.
    Wilbe, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ekvall, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eurenius, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ericson, Katharina
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Casar-Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Annerén, Göran
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Bondeson, Marie-Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    MuSK: a new target for lethal fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS).2015In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 195-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Fetal akinesia deformation sequence syndrome (FADS, OMIM 208150) is characterised by decreased fetal movement (fetal akinesia) as well as intrauterine growth restriction, arthrogryposis, and developmental anomalies (eg, cystic hygroma, pulmonary hypoplasia, cleft palate, and cryptorchidism). Mutations in components of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) pathway have previously been associated with FADS.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We report on a family with recurrent fetal loss, where the parents had five affected fetuses/children with FADS and one healthy child. The fetuses displayed no fetal movements from the gestational age of 17 weeks, extended knee joints, flexed hips and elbows, and clenched hands. Whole exome sequencing of one affected fetus and the parents was performed. A novel homozygous frameshift mutation was identified in muscle, skeletal receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), c.40dupA, which segregated with FADS in the family. Haplotype analysis revealed a conserved haplotype block suggesting a founder mutation. MuSK (muscle-specific tyrosine kinase receptor), a component of the AChR pathway, is a main regulator of neuromuscular junction formation and maintenance. Missense mutations in MuSK have previously been reported to cause congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) associated with AChR deficiency.

    CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that a mutation in MuSK is associated with FADS. The results support previous findings that CMS and/or FADS are caused by complete or severe functional disruption of components located in the AChR pathway. We propose that whereas milder mutations of MuSK will cause a CMS phenotype, a complete loss is lethal and will cause FADS.

  • 608. Witjes, Han
    et al.
    Creinin, Mitchell D.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Nguyen, Allison Martin
    Korver, Tjeerd
    Comparative analysis of the effects of nomegestrol acetate/17 beta-estradiol and drospirenone/ethinylestradiol on premenstrual and menstrual symptoms and dysmenorrhea2015In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 296-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare premenstrual and menstrual symptoms in healthy women using nomegestrol acetate/17 beta-estradiol (NOMAC/E2) and drospirenone/ethinylestradiol (DRSP/EE) via the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire Form C (MDQ-C). Methods Women completed the MDQ-C at baseline and after completion of cycles 1, 3, 6 and 13, for the premenstrual (four days before most recent flow) and menstrual (most recent flow) phases in two randomized controlled trials. Treatment effects of NOMAC/E2 and DRSP/EE on the t-scores of eight MDQ-C symptom domains from 3522 women were examined, and the effects of both treatments on the score for cramps from 1779 women with moderate to severe cramps at baseline. Longitudinal data analysis methods were applied in both analyses. Results NOMAC/E2 users experienced a significant improvement in Pain, Water Retention, Negative Affect, Impaired Concentration and Behaviour Change domain scores in the menstrual phase compared with DRSP/EE users (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). However, Arousal (emotional and mental) scores worsened with NOMAC/E2 but not with DRSP/EE. Women with moderate to severe cramps experienced an improvement in the cramps score with NOMAC/E2 and DRSP/EE. Conclusions NOMAC/E2 was effective in reducing most premenstrual and menstrual symptoms, and was associated with significantly greater improvements in many MDQ-C domain scores compared with DRSP/EE.

  • 609.
    Wu, Xuxia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Blanck, A
    Section of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical Science, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Henriksen, Rudi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindblom, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-x, Mcl-1, Bax and Bak in human uterine leiomyomas and myometrium during the menstrual cycle and after menopause2002In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ISSN 0960-0760, E-ISSN 1879-1220, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-x, Mcl-1, Bax and Bak proteins in human uterine leiomyomas and homologous myometrium during the menstrual cycle and after menopause.

