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  • 751.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    Lind, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    A comparative evaluation of mouse, pen- and touch-input in computerized version of the Torrance tests of creative thinking2011In: Proceedings of the DESIRE'11 Conference - Creativity and Innovation in Design / [ed] Clare J. Hooper, Jean-Bernard Martens, Panos Markopoulos, New York, USA: The Association for Computing Machinery , 2011, p. 383-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of an experiment comparing mouse, pen- and touch-inputs in computerized figural creativity test. The results show no statistically significant differences in creativity scores obtained by participants using mentioned devices as computer input methods. The results indicate that creativity testing can be introduced to a variety of modern computer devices with insignificant influence of the three most popular input devices tested. That also shows that the differences between the computerized and paper-based TTCT noticed in a previous research might be the result of User Interface artifacts used.

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  • 752.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Lind, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A comparative evaluation of mouse, stylus and finger input in shape tracing2011In: Proceedings of the 1st European Workshop on HCI Design and Evaluation: The inuence of domain on Human Computer Interaction design and evaluation / [ed] Georgios Christou, Panayiotis Zaphiris, Ee Lai-Chong Law, Toulouse, France: IRIT Press , 2011, p. 57-61Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparison of the aggregated performance measurements for three input methods in a line-tracing task is presented. Results indicate that users perform best using touch input, both in tasks with and without visual feedback, therefore we recommend touch input as the preferred input method for simple drawing tasks.

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  • 753.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ivanova, Vita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Yang, Guo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Gadima, Nur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Leepraphantkul, Rathakan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    The Effects of GUI on Users’ Creative Performance in Computerized Drawing2013In: Proceedings of MIDI '13: Proceedings of the International Conference on Multimedia, Interaction, Design and Innovation, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 142-151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of an empirical comparative study investigating how the outcomes of a computerized figural creativity test are affected when the participants use two different versions of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) on a mouse-operated desktop PC. The results show that participants get insignificantly lower creativity scores with the elaborated GUI, contrary to the GUI that has no visual artifacts available and offers more similar user experience to pen and paper, even though they spend significantly more time on drawing with the elaborated one. That phenomenon is expected to contribute to the cumulative effect of GUI and input method noticed by previous research. That implies that creative drawing and testing should be carefully introduced into computer-based environments.

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  • 754.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Neelakannan, Sarathkumar
    Paper equals screen: A comparison of a pen-based figural creativity test in computerized and paper form2011In: Proceedings of the DESIRE'11 Conference - Creativity and Innovation in Design / [ed] Clare J. Hooper, Jean-Bernard Martens, Panos Markopoulos, New York, USA: The Association for Computing Machinery , 2011, p. 47-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present the results of an experiment investigating how the results of a figural creativity test are affected when paper and pen or tablet PC and stylus are used to test participants. The results show no effect of the testing method on creativity scores obtained by participants. The results indicate that the differences between computerized and paper-based figural creativity tests noticed by previous research might be limited to the influence of User Interface artifacts used. That implies that creativity testing can be introduced to a variety of stylus based computer devices with insignificant influence of the transition from regular pen and paper to screen and stylus as a computer input device.

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  • 755.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Shrestha, Suman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Easy vs. Tricky: The Shape Effect in Tracing, Selecting, and Steering With Mouse, Stylus, and Touch2013In: Academic MindTrek '13: Proceedings of International Conference on Making Sense of Converging Media / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 99-103Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a work-in-progress report on an experimental comparison and evaluation of users' performance in four line-tracing tasks based on two shapes and performed with three input methods (mouse, stylus, and touch-input). The shapes' properties used in the study created the two classes of shapes: easy and hard to replicate. As expected these two classes had different impact on user's performance in each task tested (tracing, lasso selection, steering through narrow and wide tunnel). The results show that participants replicating the shapes using touch-input were the least accurate but were the fastest in comparison to the remaining input methods. The stylus was the least error-prone method and the mouse was the slowest device in drawing tasks (tracing and selection). The differences in error distances between the input methods were less pronounced in steering tasks but timing data showed that mouse was still the slowest one. While the time of replication did not differ between the two shapes tested, the differences between the errors participants made were significant for all tasks and input devices, and patterns of these differences were consistent between the shapes. These results confirm predictions from a previous study and show which shapes' properties can make their replication more difficult. The results can be used to design shapes that are easy to replicate, e.g., in surface-based gestural interaction.

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    accepted
  • 756.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Activity or Product?: Drawing and HCI2013In: Proceedings of MIDI '13: Proceedings of the International Conference on Multimedia, Interaction, Design and Innovation, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 29-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing tasks are rarely addressed experimentally by the HCI community, and even then pointing, steering, or gesturing is promoted as an approach towards drawing. We critically analyze the status quo, propose an improved framework for task analysis, and give suggestions on how to perceive drawing task at a meta-level.

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  • 757.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    Did We Miss Something? Correspondence Analysis of Usability Data2013In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013: 14th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, September 2-6, 2013, Proceedings, Part IV / [ed] Paula Kotzé, Gary Marsden, Gitte Lindgaard, Janet Wesson, Marco Winckler, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 272-279Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have applied a multivariate exploratory technique called Correspondence Analysis (CA) to create and analyze a model of the dataset of experiment results. The dataset originates from a comparative usability study of tracing with the use of mouse, pen, and touch input and contains both categorical and continuous data – i.e. results of questionnaires and task measurements. CA allowed to visually and numerically assess the main variables in the dataset and how they interact with each other. In our study, pen input had the best measured performance and was preferred by the users. Touch input was the least accurate of all input methods tested but it was preferred by users over mouse especially in the conditions lacking of visual feedback of drawing. CA helped to detect that secondary effect even though it cannot be explained by the performance results alone. The importance of the influence of user’s previous experience is also noted. We conclude that CA helped to identify all major phenomena known from previous studies but also was sensitive to minor and secondary effects, what makes it a well suited method to quickly evaluate usability data.

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  • 758.
    Zabramski, Stanislaw
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Stuerzlinger, Wolfgang
    York University, Toronto, Canada.
    The Effect of Shape Properties on Ad-hoc Shape Replication with Mouse, Pen, and Touch Input2012In: MindTrek '12 Proceeding of the 16th International Academic MindTrek Conference / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2012, p. 275-278Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes observations from four empirical studies focusing on shape replication with three input methods. The aim was to identify and assess how the components of several semirandomly generated shapes influence how accurately untrained users can replicate each of these components. We found that the pen is the least and touch the most error-prone method when used for drawing. Additionally, the distribution of errors was analyzed. The results may be used to predict which shape properties make shape replication more difficult. Additionally, the results may be used to design shapes that are easy to replicate.

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  • 759.
    Zadonsky, Shirie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    An exploratory study of the contemporary practice of UX research among UX professionals in Swedish organizations.2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting UX research has beneficial effects on product development and results in a successful user experience [24,30], [27]. By involving the end-users simultaneously, the usability and the usefulness of the product increase, as well as the user satisfaction [14], [19]. Previous studies have shown that despite the importance of UX research and user involvement, a coherent setup of UX research methods and knowledge about user involvement is currently lacking among UX professionals [21], [26]. This study was therefore conducted to explore further the contemporary practice of UX research among UX professionals in Swedish organizations, in order to gain insights into the current practice among UX professionals in Sweden. Hence, the aim of this study was to gain knowledge of the incorporated UX research methods used among UX professionals within Swedish organizations, how the UX research activities are practiced in relation to other work-related activities, and to what extent the UX professionals conduct UX research involving end-users. By using a mixed-method approach, semi-structured interviews and an online survey were conducted in order to explore this subject. 10 UX professionals participated in the semi-structured interviews that consisted of 10 questions regarding their practice of UX research and user involvement. The online survey was distributed on different social media platforms and was based on the results from the semi-structured interviews. The survey got 53 individual answers, with 24 completed answers and 29 partly completed answers. The results from both data gatherings established that the most common UX research methods incorporated in the present work of UX professionals in Swedish organizations were interviews, user testing, and heuristic evaluations. The amount of time spent on UX research activities, in relation to other activities, varied between the UX professionals and what they stated in the semi-structured interviews and the online survey. The survey established that UX professionals spend a total of 51 hours on different UX research activities, whilst the semi-structured interviews established that the hours spent on the UX research depends on the project cycle, with a variation from no work per week at all, to working full time per week. The most common UX research method to involve end-users was when conducting interviews, as established in both the semi-structured interviews and the online survey. The majority of the UX professionals stated in both the interviews and the online survey that they would like to involve end-users more but were limited to different aspects such as time constraints, the size of the UX team, and the difficulties of recruiting.