    The expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-x, Mcl-1, Bax and Bak in leiomyomas (n=24) and myometrial samples (n=22) from women with leiomyomas was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Measured by immunohistochemistry, a significant difference between leiomyomas and myometrium was observed only for the Bax protein, in tissues obtained from women in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. The Bcl-2 staining was more abundant in leiomyomas than in myometrium only in tissues obtained in the proliferative phase of the cycle. Bcl-2 was more abundant in leiomyomas from women of fertile age than in leiomyomas from menopausal women. No significant differences were observed for the Bcl-x or Bak proteins, whereas the Mcl-1 protein was significantly less abundant in secretory phase leiomyomas than in leiomyomas from menopausal women. Western blot analysis based on pools of tissue extracts from the different groups essentially confirmed the data obtained by immunohistochemistry. Bcl-2 family proteins are expressed in leiomyomas and myometrium in different phases related to and influenced by gonadal steroids. These proteins are suggested to interact with each other in the regulation of programmed cell death, apoptosis, but their specific role in growth control of uterine leiomyomas remains to be investigated.

  • 610.
    Wu, Xuxia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Blanck, A
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Möller, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Favini, Roberta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindblom, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Apoptosis, cellular proliferation and expression of p53 in human uterine leiomyomas and myometrium during the menstrual cycle and after menopause2000In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 397-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Cell proliferation, apoptosis and expression of p53 proteins were studied in human uterine leiomyomas and myometrium during the menstrual cycle and after menopause.

    METHODS:

    Expression of ki-67 and p53 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and by immunoblotting. Apoptosis was detected by in situ 3' end labelling of cells with DNA fragmentation.

    RESULTS:

    In both the proliferative and the secretory phases, ki-67 expression was higher in leiomyomas than in myometrium and both tissues showed higher expression in the secretory than in the proliferative phase. No difference in apoptotic index was observed between leiomyomas and myometrium or between the proliferative and secretory phases. After menopause, the expression of ki-67 as well as the apoptotic index was lower than in the proliferative and secretory phases and no significant difference between tissues was seen. Both leiomyomas and myometrium showed negative staining for p53. Immunohistochemical results regarding p53 were confirmed by Western blot.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Our findings indicate that sex steroids influence the growth of leiomyomas by stimulating cell proliferation rather than by affecting apoptosis. The rate of cell proliferation is higher in fertile age than after menopause and appears to be enhanced under the influence of progesterone.

  • 611. Wurst, Friedrich Martin
    et al.
    Kelso, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Weinmann, Wolfgang
    Pragst, Fritz
    Yegles, Michel
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Measurement of direct ethanol metabolites suggests higher rate of alcohol use among pregnant women than found with the AUDIT: a pilot study in a population-based sample of Swedish women2008In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 198, no 4, p. 407.e1-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to investigate whether biomarkers of alcohol consumption would provide additional information to the use of a validated alcohol questionnaire in pregnant women. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred three pregnant women were included in the study. The women completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) questionnaire, and a urine and hair sample was collected. The urine samples were used for determination of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate and the hair samples for EtG and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE). RESULTS: Twenty-six women (25.2%) were identified as possible alcohol consumers by the combined use of AUDIT and direct ethanol metabolites. Seven subjects had EtG or FAEE levels in hair highly suspicious of heavy drinking, but only 1 of these were positive according to the AUDIT questionnaire CONCLUSION: The combined use of the AUDIT questionnaire and direct ethanol metabolites appear to identify more potential alcohol consumers among pregnant women than does the sole use of the AUDIT questionnaire.

  • 612.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Alden, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Bergh, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Attitudes towards embryo donation among infertile couples with frozen embryos2013In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 2432-2439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION

    What are the attitudes towards different aspects of embryo donation among Swedish infertile couples who have surplus cryopreserved embryos?

    SUMMARY ANSWER

    Nearly three-quarters of infertile couples with surplus embryos were in favour of embryo donation. A majority of respondents were also in favour of embryos being donated for research.

    WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY

    Currently, embryo donation to other infertile couples is prohibited by law in Sweden. Encouraging results have been published from countries allowing embryo donation, although it is a complex procedure associated with many emotional, ethical, legal and psychosocial aspects.

    STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION

    This cross-sectional study included 471 infertile couples (942 patients) treated during the period March 2006 to March 2009.

    PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS

    Infertile couples who had been treated at a Swedish university-based hospital and private IVF clinic and who had cryopreserved embryos were sent questionnaires with questions regarding socio-demographic data and their attitudes towards embryo donation.

    MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE

    The response rate to the questionnaire was 58%. Of the respondents, 76% supported the donation of surplus embryos to other infertile couples, but there were divided opinions regarding the disclosure of the genetic parents' identities. Close to 60% of the participants indicated that donations of embryos should be allowed for research and about 45% of the participants approved donations of embryos to single women.

    LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION

    The relatively low response rate and the hypothetical nature of the questions may limit the validity of the results.

    WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS

    The results from the study indicate that cryopreserved embryos may be available for donation to other infertile couples, particularly where restrictions can be set on recipient characteristics.

  • 613.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Baban, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Attitudes toward embryo donation among staff at in vitro fertilization clinics2014In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 93, no 8, p. 765-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine attitudes towards embryo donation among staff at in vitro fertilization clinics in Sweden.

    DESIGN: Descriptive questionnaire study.

    SETTING: University-based in vitro fertilization clinic.

    SAMPLE: Study participants were the staff at all in vitro fertilization clinics in Sweden.

    METHODS: A questionnaire with questions regarding different aspects of embryo donation was sent to the 338 healthcare professionals working at Swedish in vitro fertilization clinics.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Attitudes towards embryo donation.

    RESULTS: A total of 207 persons (61%) responded to the questionnaire. A majority of the respondents (77%) considered that embryo donation to infertile couples should be permitted in Sweden. Most respondents (76%), and especially the men (96%), stated that it should be possible to donate surplus embryos for research. Forty-two percent of the respondents agreed with embryo donation to single women. A majority of respondents stated that special requirements with regard to the recipient's age, medical condition and criminal background should potentially be considered. The women stated that there should be special demands made concerning recipients' tobacco (48%) and alcohol abuse (92%). A majority considered that donors should be anonymous to the recipients (66%), but not to the child (9%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Swedish in vitro fertilization staff have positive attitudes concerning embryo donation to infertile couples and also the use of surplus embryos for research.

  • 614.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hanrieder, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Hambiliki, F.
    Gulen-Yaldir, F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hreinsson, Julius
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Supplementation with glycoprotein 130 to culture media improves human embryo development and blastocyst formation rate in-vitro2012In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 2, p. P-214-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 615.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Prag, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Attitudes towards embryo donation in Swedish women and men of reproductive age2013In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 187-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    When performing in-vitro fertilization (IVF), more embryos than needed are often derived. These embryos are usually frozen and stored, but as ruled by Swedish law they have to be discarded after 5 years. In other countries it is legal to donate the excess embryos to other infertile couples who for different reasons cannot undergo the procedure of IVF. The aim of the present study was to investigate public opinion in Sweden regarding different aspects of embryo donation.

    Methods

    A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards aspects of embryo donation was sent to a randomized sample of 1,000 Swedish women and men of reproductive age.

    Results

    A total of 34% responded to the questionnaires. A majority of the respondents (73%) were positive towards embryo donation. Seventy-five per cent agreed that it should be possible to donate embryos to infertile couples. Approximately half of the participants (49%) supported embryo donation to single women. A majority of the participants emphasized that demands should be imposed on the recipient's age (63%), alcohol addiction (79%), drug addiction (85%), and criminal record (67%). Forty-seven per cent of the respondents agreed that the recipient should be anonymous to the donor, and 38% thought that the donor should remain anonymous to the child.

    Conclusions

    The results of the present study indicate support for embryo donation among a subset of the Swedish population of reproductive age. If embryo donation were to be allowed in Sweden, strategies for treatment and counselling need to be developed.