  • 760.
    Zhang, Jingyi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Juvrud, Joshua
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Gender expression and gender identity in virtual reality: avatars, role-adoption, and social interaction in VRChat2024In: Frontiers in Virtual Reality, E-ISSN 2673-4192, Vol. 5, article id 1305758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This study examines the complex relationship between gender, virtual reality, and social interaction.

    Methods: Utilizing unobtrusive observations and interviews within the VRChat platform, this research explored avatar choices, interactions, and full-body tracking (FBT) technology utilization as they related to users’ expressions and perceptions of gender in virtual reality (VR).

    Results: The findings revealed that cultural background plays a significant role in shaping gender expression and perception. Results demonstrated the fluidity of gender expression in virtual environments, highlighting how users can challenge and subvert traditional gender norms, and the potential of virtual reality as a tool for experiential learning, fostering cross-cultural understanding, and promoting inclusive and diverse gender expressions.

    Discussion: This study contributes to the emerging body of literature on virtual reality and gender, providing insights that can inform future research and technology development.

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  • 761.
    Zhang, Xiwen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Designing for Stimulating Social Interaction in Outdoor Gym2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the world where the Internet has nearly linked people in every corner, for some people, the nearby places seem to disappear. It might also lead to the alienation of friends and neighbours. For addressing the disadvantages of the change, this study aims to design for stimulating social interaction in outdoor gyms that are distributed in most communities and parks. Towards this goal, I engaged in designing and evaluating a movement-based interaction project. I invited 5 participants to work as designers for generating design ideas, using reflecting somaesthetics and bodystorming design methods. The bodystorming braid was used for depicting how design ideas generated and evolved. Design ideas were packaged into 3 types of design solutions -- cooperative play, competition and just talking. The most practical solutions for each kind were selected for building prototypes. These prototypes were evaluated with Wizard-of-Oz techniques by 4 participants, followed by a focus group. The qualitative analysis surfaced the important factors that impacted social interaction and major users, including the target users, usage, interaction, and maintenance.

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  • 762.
    Zhong, Jinyun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    A Case Study: The Impact on Usability of PRINCE2 Project Management Method2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In order to take a look at the relationship between PRINCE2 (one of the most popular project management methods) and the degree of usability of the produced system, a case study was conducted in a company.

    During the case study, participants were recruited for a brainstorming section, during which they brainstormed some issues and features regarding PRINCE2 framework. These ideas were later summarized by the researcher as the preparation of a Card Sorting section. The same participants were invited again for a Card Sorting, during which they sorted the summarized issues and features into different categories labeled with different aspect of PRINCE2. An analysis was then carried out to find the most commonly agreed issues/features in a certain aspect of PRINCE2.

    The result of the study shows some strength that PRINCE2 has such as clear definition of authority and accountability, good support for planning, but there’re some concerns in tailoring/embedding of the method and etc.

  • 763.
    Zhong, Mengyu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, WoMHeR (Centre for Women’s Mental Health during the Reproductive Lifespan).
    Bilal, Ayesha Mae
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, WoMHeR (Centre for Women’s Mental Health during the Reproductive Lifespan).
    Papadopoulos, Fotios C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Castellano, Ginevra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Psychiatrists’ Views on Robot-Assisted Diagnostics of Peripartum Depression2021In: Social Robotics: 13th International Conference, ICSR 2021Singapore, Singapore, November 10–13, 2021Proceedings / [ed] Haizhou Li, Shuzhi Sam Ge, Yan Wu, Agnieszka Wykowska, Hongsheng He, Xiaorui Liu, Dongyu Li, Jairo Perez-Osorio, Cham: Springer Nature, 2021, p. 464-474Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social robots are rising to prominence as tools in healthcare and mental healthcare. In this paper, we investigate robot-assisted diagnostics of peripartum depression (PPD) in women. To design robots that are accepted by users and comply with trustworthy Artificial Intelligence principles, we use semi-structured interviews to explore the views of potential stakeholders - psychiatrists. We aim to answer three research questions regarding 1) the usefulness of robots in the diagnosis of PPD, 2) potential ethical issues, and 3) the roles that robots and clinicians may play in the diagnostic process. Results show that psychiatrists are only willing to let robots take minor responsibilities, and feel that robots may be more useful in situations where there is a shortage of clinicians.

  • 764.
    Zhong, Mengyu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, WoMHeR (Centre for Women’s Mental Health during the Reproductive Lifespan). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Fraile, Marc
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3.
    Castellano, Ginevra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3.
    Winkle, Katie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    A case study in designing trustworthy interactions: implications for socially assistive robotics2023In: Frontiers in Computer Science, E-ISSN 2624-9898, Vol. 5, article id 1152532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is a case study in applying recent, high-level ethical guidelines, specifically concerning transparency and anthropomorphisation, to Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) design practice for a real-world Socially Assistive Robot (SAR) application. We utilize an online study to investigate how the perception and efficacy of SARs might be influenced by this design practice, examining how robot utterances and display manipulations influence perceptions of the robot and the medical recommendations it gives. Our results suggest that applying transparency policies can improve the SAR's effectiveness without harming its perceived anthropomorphism. However, our objective measures suggest participant understanding of the robot's decision-making process remained low across conditions. Furthermore, verbal anthropomorphisation does not seem to affect the perception or efficacy of the robot.

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  • 765.
    Zhou, Xiaoding
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    An Exploration of Interactions and Design Implications of Low-interactivity Games2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces low-interactivity games as a new term to refer to games that provide players with very limited interaction by design. A grounded theory approach is conducted for this research, with reviewing literature and analyzing games specifically under the categories of casual games, idle games, walking simulators and minimalist games, in order to identify the available types of interactions in low-interactivity games. The design implications of games in this field are also investigated, indicating that low-interactivity games can be designed for companionship and awareness due to their core feature of supporting in-game inaction of the player. The design solutions and values of low-interactivity games are also discussed to argue for a responsible attitude towards the design of games in this space. The proposed term provides starting points for future research and development of low-interactivity games. 

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  • 766.
    Zhou, Zhuoming
    et al.
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Duval, Jared
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA.
    John, Michael
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA.
    Isbister, Katherine
    UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA.
    Astaire: A Collaborative Mixed Reality Dance Game for Collocated Players2019In: CHI PLAY'19: Proceedings Of The Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 5-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the growth of Virtual Reality (VR), the design space of collocated social play in VR remains narrow. Here we present Astaire, a collaborative hybrid VR dance game for two players sharing an HTC Vive VR system. The game resulted from a design research process using embodied design methods, and drawing upon concepts in HCI and Play Design, including social affordances, and asymmetric and interdependent play. Here we present insights from a study playtesting Astaire alongside two VR games that inspired ours: Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes (KTNE), and Audioshield. We examined players' and spectators' enjoyment, and interpersonal relationships, which were self-reported higher for Astaire. Using data from semi-structured interviews, we foreground design elements that impacted our participants' play experience, grouped under the themes of balance of players' roles, the physicality afforded by the game, and the social experience enabled. Our work contributes to opening the design space of hybrid collocated VR-through our game, we surface inspirational design concepts in HCI, and share design knowledge gained during our design process.

  • 767.
    Zhu, Hui
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    TwinkleBands: Wearable Technology Supporting Movement Imitation and Coordination in Fast-Paced Fitness Training2021In: Extended abstracts of the 2021 CHI conference on human factors in computing systems (CHI'21), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast-paced fitness training (e.g. aerobics, Bodycombat, step workouts) is one of the most popular activities at fitness clubs worldwide because it is beneficial for physical health and it can enhance participants' motivation and engagement of fitness training. Yet, their fast pace and required coordination make it difficult for some participants, especially for beginners and those with coordination problems, to follow the class. Here we present the design, implementation and qualitative user evaluation of TwinkleBands, a piece of wearable technology that provides real-time support with trainees' movement and coordination learning by providing discriminative visual cues on the extremities. We show that TwinkleBands helps movement imitation and coordination in several ways. Based on this, we discuss key design takeaways for future technology design to support movement teaching and learning in fast-paced activities.

  • 768.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    From, Ingrid
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden.
    Oestreicher, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Melander-Wikman, Anita
    Lulea Univ Technol, Div Hlth & Rehab, Dept Hlth Sci, SE-97187 Lulea, Sweden.
    A study protocol for applying user participation and co-learning: Lessons learned from the eBalance project2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eBalance project is based on the idea that serious exergames-i.e., computer gaming systems with an interface that requires physical exertion to play-that are well adapted to users, can become a substantial part of a solution to recognized problems of insufficient engagement in fall-prevention exercise and the high levels of fall-related injuries among older people. This project is carried out as a collaboration between eight older people who have an interest in balance training and met the inclusion criteria of independence in personal activities of daily living, access to and basic knowledge of a computer, four staff working with the rehabilitation of older adults, and an interdisciplinary group of six research coordinators covering the areas of geriatric care and rehabilitation, as well as information technology and computer science. This paper describes the study protocol of the project's initial phase which aims to develop a working partnership with potential users of fall-prevention exergames, including its conceptual underpinnings. The qualitative methodology was inspired by an ethnographical approach implying combining methods that allowed the design to evolve through the study based on the participants' reflections. A participatory and appreciative action and reflection (PAAR) approach, accompanied by inquiries inspired by the Normalization Process Theory (NPT) was used in interactive workshops, including exergame testing, and between workshop activities. Data were collected through audio recordings, photos, and different types of written documentation. The findings provide a description of the methodology thus developed and applied. They display a methodology that can be useful for the design and development of care service and innovations for older persons where user participation is in focus.