  • 616.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wramsby, Håkan
    Dept of Women´s and Children´s Health, Karolinska institutet.
    Bremmer, Staffan
    Dept of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Steffan
    Dept of Women´s and Children´s Health, Karolinska institutet.
    Jacobsson, Hans
    Dept of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Radionuclide Hysterosalpingography Is Not a Reliable Tool for Investigation of Fallopian Tube Transport: A Controlled Randomized Study Using Particles of Two Sizes during Three Different Parts of the Menstrual Cycle2011In: Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation, ISSN 0378-7346, E-ISSN 1423-002X, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Earlier studies with radionuclide hysterosalpingography (RN-HSG) using either small or large particles have shown different results. Some studies have questioned the clinical relevance of RN-HSG. The aim of this study was to evaluate the RN-HSG method using two different sizes of radio-labelled particles during different parts of the menstrual cycle. Methods: Ten healthy women, 28–40 years of age (mean 34.5), with proven fertility, regular menstrual cycle, not using oral contraceptives and due to undergo laparoscopic sterilization, were randomized to RN-HSG after deposition of a solution with either small Albures or large MAASOL, 99mTc-radio-labelled particles into the cervix uteri. Investigations were, for every patient, performed during the follicular, peri-ovulatory and mid-luteal parts of the menstrual cycle. Transport of radioactivity from cervix to uterus and Fallopian tubes was evaluated. Results: The RN-HSG investigations could not show any difference between the two different sizes of radio-labelled particles. Transport of radioactivity to the Fallopian tube was seen only in some cases and most frequently during the peri-ovulatory period. Conclusion: We found the RN-HSG investigations inconclusive. The RN-HSG method does not seem to be a reliable tool for the investigation of Fallopian tube transport.

  • 617.
    Yamamoto, Shinji
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Transplantation Surgery. Department of surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, SE-75185, Sweden..
    Nelander, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ectopic pregnancy in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: A case report2016In: International journal of surgery case reports, ISSN 2210-2612, E-ISSN 2210-2612, Vol. 28, p. 152-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: We present a case report of ectopic pregnancy (EP) after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SKPTx). PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 33-year-old female status post SKPTx suddenly got abdominal pain in the lower level. She had high human chorionic Gonadotropin test. Ultrasonography revealed that there was no fetus in the uterus but a dilated right fallopian tube, which strongly suggested ectopic pregnancy. An emergency operation was performed and a dilated right side uterine tube was found with adhesions to her transplant. Salpingectomy was performed and no visible injury to the pancreas was found by the procedure. Pathological evaluation showed ectopic pregnant fetus, and no pancreas dysfunction was observed after the operation. DISCUSSION: This is the first case and operation report of EP after SKPTx. We should consider various causes of acute abdomen as well as several pathological condition in the transplanted pancreas such as pancreatitis, abscess, and thrombosis in vessels in the organ. Moreover, transplanted pancreas in abdomen is easily misrecognized as adipose tissue and there is high risk that the organ to get injured surgically. CONCLUSION: EP should be included in the different diagnosis in SKPTx female patients who get acute abdominal pain. It is highly desirable that transplant surgeon is included in the operation team for EP of these patients. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IJS Publishing Group Ltd.

  • 618. Yung, Hong Wa
    et al.
    Atkinson, Daniel
    Campion-Smith, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen
    Burton, Graham J.
    Differential activation of placental unfolded protein response pathways implies heterogeneity in causation of early- and late-onset pre-eclampsia2014In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 234, no 2, p. 262-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on gestational age at diagnosis and/or delivery, pre-eclampsia (PE) is commonly divided into early-onset (<34 weeks) and late-onset (>= 34 weeks) forms. Recently, the distinction between 'placental' and 'maternal' causation has been proposed, with 'placental' cases being more frequently associated with early-onset and intrauterine growth restriction. To test whether molecular placental pathology varies according to clinical presentation, we investigated stress-signalling pathways, including unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, MAPK stress pathways, heat-shock proteins and AMPK.. in placentae delivered by caesarean section for clinical indications at different gestational ages. Controls included second-trimester, pre-term and normal-term placentae. BeWo cells were used to investigate how these pathways react to different severities of hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Activation of placental UPR and stress-response pathways, including P-IRE1 alpha, ATF6, XBP-1, GRP78 and GRP94, P-p38/p38 and HSP70, was higher in early-onset PE than in both late-onset PE and normotensive controls (NTCs), with a clear inflection around 34 weeks. Placentae from >= 34 weeks PE and NTC were indistinguishable. Levels of UPR signalling were similar between second-trimester and term controls, but were significantly higher in pre-term 'controls' delivered vaginally for chorioamnionitis and other conditions. Severe H/R (1/20% O-2) induced equivalent activation of UPR pathways, including P-eIF2 alpha, ATF6, P-IRE1 alpha, GRP78 and GRP94, in BeWo cells. By contrast, the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF alpha and IL-1 beta induced only mild activation of P-eIF2 alpha and GRP78. AKT, a central regulator of cell proliferation, was reduced in the <34 weeks PE placentae and severe H/R-treated cells, but not in other conditions. These findings provide the first molecular evidence that placental stress may contribute to the pathophysiology of early-onset pre-eclampsia, whereas that is unlikely to be the case in the late-onset form of the syndrome. (c) 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  • 619. Yung, Hong Wa
    et al.
    Campion-Smith, Tim
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Burton, Graham
    Cell-Type Specific Activation of Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Pre-Eclamptic Placentas2012In: Placenta, ISSN 0143-4004, E-ISSN 1532-3102, Vol. 33, no 9, p. A85-A85Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 620. Yung, Hong Wa
    et al.
    Colleoni, Francesca
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kingdom, John
    Burton, Graham
    Placental Energy Depletion In Early-Onset Preeclanipsia: Role Of EIF2 Alpha Signalling In Mitochondrial Activity2013In: Placenta, ISSN 0143-4004, E-ISSN 1532-3102, Vol. 34, no 9, p. A85-A85Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 621. Yung, Hong Wa
    et al.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Charnock-Jones, Steve
    Burton, Graham
    Placental Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress as a Novel Molecular Signature to Distinguish Subtypes of Pre-Eclampsia2014In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 21, no 3S, p. 405A-406AArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 622. Zeisler, Harald
    et al.
    Llurba, Elisa
    Chantraine, Frederic
    Vatish, Manu
    Staff, Anne Cathrine
    Sennstrom, Maria
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Brennecke, Shaun P.
    Stepan, Holger
    Allegranza, Deirdre
    Dinkel, Carina
    Schoedl, Maria
    Dilba, Peter
    Hund, Martin
    Verlohren, Stefan
    Soluble fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1-to-Placental Growth Factor Ratio and Time to Delivery in Women With Suspected Preeclampsia2016In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, E-ISSN 1873-233X, Vol. 128, no 2, p. 261-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of a serum soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-to-placental growth factor (sFlt-1-to-PlGF) ratio of greater than 38 with time to delivery and preterm birth.

    METHODS: Secondary analysis of an observational cohort study that included women 18 years of age or older from 24 to 36 6/7 weeks of gestation at their first study visit with suspected (not confirmed) preeclampsia. Participants were recruited from December 2010 to January 2014 at 30 sites in 14 countries. A total of 1,041 women were included in time-to-delivery analysis and 848 in preterm birth analysis.

    RESULTS: Women with an sFlt-1-to-PlGF ratio greater than 38 (n=250) had a 2.9-fold greater likelihood of imminent delivery (ie, delivery on the day of the test) (Cox regression hazard ratio 2.9; P <.001) and shorter remaining time to delivery (median 17 [interquartile range 10-26] compared with 51 [interquartile range 3075] days, respectively; Weibull regression factor 0.62; P <.001) than women with an sFlt-1-to-PlGF ratio of 38 or less, whether or not they developed preeclampsia. For women who did not (n=842) and did develop preeclampsia (n=199), significant correlations were seen between an sFlt-1-to-PlGF ratio greater than 38 and preterm birth (r=0.44 and r=0.46; both P <.001). Among women who did not develop preeclampsia, those who underwent iatrogenic preterm delivery had higher median sFlt-1-to-PlGF ratios at their first visit (35.3, interquartile range 6.8-104.0) than those who did not (8.4, interquartile range 3.4-30.6) or who delivered at term (4.3, interquartile range 2.4-10.9).

    CONCLUSIONS: In women undergoing evaluation for suspected preeclampsia, a serum sFlt-1-to-PlGF ratio greater than 38 is associated with a shorter remaining pregnancy duration and a higher risk of preterm delivery.