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  • 769.
    Åhman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Conceptualizing the self: A critical analysis of the self as a discursive trend in Human-Computer Interaction research2017In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 149-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Human–Computer Interaction (HCI), the human often has been conceptualized as a user. Although this notion has illuminated one aspect of the human–technology relationship, some researchers have argued for the need to explore alternative notions. One such notion becoming increasingly frequent in HCI is the self. In this paper, a study of how the self is described in 88 HCI research publications is presented. Four main aspects of the self are identified: instrumental, communicative, emotional, and playful. These four aspects differ, yet they present the self as stable, coherent, and individual. However, these characteristics have been criticized by several contemporary philosophers. This paper presents arguments from poststructuralist writers as a foundation for advocating the need to develop further these positions within HCI. The theories of Mark C. Taylor, who combines poststructuralism with complexity theory, provide a framework for viewing the self as relational to the extent that interaction becomes an existential process and thus interactive technology constitutes an existential arena.

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  • 770.
    Åhman, Henrik
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Interaction as existential practice: An explorative study of Mark C. Taylor’s philosophical project and its potential consequences for Human-Computer Interaction2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis discusses the potential consequences of applying the philosophy of Mark C. Taylor to the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).

    The first part of the thesis comprises a study focusing on two discursive trends in contemporary HCI, materiality and the self, and how these discourses describe interaction. Through a qualitative, inductive content analysis of 171 HCI research articles, a number of themes are identified in the literature and, it is argued, construct a dominant perspective of materiality, the self, and interaction. Examples that differ from the dominant discourse are also discussed as alternative perspectives for each of the three focal areas.

    The second part of the thesis comprises an analysis of Mark C. Taylor’s philosophical project which enables a number of philosophical positions on materiality, the self, and interaction to be identified. These positions are suggested to be variations and rereadings of themes found in Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophy. These variations emerge as Taylor approaches Nietzsche through poststructuralism and complexity theory, and it is argued that the apparent heterogeneity of Taylor’s project can be understood as a more coherent position when interpreted in relation to Nietzsche’s philosophy.

    Based on the findings of the two literature studies, the thesis then discusses the possible consequences for HCI, if Taylor’s philosophy were to be applied as a theoretical framework. The thesis argues that Taylor’s philosophy describes the interaction between humans and computers  as an existential process, which contrasts with the dominant HCI discourse; that this view can be related to and provide a theoretical foundation for the alternative discourses in HCI; and that it can contribute to developing HCI.

  • 771.
    Åhman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    När avbilder skapar avbilder som skapar: En analys av teknikutvecklingens betydelse för föreställningen om människan som imago Dei2021In: Teknoteologi: AI och människans villkor / [ed] Roitto, Rikard & Wigorts Yngvesson, Susanne, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, p. 75-95Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 772.
    Åhman, Henrik
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    The aesthetic turn: Exploring the religious dimensions of digital technology2016In: Approaching Religion, E-ISSN 1799-3121, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The arena for developing digital technology has undergone an aesthetic turn, broadening the focus from a functionalist approach producing centralized systems in the 1970s and 1980s to an increased awareness of the aesthetic aspects of the individual user’s interaction with technology in the 1990s and 2000s. Within the academic research fields studying digital technology (e.g. Human-Computer Interaction and Interaction Design) the aesthetic turn has resulted in a shift from a strong emphasis on user behaviour to an increased interest in aesthetic perspectives on the role of the designer, the design process, and the design material. Within these fields, aesthetics has often been interpreted as belonging to the realm of the individual; personal experiences such as pleasure, engagement, and emotions have been emphasized in both technology development and technology research. Aesthetics is not, however, only an individual phenomenon but also has relational and structural components that need to be acknowledged. Structural aspects of aesthetics condition the possibilities for individuals interacting with digital technology. Thus, the tension between individual and relational aspects of aesthetics in digital technology also reflects a tension between freedom and limitation; between change and permanence; between destabilizing and stabilizing forces. Such a broadened understanding of aesthetics offers a model of digital technology that roughly corresponds to Mark C. Taylor’s definition of religion. Taylor argues that religion is constituted by, on the one hand, a figuring moment characterized by structural stability and universality, and, on the other hand, a disfiguring moment characterized by disruption, particularity, and change. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the aesthetic turn and Taylor’s definition of religion to illustrate similarities between the two, suggesting possible religious dimensions of digital technology and how that can inform our understanding of people’s interaction with digital technology.