  • 623.
    Zeisler, Harald
    et al.
    Med Univ Vienna, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Vienna, Austria..
    Llurba, Elisa
    Hosp Univ Vall dHebron, Maternal Fetal Med Unit, Dept Obstet, Barcelona, Spain.;Inst Salud Carlos III, Maternal & Child Hlth & Dev Network, Madrid, Spain..
    Chantraine, Frederic
    Univ Liege, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Liege, Belgium..
    Vatish, Manu
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oxford, England..
    Staff, Anne Cathrine
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Gynecol, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Sennström, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Brennecke, Shaun P.
    Royal Womens Hosp, Dept Perinatal Med, Pregnancy Res Ctr, Parkville, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Parkville, Vic 3052, Australia..
    Stepan, Holger
    Univ Leipzig, Dept Obstet, D-04109 Leipzig, Germany..
    Allegranza, Deirdre
    Roche Diagnost Int, Rotkreuz, Switzerland..
    Dilba, Peter
    Roche Diagnost, Penzberg, Germany..
    Schoedl, Maria
    Roche Diagnost, Penzberg, Germany..
    Hund, Martin
    Roche Diagnost Int, Rotkreuz, Switzerland..
    Verlohren, Stefan
    Campus Virchow Klinikum Charite, Dept Obstet, Berlin, Germany..
    Predictive Value of the sFlt-1: PlGF Ratio in Women With Suspected Preeclampsia EDITORIAL COMMENT2016In: Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, ISSN 0029-7828, E-ISSN 1533-9866, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 273-274Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 624. Zeisler, Harald
    et al.
    Llurba, Elisa
    Chantraine, Frederic
    Vatish, Manu
    Staff, Anne Cathrine
    Sennström, Maria
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Brennecke, Shaun P
    Stepan, Holger
    Allegranza, Deirdre
    Dilba, Peter
    Schoedl, Maria
    Hund, Martin
    Verlohren, Stefan
    Predictive Value of the sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia2016In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 374, no 1, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The ratio of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) to placental growth factor (PlGF) is elevated in pregnant women before the clinical onset of preeclampsia, but its predictive value in women with suspected preeclampsia is unclear.

    METHODS: We performed a prospective, multicenter, observational study to derive and validate a ratio of serum sFlt-1 to PlGF that would be predictive of the absence or presence of preeclampsia in the short term in women with singleton pregnancies in whom preeclampsia was suspected (24 weeks 0 days to 36 weeks 6 days of gestation). Primary objectives were to assess whether low sFlt-1:PlGF ratios (at or below a derived cutoff) predict the absence of preeclampsia within 1 week after the first visit and whether high ratios (above the cutoff) predict the presence of preeclampsia within 4 weeks.

    RESULTS: In the development cohort (500 women), we identified an sFlt-1:PlGF ratio cutoff of 38 as having important predictive value. In a subsequent validation study among an additional 550 women, an sFlt-1:PlGF ratio of 38 or lower had a negative predictive value (i.e., no preeclampsia in the subsequent week) of 99.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 97.9 to 99.9), with 80.0% sensitivity (95% CI, 51.9 to 95.7) and 78.3% specificity (95% CI, 74.6 to 81.7). The positive predictive value of an sFlt-1:PlGF ratio above 38 for a diagnosis of preeclampsia within 4 weeks was 36.7% (95% CI, 28.4 to 45.7), with 66.2% sensitivity (95% CI, 54.0 to 77.0) and 83.1% specificity (95% CI, 79.4 to 86.3).

    CONCLUSIONS: An sFlt-1:PlGF ratio of 38 or lower can be used to predict the short-term absence of preeclampsia in women in whom the syndrome is suspected clinically. (Funded by Roche Diagnostics.).

  • 625.
    Zhang, Pu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Late hCG administration yields more good quality embryos and favors the overall IVF outcome2012In: Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 2160-8806, Vol. 2, p. 331-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context:

    Optimal timing of hCG administration is a crucial step for successful IVF. Currently used standard hCG administration timing is not always practically possible due to weekends break or other reasons. Sometimes hCG needs to be administrated earlier or later than standard timing.

    Aim:

    To find out whether earlier or later hCG administration gives better IVF outcome.

    Setting and Design:

    A retrospective study on patients who underwent conventional IVF treatment.