  • 773.
    Åhman, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Frameworks for studying social media interaction: A discussion on phenomenology and poststructuralism2019In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2019 / [ed] David Lamas, Fernando Loizides, Lennart Nacke, Helen Petrie, Marco Winckler, Panayiotis Zaphiris, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2019, Vol. 3, p. 701-718Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade or so, much HCI research has, according to many researchers, become increasingly phenomenologically oriented. Some have gone so far as to argue that HCI is now in a phenomenological paradigm. But how does such a paradigmatic view work for understanding interaction in the ever growing sphere of social media? Prima facie it may look as it would work only well since social media has become increasingly richer in terms of the sheer range of phenomenologically possible user experiences provided by new and emerging interaction technologies. However, through a critical reading of three major phenomenological works in HCI, we argue that phenomenology as traditionally applied in HCI points indirectly to alternative approaches for engaging in much of contemporary social media research due to its associated semiotic and relationally oriented contents. One possible family of approaches for analyzing such content can be found, as we will argue, in poststructuralist theory. We propose an increased engagement with poststructuralist semiotics grounded in Jacques Derrida’s philosophy and exemplify how this could contribute to the study of social media in the context of HCI.

  • 774.
    Åhman, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Thorén, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    When Facebook Becomes Faithbook: Exploring Religious Communication in a Social Media Context2021In: Social Media + Society, E-ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 1-12, article id 20563051211041644Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 775.
    Öfverstedt, Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Why go headless – a comperative study between traditional CMS and the emerging headless trend2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an exponential increase in the number of websites, digital channels and consequently digital content in the last years. Not only are the number of websites increasing but they are also becoming more complex, therefore it is no longer feasible to handle content and code with the same tools. Content Management Systems (CMS) are the solution to this problem and offers a way of managing content. The market today offers a broad variety of solutions that each have their own advantages, one of the more common being WYSWYG-functionality which often means that the functionality and the presentation of the content are tightly coupled. "Headless" CMS are a new way of doing things and offers the user a way of managing content without presenting them with a way of displaying the content. The different types of CMS present advantages and disadvantages from a user centred point of view as well as from a technical one. The thesis aims to explore these perspectives and form a hypothesis based on the studied cases. The study presents a set of aspects that based on the context in which the CMS is used and implemented can be perceived as either advantages or disadvantages. "Headless" CMS however shows a tendency to be the preferable choice where the editors have a technical background and the developing part values an agnostic approach when implementing a CMS, whereas a traditional CMS with WYSIWYG functionality tends to be more favourable where stability and editorial freedom are valued.

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  • 776.
    Öquist, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Goldstein, Mikael
    Towards an improved readability on mobile devices: evaluating adaptive rapid serial visual presentation2003In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 539-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can readability on small screens be improved by using adaptive Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) that adapts the presentation speed to the characteristics of the text instead of keeping it fixed? In this paper we introduce Adaptive RSVP, describe the design of a prototype on a mobile device, and report findings from a usability evaluation where the ability to read long and short texts was assessed. In a latin-square balanced repeated-measurement experiment, employing 16 subjects, two variants of Adaptive RSVP were benchmarked against Fixed RSVP and traditional text presentation. For short texts, all RSVP formats increased reading speed by 33% with no significant differences in comprehension or task load. For long texts, no differences were found in reading speed or comprehension, but all RSVP formats increased task load significantly. Nevertheless, Adaptive RSVP decreased task load ratings for most factors compared to Fixed RSVP. Causes, implications, and effects of these findings are discussed.

  • 777.
    Smolicki, Jacek (Artist)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    A Slip of the Machinic Tongue2022Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 778.
    Smolicki, Jacek
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    A Slip of the Machinic Tongue: Performative Soundscape Installation2022Artistic output (Refereed)
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