    Methods and Material:

    Based on hCG timing, the patients were divided into three groups: the early hCG group where the hCG was given when less than three follicles ≥ 17 mm; the standard hCG group where the hCG was given when three or more follicles ≥ 17 mm; and the late hCG group where the hCG was given 1 to 3 days after the standard timing. The number of retrieved mature oocytes, the fertilization rate, the number of good quality embryos, the pregnancy rate and the live birth rate were compared among three groups. Statistical Analysis: x2 test, fisher exact test and Student t-test were used.

    Results:

    in total, 289 patients, 305 IVF cycles and 2784 oocytes were analyzed. The late hCG group has significantly larger number of MII oocytes, fertilized oocytes and good quality embryos per IVF cycle, when compared with the early hCG group. The fertilization rate, the pregnancy rate and the live birth rate per IVF cycle were similar among the three groups.

    Conclusion:

    Although the delayed administration of hCG did not favor IVF outcome per IVF cycle, the cumulative pregnancy rate is likely to be improved with consideration of higher yield of good quality embryos.

  • 626.
    Zieba, Agata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Sjöstedt, Evelina
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Oskarsson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Edlund, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Tolf, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    The Human Endometrium-Specific Proteome Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling2015In: Omics, ISSN 1536-2310, E-ISSN 1557-8100, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 659-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human uterus includes the complex endometrial mucosa, the endometrium that undergoes dynamic, hormone-dependent alterations throughout the life of fertile females. Here we have combined a genome-wide transcriptomics analysis with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to analyze gene expression patterns in the normal endometrium. Human endometrial tissues from five women were used for deep sequencing (RNA-Seq). The mRNA and protein expression data from the endometrium were compared to 31 (RNA) and 44 (protein) other normal tissue types, to identify genes with elevated expression in the endometrium and to localize the expression of corresponding proteins at a cellular resolution. Based on the expression levels of transcripts, we could classify all putative human protein coding genes into categories defined by expression patterns and found altogether 101 genes that showed an elevated pattern of expression in the endometrium, with only four genes showing more than five-fold higher expression levels in the endometrium compared to other tissues. In conclusion, our analysis based on transcriptomics and antibody-based protein profiling reports here comprehensive lists of genes with elevated expression levels in the endometrium, providing important starting points for a better molecular understanding of human reproductive biology and disease.

  • 627.
    Åhman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Facts first, then reaction: expectant fathers' experiences of an ultrasound screening identifying soft markers2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, p. 60-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 628.
    Åhman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Facts first, then reaction: Expectant fathers' experiences of an ultrasound screening identifying soft markers2012In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 28, no 5, p. E667-E675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    expectant fathers often attend pregnancy ultrasound but their needs are poorly examined, especially in connection with adverse findings.

    OBJECTIVE:

    to explore men's expectations of routine ultrasound and experiences when soft markers were discovered.

    DESIGN/SETTING:

    a qualitative study at Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden where semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 17 expectant fathers 6-12 weeks after the discovery of a soft marker at the routine ultrasound scan.

    FINDINGS:

    five major themes emerged: (1) 'immediate reaction: frustration and thoughts about consequences', (2) 'need for facts to gain control', (3) 'concern about the partner', (4) 'in retrospect: almost okay but routines need changing' and (5) 'amniocenteses or not: a joint decision with several considerations'.

    CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTISE:

    these findings contribute important knowledge about men's needs related to pregnancy ultrasound with unexpected findings, and their role in decision-making concerning fetal diagnostics. Our results show that men enter a role of a kind of fact manager and have both a psychological need as well as the capacity to perceive important information during the process following the detection of a soft marker in the fetus. Practitioners conducting pregnancy ultrasound should therefore have relevant knowledge to be able to provide immediate information about soft markers, including risk assessment for chromosomal defects. In addition to this, written information about soft markers should be available to expecting parents in this situation.

  • 629.
    Åhman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Maras, Gordan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Prevalence of ultrasonographic fetal soft markers during the second trimester ultrasound screening and its correlation to Down Syndrome2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, p. 60-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 630.
    Åhman, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    'It made you think twice': an interview study of women's perception of a web-based decision aid concerning screening and diagnostic testing for fetal anomalies2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, article id 267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Enabling women to make informed decisions is a key objective in the guidelines governing prenatal screening and diagnostics. Despite efforts to provide information, research shows that women's choice of prenatal screening is often not based on informed decisions. The aim of this study was to investigate pregnant women's perceptions of the use of an interactive web-based DA, developed to initiate a process of reflection and deliberate decision-making concerning screening and testing for fetal anomalies.

    METHODS:

    A qualitative study was applied and individual interviews were conducted. Seventeen pregnant women attending antenatal healthcare in Uppsala County, Sweden, who had access to the decision aid were interviewed. Eleven opted to use the decision aid and six did not. Data were analysed by systematic text condensation.

    RESULTS:

    Women appreciated the decision aid, as it was easily accessible; moreover, they emphasised the importance of a reliable source. It helped them to clarify their own standpoints and engaged their partner in the decision-making process. Women described the decision aid as enhancing their awareness that participating in prenatal screening and diagnostics was a conscious choice. Those who chose not to use the web-based decision aid when offered reported that they already had sufficient knowledge.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The decision aid was able to initiate a process of deliberate decision-making in pregnant women as a result of their interaction with the tool. Access to a web-based decision aid tool can be valuable to expectant parents in making quality decisions regarding screening for fetal anomalies.

  • 631.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gingnell, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Within-session effect of repeated stress exposure on extinction circuitry function in social anxiety disorder2017In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 261, p. 85-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety reduction following repeated exposure to stressful experiences is generally held to depend on neural processes involved in extinction of conditioned fear. We predicted that repeated exposure to stressful experiences would change activity throughout the circuitry serving extinction, including ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), the hippocampus and the amygdala. To test this prediction, 36 participants diagnosed with SAD performed two successive speeches in front of an observing audience while regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was recorded using positron emission tomography. To control for non-anxiolytic effects of repeated exposure, rCBF was also measured during repeated presentations of neutral and angry facial expressions. Results showed that anxiety ratings and heart rate decreased from the first to the second speech, indicating an anxiolytic effect of repeated exposure. Exposure attenuated rCBF in the amygdala whereas no change in rCBF was observed in the vmPFC or hippocampus. The rCBF-reductions in the amygdala were greater following repetition of the speech task than repetition of face exposure indicating that they were specific to anxiety attenuation and not due to a reduced novelty. Our findings suggest that amygdala-related attenuation processes are key to understanding the working mechanisms of exposure therapy.

  • 632.
    Åkerud, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kårehed, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Histidine-rich glycoprotein and infertilityPatent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 633.
    Öberg, Mariella
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Stenson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Heimer, Gun
    Uppsala University, National Centre for Knowledge on Men.
    Prevalence of intimate partner violence among women seeking termination of pregnancy compared to women seeking contraceptive counseling2014In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To estimate the prevalence of intimate partner violence among women seeking termination of pregnancy (TOP) in comparison to women seeking contraceptive counseling.

    DESIGN:

    Case-control study.

    SETTING:

    Family planning unit, Uppsala University Hospital.

    POPULATION:

    Women seeking TOP (n=635) and women seeking contraceptive counseling (n=591) answered a self-administered questionnaire regarding experience of intimate partner violence. In addition, the women were interviewed by specially trained staff.

    METHOD:

    Comparisons were made between the two groups and between those who had previously undergone TOP and those who had never done so with experience of intimate partner violence as the main outcome measure. Multivariate logistic regression was used to adjust for age, education, and occupation.

    RESULTS:

    In total 29% of women seeking TOP and 22% of women seeking contraceptive counseling reported experience of violence. Women seeking TOP were more likely to report physical violence (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.6, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.2-2.1) and experience of violence during the past year (aOR=2.3, 95%Cl 1.1-4.8). Women who had ever undergone TOP were also more likely to report intimate partner violence compared to women with no history of TOP (aOR=1.7, 95%CI 1.3-2.3). Among women with repeated TOP, 51% reported experience of intimate partner violence.

    CONCLUSION:

    Women seeking TOP reported to a greater extent experience of intimate partner violence. However, women seeking contraceptive counseling had also a high prevalence of violence experiences. These results stress the importance of caregivers approaching both groups of women with questions about intimate partner violence in order to identify exposed women and offer them help. 

10111213 601 - 633 of 633
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf